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HistoryVP-22 HistoryHistory

Circa 1959

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: Naval Aviation News November 1959 "...35 Win Safety Plaques - Page 2 - Naval Aviation News - November 1959..." WebSite: http://www.history.navy.mil/nan/backissues/1950s/1959/nov59.pdf [16AUG2004]

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HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VP-22 History ThumbnailVP-22 Blue Geese "...VP-22, QA-11, BuNo: 128357 Just in from a patrol. NAS Kodiak, Alaska early May 1959..." Contributed by CHASE, Art aem-vp-22@mlode.com [17SEP2002]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...1959 VP-42 Cruisebook...[Squadron Designations: VP-42, VPB-22, and VP-MS-2]..." Contributed by Bruce Barth bbarth1@austin.rr.com, Director Mariner/Marlin Association [29NOV2000]

In the beginning there was nothing, not even the Pentagon. People believed that if it had been ordained that Man should fly, he would have been designed with feathers. Fortunately, although he had no feathers, Man did have a designing mind. It wasn't long after the invention of the wheel by some Neanderthal architect that James Watt developed the steam engine. Gustav Daimler found that by attaching four wheels he might make an automobile. Jack Daniels experiemented with a more highly refined fule, and in 1903 Orville and Wilbur Wright laid the ground work that eventually culminated in a small group of men converging on the NAAS Harvey Point, North Carolina, on April...

Patrol Squadron Twenty, as it was called...training cycle at NAAS Harvey Point, North Carolina, and Key West and then moved westward in their PBM...in the war being waged in the South Pacific. On the 1st....name was changed to Patrol Bombing Squadron Twenty-Two, stationed at Parry Island on Eniwetok Atoll, primarily ....in the nuisance bombing of Yap and Ngulu Islands, and supporting SAR and Dumbo...the area. While at Parry Island, one of the PBMs returned 560 miles to base on a single engine, navigated by one ENS C. L. Lambing.

In November, 1944, the squadron moved its base from Parry Ialand to Kossol Passage, in Palau, supported by USS Kenneth Whiting (AV-14) and continued its patrol and ASW work. On the 30th of November, they experienced their first air raid, one 1000-lb bomb dropped by one lone Japanese medium bomber it missed. Comemnts in the "Appreciable damage was inflicted on squadron aircraft by ship's boats in coming alongside the planes, thus adding to our maintenance problem. While operating from Kossol, our planes often had to return to base shortly after take-off due to discrepancies which were not remedied prior to take-off." But the chow was good.

In January the squadron packed up shop again and moved to Ulithi Atoll in the Carolines, working from the USS CUMBERLAND SOUND (AV-17), flying day and night long range patrols, special ASW patrols, and bombing missions against Yap Island. By March, 1945, VPB-22 had flown enough operational hours to have circled the globe 55 times. March and April concentrated on softening up Yap and Ngulu Islands for the final push, and the squadron's aircraft inflicted considerable damage on the islands' airstrips and facilities without sustaining a single casualty.

June, 1945, was rotation month, and by July all original personnel and aircraft had been relieved for a much-earned R & R in CONUS. Witht he final defeat of Japan in August, the squadron moved into Okinawa, still under the wing of the CUMBERLAND. But even tenders must get some rest, and by September the USS Norton Sound( AV-11) had relieved, and everyone settled down to the task of securing the peace.

Onward and upward they progressed, to Sasbo and the USS Pine Island (AV-12), to handle the increasing need for mail and passenger with an occasional patrol just for drill. And then, finally, on 15 November 1945, the long-awaited word came - "Yankee go home" - and all hands headed gratefully for NAS North Island, San Diego, California.

During the post-war shake-up, the squasdron...back to VP-22, and then to VP-MS-2 - until it became VP-42 on 1...found a detachment of SAR and DUmbo support...from NAS Kodiak, Alaska and Sand Point, Alaska.

The impending Korean conflict brought VP-42...with detachments at Oppama and NS Sangley Point, Philippines, acting as couriers and helping to ev... In August they transferred to NAS Iwakuni, Japan to begin combat operations, lending Anti-submarine support for Task Group..conducting weather...and surveillance patrols. During the summer of 1951 the squadron returned to NAS North Island, San Diego, California...PBM-5S2 aircraft, and returned to NAS Iwakuni, Japan in December. Operating from NAS Iwakuni, Japan and Chinhae, South Korea, VP-42 continued its routine operations, and sustained its only combat damage when one of the PBMs was attacked by a flight of MIG-15s over the Yellow Sea. Despite moderate damage, the plane returned to NAS Iwakuni, Japan safely.

On March 28, 1953 the squadron commenced its Alaskan deployment, long to be remembered by it...as the summer of...There were no ramps, there were no tenders. Aircraft operated from buyoys..Kodiak and flying patrols and ice reconnaissance missions. Support personnel weren't familiar with seaplane...and as an auxiliary site, was lowered 6 feet by the Army Engineers without notifying anyone, much to the dismay of ..boat's hull. By the Fall of 1953, everyone was happy to return to NAS North Island, San Diego, California. The Navy's newsest P5Ms were waiting, and in October the training cycle was begun for familiarization with the new planes. In October 1954, the first deployment to NS Sangley Point, Philippines began a tradition that has lasted until the present.

Now, as we approach the end of our last tour at NS Sangley Point, Philippines, we can look ahead by looking back at...and accomplishments of VP-42, continuing its greatness.

CHRONOLOGY

07APR44 VP-22 Commissioned at NAAS Harvey Point, North Carolina
01OCT44 Redesignated VPB-22
15MAY46 Redesignated VP-22
15NOV46 Redesignated VP-MS-2
01SEP48 Redesignated VP-42

COMMANDING OFFICERS

LT Robert G. Meaden
LCDR Ross R. Jester
LCDR John Muson
CDR Dallas M. Lazure
CDR Gordon F. Small
CDR James L. Skinner
CDR John L. Gallahan
CDR John Azab
CDR Marion F. Barfield
CDR Lawrence B. Caine
CDR Rober T. Talleson
CDR Ben R. Tate, Jr.

AWARDS AND COMMENDATIONS

Navy Occupation Service Medal, Asiatic

  • VPB-22 30SEP45-30NOV45
  • VP-MS-2 (Yokosuka and Okinawa Detachments) 09NOV47-15JAN50
  • VP-42 (Japan Detachment) 15JUL49-15JAN50

    United Nations Medal
  • VP-42 11AUG50-12APR51 and 07DEC51-03JUN52

    Korean Service Medal
  • VP-42 11AUG50-12APR51, 07DEC51-03JUN52 - Engagements Stars: K-1, K-2, K-3, K-4, K-7, and K-8

    China Service Medal
  • VP-42 02DEC54-13FEB55

    Circa 1958

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Looking Back at June 17, 1958 - June 17, 2008 - 9:02am Journal Staff..." WebSite: The Daily Journal [19JUN2008]

    50 YEARS AGO

    Rodger C. Hendrickson, son of Mrs. Dorothy Hendrickson, Apartment 8, Keyes Building and Oliver J. Hendrickson, Harvey, N.D., former Gamble Store manager here, has been promoted to aviation storekeeper second class, USN, while serving with Patrol Squadron 22.

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VP-22 History ThumbnailVP-22 Blue Geese "...Here is a nest full of VP-22 Blue Geese in NAS Kodiak, Alaska winter of 1958-1959..." Contributed by CHASE, Art aem-vp-22@mlode.com [17SEP2002]


    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...MEMORIES: VP-22 MIG Attack by CDR Richard Pickering..." PICKERING, Richard Charles "Papa Rich" Retired paparich@comcast.net [10AUG2013]

    Mig 17
    VP-22 was flying reconnaissance missions out of MCAS Iwakuni, Japan
    March and September 1957.
    ..::  I was sworn to secrecy on this event for 50 years  ::..

    I was flying at 8000 ft over water south of Vladivostok, Russia. We were in the clouds and visibility was zero. We were on a reconnaissance patrol collecting electronic emissions and shipping data. The United States had a process for determining when Russian aircraft were launched to intercept us. If such an event were to occur, my radioman would be alerted by receiving a special code and we would depart the area. He received that code. I immediately pulled back the power to the engines, deployed CHAFF and started a high rate of descent. Shortly after that moment, my radar operator reported to me that he had radar contact of two aircraft behind us. At the same time, my ECM (Electronics Countermeasures) operator reported airborne fire control radar behind us. This report was followed immediately by a report that the aircraft behind us had fired two radar controlled rockets at us. The CHAFF (Radar Countermeasures) I deployed was an attempt to fool anything they might shoot at us. CHAFF is metallic or plastic particles designed to make the rocket think that the CHAFF is the target of the rockets. The combination of my descending rapidly and the CHAFF worked and the rockets missed. I leveled off at 50 feet above the water and decided it was time to go home. Whew!!!!!! Had I not sensed that the MIGS were in our immediate area; this would have turned out different.

    Circa 1956

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: Naval Aviation News October 1956 "...Ice Floes Ahead! - Page 1 to 5 - Naval Aviation News - October 1956..." WebSite: http://www.history.navy.mil/nan/backissues/1950s/1956/oct56.pdf [09AUG2004]

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    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Continuing information provided to me by my father, George A. Murphy, VP-42, from Far East Tour Jan-Aug 1956 - Skippers Note - "From the early days of the squadrons history to the present. VP-42's overseas operations have centered in the Philippines. At the outbreak of World War II, the squadron, then called VPB-22, was flying PBY's for the Asiatic fleet from Subic Bay. Forced to retreat to Australia by the onrushing enemy. VPB-22 left a trail of sunken ships throughout the Phillipines and the East Indies. The PBY boys flew constantly in the evacuation of allied troops and civilians from the islands north of Australia, and their reconaissance of the movements of the Japanes fleet were invaluable. The war took a heavy toll on the squadrons complement of men and aircraft; consequently, the group was reformed in 1944 under the title of VP-22. The squadron was furnished with PBMs and for its meritorious action in the South Pacific was awarded the Presidential Unit Citation." (to be continued) Roster of crew 1: CDR M. F. Barfield PPC, LTJG N. E. Groff PPC, LTJG E. L. Stern PP2P, ENS D. B. Pitts PP3P, J. M. Sauer AD1, L. E. Auker AD2, D. J. Naylor AT1, L. F. Wissink AL1, R. Kurz AT2, W. D. Clark AT3, W. D. Reed AT3, J. L. Gage AO1..." Contributed by Glen A. Murphy GMURPGYESQ@aol.com [18JUN98]


    Circa 1955

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...As a member of Crew-12 - I submiting a list of white hats which were on patrol in Formosa Straight and the East China Sea in the year 1955. I also have the cruisebooks for the Alaska campaign in 1954 and one for Okinawa. If anyone would like additional information - please don't hesitate to contact me..." Contributed by AO3 Richard H. Fogo richfogo@comcast.net [02SEP2011]

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    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: Naval Aviation News July 1955 "...VP-22 Pilots Commended - Page 14 - Naval Aviation News - July 1955..." WebSite: http://www.history.navy.mil/nan/backissues/1950s/1955/jul55.pdf [04AUG2004]

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    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: Naval Aviation News July 1955 "...Pacific Unit Gets P2V-5F's - Page 25 - Naval Aviation News - July 1955..." WebSite: http://www.history.navy.mil/nan/backissues/1950s/1955/jul55.pdf [04AUG2004]

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    Circa 1954

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: Naval Aviation News November 1954 "...VP-22 Flies Mercy Mission - Page 24 - Naval Aviation News - November 1954..." WebSite: http://www.history.navy.mil/nan/backissues/1950s/1954/nov54.pdf [02AUG2004]

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    Circa 1953

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraVP-22 History "...CDR John I. HARDY was Executive Officer of VP-1 and later "skipper" of VP-22..." Official U. S. Navy Documention [22DEC2012]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "..NAVAL WAR COLLEGE NEWPORT PAPERS 38 - High Seas Buffer - The Taiwan Patrol Force, 19501979 By Bruce A. Elleman - ISSN 1544-6824 - ISBN 978-1-884733-95-6. Squadrons mentioned: VP-1 1950, VP-22 1953, VP-28 1950, VP-46 1950..." Contributed by Mike Yarded mikeyared@yahoo.com [11APR2012]
    Get Adobe Reader
    Open VP History Adobe FileHigh Seas Buffer - The Taiwan Patrol Force, 19501979 2.34 MB

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Peril on the sea - Wings of Gold, Spring 2000 by Schultz, Melvin Ray..." [01APR2005]

    It was Sunday, January 18th, 1953 and Crew Seven of VP-22 was in a P2V Neptune at 1,000 feet patrolling off the China coast heading toward the Formosa Strait. They were to make a single photo pass over reported Red Chinese anti-aircraft emplacements in the vicinity of Swatow. The crew was about to break out the box lunches when all hell broke loose. Ground fire from ashore struck the Neptune behind the cockpit on the port beam.

    The port engine was aflame and losing fuel and the port wing was on fire, its flaps gone. The radar was out, a main landing wheel gone, the vertical and horizontal stabilizers air-conditioned by one and two large holes, respectively. The crew now sought any friendly field on Formosa. But the port engine quit, emergency procedures did not arrest the fires which had been sucked into the after station and at 1230 the crew issued an SOS and said it would ditch the P2V. The radio transmitter key was tied down.

    The second engine began smoking, the left wing was about to fall off and the fires were still burning. LT Clement R. Prouhet preapred to ditch as the waves rose to 15 feet in the 30-knot winds with crests running every 200 feet. Water temperature was estimated at 62F. The aircraft slammed onto the sea fifteen minutes of ter it was hit by ground fire. All 13 crewmembers managed to get out as the patrol plane sank.

    Only one burned and partially inflatable, eight-foot, seven-man life raft was launched. AT3 Byars, wounded by the AAA and ENS Angell, the navigator, deathly seasick, were placed in the raft. PH1 McClure and AD2 Smith were last seen being washed toward shore. The remaining crewmembers clung to the raft, trusting their Mae Wests to keep them afloat.

    Another VP-22 P2V, patrolling a dif ferent sector, diverted to the ditching position, eventually sighted the survivors, radioed for help and dropped a raft that could not be retrieved due to the rough seas.

    A U.S. Coast Guard PBM Mariner based at NS Sangley Point, Philippines arrived at the crash site at 1630. The pilot, LT John Vukic, assessed the sea and wind state as darkness approached. The survivors had been in the water for nearly five hours.

    Vukic landed successfully between crests and taxied toward the raft, ensuring the propellers weren't endangering the survivors. The third effort at securing a rescue line worked. Survivors of Crew Seven were hauled aboard the Mariner and wrapped in blankets. Many of the Coast Guard crewmen removed their Mae Wests to provide medical and other assistance more effectively to the injured Navy personnel. The PBM taxied in the cresting waters for 30 minutes but failed to locate Smith and McClure. The swells began to increase as night descended upon them. Vukic decided to take off.

    The PBM lifted off and the pilot actuated the JATO bottles to enhance climb-out. But the starboard engine suddenly quit. The dipping right wing was caught by a swell which swept into the hull, heaved the plane upwards and caused it to cart wheel. The PBM exploded and struck the water, burning. All hands were blown from the Mariner into a burning oil slick. Those who had removed their Mae Wests had extra difficulty. Only ADC J. Miller and Radioman French recalled exiting the aircraft, French, vividly, to this day. Killed by the impact were copilot LTJG Stuart, ATC Hammond, AOl Bridge, AT1 Tornell and AD3 Tracy Miller of the PBM crew. Missing were Angell, AN Beahm, Airman Morley and Byars from Crew Seven.

    Two more P2Vs arrived and dropped a raft each to the survivors. An Air Force Albatross from Clark Field and a British Sunderland from Hong Kong joined the vigil. Throughout the ordeal, rescue aircraft were fired upon by shore batteries as well as by enemy aircraft. LT Vukic retrieved one raft and was able to pick up AD 1 Ballenger and A03 Brown. J. Miller and AM3 Hewitt retrieved the second raft which accommodated Prouhet, Varney, Ludena, McDonald and French who was badly burned. The rafts never did join despite courageous efforts.

    Ships were dispatched to assist. Patrol aircraft continued the watch and were relieved by fresh crews after 10 hours of flight time. The destroyer, USS Halsey Powell, traveled at flank speed to the site, arriving when the downed flyers had been in the water for seven and a half hours.

    A second Coast Guard PBM arrived after dark and dropped 34, one million candlepower parachute flares to assist the destroyer in navigating through the Chinese coastal waters. Squalls increased in intensity and visibility was now less than 700 feet. The survivors in one raft had used all but one of its few signal flares. The last one successfuly signalled their position for the destroyer. Eventually, as the ship approached, two swimmers from Powell proceeded to the raft and secured a line. As the raft was being towed to the destroyer, it broke. A third attempt at securing a line succeeded. Stripped to his skivvies, an ensign from Powell swam a line to the raft with French on board who was unconscious and delirious. This raft was tethered to the ship. The survivors were pulled aboard and provided blankets, hot coffee, food, sedatives and medicinal brandy.

    Meanwhile, the first raft had drifted to within 200 yards of Namoy Island. Powell found itself in less than six fathoms of water, navigating over uncharted barrier reefs. She had to back off from a near grounding. The skipper, demonstrating superlative seamanship, maneuvered the destroyer around the reef so that the ship sailed parallel to the coastline with less than 200 yards margin for error. The three men in the first raft were finally rescued from the treacherous shoals just before midnight. The search went on for the missing well past that.

    Coast Guard survivors were returned to Sangley Point. The Navy crew was taken to Naha, Okinawa. Of the original 21 men, 10 survived, three Coast Guard and seven Navy. Six men were killed in the two crashes. Five were missing. Two of the missing were believed to have made it to the island. Rumors had them in Canton in February 1953. A press report claimed that two were captured and taken to Swatow and eventually killed.

    All Coast Guard personnel involved in this episode were awarded the Gold Life Saving Medal. The enlisted members of both crews were inducted into the Enlisted Combat Aircrew Roll of Honor aboard USS Yorktown in Charleston, South Carolina in November 1997.

    (Editor's Note: CAPT Schultz oversees the Enlisted Combat Aircrew Roll of Honor. He leads the effort to seek out aircrewmen deserving of induction into this prestigious organization, such as the men described in this article. The following is from a letter by Thomas V. Mullen who was an earlier inductee into the Roll of Honor. His remarks reflect the pride of his achievement and of his fellow Enlisted Combat Aircrewmen.).

    "I must tell you how much 1 appreciate all that you did for me. You will never know how much I was in heaven. Nothing ever happened to me that was really exciting until now. My children and grandchildren really were very proud of me. They put me on a pedestal and brag to everyone. I thank you with my whole hear"

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: Naval Aviation News September 1953 "...VP-22 Scores Maintenance Record - Page 31 - Naval Aviation News - September 1953..." WebSite: http://www.history.navy.mil/nan/backissues/1950s/1953/sep53.pdf [31JUL2004]

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    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: Naval Aviation News July 1953 "...VP-22 Check System Efficient - Page 37 - Naval Aviation News - July 1953..." WebSite: http://www.history.navy.mil/nan/backissues/1950s/1953/jul53.pdf [30JUL2004]

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    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...18 JAN 53 - A P2V of VP-22, conducting patrol of Formosa Strait, was shot down off Swatow, China, by Communist Chinese antiaircraft fire. Rescue operations were hampered by shore battery gunfire and high seas, the latter causing the Coast Guard rescue plane to crash on takeoff. Total losses from the incident were 11 men, 7 of them from the P2V crew..." http://www.history.navy.mil/avh-1910/PART07.PDF [28MAY2003]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...18JAN53 - A US Navy P2V-5 (BuNo 127744) of VP-22 was damaged by Chinese anti-aircraft fire over Swatow China, but was able to ditch in the Formosa Strait. Eleven of thirteen crewmen were rescued by a US Coast Guard PBM-5, under fire from Chinese shore batteries on Nan Ao Tao island. Attempting to takeoff in 8-12 foot swells, the PBM crashed. Ten survivors out of nineteen total (including five from the P2V-5) were rescued by the destroyer USS Halsey Powell (DD 686). During the search effort a PBM-5 from VP-40 received fire from a small-caliber machine gun and the destroyer USS Gregory (DD 802) received fire from Chinese shore batteries..." Website: Aircraft Downed During the Cold War and Thereafter http://www.silent-warriors.com/shootdown_list.html [20FEB2003]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...From 1945 to 1969, U.S. Navy aircraft were involved in a number of aerial incidents with forces of the Soviet Union, People's Republic of China, North Korea, and Czechoslovakia. These incidents resulted in the loss of eight Navy aircraft and one Coast Guard aircraft, eighty-one Navy, Marine Corps, and Coast Guard aviators and crewman, and several aircraft damaged and crewmen wounded and injured. The list below, compiled from official and unofficial sources, does not include aircraft lost in direct action in the Korean and Vietnam wars, nor aircraft shot down by Chinese forces in the vicinity of Vietnam in connection with that war..." Naval Historical Center, Department Of The Navy, Washington, D. C http://www.history.navy.mil/branches/dictvol2.htm [06MAY2001]

  • 18 Jan 1953 P2V-5 VP-22
    P2V-5 (BuNo 127744) was shot down by Chinese anti-aircraft fire near Swatow, and ditched in the Formosa Strait. Eleven of thirteen crewmen were rescued by a Coast Guard PBM-5 under fire from shore batteries on Nan Ao Tao island. Attempting to takeoff in eight-twelve foot swells, the PBM crashed. Ten survivors out of nineteen total (including five from the P2V) were rescued by Halsey Powell(DD 686). During the search effort a PBM-5 from VP-40 received fire from a small-caliber machine gun, and Gregory (DD 802) received fire from shore batteries.

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "00JAN53--When the P2V from VP22 was shot down by the Chicoms in Jan 1953 my crew was on a scheduled patrol. As we were very close when it happened we flew cover waiting for the CG PBM, which dipped a float and crashed on take off. We lost an engine that day and had to land at a field on Formosa and a new engine was flown to us to hang. That was a busy day. Billy B. Buckley ATC USN (RET)1941/1963" silverbullit@earthlink.net

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "18JAN53--A P2V of VP-22, conducting patrol of Formosa Strait, was shot down off Swatow by Red Chinese AA fire. Rescue operations were hampered by shore battery gunfire and high seas, the latter causing the Coast Guard rescue plane to crash on takeoff. Total losses from the incident were 11 men, seven of them from the P2V crew..." http://www.history.navy.mil/branches/avchr7.htm

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "18JAN53--US Korean War MIA/POW--Airman William E. McClure - was on display in a bamboo cage along with Lloyd Smith Jr. They were crew members of a US Navy Patrol Squadron 22 plane with 13 aboard, shot down on 18 January, 1953. A Navy rescue plane was also shot down. A total of 10 Amerians are presumed captured alive. ..." http://www.kimsoft.com/korea/mia-us.htm


    Circa 1952

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...FASRON-110, FASRON-112, FASRON-114, FASRON-117, FASRON-118, FASRON-119, FASRON-120, FASRON-885, FASRON-895, VP-1, VP-2, VP-4, VP-6, VP-9, VP-22, VP-28, VP-29, VP-40, VP-42, VP-46, VP-47, VP-731, VP-772, VP-871, VP-892 and VP-931) - Naval Aeronautical Organization OPNAV NOTICE 05400 for Fiscal Year 1953 dated 1 October 1952 is: DECLASSIFIED per Office of Chief of Naval Operations on 1 February 1965 by Op-501..." WebSite: Naval Historical Center http://www.history.navy.mil/a-record/nao53-68/fy1953-oct52.pdf [14MAR2007]

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    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...FAW-1, FAW-2, FAW-4, FAW-6, FAW-14, VP-1, VP-2, VP-4, VP-6, VP-9, VP-22, VP-28, VP-40, VP-42, VP-46, VP-47 and VP-871) - Naval Aeronautical Organization OPNAV NOTICE 05400 for Fiscal Year 1953 dated 1 October 1952 is: DECLASSIFIED per Office of Chief of Naval Operations on 1 February 1965 by Op-501..." WebSite: Naval Historical Center http://www.history.navy.mil/a-record/nao53-68/fy1953-oct52.pdf [14MAR2007]

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    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: Naval Aviation News December 1952 "...VP Commanding Officers - Page 16 - Naval Aviation News - December 1952..." WebSite: http://www.history.navy.mil/nan/backissues/1950s/1952/dec52.pdf [28JUL2004]

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    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: Naval Aviation News September 1952 "...Junior College In Far East - Page 24 - Naval Aviation News - September 1952..." WebSite: http://www.history.navy.mil/nan/backissues/1950s/1952/sep52.pdf [27JUL2004]

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    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: Naval Aviation News August 1952 "...'Doggy' Fliers Log Many Hours In Air - Page 20 to 21 - Naval Aviation News - August 1952..." WebSite: http://www.history.navy.mil/nan/backissues/1950s/1952/aug52.pdf [26JUL2004]

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    Circa 1951

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: Naval Aviation News May 1951 "...Planes Aid Tree Planting - Page 34 - Naval Aviation News - May 1951..." WebSite: http://www.history.navy.mil/nan/backissues/1950s/1951/may51.pdf [24JUL2004]

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    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: Naval Aviation News May 1951 "...New 'Seabees' With Wings - Page 32 - Naval Aviation News - May 1951..." WebSite: http://www.history.navy.mil/nan/backissues/1950s/1951/jun51.pdf [24JUL2004]

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    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: Naval Aviation News May 1951 "...Planes Aid Tree Planting - Page 34 - Naval Aviation News - May 1951..." WebSite: http://www.history.navy.mil/nan/backissues/1950s/1951/may51.pdf [23JUL2004]

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    Circa 1950

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...USS Salisbury Sound (AV-13) - Circa 1950. Squadrons Mentioned: FAW-1, FAW-6, VP-1, VP-2, VP-4,VP-42, VP-46 and VP-47..." WebSite: USS Salisbury Sound http://www.salisburysound.com/index_Page555.htm [07JAN2007]

    She tended planes of VP-42 at that port until 6 February 1950, then shifted to Subic Bay in the Philippine Islands. She resumed duty at Hong Kong on 12 April and cleared port on 11 May for exercises off Sangley Point, Luzon before loading aircraft at Guam (27-29 May 1950). She put to sea on the latter day and steamed by way of Pearl Harbor for return to San Diego on 13 June 1950. After voyage repair in the San Francisco Naval Shipyard, she embarked passengers, including men of VP-42, and sailed from San Diego on 26 July bound for the Far East. She debarked her passengers at Pearl Harbor on 1 August and to sea the next day, carrying some 700 passengers destined for the VP-1, VP-2, and VP-4 of Fleet Air Service Squadron and Army units in Japan. Four helicopters and an equal number of SNBS of the Fleet Air Service Squadron were loaded on her seaplane deck. She reached Yokosuka on 11 August 1950, debarking her passengers and their equipment, and took on new aviation cargo and passengers for transport to Apra Harbor, Guam. She arrived at the latter port on 20 August, debarked her passengers, then loaded patrol bomber spare parts and eight jet fighters for delivery to Naha Harbor, Okinawa, 25 August 1950. She reported to Commander Seventh Fleet for duty that day and shifted to Buckner Bay for operations under Commander Service Squadron Three (Commander Task Group 70.7). On 3 September she serviced seven Mariners of VP-46 and two Sunderlands of the 88th Royal Air Force Squadron, which had sortied on typhoon evacuation from their base at Iwakuni, Japan.

    On 6 September 1950, Salisbury Sound arrived at Iwakuni, Japan, and reported for duty to Commander FAW-6. She commenced service to VP-42 and VP-47, which had eleven Mariners present on that day plus three Sunderlands of the 88th Squadron of the Royal Air Force. These units comprised the seaplane and reconnaissance of Task Force Ninety-Six supporting the operations of Task Force Seventy-Seven and Task Group 96.5. Four additional Mariners had arrived on 9 September 1950 when Salisbury Sound became Flagship of Commander Fleet Wing SIX. She now became the operating base for all seaplanes in the Patrol and Reconnaissance Force (*Task Force 99) tending eight Sunderlands of the 88th Squadron of the Royal Air Force, seven planes of VP-47 and nine planes of VP-42. On 16 September Commander FAW-6 shifted his Flag, along with pilots and crew of VP-47, to sea plane tender USS Curtiss (AV-4), controlling all flights from that ship. Salisbury Sound continued seadrome control until 18 September, then took on aviation fuel at Kure, returning to Iwakuni on 21 September 1960. She reported for duty to Commander Air Wing One (task Group 70.6) on 23 September and shifted to base at Buckner Bay, Okinawa, on the 26th. She laid 18 buoys in the seaplane anchorage and on 2 October five Mariners of VP-46 (Southern Search and Reconnaissance Force), arrived from the Pescadores Islands to escape the fury of a typhoon. These planes conducted nightly reconnaissance and patrol flights of the Formosa Straits from the Salisbury Sound until 10 October, when they again terminated their flights in the Pescadores. Meantime she had hoisted the flag of Commander FAW-1 on 5 October 1950. Winds and heavy seas again threatened the seadrome in the Pescadores on 19 October, and Mariners of VP-46 there once again shifted gradually to base from Salisbury Sound. On 2 November 1950 she entered the harbor of Naha, transferring 30,000 gallons of gasoline to Y-53 for delivery to the Naval Base before return to Buckner Bay the same day. She continued direction and tending of the Mariners' search and reconnaissance flights until 27 November 1950 when Commander Fleet Wing ONE- shifted his flag to USS Gardiners Bay (AVP-39).

    Salisbury Sound arrived at Iwakuni, Japan 20 November 1950, and hoisted the flag of Commander Air Wing Six. She relived USS Curtiss (AV-4) of seadrome control and began tending nine Mariners of VP-42 and four Royal Air Force Sunderlands, operating from Iwakuni. On 1 December, seven Mariners of VP-47 arrived, and on the 21st, Commander FAW-6 transferred his flag to Curtis. On 15 December 1950, Salisbury Sound returned to Buckner Bay and relieved Gardiners Bay (AVP-39) as flag ship of Commander FAW-1. She now commenced service for the detachment of five Marines of VP-46, stationed at Buckner Bay, and three Mariners of the same squadron, stationed at Sangley point, Luzon, Philippine Islands. These units conducted search and reconnaissance flights out of Buckner Bay and completed courier flights between Sangley Point and Hong Kong. Commencing 6 January 1951, she supported Anti-Submarine Warfare Training Element 7016 comprising a Land Plane Air Search and Attack Unit (9 P2V4s of VP-22); a Seaplane Air Search and Attack Unit (9 Mariners of VP-46); and Fleet Submarine Besugo (SS-321). This duty terminated on 16 January 1951 and Salisbury Sound resumed her daily direction of reconnaissance flight and tender services.

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: Naval Aviation News September 1950 "...P2V's Replace The Privateer - Page 24 - Naval Aviation News - September 1950..." WebSite: http://www.history.navy.mil/nan/backissues/1950s/1950/sep50.pdf [21JUL2004]

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    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: Naval Aviation News August 1950 "...VP-22 Wins Safety Trophy - Page 20 - Naval Aviation News - August 1950..." WebSite: http://www.history.navy.mil/nan/backissues/1950s/1950/aug50.pdf [21JUL2004]

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    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: Naval Aviation News June 1950 "...PB4Y's FInd Disabled Ship - Page 18 - Naval Aviation News - June 1950..." WebSite: http://www.history.navy.mil/nan/backissues/1950s/1950/jun50.pdf [20JUL2004]

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    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: Naval Aviation News March 1950 "...'Weathercock Tiedown' Used - Page 39 - Naval Aviation News - March 1950..." WebSite: http://www.history.navy.mil/nan/backissues/1950s/1950/mar50.pdf [19JUL2004]

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    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: Naval Aviation News February 1950 "...VP-22 Scores 100% In Test - Page 8 - Naval Aviation News - February 1950..." WebSite: http://www.history.navy.mil/nan/backissues/1950s/1950/feb50.pdf [19JUL2004]

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    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "14NOV50--KOREA--ARRIVED: 14NOV50 DEPARTED: 30MAY53 TAIL CODE: CE AIRCRAFT: P2V-3/4/5" http://www.history.navy.mil/branches/koreaob.htm


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