VPNAVY VP-5 Mercury Capsule Recovery
http://www.vpnavy.org
VPNAVY Address

HistoryVP-1 HistoryHistory

Circa 1959

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraVP-1 History "...CDR R. E. DIMMITT was assigned to VP-14 on October 1941. His PBY squadron deployed to the South Pacific where he was shot down by the Japanese. As an Operations Officer of VP-9 (P2V) in 1955 he got his first taste of Alaskan flying. In 1959 he too over as XO of VP-1 (P2V) and fleeted up to CO in 1960...." Official U. S. Navy Documention [24DEC2012]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: Naval Aviation News November 1959 "...Neptune HAs Hairy Flight - Page 28 - Naval Aviation News - November 1959..." WebSite: http://www.history.navy.mil/nan/backissues/1950s/1959/nov59.pdf [16AUG2004]

VP History Thumbnail

Circa 1956

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VP-1 Crew ThumbnailCameraVP-1 Crew 10 "...Vintage Spring 1956. VP-1 deployed to NAS Kwajalein, Marshall Islands to participate in Operation Redwing which was a series of atomic and hydrogen bomb tests. This series had the first air-dropped hydrogen bomb. Many bombs were set off on towers and similiar. One small atoll had a bulls eye painted on it help the air force find the target. We flew over an island one day, a day or two after a test, but no, it was not an island anymore, just a dark blue circular hole in the ocean. One morning, in the pre-dawn darkness on NAS Kwajalein, Marshall Islands, we observed the first hydrogen test. The blast was over 200 miles away, and it lit up the sky so bright, that we cast shadows on the ground, and it was still dark. VP-1's mission was to ensure no surface vessels came close to ground zero so as to cause radiation burns and sickness. This happened in the late forties when some japanese fisherman intentionally got burned so as to create an internation incident. Another purpose of our mission was to track, actually fly into the atmospheric radiation to ensure the radioactive clouds were not going to drift over inhabited islands. If so, the Army was prepared to evacuate the native islanders. Several times we aircrews would come back HOT, i.e., radioactive. When this happened, the crew would strip and take as many showers as necessary to wash off the radiation, then clean, non-contaminated clothing was issued. Hot planes would be parked on the far end of the island, cooling off. I actually watched a nuke go off (zero +10 seconds) from 10,000', one hundred miles away. The power, the explosion, it was unbelievable. One form of recreation was to go to the EM club and watch the SeeBees and Marines kick the crap out of each other. In the photo, I am the 2nd guy from the left. Joseph Smith, Newport RI me, and all the others, are now official members of the DOD "Atomic Veterans". If any radiation problems, such a thyroid disease or other illnesses show up, the Federal Government will provide some kind of medical assistance. The Atomic Veterans include all personnel who participated in desert tests, ship board tests, anything where they could have been exposed, accidently or intentionally, to radiation..." Contributed by SMITH, Joseph F. Retired sailmail@verizon.net [26MAR2004]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...The P2V history I just read stated that "the first J34 Jet boosters came on the P2V-7." I believe the first to receive the boosters was the P2V-5F. I reported for duty at NAS Whidbey Island, Washington (VP-1) in December 1956. P2V-5's with the nose, tail and deck gun turrets were in use at that time. Shortly after I arrived the squadron removed the turrets and replaced them with the observers bow,the MAD stinger and a top deck patch as replacements. Don't remember the exact date, but sometime before our six month deployment to NAS Kodiak, Alaska in November 1957, all our P2V-5's were replaced with P2V-5F's, with the J34 Jet Boosters, I have pics. As I remember, the only exterior physical distinction between the P2V-5F and P2V-7 was the larger appearing cockpit on the P2V-7. Sometime after our return to NAS Whidbey Island, Washington from NAS Kodiak, Alaska, between May of 1958 and when I left the squadron in June 1959, we received brand spanking new P2V-7's for the planned deployment to NAS Iwakuni, Japan...Dallas Spindler dscnohills@aol.com..." [21JAN2002]


Circa 1955

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraVP-1 History "...VP-1 - April 18, 1955 - Navy Planning Long Flight...Publication Title: 13th Naval District Public Information Department Press Clippings, 1942-1960 - Content Source: NARA - Publication Number: P2012 - Date Range: Jan 1953-1955 - Reel Number: 0003 - WebSite: http://www.footnote.com/..." Forwarded by Stephen Miller f134kilmil@comcast.net [14AUG2008]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: Naval Aviation News November 1955 "...Safety Award Winners - Naval Aviation News - November 1955..." WebSite: http://www.history.navy.mil/nan/backissues/1950s/1955/nov55.pdf [06AUG2004]

VP History ThumbnailCamera

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: Naval Aviation News June 1955 "...VP Squadron Scores First - Page 10 - Naval Aviation News - June 1955..." WebSite: http://www.history.navy.mil/nan/backissues/1950s/1955/jun55.pdf [04AUG2004]

VP History Thumbnail

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...05 MAY 55 - VP-1, with 12 P2V-5 Neptunes, returning from duty in the Far East by way of Asia, Europe, and North Africa, arrived at NAS Whidbey Island, Wash. Although a tour of duty separated the Pacific Ocean leg from the rest of the flight, this was the first round the world flight by a Navy squadron..." http://www.history.navy.mil/avh-1910/PART08.PDF [28MAY2003]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "05MAY55--Patrol Squadron 1, with 12 P2V-5 Neptunes, returning from duty in the Far East by way of Asia, Europe, and North Africa, arrived at NAS Whidbey Island. Although a tour of duty separated the Pacific Ocean leg from the rest of the flight, this was the first round-the-world flight by a Navy squadron..." http://history.navy.mil/branches/avchr8.htm [11DEC98]


Circa 1954

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VP-1 Misc ThumbnailCameraPatch and Model "...Here is a photo of Dad's VP-1 patch and a desk top model of the P2V that they received after their completion of the first around the world cruise by the Navy. He is W.F. Moyer and is listed in the 1954 NAS Whidbey Island, Washington roster. I was born on that navel base in 1954 and think of some of this as part of my history although I was in Missouri by the time I was 1.Would like to go there some day and see the area..." Contributed by Steve Moyer sfmjem@greenhills.net [12MAY2000]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: I have the BUNO's for most of the P2V5F's that replaced the older 5A's in early 1954. The list was given to me by Sam Hash samshash@aol.com who was 1st radioman in crew 7 in 1953-54 and in another crew in 1952 while on deployment to NAS Atsugi, Japan..." Contributed by Bobby Cammer becammer@sc.rr.com [12APR2001]

BUNO
CD-1 128416
CD-2 -Unknown
CD-3 128413
CD-4 128404
CD-5 128400
CD-6 128406
CD-7 128417
CD-8 128415
CD-9 128809
CD-10 128410
CD-11 128411
CD-12 128412

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "... NAS Whidbey Island, Washington Station Book 1954...VP-1 Squadron Roster..." Contributed by Tom Ash tomcat@whidbey.net[02JAN2000]

VP-1 Squadron Roster
Whidby Island
1954


CDR L. A. KITTEL, Commanding Officer
CDR J. N. PHELPS, Executive Officer
LCDR R. N. DESBROW, JR., Operations Officer
LCDR C. POOLE, Maintenance Officer
Lt. S. R. ADAMS, Asst. Elect. Mat. Officer
Lt. C BULLOCK
Lt. R H. FOSTER, Personnel Officer
Lt. J. E. MOORE
Lt. W. L. PARSONS
Lt. L. P. PROCTOR
Lt. E. SANDBER
Lt. S L SCOTT
Lt. W B SHEPARD. JR.
Lt. F. THUMMEL, Legal Officer
Lt. J. A. WALLACE, Communications Officer
Lt. P. DAWES, Flight Lt. R.A.F.
Lt. (jg) W. L. BAXTER, Schedules Officer
Lt. (jg) J. P. BRENNAN
Lt. (jg) R. E. BRETT,Personnel Officer
Lt. (jg) B. L. BUCHANAN, Materiel Officer
Lt. (jg) R. H. ECKERT, Education
Lt. (jg) H. C. KING, Asst. Ground Training
Ensign S. ARMSTRONG, Asst. First Lieutenant
Ensign R. L. BENCE, Asst. Electronics
Ensign G. M. COMPTON, Communications Officer
Ensign W. F. MOYER, Education Officer
Ensign E. H. PRESTON, Asst. Materiel Officer
Ensign R. SCHWALLER, Asst. Personnel Officer
Ensign J. R. WUNSCH

Bobby E. Cammer AT2
H. M. Chaney ALC
W. W. Cockrell ADC
W. F. Dixon AOC
H. Dyckman ADC
S. Eason ALC
W. T. Edwards ATC
R. H. Elmer AMC
F. M. Elzey ADC
W. E. Fulp ADC
J. E. Goode ADC
J. A. Gray ADC
A. F. Henry ATC
B. G. Hill ADC
C. W. Houlne ADC
M. C. Hynes ANC
E. L. lsbell ADC
C. R. Johnson AMC
J. M. Kafaro ADC
R. M. Keeney ATC
D. T. LeRoy ALC
H. H. Lewis ATC
J. E. Messamore ADC
R. L. Messenger AOC
R. J. Miller AOC
R. H. Moore AOC
E. L. Peck ALC
J. Rigley ADC
W. J. Sheehan AEC
B. W. Smith ADC
C. S. Whitlock AMC
J. W. Wiesler ADC
D. G. Alien AEl
J. W. Brantley AD1
R. C. Carder AD1
W. H. Coyle AOl
W. H. Ford AD1
W. R. Gardner AD1
R. E. Greene AO1
J. T. Hudson AD1
R. E. Kandl AE1
D. F. Kleeberger AM1
R. E. Loker AO1
T. R. Medvetz AD1
C. F. Newby AM1
C. L. Place AE1
W. A. Rettig AD1
R. M. Sauage AD1
J. R. Timpson AM1
J. L. West AT1
A. J. Wade AO1
H. H. Adams AB2
J. G. Andrews AM2
B. R. Borland A02
R. A. Cain YN2
M. F. Craig AT2
D. R. Doan AT2
N. T. Grecia YN2
R. S. Halupa AM2
S. S. Hash AL2
B. Hrabak AOU2
R. L. Hudson AM2
J. H. Kimer AD2
J. P. Kunau AM2
E. E. Lane SK2
D. R. Lutner AT2
A. C. MacLean AB2
G. D. Martin PN2
R. B. Morrisseau AT2
H. P. Myers AE2
J. O. Nichols YN2
H. Patrick AO2
E. M. Porbansky AO2
D. W. Bagnall AD3
W. P. Bauer AD3
A. W. Benefiel AD3
W. E. Bross AE3
K. R. Brown AE3
R. Burger AL3
J. T. Chilenko AE2
W. V. Damm AT3
J. L. Darby AT3
M. K. Eberhart AD3
H. D. English AM3
E. G. Ernstes AD3
E. G. Fleming AK3
W. E. Fordney AE3
R. F. Hermes AE3
J. A. Hingeman AM3
B. H. Hinote AD3
R. E. Lamfers AE3
H. C. Lesser AD3
H. M. Lewis AM3
J. C. Mann AD3
W. R. Miller AL3
T. F. Mineau AE3
R. J. Morgan AD3
B. E. Morrow AK3
R. D. Murray AT3
B. C. Pannebecker AL3
T. G. Parler PN3
A. R. Pinocci AM3
C. C. Price AD3
W. D. Ragsdale AL3
E. S. Rife AM3
A. Sarhanis AE3
R. W. Smith AO3
B. R. Stiefel AD3
H. A. St. John AD3
T. J. Taylor AD3
K. J. Wheeler AL3
R. T. Yawn AD3
R. D. Zehner A03
L. K. Alien ALHN
J. L. Atkins ADAN
E. D. Backlin AMAN
H. R. Barrentine AN
K. H. Bartley AN
B. P. H. Benedict AA
G. R. Bernlochr ADAN
R. C. Burgess AEAN
B. J. Carman AN
G. H. Carman SN
D. E. Cherry AN
B. D. Crump PRAN
A. E. Davis ADAN
L. H. Davis ADAN
F. J. Deshler ADAN
M. J. DeWeert ATAN
J. 0. Dickinson ADAN
R. A. Dimmick AMAN
M. H. Dupree AN
J. C. Dutra AN
O. B. Finley ADAN
M. Fountaine AMAN
W. W. Glover AN
J. A. Gertis ATAN
L. J. Geyer AN
L. W. Harper AKAN
L. D. Hal AN
C. W. Hindman SN
D. C. lrwin ADAN
D. R. Johnson ADAN
V. P. Jose TN
R. L. Juhnke AMAN
D. W. Krone ADAN
C. L. Lakey AMAN
L. C. Lawhorn AN
A. L. McFearin AOAN
C. McGlothlin ADAN
R. F. Metal ADAN
T. J. Mueller PNSN
L. R. Naegele AOAN
C. E. O'Neal ADAN
E. J. L. Pryor AN
D. L. Ray ADAN
B. E. Robinson SN
J. L. Sansom AMAN
J. L. Satlak PNSN
G. A. Schmucker AN
K. L. Soper AN
L. C. Sutton ABAN
F. L. Taylor ATAN
D. W. Thomas AN
C. O. Tindell AN
J. M. Towns ALAN
M. Underwood AMAN
R. W. Wah AMSAN
B. T. Washington TN
W. Weatherly ATAN
M. E. Wilkes ADAN
R. S. Wilson AN
R. C. Wirrbold SN
L. C. Wold SN

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Patrol Squadron ONE Far East Deployment 1959 Cruise Book..." Contributed by Robert B. (Bob) Casey spec439@yahoo.com [25MAY99]

Far East Deployment 1959

Patrol Squadron One left Whidbey Island during the summer of 1959. We left Whidbey and headed for Japan, We were off to Japan to complete an important task; one which would require that we leave our families behind and work long,weary hours. It was a long, hard, operational Deployment. We were ready for it, and we did the job.

Our stay at HAS Whidbey was a training cycle pure and simple. There were times when we were hauled out of bed at ungodly hours of the night to fly around the Puget Sound area; however, VP'l's purpose in Whidbey was to be trained. There was plenty of training to be done.

It seemed as though every pilot who was a veteran of the Kodiak Deployment completed his tour with VP-1; over three quarters of the Officer personnel turned over. It was the same story with the men. For a while there, if it was not a VFR day, no planes flew. This situation was soon corrected. The new plane crews began to understand the workings of the P2V and maintenance became more efficient. The Patrol Squadron entered the 'Era of the Cross'Country Flight', we began to get a look at Dallas, Vegas, the Twin Cities, and points south on the Coast. VP"1 was getting proficient, we were beginning to be trained. There were times, during "The Exercises", when we began to feel this training was going too far.

Then it happened. Word came that we were going to lwakuni, Japan lor our deployment. At first it was a rumor, then a fact. Then we got new planes, the P2V»7's. Our old P2V-5's were packed off to Alameda for O and R. These new planes, the P2V-7's, seemed to arrive one day and be shipped off the next day to the factory. When the factory sent them back, these new planes were full of new equipment. It looked like we were going to be busy with more training, only now that frightening expression "meet the deadline" kept cropping up.

About this time, we had a change in Command. CDR. Adier left VP-1 and our Exec, CDR. Murph, took over as Commanding Officer. Our new Exec, CDR. Dimmitt, reported on board.

The last few weeks prior to deployment were 'hairy'. Training missions around the clock, not enough airplanes, not enough gear, not enough sleep, MOT EMOUGH TIME. We made it, however. When it came time to go, we were ready. We were the best trained, latest equipped Anti»3ubmarine Squadron on the West Coast. The US Mavy knew what they had in Patrol Squadron One; everyone from the Chief of Naval Operations on down knew we were ready to go and they knew we were best suited to do the job,

We were the FLEETS REAL MUMBER ONE SQUADRON, the best available, the most ready to contend with ASW situations.

The reasons for VP-l's deployment to Japan are obvious. We went where we could be best used, we went where our hard won capability in ASW could best be exploited, we went to the front line of the United States' barrier in the Far East.

It took some doing to get to lwakuni. The advance party went first to grease the tracks. Our planes went off in groups of four via Hawaii, Kwajalein, and Guam. About a half dozen air lifts accompanied them. Everyone made it to lwakuni on schedule save Crew 11; they made the newspapers and the radio networks all over the world instead. Mr. Briggs set a record flying 1000 miles across the Pacific to Hawaii on one engine. He made it to lwakuni, but not until he found replacement for all the gear he had to jetison from the plane during the emergency.

At lwakuni we were immediately drawn into the whirlpool of 'Tactical Flights'. About the time we began to get the operation running on a smooth basis-scarely two weeks after our arrival-we were in the midst of an Exercise. During the middle of this Exercise, word came that half the Squadron was to go to Misawa, way up at the top of the Japanese Island of Honshu. Off they went and VP-1 became two organizations instead of one. Then the first typhoon hit, Sarah was her name, and VP-1 evacuated lwakuni. Sarah just missed lwakuni and came even closer to Misawa where our planes had fled in the evacuation. VP-1 returned to lwakuni, the Misawa detachment returned, and typhoon Vera appeared. Evacuate again, and the planes were readied for their flight to the Philippines. This is just a sample of our "routine".

Deployments are not reputed for monotony. Everyone expects to have a rough time trying to keep current with the latest situation. Surely our deployment to lwakuni was no exception; however, whatever confusion appeared on the surface, the detachments, the evacuations, the unexpected in its every form. Patrol Squadron One followed through on its assigned mission. Every confusion encountered was overcome as it appeared, and every commitment was made.

Patrol Squadron One, the FLEETS REAL ICHIBAN SQUADRON, completed its deployment in lwakuni, Japan. We made our mark, the Fleet could count our visible achievements in the ASW field, and we had official commendations to prove it.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "04SEP54--An US A P2V-5 of VP-1 shot down. " http://www.csd.uwo.ca/~pettypi/elevon/gustin_military/shotdown.html ... "...The shoot down of a P2V-5 on 4 Sep 1954 was not a VP-1 Aircraft. The Aircraft was from VP-19. One crewman was lost, ENS Reid. The football field at NAS Atsugi, Japan was named after ENS Reid. I was an AE3 assigned to the squadron at the time. ENS Reid was my division officer..." Contributed by Carl G. Nelson Jr. AVCM (RET) gunnarn32@gmail.com


Circa 1953

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...28JUN53 - A US Navy P2V-5 of VP-1 was fired on by Chinese surface ships in the Formosa Strait. No damage was inflicted..." Website: Aircraft Downed During the Cold War and Thereafter http://www.silent-warriors.com/shootdown_list.html [20FEB2003]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...08JUL53 - A US Navy P2V-5 of VP-1 was fired on by antiaircraft artillery near Nantien China. No damage was inflicted..." Website: Aircraft Downed During the Cold War and Thereafter http://www.silent-warriors.com/shootdown_list.html [20FEB2003]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...From 1945 to 1969, U.S. Navy aircraft were involved in a number of aerial incidents with forces of the Soviet Union, People's Republic of China, North Korea, and Czechoslovakia. These incidents resulted in the loss of eight Navy aircraft and one Coast Guard aircraft, eighty-one Navy, Marine Corps, and Coast Guard aviators and crewman, and several aircraft damaged and crewmen wounded and injured. The list below, compiled from official and unofficial sources, does not include aircraft lost in direct action in the Korean and Vietnam wars, nor aircraft shot down by Chinese forces in the vicinity of Vietnam in connection with that war..." Naval Historical Center, Department Of The Navy, Washington, D. C http://www.history.navy.mil/branches/dictvol2.htm [06MAY2001]

  • 19–28 Jun 1953 P2V-5 (2) VP-1
    Fired upon, in separate incidents, by surface ships in the Formosa Strait. No damage inflicted.

  • 8 Jul 1953 P2V-5 VP-1
    Fired upon by Chinese antiaircraft artillery (AAA) near Nantien, China. No damage inflicted.

  • 21 Jul 1953 P2V-5 VP-1
    Fired upon by Chinese antiaircraft artillery (AAA) near Amoy Island in the Formosa Strait. No damage inflicted.

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "1953--During our 1953-54 deployment flying in the Formosa Straights two of our aircraft received gunfire from either ship or island shore batteries..." Contributed by Bobby E. Cammer becammer@hotmail.com [24APR2000]


    Circa 1952

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...FASRON-110, FASRON-112, FASRON-114, FASRON-117, FASRON-118, FASRON-119, FASRON-120, FASRON-885, FASRON-895, VP-1, VP-2, VP-4, VP-6, VP-9, VP-22, VP-28, VP-29, VP-40, VP-42, VP-46, VP-47, VP-731, VP-772, VP-871, VP-892 and VP-931) - Naval Aeronautical Organization OPNAV NOTICE 05400 for Fiscal Year 1953 dated 1 October 1952 is: DECLASSIFIED per Office of Chief of Naval Operations on 1 February 1965 by Op-501..." WebSite: Naval Historical Center http://www.history.navy.mil/a-record/nao53-68/fy1953-oct52.pdf [14MAR2007]

    History - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge Thumbnail

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...FAW-1, FAW-2, FAW-4, FAW-6, FAW-14, VP-1, VP-2, VP-4, VP-6, VP-9, VP-22, VP-28, VP-40, VP-42, VP-46, VP-47 and VP-871) - Naval Aeronautical Organization OPNAV NOTICE 05400 for Fiscal Year 1953 dated 1 October 1952 is: DECLASSIFIED per Office of Chief of Naval Operations on 1 February 1965 by Op-501..." WebSite: Naval Historical Center http://www.history.navy.mil/a-record/nao53-68/fy1953-oct52.pdf [14MAR2007]

    History - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge Thumbnail

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: Naval Aviation News December 1952 "...VP Commanding Officers - Page 16 - Naval Aviation News - December 1952..." WebSite: http://www.history.navy.mil/nan/backissues/1950s/1952/dec52.pdf [28JUL2004]

    VP History Thumbnail

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: Naval Aviation News March 1952 "...Aerial Search Praised - Page 21 - Naval Aviation News - March 1952..." WebSite: http://www.history.navy.mil/nan/backissues/1950s/1952/mar52.pdf [25JUL2004]

    VP History ThumbnailCamera

    Circa 1951

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraVP-1 History "...CDR John I. HARDY was Executive Officer of VP-1 and later "skipper" of VP-22..." Official U. S. Navy Documention [22DEC2012]


    Circa 1950 - 1953
    Korean War

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Patrol Squadron Korean War Deployments - 1950 Deployments - 1951 Deployments - 1952 Deployments - 1953 Deployments..." WebSite: Naval Historical Center http://www.history.navy.mil/a-korea/vp-deploy.htm [26MAY2007]

        VP-1

          Deployed to: NAF Naha, Okinawa, Japan
          Date In: 19 Aug 1950
          Date Out: 13 Nov 1950
          Patrol Area: Formosa Straits
          Aircraft: P2V-3/3W
          Losses: None
          Detachment Location: None

          Deployed to: NAF Naha, Okinawa, Japan
          Date In: Apr 1951
          Date Out: 29 Aug 1951
          Patrol Area: Korean coast
          Aircraft: P2V-3
          Losses: None
          Detachment Location: None

          Deployed to: NAF Naha, Okinawa, Japan
          Date In: 29 Mar 1952
          Date Out: 5 Oct 1952
          Patrol Area: Korean coast
          Aircraft: P2V-3
          Losses: None
          Detachment Location: None

          Deployed to: NAF Naha, Okinawa, Japan
          Date In: 27 May 1953
          Date Out: 1 Dec 1953
          Patrol Area: Korean coast
          Aircraft: P2V-5
          Losses: None
          Detachment Location: None

        VP-2

          Deployed to: Detachment only
          Detachment Location: NAF Naha, Okinawa, Japan
          Detachment Date In: 1 Aug 1951
          Detachment Date Out: 2 Dec 1951
          Patrol Area: East China Sea; Yellow Sea
          Aircraft: P2V-3W
          Losses: None

        VP-6

          Deployed to: Johnson AFB
          Date In: 7 Jul 1950
          Date Out: 6 Aug 1950
          Patrol Area: Yellow Sea

          Deployed to: Tachikawa AFB
          Date In: 7 Aug 1950
          Date Out: 12 Feb 1951
          Patrol Area: Korean coastline; Sea of Japan
          Aircraft: P2V-3/3Wbr>Losses: None
          Detachment Location: NAS Atsugi, Japan
          Detachment In: 5 Jan 1951
          Detachment Out: 12 Feb 1951
          Patrol Area: Yellow Sea; Korean coastline

          Deployed to: NAS Atsugi, Japan
          Date In: 1 Aug 1951
          Date Out: 14 Jan 1952
          Patrol Area: Yellow Sea; Sea of Japan; Tsushima Straits
          Aircraft: P2V-3/3W
          Losses: P2V-3 on 16 Aug 1951, crew rescued P2V on 6 Nov 1951, 10 KIA (combat)
          Detachment Location: None

        VP-7

          Deployed to: NAS Iwakuni, Japan
          Date In: 28 Jun 1953
          Date Out: 27 Jul 1953
          Patrol Area: Sea of Japan; Yellow Sea
          Aircraft: P2V-5
          Losses: None
          Detachment Location: None

        VP-9

          Deployed to: NAS Iwakuni, Japan
          Date In: 27 Jun 1952
          Date Out: 16 Nov 1952
          Patrol Area: Sea of Japan
          Aircraft: P4Y-2S
          Losses: None
          Detachment Location: Pusan
          Detachment Date In: Jul 1952
          Detachment Date Out: 3 Jan 1953
          Patrol Area: Inland Korea

        VP-17

          Deployed to: NAS Iwakuni, Japan
          Date In: 1 Feb 1953
          Date Out: 30 Jun 1953
          Patrol Area: Sea of Japan; Yellow Sea
          Aircraft: P4Y-2/2s
          Losses: None
          Detachment Location: None

        VP-22

          Deployed to: NAF Naha, Okinawa, Japan
          Date In: 4 Nov 1950
          Date Out: 1 May 1951
          Patrol Area: Chinese mainland; Formosa
          Aircraft: P2V-4
          Losses: P2V, 21 Jan 1951 (non-combat)
          Detachment Location: None
          VP-22

          Deployed to: NAS Atsugi, Japan
          Date In: 1 Dec 1951
          Date Out: 31 May 1952
          Patrol Area: Tsushima Straits; Sea of Japan
          Aircraft: P4Y-2S
          Losses: None
          Detachment Location: None
          VP-22

          Deployed to: NAS Atsugi, Japan
          Date In: 30 Nov 1952
          Date Out: 31 May 1953
          Patrol Area: North and South China Sea
          Aircraft: P2V-5
          Losses: P2V-5, 18 Jan 1953 (combat), 7 rescued, 4 KIA and 2 POW (combat related)
          P2V-5, 31 Jan 1953 (non-combat)
          Detachment Location: None

        VP-28

          Deployed to: NAF Naha, Okinawa, Japan
          Date In: 16 Jul 1950
          Date Out: 7 Aug 1950
          Patrol Area: Foochow; Shanghai
          Aircraft: PB4Y-2S
          Losses: None
          Detachment Location: NAF Agana
          Detachment Date In: Jan 1950
          Detachment Date Out: 7 Aug 1950
          VP-28

          Deployed to: Tachikawa AFB
          Date In: 1 Apr 1951
          Date Out: 9 Oct 1951
          Patrol Area: Yellow Sea; Tsushima Straits
          Aircraft: PB4Y-2S
          Losses: None
          Detachment Location: Itami AFB
          Detachment Date In: 24 Apr 1951
          Detachment Date Out: 30 Apr 1951
          Patrol Area: Japanese coast, ASW ops.
          Detachment Location: Kimpo AFB
          Detachment Date In: 1 Oct 1951
          Detachment Date Out: 13 Dec 1951
          Patrol Area: Inland Korea
          VP-28

          Deployed to: NAF Itami
          Date In: 1 Jun 1952
          Date Out: 2 Dec 1952
          Patrol Area: North Korean coast; China coast
          Aircraft: P2V-3/P4Y-2/2S
          Losses: None
          Detachment Location: None

        VP-29

          Deployed to: NAS Atsugi, Japan
          Date In: 27 Sep 1952
          Date Out: 1 Apr 1953
          Patrol Area: Sea of Japan; Korean coast
          Aircraft: P2V-5/6
          Losses: None
          Detachment Location: None

        VP-40

          Deployed to: NAS Iwakuni, Japan
          Suisun (AVP 53), 11 Apr 1951–late 1951
          Date In: 9 Jun 1951
          Date Out: 13 Dec 1951
          Patrol Area: Yellow Sea; Tsushima Straits
          Aircraft: PBM-5/5S
          Losses: None
          Detachment Location: None
          VP-40

          Deployed to: NS Sangley Point, Philippines
          Date In: 2 Sep 1952
          Date Out: 28 Mar 1953
          Patrol Area: South China Sea; Formosa Straits
          Aircraft: PBM-5/5S
          Losses: None
          Detachment Location: Pescadores
          Detachment Date In: 2 Sep 1952
          Detachment Date Out: 28 Mar 1953
          Patrol Area: South China Sea and East China Sea
          Detachment Location: NAF Naha, Okinawa, Japan
          Detachment Date In: 2 Sep 1952
          Detachment Date Out: 28 Mar 1953
          Patrol Area: East China Sea; Yellow Sea

        VP-42

          Deployed to: NAS Iwakuni, Japan
          Date In: 19 Jul 1950
          Date Out: 10 Aug 1950
          Patrol Area: Korean coast

          Deployed to: NAS Yokosuka
          Date In: 11–31 Aug 1950
          Date Out: 1 Sep 1950
          Patrol Area: Tsushima Straits; Sea of Japan

          Deployed to: NAS Iwakuni, Japan
          Pine Island (AV 13), Aug 1950–Dec 1950
          Curtiss (AV 4), 1 Nov 1950–1 Dec 1950
          USS Gardiners Bay (AVP-39), 18 Oct 1950–27 Feb 1951
          Suisun (AVP 53), 11 Apr 1951–15 Jul 1951
          Date In: 1 Sep 1950
          Date Out: 9 Apr 1951
          Patrol Area: Yellow Sea
          Aircraft: PBM-5
          Losses: PBM-5, 7 Jan 1951 (non-combat)
          Detachment Location: Inchon
          USS Gardiners Bay (AVP-39), 3–13 Oct 1950
          Detachment Date In: 3 Oct 1950
          Detachment Date Out: 17 Oct 1950
          Patrol Area: Korean waters
          Detachment Location: Chinhae
          USS Gardiners Bay (AVP-39), 13–18 Oct 1950
          Detachment Date In: 14 Oct 1950
          Detachment Date Out: 18 Oct 1950
          Patrol Area: Korean waters; Yellow Sea

          Deployed to: NAS Iwakuni, Japan
          Date In: 7 Dec 1951
          Date Out: 6 Jun 1952
          Patrol Area: Korean coast
          Aircraft: P4Y-2
          Losses: None
          Detachment Location: Chinhae
          Detachment Date In: 15 Mar 52
          Detachment Date Out: Apr 1952
          Patrol Area: Inland Korea

        VP-46

          Deployed to: Pescadores Islands
          Suisun (AVP 53) 30 Jul 1950–6 Mar 1951
          Date In: 31 Jul 1950
          Date Out: 6 Feb 1951
          Patrol Area: Formosa Straits; China

          Deployed to: NS Sangley Point, Philippines
          Date In: 1 Dec 1950
          Date Out: 6 Feb 1951
          Patrol Area: Night sector searches
          Aircraft: PBM-5
          Losses: None
          Detachment Location: Buckner Bay
          USS Salisbury Sound (AV-13), 1 Nov 1950–6 Mar 1951
          Detachment Date In: 1 Nov 1950
          Detachment Date Out: 6 Feb 1951
          Detachment Location: NS Sangley Point, Philippines
          Detachment Date In: 31 Jul 1950
          Detachment Date Out: 6 Feb 1951
          Patrol Area: Courier flights to Okinawa

          Deployed to: NAS Iwakuni, Japan
          Floyds Bay (AVP 40), 26 Sep 1951–early 1952
          USS Gardiners Bay (AVP-39), 26 Sep 1951–early 1952
          Date In: 30 Sep 1951
          Date Out: 2 Apr 1952
          Patrol Area: Korean coast
          Aircraft: PBM-5S/5S2
          Losses: None
          Detachment Location: Chinhae
          Suisun (AVP 53)
          Detachment Date In: Sep 1951
          Detachment Date Out: 2 Apr 1952
          Patrol Area: Korean coast

          Deployed to: NAS Iwakuni, Japan
          Kenneth Whiting (AV 14)
          Date In: 1 Mar 1953
          Date Out: 27 Jul 1953
          Patrol Area: Formosa Straits; east coast of Korea
          Aircraft: PBM-5S2
          Losses: None
          Detachment Location: None

        VP-47

          Deployed to: NAS Iwakuni, Japan
          USS Gardiners Bay (AVP-39), Jul 1950–1 Oct 1950
          Date In: 31 Jul 1950
          Date Out: 16 Oct 1950
          Patrol Area: Chosin Straits

          Deployed to: Chinhae/Inchon
          USS Gardiners Bay (AVP-39), 3–13 Oct 1950
          Patrol Area: Korean waters
          Date In: 16 Oct 1950
          Date Out: 15 Nov 1950

          Deployed to: NAF Yokosuka
          Date In: 16 Nov 1950
          Date Out: 1 Jan 1951
          Patrol Area: Sea of Japan; eastern Korean coast
          Aircraft: PBM-5
          Losses: None
          Detachment Location: None

          Deployed to: Pescadores Island
          Pine Island (AVP 12)
          Date In: 1 Aug 1951
          Date Out: 4 Mar 1952
          Patrol Area: Yellow Sea
          Aircraft: PBM-5
          Losses: None
          Detachment Location: NS Sangley Point, Philippines
          USS Salisbury Sound (AV-13)
          Detachment Date In: 26 Jul 1951
          Detachment Date Out: 4 Mar 1952
          Patrol Area: China Sea
          Detachment Location: Buckner Bay
          USS Gardiners Bay (AVP-39)
          Corson (AVP 37)
          Detachment In: 26 Jul 1951
          Detachment Date Out: 4 Mar 1952
          Patrol Area: China Sea
          1952 Deployments
          VP-47

          Deployed to: NAS Iwakuni, Japan
          Kenneth Whiting (AV 14)
          USS Gardiners Bay (AVP-39)
          Date In: 22 Nov 1952
          Date Out: 31 May 1953
          Patrol Area: Yellow Sea; Sea of Japan
          Aircraft: PBM-5
          Losses: None
          Detachment Location: Fukuoka
          Corson (AVP 37)
          Detachment Date In: Dec 1952
          Detachment Date Out: 31 May 1953
          Patrol Area: Sea of Japan

        VP-48

          Deployed to: NAS Iwakuni, Japan
          Kenneth Whiting (AV 14)
          USS Gardiners Bay (AVP-39)
          Date In: Jul 1953
          Date Out: Dec 1953
          Patrol Area: Yellow Sea
          Aircraft: PBM-5S2
          Losses: PBM-5 on 30 Jul 1953 (non-combat), 5 rescued, 10 killed in the crash
          Detachment Location: None

        VP-50

        VP-57

          Deployed to: NAS Atsugi, Japan
          Date In: 28 Mar 1953
          Date Out: 27 Jul 1953
          Patrol Area: Sea of Japan; Yellow Sea
          Aircraft: P2V-5
          Losses: None
          Detachment Location: None

        VP-731

          Deployed to: Buckner Bay
          USS Salisbury Sound (AV-13), 1 Nov 1950–6 Mar 1951
          Suisun (AVP 53), 6 Mar 1951–13 Aug 1951
          Date In: 7 Feb 1951
          Date Out: 13 Aug 1951
          Patrol Area: Formosa Straits; China coast
          Aircraft: PBM-5
          Losses: None
          Detachment Location: NS Sangley Point, Philippines
          USS Salisbury Sound (AV-13), 13 Mar 1951–18 Oct 1951
          Detachment Date In: 7 Feb 1951
          Detachment Date Out: 13 Aug 1951
          Patrol Area: Formosa coast; China coast
          Detachment Location: Hong Kong
          Detachment Date In: 7 Feb 1951
          Detachment Date Out: 13 Aug 1951
          Patrol Area: Courier Flights

          Deployed to: NAS Iwakuni, Japan
          Kenneth Whiting (AV 14)
          USS Gardiners Bay (AVP-39)
          Date In: 1 Jun 1952
          Date Out: 8 Dec 1952
          Patrol Area: Korean coast; Formosa Straits
          Aircraft: PBM-5S2
          Losses: PBM damaged on 31 Jul 1952, 2 KIA and 2 WIA (combat related)
          Detachment Location: None

        VP-772

          Deployed to: NAS Atsugi, Japan
          Date In: 31 Jan 51
          Date Out: 3 Aug 1951
          Sea Patrol Area: Yellow; Tsushima Straits
          Aircraft: P4Y-2
          Losses: None
          Detachment Location: K-1, Pusan
          Detachment Date In: 12 Jun 1951
          Detachment Date Out: 3 Aug 1951
          Patrol Area: Inland Korea

        VP-871

          Deployed to: NAS Atsugi, Japan
          Date In: 1 Dec 1951
          Date Out: 7 Jul 1952
          Patrol Area: Sea of Japan
          Aircraft: P4Y-2S
          Losses: None
          Detachment Location: Kimpo AFB
          Detachment Date In: 12 Dec 1951
          Detachment Date Out: 7 Jul 1952
          Patrol Area: Inland Korea

        VP-892

          Deployed to: NAS Iwakuni, Japan
          Curtiss (AV 4) thru 30 Dec 1950
          Pine Island (AV 12), Dec 1950–mid-1951
          USS Gardiners Bay (AVP-39), 18 Oct 1950–13 Apr 1951
          Suisun (AVP 53), 11 Apr 1951 – Late 1951
          Date In: 13 Dec 1950
          Date Out: 9 Jun 1951
          Patrol Area: Yellow Sea, night patrols
          Aircraft: PBM-5
          Losses: None
          Detachment Location: None
          1951 Deployments

          Deployed to: NS Sangley Point, Philippines
          USS Salisbury Sound (AV-13)
          Date In: 1 Mar 1952
          Date Out: 12 Sep 1952
          Patrol Area: China Sea
          Aircraft: PBM-5S/S2
          Losses: None
          Detachment Location: None
          1953 Deployments

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Patrol squadrons in the Korean War - Naval Aviation News, July-August, 2002 by Rick Burgess..." http://www.findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0IAX/is_5_84/ai_90332255 [29MAR2005]

    Because most of the combat action of the KOREAN WAR took place over the Korean peninsula, the bulk of the Navy's aerial contribution to the war took the form of carrier-based tactical aircraft. For Navy patrol squadrons (VP), the war was fought primarily on the peripheries of the main front, mostly in sea-control and sea-denial missions, and other roles such as mine hunting.

    The Korean War was one hot spot of many along the Asian landmass attracting the attention of VP squadrons in the early 1950s. The broader Cold War was in full chill. The Soviet Union had tested its first nuclear weapons in 1949, and its large submarine fleet presented a credible threat to the Navy's carrier and amphibious task forces. Also in 1949, the Communist Chinese People's Liberation Army forces had pushed the Chinese Nationalist forces off the Asian mainland across the Formosa Strait onto Formosa (now Taiwan). French colonial forces in Indochina were embattled by an increasingly strong Viet Minh force led by Ho Chi Minh. From the Bering Strait to Singapore, Navy patrol planes had much to monitor.

    Although the U.S. Seventh Fleet's carrier task forces were committed to the Korean area of operations, the fleet still was charged with the protection of Formosa. The fleet was able to maintain routine surveillance of the Formosa Strait with patrol aircraft, which made it impossible for the Communist Chinese to launch a surprise invasion of the island.

    In the Korean area of operations, VP squadrons participated in the blockade of North Korea, keeping merchant shipping and fishing fleets under surveillance and deterring hostile submarine activity. In addition, patrol aircraft hunted and destroyed mines, dropped flares for air strikes, and conducted weather reconnaissance and search-and-rescue operations.

    At the beginning of the Korean War, Pacific Fleet VP squadrons were equipped with three heavily armed aircraft types. Martin PBM-5/5S/5S2 Mariners were the only flying boats in active patrol squadrons (the P5M Marlin had not yet entered service.) Seaplanes were increasingly being displaced by land-based patrol bombers, such as the four-engine Consolidated Privateer P4Y-2/2S/2B, a holdover from WW II; and versions of the new twin-engine Lockheed Neptune (P2V2/3/3W/4/5), successor to the post-WWII PV-2 Harpoon patrol bomber.

    The Pacific Fleet was equipped with only nine VP squadrons in June 1950, having disestablished four squadrons in the first half of the year. VP squadrons were based at NAS Whidbey Island, Washington; NAS North Island, San Diego, California; and NAS Barbers Point, Hawaii. They deployed to NAF Yokosuka, Japan; NS Sangley Point, Philippines, Philippines.; NAS Kodiak, Alaska; and NAS Agana, Guam. By the end of 1950, seven reserve VP squadrons were activated, five of which were assigned to the Pacific Fleet. By the end of 1951, two more active duty VP squadrons were established in the Pacific Fleet, and two more reserve squadrons were activated to augment them. NAS Alameda, California, and NAS Seattle, Washington, accommodated some of the new squadrons. Only one Atlantic Fleet patrol squadron, VP-7 at NAS Quonset Point, Rhode Island, was deployed to the war zone, arriving less than one month before the truce on 30 June 1953.

    When the war broke out in 1950, Fleet Air Wing FAW-1 at Guam controlled squadrons deployed to the western Pacific. In July 1950 FAW-1 moved to Naha, Okinawa, to control patrols over the Formosa Strait using one land-based and one flying boat squadron. FAW-6 was established at Atsugi, Japan, to coordinate patrols in the Yellow Sea and Sea of Japan. Eventually the typical strength of FAW-6 included three land-plane squadrons and two flying boat squadrons, as well as two squadrons of Royal Air Force Sunderland flying boats. These command structures remained in place throughout the war, except during a short period when they were relieved by FAW-2 and FAW-14, respectively.

    Only eight patrol planes--PBMs assigned to VP-46 and the squadron it was relieving, VP-47--patrolled the Far East when the North Korean invasion began, while VP-28's PB4Ys were deployed to NAS Agana, Guam. Soon, VP-47 was regrouped and retained on deployment, VP-6's P2V-3s arrived at Johnson Air Base near Tokyo, Japan, and VP-42's PBMs staged at Iwakuni, Japan. VP-28 staged to NAF Naha, Okinawa, Japan and began daily patrols of the Formosa Strait and the coast of China. Other squadrons rotated in turn, and also deployed to far-flung bases and anchorages such as Hong Kong; the Pescadores, Buckner Bay and NAF Kadena, Okinawa, Japan; Tachikawa and Itami in Japan; and NAS Kodiak, Alaska and Shemya in the Aleutians.

    As the North Korean invasion pushed south, VP-6's Neptunes were used on three occasions to provide naval gunfire spotting for United Nations warships on the western coast of South Korea. The squadron's P2V-3s, armed with 20mm cannon, bombs and rockets, also launched many attacks themselves against North Korean targets along the northeast shore.

    On 29 July 1950, two crews destroyed a railroad train with their rockets and guns. On 13 August, crews sank three boats and two barges engaged in minelaying near Chinnampo, and damaged two surface craft near Wonsan. One VP-6 Neptune was damaged in the attack. An attack on a patrol boat near Chinnampo on 16 August was fatal to another VP-6 aircraft, which ditched after taking fire. The crew was rescued by the Royal Navy cruiser HMS Kenya. Patrol planes were prohibited thereafter from undertaking attack missions over Korea. VP-6 became the only patrol squadron awarded the Navy Unit Citation during the Korean War.

    Patrol planes--PBMs, P2Vs and Sunderlands--were used extensively in mine hunting, particularly in the harbors of Inchon and Wonsan. This tedious activity required the PBMs to fly low and slow, close enough to detonate a moored mine with machine gunfire, but high enough to avoid the mine's explosion. P2Vs dropped depth charges to wipe out magnetic mines.

    In 1951 VP squadrons were pressed into another role, this time over land, dropping illumination flares in support of air strikes. Known as Firefly missions, they helped deny the night to enemy supply movements. Admiral Arthur W. Radford suggested the use of P4Y-2 Privateers as flare ships to replace the more vulnerable R4D Skytrains in illuminating targets for Marine Corps F4U-5N Corsair and F7F-3N Tigercat night hecklers. One P4Y from VP-772 was modified For the mission and proved highly successful, and three more P4Ys from VP-772 and VP-28 were assigned as "Lamp Lighters" (later operated by successive squadrons). During a typical mission, the P4Y would rendezvous with four attack aircraft, search for truck convoys and illuminate the targets for the attack aircraft.

    Although United Nations forces were successful in maintaining air superiority over most of the Korean peninsula, lumbering patrol aircraft had a few encounters with enemy aircraft. A VP-42 Mariner was damaged on 11 May 1952 by a MiG-15 fighter over the Yellow Sea, and on 31 July 1952 a VP-731 PBM was seriously damaged by gunfire from a MiG-15, which killed two crewmen and injured two others.

    Flights off China and the Soviet Union, far from protective cover, were more dangerous. VP-28 P4Ys were attacked over the Formosa Strait on 26 July by an F-51 Mustang in North Korean markings, and on 20 September and 22 November 1950 by MiG-15s, all without result. A VP-42 PBM was lost to unknown causes in the southern Formosa Strait on 5 November. On 6 November 1951 a VP-6 P2V-3W was shot down, with no survivors, by Soviet fighters near Vladivostok. On 18 January 1953 Chinese antiaircraft batteries shot down a VP-22 P2V off Swatow. A Coast Guard PBM-5G picked up the survivors but crashed on takeoff, resulting in the loss of 11 fliers, including 7 from the P2V. The survivors were rescued by a Navy ship. Further such aircraft incidents and losses occurred in the years after the Korean truce.

    One daring P2V crew amazingly survived a series of eight or nine intentional overflights of the Soviet Union's Kamchatka peninsula between April and June 1952. A VP-931 P2V-3W--modified with special electronic intelligence equipment in its nose and flown by a handpicked crew--flew in radio silence over the peninsula at 15,000 feet in search of military installations. When military sites were detected, an Air Force RB-50 flying above and behind the P2V photographed the sites. The snoopers were intercepted on two missions by Soviet MiG fighters but apparently never were fired upon. Fortunately, the recently declassified operations never required the services of the Air Force SB-17 rescue plane assigned to the missions. This VP-931 (later VP-57) crew also performed a daring search and rescue flight in July 1953 over Vladivostok harbor for the crew of an RB-50 that was shot down by Soviet fighters. A U.S. destroyer rescued one of the crewmen.

    Land-based patrol planes saw greater use than flying boats in the Korean War, proving to be more efficient. In Korea, land-based patrol planes flew 12 sorties for every 9 flown by flying boats.

    As with U.S. forces in general, patrol aviation maintained a high level of presence in the Far East after the Korean War. Its operations increasingly focused on peripheral reconnaissance of the Soviet Union and China, particularly surveillance of the growing Soviet submarine force and vigilance against Chinese sabre-rattling against Formosa.

    U.S. Navy Patrol Squadrons in the Korean War

    Squadron    Aircraft    Tail Code    Home Port


    Circa 1950

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "..NAVAL WAR COLLEGE NEWPORT PAPERS 38 - High Seas Buffer - The Taiwan Patrol Force, 1950–1979 By Bruce A. Elleman - ISSN 1544-6824 - ISBN 978-1-884733-95-6. Squadrons mentioned: VP-1 1950, VP-22 1953, VP-28 1950, VP-46 1950..." Contributed by Mike Yarded mikeyared@yahoo.com [11APR2012]
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    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...USS Salisbury Sound (AV-13) - Circa 1950. Squadrons Mentioned: FAW-1, FAW-6, VP-1, VP-2, VP-4,VP-42, VP-46 and VP-47..." WebSite: USS Salisbury Sound http://www.salisburysound.com/index_Page555.htm [07JAN2007]

    She tended planes of VP-42 at that port until 6 February 1950, then shifted to Subic Bay in the Philippine Islands. She resumed duty at Hong Kong on 12 April and cleared port on 11 May for exercises off Sangley Point, Luzon before loading aircraft at Guam (27-29 May 1950). She put to sea on the latter day and steamed by way of Pearl Harbor for return to San Diego on 13 June 1950. After voyage repair in the San Francisco Naval Shipyard, she embarked passengers, including men of VP-42, and sailed from San Diego on 26 July bound for the Far East. She debarked her passengers at Pearl Harbor on 1 August and to sea the next day, carrying some 700 passengers destined for the VP-1, VP-2, and VP-4 of Fleet Air Service Squadron and Army units in Japan. Four helicopters and an equal number of SNBS of the Fleet Air Service Squadron were loaded on her seaplane deck. She reached Yokosuka on 11 August 1950, debarking her passengers and their equipment, and took on new aviation cargo and passengers for transport to Apra Harbor, Guam. She arrived at the latter port on 20 August, debarked her passengers, then loaded patrol bomber spare parts and eight jet fighters for delivery to Naha Harbor, Okinawa, 25 August 1950. She reported to Commander Seventh Fleet for duty that day and shifted to Buckner Bay for operations under Commander Service Squadron Three (Commander Task Group 70.7). On 3 September she serviced seven Mariners of VP-46 and two Sunderlands of the 88th Royal Air Force Squadron, which had sortied on typhoon evacuation from their base at Iwakuni, Japan.

    On 6 September 1950, Salisbury Sound arrived at Iwakuni, Japan, and reported for duty to Commander FAW-6. She commenced service to VP-42 and VP-47, which had eleven Mariners present on that day plus three Sunderlands of the 88th Squadron of the Royal Air Force. These units comprised the seaplane and reconnaissance of Task Force Ninety-Six supporting the operations of Task Force Seventy-Seven and Task Group 96.5. Four additional Mariners had arrived on 9 September 1950 when Salisbury Sound became Flagship of Commander Fleet Wing SIX. She now became the operating base for all seaplanes in the Patrol and Reconnaissance Force (*Task Force 99) tending eight Sunderlands of the 88th Squadron of the Royal Air Force, seven planes of VP-47 and nine planes of VP-42. On 16 September Commander FAW-6 shifted his Flag, along with pilots and crew of VP-47, to sea plane tender USS Curtiss (AV-4), controlling all flights from that ship. Salisbury Sound continued seadrome control until 18 September, then took on aviation fuel at Kure, returning to Iwakuni on 21 September 1960. She reported for duty to Commander Air Wing One (task Group 70.6) on 23 September and shifted to base at Buckner Bay, Okinawa, on the 26th. She laid 18 buoys in the seaplane anchorage and on 2 October five Mariners of VP-46 (Southern Search and Reconnaissance Force), arrived from the Pescadores Islands to escape the fury of a typhoon. These planes conducted nightly reconnaissance and patrol flights of the Formosa Straits from the Salisbury Sound until 10 October, when they again terminated their flights in the Pescadores. Meantime she had hoisted the flag of Commander FAW-1 on 5 October 1950. Winds and heavy seas again threatened the seadrome in the Pescadores on 19 October, and Mariners of VP-46 there once again shifted gradually to base from Salisbury Sound. On 2 November 1950 she entered the harbor of Naha, transferring 30,000 gallons of gasoline to Y-53 for delivery to the Naval Base before return to Buckner Bay the same day. She continued direction and tending of the Mariners' search and reconnaissance flights until 27 November 1950 when Commander Fleet Wing ONE- shifted his flag to USS Gardiners Bay (AVP-39).

    Salisbury Sound arrived at Iwakuni, Japan 20 November 1950, and hoisted the flag of Commander Air Wing Six. She relived USS Curtiss (AV-4) of seadrome control and began tending nine Mariners of VP-42 and four Royal Air Force Sunderlands, operating from Iwakuni. On 1 December, seven Mariners of VP-47 arrived, and on the 21st, Commander FAW-6 transferred his flag to Curtis. On 15 December 1950, Salisbury Sound returned to Buckner Bay and relieved Gardiners Bay (AVP-39) as flag ship of Commander FAW-1. She now commenced service for the detachment of five Marines of VP-46, stationed at Buckner Bay, and three Mariners of the same squadron, stationed at Sangley point, Luzon, Philippine Islands. These units conducted search and reconnaissance flights out of Buckner Bay and completed courier flights between Sangley Point and Hong Kong. Commencing 6 January 1951, she supported Anti-Submarine Warfare Training Element 7016 comprising a Land Plane Air Search and Attack Unit (9 P2V4s of VP-22); a Seaplane Air Search and Attack Unit (9 Mariners of VP-46); and Fleet Submarine Besugo (SS-321). This duty terminated on 16 January 1951 and Salisbury Sound resumed her daily direction of reconnaissance flight and tender services.

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: Naval Aviation News August 1950 "...VP-1 Tests 1065 Engine Oil - Page 35 - Naval Aviation News - August 1950..." WebSite: http://www.history.navy.mil/nan/backissues/1950s/1950/aug50.pdf [21JUL2004]

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    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: Naval Aviation News April 1950 "...A Salty Tale From Alaska - Page 23 - Naval Aviation News - April 1950..." WebSite: http://www.history.navy.mil/nan/backissues/1950s/1950/apr50.pdf [19JUL2004]

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    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: Naval Aviation News April 1950 "...High Morale Sets Arctic Mark - Naval Aviation News - April 1950..." WebSite: http://www.history.navy.mil/nan/backissues/1950s/1950/apr50.pdf [19JUL2004]

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    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Patrol Squadrons In The Korean War By LCDR Rick Burgess, USN (Retired) - Naval Aviation News July-August 2002..." Contributed by Mike Yared mikeyared@yahoo.com [25JAN2003]
    VP History ThumbnailCameraPatrol Squadrons In The Korean War Page 1 of 4
    VP History ThumbnailCameraPatrol Squadrons In The Korean War Page 1 of 4
    VP History ThumbnailCameraPatrol Squadrons In The Korean War Page 1 of 4
    VP History ThumbnailCameraPatrol Squadrons In The Korean War Page 1 of 4

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "07AUG50--KOREA--ARRIVED: 07AUG50 DEPARTED: 27JUL53 TAIL CODE: CD AIRCRAFT: P2V-3/5" http://www.history.navy.mil/branches/koreaob.htm


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