VPNAVY VP-5 Mercury Capsule Recovery
http://www.vpnavy.org
VPNAVY Address

HistoryVP-6 HistoryHistory

Circa 1938

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VP-1, VP-4, VP-6, VP-10, and VP-18 made up Patrol Wing TWO in 1938
Title: U.S. Navy Aircraft 1921-1941, U.S. Marine Corps Aircraft 1914-1959: Two Classics in One Volume [Squadron insignias, aircraft, and more!] by William T. Larkins [10SEP98]


Circa 1937

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...History of FAW-2 - History of Headquarters Squadron Fleet Air Wing Three - History: 01OCT37 - 15MAY45 . Squadron's Assigned: VP-1, VP-4, VP-6, VP-8, VP-10, VP-13, VP-16, VP-21, VP-22, VP-23, VP-24, VP-25, VP-26, VP-27, - Submitted July 5, 1945..." Official U. S. Navy Records (National Archives and Records Administration) via Fold3 http://www.fold3.com/ [24NOV2012]

History - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge Thumbnail
History - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge Thumbnail
History - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge Thumbnail
History - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge Thumbnail
History - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge Thumbnail      

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Naval Aeronautic Organization - Change In - Fiscal Year 1938 - Dated 24 Sep 1937..." WebSite: Naval Historical Center http://www.history.navy.mil/ [25SEP2006]

VP SQUADRONS MENTIONED

VP-1, VP-2, VP-3, VP-4, VP-5, VP-6, VP-7, VP-8 and VP-9

VP-10, VP-11, VP-12, VP-14, VP-15, VP-16, VP-17 and VP-19
History - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge Thumbnail

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Naval Aeronautic Organization - Fiscal Year 1938 - Dated 7 May 1937..." WebSite: Naval Historical Center http://www.history.navy.mil/ [25SEP2006]

VP SQUADRONS MENTIONED

VP-1, VP-2, VP-3, VP-4, VP-5, VP-6, VP-7, VP-8 and VP-9

VP-10, VP-11, VP-12, VP-14, VP-15, VP-16, VP-17 and VP-19
History - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge Thumbnail

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Shore duty followed in July, 1937, when Captain DICKEY was assigned duty as Commanding Officer of Patrol Squadron SIX, based at Pearl harbor. In July of 1939, he was shifted to duty aboard the RANGER as Assistant Air Officer..." WebSite: USS HANCOCK CV-19 http://www.usshancockassociation.org/wwii%20history-3.html [01NOV2005]


Circa 1936

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VP-6 Post Card Thumbnail "...First 24 hour mass flight made by planes #'s 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 of Patrol Squadron SIX-F on December 18-19, 1936. Carried on aircraft 6-P-6. Postmarked San Diego, CA December 18, 1936 and VT Squadron December 19, 1936 8-B..." [23SEP99]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "00SEP36--The Navy was so impressed with the airplane's performance (PBY) performance that a contract for 60 production aircraft - at a cost of $90,000 each - was awarded to Consolidated on 29 JUN 1935. The designation change, from P3Y to PBY, was made during production...San Diego, and deliveries of the new PBY1s were made there, starting in September 1936. Patrol Squadron 6 (VP-6), based at North Island, was the first Navy squadron to receive the new planes..." "Cause a PBY Don't Fly That High," by Captain William E. Scarborough, U. S. Navy (Retired), U. S. Naval Institute "Proceedings" - April 1978


Circa 1935

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VP History ThumbnailCameraVP-6 Postcard "...1935 Fleet Maneuvers, cover flown with Patrol Squadron 6 plane from Hawaii to Midway Island; Pearl Harbor cancel on departure (May 9), with USS Beaver/Midway Island cancel on arrival (May 11)..." Contributed by John Lucas JohnLucas@netzero.com [21AUG2005]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "30OCT35--USS Wrightsupported the planes photographing the island and served as "home" for the survey party sent ashore. Setting course for Pearl Harbor on 2 November, she later embarked men of VP-6F for transport to French Frigate Shoals. She then tended three squadrons of seaplanes off East Island while her diving party engaged in reef-blasting operations for the seaplane base being established there.." http://namopdc.nawcad.navy.mil/talps/tapxo.htm


Circa 1934

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...This just came out of an estate of a fellow that was stationed at Pearl Harbor when this photo was taken. The photo has spent the last 70+ years rolled up in a tube. As you can see, Patrol Squadron Six has posed in front of the hangar with their patrol plane. Signed in the negative "Parish Honolulu T.H. 1934" at lower right corner..." WebSite: EBay http://search.ebay.com/_W0QQsassZbigironQQhtZ-1 [18MAY2007]

History - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge Thumbnail

Circa 1933

Circa 1930

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...In the late 1930's United States Navy Able Seaman Charles Myhan Shipmate was assigned to the Pensacola Naval Air Station to join Patrol Squadron 6. The patrol squadrons operating out of Pensocola flew PBY Catalina flying boats and their mission was to patrol the Gulf of Mexico. By that time Nazi Germany had invaded Poland and German submarines (U-boats) and commerce raiders were sinking British merchant vessels all over the world. The Germans were so brazen that they were attacking merchant ships just outside of American waters. Patrol Squadron 6 was one of the groups assigned to keep an eye on the activities of the Germans and "enforce the peace." When the United States entered the conflict in 1941, the Germans were more prepared for war than the Americans. German submarines immediately began sinking American ships all along the Eastern and Gulf coasts. There were few escort ships available and the American Navy was having real problems coming up with a coordinated defense. The Germans became even more audacious and began sinking ships in broad daylight and within full view of people standing on the shore. Myhan's squadron flew hundreds of patrols within the Gulf of Mexico attempting to find and destroy the elusive U-boats. Frustration levels were high but they continued to do the best they could. Finally, on a patrol in 1942, Myhan's plane spotted a submarine. Communication with Pensacola verified that no Allied submarines were in that sector and authorization was given to attack. On this mission the PB-Y was armed with 4 trashcan-sized depth charges. When dropped near a submarine, a depth charge sinks to a pre-determined depth and explodes. If dropped close enough to a submarine's hull, a depth charge can crush it like an eggshell. Myhan's plane would try to use its depth charges to destroy the U-boat. A submarine's best defense against aircraft is to submerge and run away and this one was just going under. Myhan's PB-Y closed the range and the bombardier set up to drop their depth charges on either side of the fleeing submarine. Unfortunately the haste of the attack caused the bombardier to lose his track and the PB-Y had to make a second pass. The submarine was deeper in the water at that point but could still be clearly seen by the crew. On the second pass the bombardier repeated his mistake and the bomber had to turn and make a third run. This time the pilot began his approach from a greater distance and the flustered bombardier was able to line everything up properly. As they got closer to the still-submerged U-boat, the crew was able to see the cigar-shaped vessel trying to dive deeper. Or was it? On closer observation it actually looked like the submarine was going to surface. This was suicide for the Germans but it did not deter Myhan. With every American ship and plane in the area listening in on the radio, the PB-Y drove on toward the target. Just before the depth charges were dropped the submarine broke the surface and part of it exploded. That's when the crew realized what they had been attacking. The submarine wasn't exploding, it was spouting. It was a whale. And every American military unit within 200 miles had heard it happen, live. And that, my friends, is what Charles Myhan, my grandfather, did in World War II..." Contributed by Chuck Walden planetwalden@sprintmail.com WEBSITE: http://www.waldencompany.com/waldenhome/adventur.htm


Return
"VP-6 History Summary Page"

Selection Page

VPNAVY Copyrighted  1996 - 2012