| E-Mail Spam| Frequently Asked Questions| Privacy Statement| $Site Donations$
VP-5 P-3 Orion BUNO: 158923
VP-5 P-3 Orion BUNO: 158923
VPNAVY Address VP-5 P2 Neptune BUNO: 131428
VP-5 P2 Neptune BUNO: 131428
****VPNAVY Has Been "On Station" For 20 Years as of December 1st, 2016****  
Home Page

Updates
Guestbook
Notices

Maritime Patrol
MPA Logo

Association


Active Duty
VP
Squadrons

VB
VP
VPB
VP-AM
VP-HL
VP-ML
VP-MS
VPP
VP(P)
VP-MAU

VP
VPB
VPU
VP-MAU
Squadron
Awards

AEW
BarRonPac

AirBarSRon
Aircraft Scouting Force
Aircrew Wings
Air Wing Staff (AWS)
Allies
ASCAC
ASWOC
ATU
AVCM Donald M. Neal Aircraft Maintenance Award
Aviation Ratings
Beasley
Black Cats
CAPTAIN Arnold Jay Isbell Trophy
CASU
Catbird ETD
Chief Of Naval Operations Support
CMO
CPW
Crazy Cats
1st Radio Research Company

Enlisted Combat Aircrew RoH
FASRON
FAETU
FAW
FICPACFAC
Fleet Support Squadron
Flight Engineer
Glick
IFT
Last ASW Equiped Flying P2V Neptune
Mariner/Marlin Aircraft
Mariner/Marlin Association
Vietnam Seaplane Veterans
Maritime Patrol Association
MOCC
NADC
NADU
NAS
NASA
NATS
NATTU
NATU
Newsletters
NOAA
Notices
NRL
NWTS
OASU
Patch Swap
Identify
In Search Of

PMTC
PATSU
SAU
Shipmates
Site SEARCH
Tailcodes
Tenders
Terrorist Attack Claims Six U.S. Navy VP Personnel
Truculent Turtle
V-1/12 Pre-Flight
VAH
VAHM
VAP
VAW
VC
VCS
VD
VE
VFP
VGS
VH
VJ
VP
VPB
VP-AM
VP-HL
VP-ML
VP-MS
VPP
VP(P)
VP-MAU

VMD
VO
VP International
VP Links
VP Related Employment Opportunities
VPM
VP-MAU
VPU
VPW
VQ/VAQ
VR
VS
VT
VU
VUP
VW
VX/VXS
ZP/ZT/ZW/ZX
SITE
PAGES
Chatroom
Donations
E-Mail
Expenses
FAQ
Gift Corner
Glossary
Logo History
Privacy
Profits
SPAM!
Statistics
WebMaster
Why VPNAVY

SUMMARY
PAGES
Aircraft
Crew
Flight Simulator
History Link
ICQ
Logo
Mishap
Model
Movie
Museum
Recycled AC
Reunion

Shipmates
Site
$Donations$
VP-10 Crew - In Memorium - VP-10 Crew

"Eternal Father Strong To Save"
The Navy Hymn
Sailor Aviators Version

Eternal Father, Strong to Save,
Whose arm hath bound the restless wave,
Who bid'st the mighty Ocean deep
Its' own appointed limits keep;
O hear us when we cry to thee,
for those in peril on the sea.

Lord, guard and guide the men who fly
Through the great spaces in the sky.
Be with them always in the air,
In dark'ning storms or sunlight fair.
O, Hear us when we lift our prayer,
For those in peril in the air.

But when at length our course is run,
Our work for home and country done,
Of all the souls that flew and sailed,
Let not one life in thee be failed,
But hear from heaven our sailors cry,
And grant eternal life on high.

May all our departed shipmates rest in peace.

Eternal Father by the U.S. Navy Band's Sea Chanters (668 kbytes - WAV file)

11 Feared Dead, 2 Bodies Found
By HARRY G. SHULMAN
District Correspondent

Contributed by John R. Fisher, Sr. jfishe3@ibm.net [29SEP2000]

VP-10 Mishap


BRUNSWICK - A NAS Brunswick, Maine patrol bomber with 11 men aboard plunged into the Atlantic Ocean 300 miles off the Virginia coast Wednesday. The bodies of 2 crewmen were recovered, the rest were listed as missing and presumed dead. The twin-engine Neptune P2V was returning to the local base after completing Anti-Submarine Warfare exercises. A search for the other nine officers and men is continuing. LCDR Herbert E. Wilson, Public Information Officer of FAW-3 here said a search plane spotted debris from the VP-10 plane at about 10:30 a.m. Wednesday. Found were a life raft and other objects definitely identified as coming from the P2V of VP-10 based here.

NAVY AUTHORITIES said the plane, commanded by LCDR Phillip S. Callihan, was last heard from shortly after 2:30 a.m.. There was no indication of trouble at the time and no distress signals were received from the plane. The Navy did not reveal the names of the men whose bodies had been recovered. FAW-3 headquarters here said aircraft from NAS Brunswick, Maine and from the carrier USS Champlain are taking part in the search. It was expected the search would be discontinued temporarily during the night.

THE PLANE took off from NAS Brunswick, Maine at 8 p.m. Tuesday with four officers and 7 enlisted men aboard. It carried sufficient fuel for 14 hours of flight and was due back at its home base here at 7 a.m. Planes from NAS Brunswick, Maine took off in search of the aircraft when it failed to reach port. The Navy said no reason for the accident has been determined. The fact that the life raft was floating on the water may indicate that some of the crew had time to escape.

LISTED AS THE OFFICIAL crew of the downed patrol bomber, and next of kin by the NAS Brunswick, Maine were:

LCDR Phillip S. Callihan, 36, Brunswick, home, Memphis, Tenn; wife, Anita Taylor Callihan; one child.

LT(jg) Robert J. Miller, 23, son of Mr and Mrs James Edward Miller, New Hyde Park, N. Y.

LT(jg) William G. McLane, 22, Brunswick, wife, Mrs Rosemarie Belton McLane; home, Lake Placid, N.Y.

LT(jg) Edmund J. McGrath, 24, son of Mr and Mrs Joseph T. McGrath, Chicago, ILL.

Harold G. Kirkman, aviation structural mechanic first class, 27, wife, Mrs Kathryn Yvonne Kirkman, Brunswick; four children; home, Kernersville, N.C.

Paul Harden, aviation machinist mate third class, 23, Brunswick; wife, Phyllis Eileen Harden, Thomas Point, Brunswick; two children; home, Philadelphia, PA.

Gerald J. Dinan, aviation electronics technician first class, 25, son of Mr and Mrs Gerald Andrew Dinan, Zanesville, Ohio.

Wayne J. Stevens, 30, aviation electronics technician second class; wife, Mrs Marilyn Corrine Stevens, Brunswick; two children; home, Adairsville, Ga.

Paul E. Lare, airman, 26; wife, Mrs Francis Noel Lare, Brunswick; two children.

John J. Walsh, 22, avaition electricians mate third class; parents, Mr and Mrs John Joseph Walsh of Ellsworth.

Roy D. Smith, aviation ordnanceman second class, 23, son of Mr and Mrs Day Ray Smith, Crofton, Ky.

THE VIRGINIA-PILOT THURSDAY, NOV. 9, 1961 - Norfolk-Portsmouth, Va.
11 Lost in Navy Plane Crash

Contributed by John R. Fisher, Sr. jfishe3@ibm.net [29OCT99]


"BRUNSWICK, Maine (AP) - A Navy patrol bomber with 11 men aboard plunged into the Atlantic Ocean 300 miles off the Virginia coast Wednesday. the bodies of two crewmen were recovered; the rest were listed as missing. The plane, a four-engine Neptune P2V from NAS Brunswick, Maine, was on an antisubmarine training mission with the carrier Lake Champlain. The last radio message came at 2:40 a.m., but the craft gave no indication that it was in trouble. Nearly 12 hours later the two bodies were recovered and taken aboard the Lake Champlain as search planes circled overhead and five destroyers hunted for wreckage.

NAMES WITHHELD - The names of all the crewmen were withheld, pending notification of next-of-kin. The Navy said two life rafts, one inflated, were also recovered, and bits of debris were positively identified as that of the lost plane. One of the rafts was marked "VP-10." indicating the plane was from VP-10, based at NAS Brunswick, Maine .A base spokesman said search planes were recalled from the area as soon as the wreckage was identified. The officer said the plane took off from Brunswick at 8 p.m. Tuesday with enough fuel to keep it aloft 14 hours.

LAST MESSAGE - The Navy said the Lake Champlain's last message with the plane came as the craft was about ready to head back to NAS Brunswick, Maine. The crash scene was about 75 miles from the carrier. It was added that the Neptune is a land-based plane and does not land or take off from carriers. Coast Guard planes and cutters joined the Navy in the search for the ill-fated craft."

Crew Members Were

LCDR Phil Callahan
Pilot - PPC

LT Robert Miller
Co-Pilot

LT McLane
TACCO

LT McGrath
TACCO

AM1 Harold G. Kirkman
Plane Captain

UPDATE "...I am so thankful that my Father, AM1 Harold G. Kirkman, death has not been forgotten (SEE: In Memorial for VP-10 lost friends November 9th, 1961). I never knew my father like alot of you. There are not to many days that goes by that I don't think of my Father and of the many men that were onboard that aircraft. I would love to hear from anyone that may have known or heard of my Dad..." Contributed by David Kirkman ab1234777@yahoo.com [28MAY2012]

UPDATE "...My husband, AM1 Harold G. Kirkman, was lost November 9th, 1961 while serving with VP-10 (SEE: In Memorial for VP-10 lost friends November 9th, 1961). I want to thank you that remember, we must never forget them, every time I see a navy guy---I remember. Thank you all..." Contributed by Kathryn Y Kirkman (Gardner) katgar1@graceba.net [27MAY2011]


AD3 Paul "Bones" Harden
2nd Mech

AE3 John Walsh
Electrician/ECM

AO2 Roy Dan "Billy Billy" Smith
Ordnanceman

UPDATEHistory ThumbnailCameraAO2 Roy Dan Smith "...I am a brother of AO2 Roy Dan Smith who lost his life November 9th, 1961 while serving with VP-10 (SEE: In Memorial for VP-10 lost friends November 9th, 1961). I would like to hear from anyone who knew my brother..." Contributed by A0C David R."Buddy" Smith messkit1940@falcon1.net [08NOV2015]


AT1 Gerald J. "Jerry" Dinan
1st Tech

AT2 Wayne Stevens
2nd Tech

UPDATE "...My father, Wayne Stevens was on the plane. I never knew him as I was 5 months old when it happened. I would like to contact anyone connected with the crash whether they knew my Dad or not. I am sure that there may be family members who, like me, would like to share how our lives were shapened by this loss. I would like to acknowlege John Fisher for taking the initiative to put this event on the web site. He is a true patriot as are others who contribute to this great web page...LT Dave Stevens, MC USNR david.stevens2@worldnet.att.net..." [19APR2000]


AN Paul Lare
Radioman


This crew on LD-2 was operating out of NAS Brunswick, Maine and was working on an Anti-Submarine exercise with the submarine Seawolf about 300 miles off the Virginia coastline.

"They were in a right turn at night in a JULIE Exercise against the Seawolf"; "We then moved a detachment down to Norfolk , Virginia to cut down the "enroute time" after the accident, and continued the exercise. I was on the first flight after the accident with Les Breeding in the laft seat as A/C commander. We dropped a wreath at the crash site just about dusk. The AC Generator warning light (a big red light on the pilots panel) came on and went off three times just about the time the wreath would hit the water. Les looked over at me and asked if I had seen it and we decided right then to go back to Norfolk. The maintenance troops never found anything wrong with the generator!" George Allender - Captain USN Retired
UPDATEHistory ThumbnailCameraAO2 Roy Dan Smith "...I am a brother of AO2 Roy Dan Smith who lost his life November 9th, 1961 while serving with VP-10 (SEE: In Memorial for VP-10 lost friends November 9th, 1961). I would like to hear from anyone who knew my brother..." Contributed by A0C David R."Buddy" Smith messkit1940@falcon1.net [08NOV2015]

UPDATE "...I am so thankful that my Father, AM1 Harold G. Kirkman, death has not been forgotten (SEE: In Memorial for VP-10 lost friends November 9th, 1961). I never knew my father like alot of you. There are not to many days that goes by that I don't think of my Father and of the many men that were onboard that aircraft. I would love to hear from anyone that may have known or heard of my Dad..." Contributed by David Kirkman ab1234777@yahoo.com [28MAY2012]

UPDATE "...My husband, AM1 Harold G. Kirkman, was lost November 9th, 1961 while serving with VP-10 (SEE: In Memorial for VP-10 lost friends November 9th, 1961). I want to thank you that remember, we must never forget them, every time I see a navy guy---I remember. Thank you all..." Contributed by Kathryn Y Kirkman (Gardner) katgar1@graceba.net [27MAY2011]

UPDATE "...VP-10 The P2V-5 involved in the crash on 09nov61 was 131505..." Contributed by Jan van Waarde jwaarde@chello.nl, Navy/USMC/USCG/NASA Updates Editor WebSite: http://www.scramble.nl Dutch Aviation Society / Scramble [01DEC2004]

UPDATE "...I was the Plane Captain for crew 8(?) when we lost the crew off Virginia. We were the crew that ferried CDR. Brady back to NAS Brunswick, Maine that day. I remember turning two and burning one all the back. Both my wife Ann and I were friends with the KIRKLINs...BUCKLEY, John JFB2HDS@gateway.net..." [11APR2001]

UPDATE "...My father, Wayne Stevens was on the plane. I never knew him as I was 5 months old when it happened. I would like to contact anyone connected with the crash whether they knew my Dad or not. I am sure that there may be family members who, like me, would like to share how our lives were shapened by this loss. I would like to acknowlege John Fisher for taking the initiative to put this event on the web site. He is a true patriot as are others who contribute to this great web page...LT Dave Stevens, MC USNR david.stevens2@worldnet.att.net..." [19APR2000]

UPDATE "...Randy Poplin rpoplin001@roadrunner.com provided numerous sources for obtaining information. (Note: Randy's Dad was lost in a ASW night mission in 1968. Randy was only 2 years old at the time.)..." [08MAY2000]

UPDATE "...LT Dave Stevens shared numerous e-mails with me. I am requesting permission to post them with the mishap..."

UPDATE "...I flew with your dad in early 1960. He was second tech and radioman on crew #3. He was a quiet guy, a family man, unlike some of the crazies (like me). He was a good guy as I remember and it was a huge loss when their crew went down off of Norfolk in late 1961. I was then on crew #8 when it occurred and, as I remember, we had been in Puerto Rico on an exercise when we were called home immediately. My best friend, Billy Smith, AO2 was on the plane and perished also. It was a very sad time for all VP-10ers. Our squadron had a lot of pride in those days and it still shows as we are planning a reunion on June 23-24 of this year and it looks like it will be well attended by all of us "old coots". If there would be something I could add to this letter, please let me know. I see by your signature you've followed in your dad's footsteps. That's not the worst thing you could have done. I wish you and yours well...Al Warnick bigalw@enter.net..." [16MAY2000]

UPDATE "...John Fisher forwarded your request for information concerning the loss of you father in the VP-10 accident which occurred back in 1961. Although my recollection of many details surrounding the accident have been dimmed by the years, my memory of the incident remains paramount. It had a profound effect on all of us in the squadron since those crewmembers were both our shipmates and friends. Their loss truly saddened and shocked us all. I will attempt here to share my knowledge of the pertinent events surrounding the accident.

I was, at the time, the Executive Officer of the squadron and subsequently headed up the Board of Investigation. That evening, I was the pilot of the back-up aircraft to LD-2 and waited on the taxiway until the plane took off, checked out all its essential operational equipment, reported everything up and operating and departed on its final mission. The mission was a training evolution with a submarine, wherein the various phases of the entire ASW problem were practiced. These phases consisted of a search phase, a localization phaze, and lastly an attack phase. After each phase, the submarine which is operating submerged, would surface and exchange communications with the aircraft to insure conditions were normal. The search phase had been completed and the aircraft indicated that it was descending to conduct a low altitude localization procedure. This evolution is a series of precision manuevers at a relatively low altitude, a safe but exacting event in which all well trained crews are proficient. When the submarine surfaced at the end of the allotted time, radio contact with the aircraft could not be established. Efforts to contact the aircraft were unsuccessful and a downed aircraft search was initiated by units of the Navy and Coast Guard. After several hours of search some debris positively identified as from LD-2 was located and two bodies were recovered. I spent the entire time up until the loss was confirmed in the Wing Operations Center which served as a Search Control Center attending to the various tasks necessary any accident. I was acting for the CO who was in Key West, Florida on another training event.

The accident investigation was as thorough as the limited amount of concrete evidence permitted. The aircraft maintenance records were carefully examined to see if any pertinent patterns could be identified. Nothing could be found which had any bearing on a potential mechanical failure. Crew training and health records were audited for any clues. The crew were all highly trained and proficient and the aircraft had been well maintained. The Accident Board concluded that there were no identifiable causes for the accident, either actual or implied. The convening and reviewing authorities agreed with the conclusions of the report.

I would be remiss if I failed to share with you my totally unsubstantiated opinion as to what may have happened. I suspect that there was a sudden loss of control of the aircraft while at low altitude occasioned either by a sudden and catastrophic mechanical malfunction or by the pilot sustaining an episode of vertigo, a condition with which you are familiar. We will never know.

I hope that this provides some information for you about that tragic flight. It was another of those unfortunate and unexplained casualties of military service. The risks which your father, like the rest of us who serve, proudly accepted. Sincerely, Jens B. Hansen, Captain, USN, Ret....forwarded by John Fisher jrfishersr@comcast.net..." [19MAY2000]

Return
"VP-10 Mishap Summary Page"

Selection Page

VPNAVY Copyrighted  1996 - 2012