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HistoryVP-42 HistoryHistory

Circa 1959

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VP-42 Crew ThumbnailCameraVP-42 Crew 1 "...1959 Cruise VP-42 CREW 1 - Everyone looking at all the references to BAMBOO BOMBER would like to know how that evolved. Here is the real story related to me by one of my crewmates. It seems Crew one made a normal takeoff from the sealane and climbed to a safe altitude to retract the flaps and jettison the spent jato bottles. It was reported that one or both bottles crashed into an active fish trap and destroyed it. The owner was really mad and there were some legal actions taken against the US NAVY. I've asked Jack to fill in the blanks but haven't heard from him yet. Anyone reading this is welcome to embelish if desired. A bunch of us did get out of the PI with our hides still attached - 1959 Deployment to NS Sangley Point, Philippines..." Contributed by SATTERLEE, AT2 Mark M. msatterlee2@excite.com [15JAN2008]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VP-42 Crew ThumbnailCameraVP-42 Crew 10 "...1959 Cruise VP-42 CREW 10 - The jato bottles attached to RB-9 aren't really bottles filled with SAN MIGOO. Its the legacy our crew had while deployed. Our reputation indicated we consumed our share of San Miguel beer at the club orient not to mention Jimmy's and Sonney's. Those were fun times. We had a great crew - 1959 Deployment to NS Sangley Point, Philippines..." Contributed by SATTERLEE, AT2 Mark M. msatterlee2@excite.com [14JAN2008]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VP-42 Crew ThumbnailCameraVP-42 Crew 10 "...1959 Cruise VP-42 CREW 10 - RB-10 (BUNO: 130294) rigging a ship somewhere in the South China sea. The source of this photo is quite curious - 1959 Deployment to NS Sangley Point, Philippines..." Contributed by SATTERLEE, AT2 Mark M. msatterlee2@excite.com [14JAN2008]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VP-42 Crew ThumbnailCameraVP-42 Crew 2 "...1959 Cruise VP-42 CREW 2 - 1959 Deployment to NS Sangley Point, Philippines. During the first half of our 1959 cruise, Crew 8 won the award for the most ships rigged. That's how they earned the name ICHIBAN crew 8. If memory serves me correctly, the crew got a free trip to Australia for a serious R&R. I'm sure they enjoyed every minute of drinking Fosters and making aquaintences with the local natives. Sometime during the fall of 1960 their plane was sent to the boneyard. That's when 147937 became RB-8..." Contributed by SATTERLEE, AT2 Mark M. msatterlee2@excite.com [11JAN2008]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VP-42 Crew ThumbnailCameraVP-42 Crew 3 "...1959 Cruise VP-42 CREW 3 - 1959 Deployment to NS Sangley Point, Philippines - Photos from the cruisebook "BAMBOO BOMBER" which is a story all by itself! This is Crew 4 and the Pilot Steven Kish is one of my all-time favorite P5 drivers. His after mission statement was always "We cheated death again!" I think he and his crew rigged 57 ships one day. I think it was a daily record for our squadron during that cruise..." Contributed by SATTERLEE, AT2 Mark M. msatterlee2@excite.com [21DEC2007]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VP-42 Crew ThumbnailCameraVP-42 Crew 4 "...1959 Cruise VP-42 CREW 4 - 1959 Deployment to NS Sangley Point, Philippines - Photos from the cruisebook "BAMBOO BOMBER" which is a story all by itself! This is Crew 4 and the Pilot Steven Kish is one of my all-time favorite P5 drivers. His after mission statement was always "We cheated death again!" I think he and his crew rigged 57 ships one day. I think it was a daily record for our squadron during that cruise..." Contributed by SATTERLEE, AT2 Mark M. msatterlee2@excite.com [19DEC2007]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VP-42 Crew ThumbnailCameraVP-42 Crew 5 "...1959 Cruise VP-42 CREW 5 - 1959 Deployment to NS Sangley Point, Philippines..." Contributed by SATTERLEE, AT2 Mark M. msatterlee2@excite.com [15DEC2007]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VP-42 Crew ThumbnailCameraVP-42 Crew 6 "...1959 Cruise VP-42 CREW 6 - 1959 Deployment to NS Sangley Point, Philippines..." Contributed by SATTERLEE, AT2 Mark M. msatterlee2@excite.com [16DEC2007]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VP-42 Crew ThumbnailCameraVP-42 Crew 7 "...1959 Cruise VP-42 CREW 7 - 1959 Deployment to NS Sangley Point, Philippines. During the first half of our 1959 cruise, Crew 8 won the award for the most ships rigged. That's how they earned the name ICHIBAN crew 8. If memory serves me correctly, the crew got a free trip to Australia for a serious R&R. I'm sure they enjoyed every minute of drinking Fosters and making aquaintences with the local natives. Sometime during the fall of 1960 their plane was sent to the boneyard. That's when 147937 became RB-8..." Contributed by SATTERLEE, AT2 Mark M. msatterlee2@excite.com [11JAN2008]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VP-42 Crew ThumbnailCameraVP-42 Crew 8 "...1959 Cruise VP-42 CREW 8 - 1959 Deployment to NS Sangley Point, Philippines. During the first half of our 1959 cruise, Crew 8 won the award for the most ships rigged. That's how they earned the name ICHIBAN crew 8. If memory serves me correctly, the crew got a free trip to Australia for a serious R&R. I'm sure they enjoyed every minute of drinking Fosters and making aquaintences with the local natives. Sometime during the fall of 1960 their plane was sent to the boneyard. That's when 147937 became RB-8..." Contributed by SATTERLEE, AT2 Mark M. msatterlee2@excite.com [16DEC2007]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VP-42 Crew ThumbnailCameraVP-42 Crew 12 "...1959 Cruise VP-42 CREW 12 - 1959 Deployment to NS Sangley Point, Philippines..." Contributed by SATTERLEE, AT2 Mark M. msatterlee2@excite.com [14JAN2008]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VP-42 Crew ThumbnailCameraVP-42 Crew 8 "...1959 Cruise VP-42 CREW 10 - 1959 Deployment to NS Sangley Point, Philippines. During the first half of our 1959 cruise, Crew 8 won the award for the most ships rigged. That's how they earned the name ICHIBAN crew 8. If memory serves me correctly, the crew got a free trip to Australia for a serious R&R. I'm sure they enjoyed every minute of drinking Fosters and making aquaintences with the local natives. Sometime during the fall of 1960 their plane was sent to the boneyard. That's when 147937 became RB-8..." Contributed by SATTERLEE, AT2 Mark M. msatterlee2@excite.com [10JAN2008]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VP-42 Crew ThumbnailCameraVP-42 Crew 11 "...1959 Cruise VP-42 CREW 11 - 1959 Deployment to NS Sangley Point, Philippines. This crew had a tremendous loss during the first half of the cruise. Six men were killed in a JATO mishap and that's why the hand voodoo kit is featured in the history shot. This photo of the crew was taken after the accident and they completed the cruise without further incident..." Contributed by SATTERLEE, AT2 Mark M. msatterlee2@excite.com [02JAN2008]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Zippo's marked NS Sangley Point, Philippines; Ronson with the USN anchor emblem and M.E.J. on the back; Konwal Super with a box and marked 1959 VP-42 backed marked F. Zimmerman..." WebSite: EBay http://www.ebay.com/ [21JUL2007]

History - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge Thumbnail

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...1959 VP-42 Cruisebook...[Squadron Designations: VP-42, VPB-22, and VP-MS-2]..." Contributed by Bruce Barth bbarth1@austin.rr.com, Director Mariner/Marlin Association [29NOV2000]

In the beginning there was nothing, not even the Pentagon. People believed that if it had been ordained that Man should fly, he would have been designed with feathers. Fortunately, although he had no feathers, Man did have a designing mind. It wasn't long after the invention of the wheel by some Neanderthal architect that James Watt developed the steam engine. Gustav Daimler found that by attaching four wheels he might make an automobile. Jack Daniels experiemented with a more highly refined fule, and in 1903 Orville and Wilbur Wright laid the ground work that eventually culminated in a small group of men converging on the NAAS Harvey Point, North Carolina, on April...

Patrol Squadron Twenty, as it was called...training cycle at NAAS Harvey Point, North Carolina, and Key West and then moved westward in their PBM...in the war being waged in the South Pacific. On the 1st....name was changed to Patrol Bombing Squadron Twenty-Two, stationed at Parry Island on Eniwetok Atoll, primarily ....in the nuisance bombing of Yap and Ngulu Islands, and supporting SAR and Dumbo...the area. While at Parry Island, one of the PBMs returned 560 miles to base on a single engine, navigated by one ENS C. L. Lambing.

In November, 1944, the squadron moved its base from Parry Ialand to Kossol Passage, in Palau, supported by USS Kenneth Whiting (AV-14) and continued its patrol and ASW work. On the 30th of November, they experienced their first air raid, one 1000-lb bomb dropped by one lone Japanese medium bomber it missed. Comemnts in the "Appreciable damage was inflicted on squadron aircraft by ship's boats in coming alongside the planes, thus adding to our maintenance problem. While operating from Kossol, our planes often had to return to base shortly after take-off due to discrepancies which were not remedied prior to take-off." But the chow was good.

In January the squadron packed up shop again and moved to Ulithi Atoll in the Carolines, working from the USS CUMBERLAND SOUND (AV-17), flying day and night long range patrols, special ASW patrols, and bombing missions against Yap Island. By March, 1945, VPB-22 had flown enough operational hours to have circled the globe 55 times. March and April concentrated on softening up Yap and Ngulu Islands for the final push, and the squadron's aircraft inflicted considerable damage on the islands' airstrips and facilities without sustaining a single casualty.

June, 1945, was rotation month, and by July all original personnel and aircraft had been relieved for a much-earned R & R in CONUS. Witht he final defeat of Japan in August, the squadron moved into Okinawa, still under the wing of the CUMBERLAND. But even tenders must get some rest, and by September the USS Norton Sound( AV-11) had relieved, and everyone settled down to the task of securing the peace.

Onward and upward they progressed, to Sasbo and the USS Pine Island (AV-12), to handle the increasing need for mail and passenger with an occasional patrol just for drill. And then, finally, on 15 November 1945, the long-awaited word came - "Yankee go home" - and all hands headed gratefully for NAS North Island, San Diego, California.

During the post-war shake-up, the squasdron...back to VP-22, and then to VP-MS-2 - until it became VP-42 on 1...found a detachment of SAR and DUmbo support...from NAS Kodiak, Alaska and Sand Point, Alaska.

The impending Korean conflict brought VP-42...with detachments at Oppama and NS Sangley Point, Philippines, acting as couriers and helping to ev... In August they transferred to NAS Iwakuni, Japan to begin combat operations, lending Anti-submarine support for Task Group..conducting weather...and surveillance patrols. During the summer of 1951 the squadron returned to NAS North Island, San Diego, California...PBM-5S2 aircraft, and returned to NAS Iwakuni, Japan in December. Operating from NAS Iwakuni, Japan and Chinhae, South Korea, VP-42 continued its routine operations, and sustained its only combat damage when one of the PBMs was attacked by a flight of MIG-15s over the Yellow Sea. Despite moderate damage, the plane returned to NAS Iwakuni, Japan safely.

On March 28, 1953 the squadron commenced its Alaskan deployment, long to be remembered by it...as the summer of...There were no ramps, there were no tenders. Aircraft operated from buyoys..Kodiak and flying patrols and ice reconnaissance missions. Support personnel weren't familiar with seaplane...and as an auxiliary site, was lowered 6 feet by the Army Engineers without notifying anyone, much to the dismay of ..boat's hull. By the Fall of 1953, everyone was happy to return to NAS North Island, San Diego, California. The Navy's newsest P5Ms were waiting, and in October the training cycle was begun for familiarization with the new planes. In October 1954, the first deployment to NS Sangley Point, Philippines began a tradition that has lasted until the present.

Now, as we approach the end of our last tour at NS Sangley Point, Philippines, we can look ahead by looking back at...and accomplishments of VP-42, continuing its greatness.

CHRONOLOGY

07APR44 VP-22 Commissioned at NAAS Harvey Point, North Carolina
01OCT44 Redesignated VPB-22
15MAY46 Redesignated VP-22
15NOV46 Redesignated VP-MS-2
01SEP48 Redesignated VP-42

COMMANDING OFFICERS

LT Robert G. Meaden
LCDR Ross R. Jester
LCDR John Muson
CDR Dallas M. Lazure
CDR Gordon F. Small
CDR James L. Skinner
CDR John L. Gallahan
CDR John Azab
CDR Marion F. Barfield
CDR Lawrence B. Caine
CDR Rober T. Talleson
CDR Ben R. Tate, Jr.

AWARDS AND COMMENDATIONS

Navy Occupation Service Medal, Asiatic

  • VPB-22 30SEP45-30NOV45
  • VP-MS-2 (Yokosuka and Okinawa Detachments) 09NOV47-15JAN50
  • VP-42 (Japan Detachment) 15JUL49-15JAN50

    United Nations Medal
  • VP-42 11AUG50-12APR51 and 07DEC51-03JUN52

    Korean Service Medal
  • VP-42 11AUG50-12APR51, 07DEC51-03JUN52 - Engagements Stars: K-1, K-2, K-3, K-4, K-7, and K-8

    China Service Medal
  • VP-42 02DEC54-13FEB55

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...The Ens. C. L. Lambing mentioned in the below history went on to be the PPC of crew 7 for the 1959 cruise and was the skipper of VP-42 when I was released to active reserves in July 1961...Mark M. Satterlee msatterlee2@excite.com..." Forwarded by AEC John Bartlett, Retired aufever@gmail.com

    The following is a transcription from the VP-42 1959 Cruise book. The text represents a little slap stick humor however the history seems to be on target.

    In the beginning there was nothing, not even the Pentagon. People believed that if it had been ordained that man should fly, he would have been designated with feathers. Fortunately, although he had no feathers, Man did have a designing mind. It wasn't long after the invention of the wheel by some Neanderthal architect that James Watt developed the steam engine. Gustav Daimler found that by attaching four wheels he might make an automobile. Jack Daniels experimented with a more highly refined fuel; and in 1903 Orville and Wilbur Wright laid the ground work that eventually culminated in a small group of men converging on the Naval Auxiliary Air Station at Harvey Point, North Carolina, on April 7th 1944, to become a Patrol Squadron.

    Patrol Squadron Twenty-two (VP-22), as it was called, underwent the initial training cycle at NAAS Harvey Point, North Carolina, and Key West, and then moved westward in their PBM-3Ds to lend their assistance in the war being waged in the South Pacific. On the 1st of October, their name was changed to Patrol Bombing Squadron Twenty-Two, stationed at Parry Island on Eniwetok Atoll, primarily a patrol and anti-submarine unit, but assisting in the nuisance bombing of Yap and Ngulu Islands, and supporting SAR and Dumbo operations in the area. While at Parry Island, on of the PBMs returned 560 miles to base on single-engine, navigated by on ENS. C.L. LAMBING.

    In November, 1944, the squadron moved its base from Parry Island to Kollol Passage, in Palau, supported by the USS Kenneth Whiting(AV-14) and continued its patrol and ASW work. On the 30th of November, they experienced their first air raid, on 1000-lb. bomb dropped by one lone Japanese medium bomber-it missed. Comments in the squadron's notes indicate that tender-based operation hasn't changed much: "Appreciable damage was inflicted on squadron aircraft by ship's boats in coming alongside the planes, thus adding to our maintenance problem. While operating from Kossol, our planes often had to return to base shortly after take-off due to discrepancies which were not remedied prior to take-off." But the chow was good.

    In January the squadron packed up shop again, and moved to Ulithi Atoll in the Carolines, working from the USS CUMBERLAND SOUND (AV-17), flying day and night long range patrols, special ASW patrols, and bombing missions against Yap Island. By March, 1945, VPB-22 had flown enough operational hours to have circled the globe 55 times. March and April concentrated on softening up Yap and Ngulu Islands for the final push, and the squadron's aircraft inflicted considerable damage on the islands' airstrips and facilities without sustaining a single casualty.

    June, 1945, was rotation month, and by July all original personnel and aircraft had been relieved for a much-earned R & R in CONUS. With the final defeat of Japan in August, the squadron moved into Okinawa, still under the wing of the CUMBERLAND. But even tenders must get some rest, and by September the USS Norton Sound (AV-11) had relieved, and everyone settled down to the task of securing the peace.

    Onward and upward they progressed, to Sasebo and the USS Pine Island (AV-12), to handle the increasing need for mail and passenger runs with an occasional patrol just for drill. And then, finally, on 15 November 1945, the long-awaited word came--"Yankee, come home" -and all hands headed gratefully for NAS North Island, San Diego, California.

    During the post-war shake-up the squadron rapidly changed its name a few more times; back to VP-22 --until it finally became VP-42 on 1 September, 1948. December and January found a detachment of SAR and Dumbo support planes participating in Operation Microwex-49A, operating from NAS Kodiak, Alaska and Sand Point, Alaska.

    The impending Korean conflict brought VP-42 to Saipan in July, 1949, with detachments at Oppama and NS Sangley Point, Philippines, acting as couriers and helping to evacuate Hong Kong. In August they transferred to Iwakuni to begin combat operations, lending Anti-submarine support for Task Group 77, conducting weather reconnaissance, and surveillance patrols. During the summer of 1951 the squadron returned to NAS North Island, San Diego, California to accept the latest PBM-5S2 aircraft, and returned to NAS Iwakuni, Japan in December. Operating from NAS Iwakuni, Japan and Chinhae, South Korea, VP-42 continued its routine operations, and sustained its only combat damage when one of the PBMs was attacked by a flight of MIG-15's over the Yellow Sea. Despite moderate damage, the plane returned to NAS Iwakuni, Japan safely.

    On March 28, 1953, the sqadron commenced its Alaskan deployment, long to be remembered by the old-timers as a summer of horror. There were no ramps; there were no tenders. Aircraft operated from buoys at NAS Kodiak, Alaska and NAS Adak, Alaska, flying patrols and ice reconnaissance missions. Support personnel weren't familiar with seaplane operation, and Lake Andrews, used as an auxiliary site, was lowered 6 feet by the Army Engineers without notifying anyone, much to the dismay of 8-boat's hull. By the Fall of 1953, everyone was happy to return to NAS North Island, San Diego, California. The Navy's newest P5Ms were waiting, and in October the training cycle was begun for familiarization with the new planes. I October, 1954, the first deployment to NS Sangley Point, Philippines began a tradition that has lasted until the present.

    Now, as we approach the end of our last tour at NS Sangley Point, Philippines, we can look ahead by looking back at the traditions and accomplishments of VP-42, continuing its greatness.

    CHRONOLOGY


    7 April 1944 VP-22 commissioned at NAAS Harvey Point
    1 October 1944 Redesignated VPB-22
    15 May 1946 Redesignated VP-22
    15 November 1946 Redesignated VP-MS-2
    1 September 1948 Redesignated VP-42

    Commanding Officers

    Cdr. John Azab
    Cdr. Marion F. Barfield
    Cdr. Lawrence B. Caine Jr.
    Cdr. John L. Gallahar
    Lt. Robert G. Meaden
    Lcdr. Ross R. Jester
    Lcdr. Alan J. Holmes Cdr.
    Lcdr John J. Munson
    Cdr. Dallas M. Laizure
    Cdr. James L. Skinner
    Cdr. Gordon F. Smale
    Cdr. Ben R. Tate, Jr
    Cdr. Robert T. Tolleson

    AWARDS AND COMMENDATIONS

    Navy Occupation Service Medal, Asiatic
    VPB-22
    30 September, 1945---30 November, 1945

    VP-MS-2 (Yokosuka and Okinawa Detachments)
    9 November 1947---5 April 1948

    VP-42 (Japan Detatchment
    15 July 1949---15 January 1950
    United Nations Medal

    VP-42
    11 August 1950---12 April 1951
    7 December 1951---3 June 1952

    Korean Service Medal
    VP-42
    11 August 1950---12 April 1951
    7 December 1951---3 June 1952
    Engagement Stars: K-1, K-2, K-3, K-4, K-7, K-8

    China Service Medal
    VP-42
    2 December 1954---13 February 1955

    That ends the transcription from the 1959 VP-42 cruisebook.

    Circa 1958

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Okinawa, Japan Circa 1958..." Contributed by JORDAN, Larence R. "Rod" realrod@att.net [23APR2009]

    History - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge Thumbnail

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: Naval Aviation News May 1958 "...'Blood Brothers' Meet - Page 13 - Naval Aviation News - May 1958..." WebSite: http://www.history.navy.mil/nan/backissues/1950s/1958/may58.pdf [13AUG2004]

    VP History ThumbnailCamera

    Circa 1957

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...VP-42 1957 deployment to NS Sangley Point, Philippines..." Contributed by SCINTA, AD3 Sam whoopeecp@ol.com [02JUN2013]

    History - Tap To Enlarge Thumbnail History - Tap To Enlarge Thumbnail History - Tap To Enlarge Thumbnail

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraVP-42 History "...Ducks with Seaplane Tender-Lower Phillipines Circa 1957..." Contributed by JORDAN, Larence R. "Rod" realrod@att.net [23APR2009]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: CruisebookCamera "...1957 to 1958 Far East Cruise Book. Overhead shot of NS Sangley Point, Philippines..." Contributed by LAKIN, Toby B. Jr. alltbl@olg.com [28APR2001]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: CruisebookCamera "...1957 to 1958 Far East Cruise Book..." Contributed by LAKIN, Toby B. Jr. alltbl@olg.com [28APR2001]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: CruisebookCamera "...1957 to 1958 Far East Cruise Book..." Contributed by LAKIN, Toby B. Jr. alltbl@olg.com [28APR2001]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: CruisebookCamera "...1957 to 1958 Far East Cruise Book. Inside of BUNO: 135507 Boat 3..." Contributed by LAKIN, Toby B. Jr. alltbl@olg.com [28APR2001]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: Cruisebook "...1957 to 1958 Far East Cruise Book..." Contributed by LAKIN, Toby B. Jr. alltbl@olg.com [28APR2001]

    BRIEF RESUME OF DEPLOYMENT: On the morning of 8 July 1957 the first flight unit of Patron 42 P5M2 aircraft, led by CDR L. B. CAINE, Jr., USN, departed from families, friends, and North Island on the 8000 miles jaunt to NS Sangley Point, Philippines. Flight Units Two and Three followed on succeeding days. By way of Alameda, Pearl Harbor, Midway, Kwajalein, and Guam the twelve aircraft winged their way to NS Sangley Point, Philippines in good time, on time, with only a few minor maintenance discrepancies (easily fixed) enroute. It might be appropriate to mention that the "on time" aspect applied only to the first eight aircraft since the third unit, under CDR R. T. TOLLESON, preferred to remain in Alameda four extra days to play water polo by day aiid hit the Frisco nite spots by night. The fact that unfavorable winds precluded an earlier departure is merely incidental.

    Upon arrival at NS Sangley Point, Philippines on 16 July an immediate relief of Patron 46 was executed and LTjg Webb with Crew No. 11 corn. menced our patrol activities over the South China Seas at 0430 17 July. With this flight the long six and one-half month deployment got underway. At this writing with 4040 hours flight time and 615 flights behind us and roughly 1300 hours and 160 flights to go before arrival at San Diego, it is readily apparent that all hands have kept busy. On various flights the VP.42 flag has been carried from Japan to the southern tip of the Philip­pines with few spots between the extremes missed. It is estimated that approximately 800,000 nautical miles of flying, will lie behind us when we arrive at San Diego.

    Besides daily operational surveillance flights under the direction of Commander Fleet Air Wing ONE, Patron 42 almost constantly staged from one to all of its aircraft at various advance base sites established by Pacific Fleet seaplane tenders Buckner Bay in Okinawa, Bokoko in the Pescadores Islands, Puerto Princesa in Palawan, Cehu, Igat Bay, and Mangarin Bay. Never since World War II have advance base operations been con­ducted with such frequency and to such an extent as during ‘42's deployment.

    Among the highlights of squadron opera­tions was the eight plane detachment that was sent to Okinawa to participate in an operation viewed by Admiral BURKE, Chief of Naval Operations. Among the interesting duties performed, several crews carried paratroopers alioard which they dropped over target areas-definitely a new employment of seaplane.

    So that non of will forget (how could we?) our grandest operation we reprint our new release on "Double Tender Operations".

    When RADM P. D. STROOP, USN directs that aircraft tender operations be conducted with his Taiwan Patrol Force units you can be sure that the two-hatted Admiral i~ComTaiPatPac and ComFairWing ONE) really means it, and in a big way.

    In response to a message from the Admiral on 27 October, VP-42 with its 12 P5M-2 seaplanes, under CDR L. B. CAINE, Jr., USN, moved into action and into what was dubbed a "Double Tender Operation." On 28 October, Patron 42 commenced the fly away of eleven of its twelve air­craft to Puerta Princessa on the southern Philippine Island of Palawan. There, with all aircraft the squadron commenced what is believed to be the largest scale advanced base seaplane operation since World War II. At this remote site the aircraft were supported in all respects (aircraft spare parts, fuel, oil, berthing, messing, intelligence) by the USS ORCA, AVP.49, commanded by Captain SAM R. BROWN, J'., USN. After four days operating in these waters from a seadrome laid out and swept continuously by the ships boats, all aircraft departed in a mass aerial formation for Mangarin flay, a sheltered hay in Southern Mindoro, there to be tended by the large seaplane tender and flagship, the USS Kenneth Whiting (AV-14], under the com­mand of Captain J. H. MINI, USN.

    While operations coiitinued at Mangarin, the ORCA steamed to Cebu City on the island of Cebu, set up a seaplane operating area and readied itself for the arrival of Patrol Squadron 42 at this exotic and little known tropical metropolis. In like manner the USS Kenneth Whiting (AV-14] picked up its seadrome and I)Oats and steamed to Igat Bay while the Cebti operation ensued. Igat Bay is a remote but picturesque bay carved into the island of Mindanao by the waters of the Sulu Sea. Operations were scheduled to terminate tile 10th of November, but typhoon "KIT" would not cooperate. The typhoon was threatening NS Sangley Point, Philippines at this time making it unsafe for the aircraft to return. Thus two addi­tional days were spent operating from Igat Bay. On 13 November all aircraft departed and the operation was secured officially after sixteen days of varied types of flights. Flights conducted included the operational ~ariety, local ti-aining flights including tender- controlled approaches, orientation flights for Staff and Ships' officers, and several flights devoted primarily to scouting out, surveying, and photographing other bays, coves, and sheltei-ed watei-s foi- future operations.

    Besides proving that operational flights could be sustained from remote seadrome sights for a lengthy period of time, the experience gained by flight crews, staff, ships' companies have provided a wealth of know- how for the future conduct of advance base operations, thus considerably advancing the mobile logistic support of water-based aircraft concepts that might possibly prove invaluable in a future wai~.

    To brighten the operation recreational swimming parties were conducted; however most crew members preferred swimming from their own aircraft. Several excursions ashore provided inroads on local beer supplies. All in all, it was a pleasant respite from the routine at the squadron's ovel-seas home base at NS Sangley Point, Philippines.

    This tells lint one phase of the operation -you fill in the rest-lousy chow, the heat, buoy parties, banca boat check-outs, Iiarterino with the natives, RB-2 going adrift, hole­1)Unching drills conducted by ships' boats, etc. But, it was fun!

    Other notable events that we will always remember were those "R & R" trops to Hong Kong for loot, good chow, and a look at those slit skirts that according so some of the oldtimers are getting higher every year. I for one agree.

    This year the "Cavite Expeditionary Force" (C.E.F.) did it's best to keep up with the San Miguel Brewery output but has admittedly run a poor second. Better luck next tour.

    LTjg Garry Watson, after a whirl-wind courtship, married LT Bella Fritz, of ~he Navy Nurse Corps. We wish them the very best in the future. Also tying the nuptial knot was Luciano Valero. Bob Sugiyama' s marital plans are being readied for early implementation.

    Warrant Officer Garrett was flown to the remote Philippine Island of Bongao in the Slulu Archipelago to renew fellowship with his Muslim blood brother. The latter gentleman had adopted WO Garrett when he was on an Advance Base Operation there in 1940. Mr. Garrett was 1)estowed The Honorary Rank and Name of DATU MAHA­BASSAR confirmed by the SULTAN of Sum Ombra AMILBANGSA and afforded a royal welcome.

    Last, but not least, Patron 42's athletic endeavors were highly succes~ful with out­standing performances turned in basketball, softball, and bowling. Congratulations to all those athletes who helped put ‘42 on the map. Among the officers water polo and tennis comprised the main sports events; ]. e., if one would disqualify frequent elbow bending excercises from the realm of sports. Each day, fair or foul, CDR TOLLESON would muster his boys at the pool for ~legalized murder and mayhem" six feet under. Toward the end of the tour atten­dance dropped off as the going price of "Dry-back Chits" from Dr. Anthony came down. For the uninitiated these chits offered respite from sure maining or drownings in the pool.

    Now, with only a few weeks to go it can't be said that we grow nostalgic, but we will miss NS Sangley Point, Philippines, our close associations there, and out squadron mates. Many of will soon depart VP-42, but only in body. Always we will remember this cruise to lie one of extreme pleasantness and hard work, but we take with us a comfortable feeling of having earned a "Well-Done".

    So, it is with these words that we take our departure from the fair, exotic islands comprising the Republic of the Philippines.


    Circa 1956

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraVP-42 History "...File Number: USN 676498 Flying with the P5M - After a maintenance check-up and fueling, part of the aircraft of a U. S. Navy Patrol Squadron prepare for take-off from NS Sangley Point, Philippines. Official U. S. Navy Photo released by the Department of Defense released at Washington, D. C. October 5, 1956..." WebSite: EBay http://www.ebay.com/ [02APR2010]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraVP-42 History "...File Number: USN 676504 - Flying with the P5M after a P5M Martin "Marlin" returns to its base at NS Sangley Point, Philippines following patrol mission in the China Sea. The entire aircraft must be washed down from stem to stern to remove corrosion caused by salt water. October 5, 1956..." WebSite: EBay http://www.ebay.com/ [03FEB2010]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: Naval Aviation News October 1956 "...Ice Floes Ahead! - Page 1 to 5 - Naval Aviation News - October 1956..." WebSite: http://www.history.navy.mil/nan/backissues/1950s/1956/oct56.pdf [09AUG2004]

    History - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge Thumbnail

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Continuing information provided to me by my father, George A. Murphy, VP-42, from Far East Tour Jan-Aug 1956, additional crew rosters - Crew 8, LT J. B. Sherfy PPC, LTJG G. C. Chapman PPC, LTJG J. C. Cole PPC, ENS. G. G. Watson PP3P, R. L. Noll AD1, W. L. Cummings AD1, W. H. Scanlon AT2, J. J. Braun AT3, J. E. Clark AT3, A. N. Jensen AN, L. P. Miller AN, Crew 9, CDR L. B. Caine PPC, LTJG H. Gray PPC, LTJG W. J. Stevens PP2P, ENS. J. E. Laye PP3P, R. W. Allen AD1, J. W. Davis AD3, P. W. Crandall AT1, L. R. Fortunati AT3, R. E. Swanson AT2, W. H. Hayes AT3, R. L. Martin AOAN, Crew 10CDR R. E. Empey PPC, LTJG R. F. Kampe PPC, LTJG P. R. Kennicott PP3P, ENS. J. B. Webb PP3P, P. T. Hoskins AD1, D. D. Cortelyou AD1, A. C. Brigantino AL1, R. L. Hawks AT#, D. F. Ward AT3, L. R. Johnson AT3, V. F. Cerullo AN. That concludes the listing of all crew names from the tour book....MURPHY, CDR George A. Retired Murphycdr@aol.com..." [24MAR2002]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Squadron History..." Contributed by George A. Murphy, (Cdr. USN-Ret.) Murphycdr@aol.com

    UPDATE"...Further information provided to me by my father, George A. Murphy, Crew 7, VP-42, Far East Tour Jan-Aug 1956 - Skippers Note "Before dawn on the morning of January 18, 1956, ten planes broke the water in San Diego Harbor bound for the Hawaiian Islands. Patrol Squadron Forty-Two had commenced the first leg of its second Philippine deployment, and after long months of training and preparation at NAS North Island, San Diego, California, we headed west as in past years to call the Far East home for six months. Some of us looked forward to traveling throughout the Pacific, but to many the deployment meant leaving our family and friends. Regardless of the individual feelings, no part of the squadron mission was left unfulfilled, and each man gave his all." (to be continued) Crew 7 Roster: LCDR N. N. Langford PPC, LTJG J. F. Hossfeld PPC, LTJG G. A. Murphy PP3P, LTJG D. S. Tips PP3P, D. T. Schulz AD1, C. L. Fowler AD2, F. T. Cook AE1, C. E. Flinn AT3, C. C. Kennedy AT2, C. F. Benner AT3, M. L. Kimberly AN...Glen Murphy Murphycdr@aol.com..." [17JUN98]

    UPDATE"...Continuing information provided to me by my father, George A. Murphy, VP-42, from Far East Tour Jan-Aug 1956 - Skippers Note - "From the early days of the squadrons history to the present. VP-42's overseas operations have centered in the Philippines. At the outbreak of World War II, the squadron, then called VPB-22, was flying PBY's for the Asiatic fleet from Subic Bay. Forced to retreat to Australia by the onrushing enemy. VPB-22 left a trail of sunken ships throughout the Phillipines and the East Indies. The PBY boys flew constantly in the evacuation of allied troops and civilians from the islands north of Australia, and their reconaissance of the movements of the Japanes fleet were invaluable. The war took a heavy toll on the squadrons complement of men and aircraft; consequently, the group was reformed in 1944 under the title of VP-22. The squadron was furnished with PBMs and for its meritorious action in the South Pacific was awarded the Presidential Unit Citation." (to be continued) Roster of crew 1: CDR M. F. Barfield PPC, LTJG N. E. Groff PPC, LTJG E. L. Stern PP2P, ENS D. B. Pitts PP3P, J. M. Sauer AD1, L. E. Auker AD2, D. J. Naylor AT1, L. F. Wissink AL1, R. Kurz AT2, W. D. Clark AT3, W. D. Reed AT3, J. L. Gage AO1...Glen Murphy Murphycdr@aol.com..." [18JUN98]

    UPDATE"...Continuing information provided to me by my father, George A. Murphy, VP-42, from Far East Tour Jan-Aug 1956 - Skippers Note - "The later stages of the war saw VP-22 move from the Marshalls to Palau, from Okinawa to Japan continuing it reign over sea-lanes and searching out and destroying enemy vessels and aircraft. After the war VP-22 was permanently based at San Diego and commenced peacetime deployment to the Philippines, Saipan, Japan and Tsingtao, China. Redesignated VP-42 in 1948, the squadron saw action in Korea and received a citation from the President of that Country. NAS Kodiak, Alaska was VP-42's home for six months of 1953, (where we obtained the dubious distinction of having the only PBM ever to fly over the Artic Circle), and on completion of the Alaskan tour our outdated PBM's were replaced with P5M-1. Our next deployment was in late 1954 to NS Sangley Point, Philippines where we saw action in the Tachen Islands evacuation and set a records that still stand: more time per single month flown: more accident free hours and more time flown per tour: flying the 'T' Tail P5M-2, VP-42 returned to NS Sangley Point, Philippines this year [1956] to continue the Navy's protection of peace in the far east." Will post further crew rosters later...Glen Murphy Murphycdr@aol.com..." [25JUN98]

    UPDATE"...Continuing information provided to me by my father, George A. Murphy, VP-42, from Far East Tour Jan-Aug 1956, additional crew rosters - Crew 2 LT. R. H. Pauls PPC, LTJG R. D. Rhodes PP2p, ENS J. D. Hale PP3P, H. Zuckerman AD1, M. W. Scott AD2, D. D. Russ AT3, L. N. Davis AT3, W. A. Kunst AN, F. D. Motley AT1, R. Grover AO3, Crew 3, LTCDR J. B. Muoio PPC, LTJG G. A. Koverman PPC, LTJG J. W. Lawder PP2P, W. H. Arch AD1, F. L. Inman AD1, W. C. Colgate AL1, P. S. Evert ATAN, C. W. Lee AT3, J. R. Wilson AT3. C. L. Turner Crews 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10 to come...Glen Murphy Murphycdr@aol.com..." [01JUL98]

    UPDATE"...Continuing information provided to me by my father, George A. Murphy, VP-42, from Far East Tour Jan-Aug 1956, additional crew rosters - Crew 4 LCDR J. D. Haithcock PPC, LTJG J. R. Parker PPC, LTJG K. A. Wilkinson PPC, ENS P. R. Roche, G. R. Palmer AD2, J. Correia AD2, D. L. Umphress AT2, T. A. Doncevic AT3, A. Mineo AT3, V. M. Hamilton AT2, R. G. Diaz AO2. More will follow...Glen Murphy Murphycdr@aol.com..." [08NOV98]

    UPDATE"...Continuing information provided to me by my father, George A. Murphy, VP-42, from Far East Tour Jan-Aug 1956, additional crew rosters - Crew 5, CDR M. F. Wasco PPC, LTJG K. V. Zeppa PP2P, LTJG J. E. Tarlton PP3P, LTJG R. C. Speed PP3P, C. R. Clay AD1, E. L. Toyn AD1, D. R. Mickle AD1, B. R. Warner AT3, C. J. Boigegrain AT3, W. J. Stephen AT3, L. O. Sorenson AO1. Crew 6, LT H. R. Furdy PPC, LTJG R. C. Byberg PPC, LTJG B. L. Hamilton PP2P, ENS J. J. Johnson, J. B. Fowlkes AD1, R. N. Ewing AD2, G. C. Mullins AT1, T. J. Felzein AT2, J. A. Hill AT3, D. D. Hoepfer. 8,9,and 10 still to go. Further notes from the tour book, "The journey west from Hawaii to NS Sangley Point, Philippines took four days and covered 3600 long miles over a big stretch of the blue Pacific. The first day out we crossed the International Date Line where Sunday became Monday on the track to Midway Island. Our P5M's were the first to utilize Midway's seaplane facilities; however, to be different, SA-4 and 9 stopped at Johnson Island on the older transpac route. With most of the squadron imitiating Midway's feathered denizens, we set sail for Kwajelein Atoll, a finger of coral famous during WWII. Guam was our last overnight stop before reaching NS Sangley Point, Philippines where we ended one of the most successful long range flights on record...Glen Murphy Murphycdr@aol.com..." [09MAY2000]


    Circa 1953

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...USS Salisbury Sound (AV-13) - Circa 1953. Squadrons Mentioned: FAW-6, VP-40, VP-42, VP-46 and VP-48..." WebSite: USS Salisbury Sound http://www.salisburysound.com/index_Page555.htm [08JAN2007]

    On 28 February 1953 the Mariner planes of VP-40 were relieved by planes of VP-46. Commander Task Force Seventy-Two transferred his flag to Pine Island on 7 March and detachments of VP-42 also left the Salisbury Sound for that seaplane tender. That same day Task Force Seventy-Two was established as the Formosa Patrol Force under Rear Admiral Williamson in Pine Island.

    Relieved of her duties in the Far East, she sailed by way of Guam and Pearl Harbor to reach Alameda, California, 25 March 1953. She underwent overhaul in the Hunter's Point Shipyard (31 March-27 April 1953). She put into the harbor of Long Beach on 28 April, embarking Commander Mine Squadron Five, and got underway on the 30th with other ships of Task Unit 11.7 for landing assault exercises of Ayliso Beach, California. This duty terminated on 7 May and the ships underwent alternations in the Hunter's Point Shipyard (11 May-30 June), followed by gunnery exercises in local areas from the NAS Alameda, California. She cleared the latter port on 21 July and arrived at Boko Ko, Pescadores Islands, 12 August 1953. On that day she became the flagship of Rear Admiral Truman J. Hedding, Commander Formosa Patrol Force (Task Force Seventy-Two) and Commander FAW-6. Tending the planes of VP-48, she departed Boko Ko on 26 August to base at Buckner Bay until 12 September 1953. Thereafter, she based her operations at Boko Ko (14-19 September); Keelung, Formosa (20-25 September); Kaohsiung, Formosa (29-30 September); Keelung, Formosa (8-14 October); Buckner Bay (15-29 October); Hong Kong (1-7 November); Buckner Bay (11-28 November); Kaohsiung, Formosa (30 November); and Manila (1 December-6 January 1954).

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VP-42 PBM ThumbnailCameraVP-42 PBM SA-6 "...A shipmate suggested I send you this pix of PBM SA 6 VP-42 refuelling from behind USS Onslow (AVP-48) during an Alaska deployment. Circa 1953..." Contributed by LCDR Harvey Herzog, Retired HHerzog991@aol.com [04MAY2000]


    Circa 1952

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...FASRON-110, FASRON-112, FASRON-114, FASRON-117, FASRON-118, FASRON-119, FASRON-120, FASRON-885, FASRON-895, VP-1, VP-2, VP-4, VP-6, VP-9, VP-22, VP-28, VP-29, VP-40, VP-42, VP-46, VP-47, VP-731, VP-772, VP-871, VP-892 and VP-931) - Naval Aeronautical Organization OPNAV NOTICE 05400 for Fiscal Year 1953 dated 1 October 1952 is: DECLASSIFIED per Office of Chief of Naval Operations on 1 February 1965 by Op-501..." WebSite: Naval Historical Center http://www.history.navy.mil/a-record/nao53-68/fy1953-oct52.pdf [14MAR2007]

    History - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge Thumbnail

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...FAW-1, FAW-2, FAW-4, FAW-6, FAW-14, VP-1, VP-2, VP-4, VP-6, VP-9, VP-22, VP-28, VP-40, VP-42, VP-46, VP-47 and VP-871) - Naval Aeronautical Organization OPNAV NOTICE 05400 for Fiscal Year 1953 dated 1 October 1952 is: DECLASSIFIED per Office of Chief of Naval Operations on 1 February 1965 by Op-501..." WebSite: Naval Historical Center http://www.history.navy.mil/a-record/nao53-68/fy1953-oct52.pdf [14MAR2007]

    History - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge Thumbnail

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: Naval Aviation News December 1952 "...VP Commanding Officers - Page 16 - Naval Aviation News - December 1952..." WebSite: http://www.history.navy.mil/nan/backissues/1950s/1952/dec52.pdf [28JUL2004]

    VP History Thumbnail

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: Naval Aviation News March 1952 "...Marine Navy Units Honored - Page 28 - Naval Aviation News - March 1952..." WebSite: http://www.history.navy.mil/nan/backissues/1950s/1952/mar52.pdf [25JUL2004]

    VP History Thumbnail

    Circa 1951

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraVP-42 "...VP-42 - January 26, 1951 - UFO Tracking...Publication Number: T1206 - Publication Title: Project Blue Book, 1947-1969 - Publisher: NARA - Year: [ILLEGIBLE] - Month: [ILLEGIBLE] - Month Season Number: [ILLEGIBLE] - Location: [ILLEGIBLE] - Incident Number: [BLANK] - WebSite: http://www.footnote.com/..." Forwarded by Stephen Miller f134kilmil@comcast.net [14AUG2008]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraVP-42 "...VP-42 - January 26, 1951 - UFO Tracking...Publication Number: T1206 - Publication Title: Project Blue Book, 1947-1969 - Publisher: NARA - Year: [ILLEGIBLE] - Month: [ILLEGIBLE] - Month Season Number: [ILLEGIBLE] - Location: [ILLEGIBLE] - Incident Number: [BLANK] - WebSite: http://www.footnote.com/..." Forwarded by Stephen Miller f134kilmil@comcast.net [14AUG2008]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: Naval Aviation News May 1951 "...Back From The Wars - Naval Aviation News - May 1951..." WebSite: http://www.history.navy.mil/nan/backissues/1950s/1951/jun51.pdf [24JUL2004]

    VP History Thumbnail

    Circa 1950

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...USS Salisbury Sound (AV-13) - Circa 1950. Squadrons Mentioned: FAW-1, FAW-6, VP-1, VP-2, VP-4,VP-42, VP-46 and VP-47..." WebSite: USS Salisbury Sound http://www.salisburysound.com/index_Page555.htm [07JAN2007]

    She tended planes of VP-42 at that port until 6 February 1950, then shifted to Subic Bay in the Philippine Islands. She resumed duty at Hong Kong on 12 April and cleared port on 11 May for exercises off Sangley Point, Luzon before loading aircraft at Guam (27-29 May 1950). She put to sea on the latter day and steamed by way of Pearl Harbor for return to San Diego on 13 June 1950. After voyage repair in the San Francisco Naval Shipyard, she embarked passengers, including men of VP-42, and sailed from San Diego on 26 July bound for the Far East. She debarked her passengers at Pearl Harbor on 1 August and to sea the next day, carrying some 700 passengers destined for the VP-1, VP-2, and VP-4 of Fleet Air Service Squadron and Army units in Japan. Four helicopters and an equal number of SNBS of the Fleet Air Service Squadron were loaded on her seaplane deck. She reached Yokosuka on 11 August 1950, debarking her passengers and their equipment, and took on new aviation cargo and passengers for transport to Apra Harbor, Guam. She arrived at the latter port on 20 August, debarked her passengers, then loaded patrol bomber spare parts and eight jet fighters for delivery to Naha Harbor, Okinawa, 25 August 1950. She reported to Commander Seventh Fleet for duty that day and shifted to Buckner Bay for operations under Commander Service Squadron Three (Commander Task Group 70.7). On 3 September she serviced seven Mariners of VP-46 and two Sunderlands of the 88th Royal Air Force Squadron, which had sortied on typhoon evacuation from their base at Iwakuni, Japan.

    On 6 September 1950, Salisbury Sound arrived at Iwakuni, Japan, and reported for duty to Commander FAW-6. She commenced service to VP-42 and VP-47, which had eleven Mariners present on that day plus three Sunderlands of the 88th Squadron of the Royal Air Force. These units comprised the seaplane and reconnaissance of Task Force Ninety-Six supporting the operations of Task Force Seventy-Seven and Task Group 96.5. Four additional Mariners had arrived on 9 September 1950 when Salisbury Sound became Flagship of Commander Fleet Wing SIX. She now became the operating base for all seaplanes in the Patrol and Reconnaissance Force (*Task Force 99) tending eight Sunderlands of the 88th Squadron of the Royal Air Force, seven planes of VP-47 and nine planes of VP-42. On 16 September Commander FAW-6 shifted his Flag, along with pilots and crew of VP-47, to sea plane tender USS Curtiss (AV-4), controlling all flights from that ship. Salisbury Sound continued seadrome control until 18 September, then took on aviation fuel at Kure, returning to Iwakuni on 21 September 1960. She reported for duty to Commander Air Wing One (task Group 70.6) on 23 September and shifted to base at Buckner Bay, Okinawa, on the 26th. She laid 18 buoys in the seaplane anchorage and on 2 October five Mariners of VP-46 (Southern Search and Reconnaissance Force), arrived from the Pescadores Islands to escape the fury of a typhoon. These planes conducted nightly reconnaissance and patrol flights of the Formosa Straits from the Salisbury Sound until 10 October, when they again terminated their flights in the Pescadores. Meantime she had hoisted the flag of Commander FAW-1 on 5 October 1950. Winds and heavy seas again threatened the seadrome in the Pescadores on 19 October, and Mariners of VP-46 there once again shifted gradually to base from Salisbury Sound. On 2 November 1950 she entered the harbor of Naha, transferring 30,000 gallons of gasoline to Y-53 for delivery to the Naval Base before return to Buckner Bay the same day. She continued direction and tending of the Mariners' search and reconnaissance flights until 27 November 1950 when Commander Fleet Wing ONE- shifted his flag to USS Gardiners Bay (AVP-39).

    Salisbury Sound arrived at Iwakuni, Japan 20 November 1950, and hoisted the flag of Commander Air Wing Six. She relived USS Curtiss (AV-4) of seadrome control and began tending nine Mariners of VP-42 and four Royal Air Force Sunderlands, operating from Iwakuni. On 1 December, seven Mariners of VP-47 arrived, and on the 21st, Commander FAW-6 transferred his flag to Curtis. On 15 December 1950, Salisbury Sound returned to Buckner Bay and relieved Gardiners Bay (AVP-39) as flag ship of Commander FAW-1. She now commenced service for the detachment of five Marines of VP-46, stationed at Buckner Bay, and three Mariners of the same squadron, stationed at Sangley point, Luzon, Philippine Islands. These units conducted search and reconnaissance flights out of Buckner Bay and completed courier flights between Sangley Point and Hong Kong. Commencing 6 January 1951, she supported Anti-Submarine Warfare Training Element 7016 comprising a Land Plane Air Search and Attack Unit (9 P2V4s of VP-22); a Seaplane Air Search and Attack Unit (9 Mariners of VP-46); and Fleet Submarine Besugo (SS-321). This duty terminated on 16 January 1951 and Salisbury Sound resumed her daily direction of reconnaissance flight and tender services.

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...USS Curtiss (AV-4) Thanksgiving Day 1950 Menu - NAS Iwakuni, Japan - FAW-6 - VP-42 - VP-47 - RAF-205 - RAF-209..." [30OCT2003]
    Tender ThumbnailCameraUSS Curtiss Menu
    Tender ThumbnailCameraUSS Curtiss Menu

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...VP-42, based at Iwakuni, 21AUGUST50-10APR51, aircraft-nine PBM-5, CO - CDR G. F. Smale. Captain Gorden Frank Smale, USN, (Ret.). If you need Captains Smale's address, please e-mail me. I am a researcher seeking information from PATRONS on the Soviet submarines based at Port Arthur, China (now called Lushun, China) during the years 1950 through 1951. Any information would be a great help in my research! I am still trying to locate information on Knave 206 and Knave 210 ( one land based aircraft that came out on the morning of July 29, 1951, then the second aircraft in the afternoon to relieve the first, to aid the ships attacking the submarine contact ), I would be most greatful!..." Contributed by Al March a499march@aol.com [12DEC98]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...21AUG50-10APR51--Based at Iwakuni. Aircraft: Nine PBM-5's. CO: CDR G. F. Smale..." Contributed by Allison E. March a499march@aol.com

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...21AUG50--KOREA--ARRIVED: 21AUG50 DEPARTED: 02JUN52 TAIL CODE: SA AIRCRAFT: PBM-5/5S2" http://www.history.navy.mil/branches/koreaob.htm


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