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HistoryVP-22 HistoryHistory

Circa 1949

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: Naval Aviation News November 1949 "...Guam fliers Track Typhoons - Page 29 - Naval Aviation News - November 1949..." WebSite: http://www.history.navy.mil/nan/backissues/1940s/1949/nov49.pdf [13JUL2004]

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HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: Naval Aviation News April 1949 "...Out In The Balmy Pacific - Page - 26 - Naval Aviation News - April 1949..." WebSite: http://www.history.navy.mil/nan/backissues/1940s/1949/apr49 [14JUL2004]

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HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: Naval Aviation News February 1949 "...33 AF Men Saved By Navy - Page 10 - Naval Aviation News - February 1949..." WebSite: http://www.history.navy.mil/nan/backissues/1940s/1949/feb49.pdf [16JUL2004]

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HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "00JAN49--... In January 1949 we (VP-28)were deployed to NAS Agana, Guam for six (6) months, relieving VP-22, one of our sister squadrons at our home base of NAS Kaneohe Bay, Pearl Harbor, Hawaii..." Contributed by James C. Miller, Sr. Patron 28@aol.com


Circa 1948

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...VP-25 was designated a "Bat" squadron and received their PB4Y-2B "Privateers" in early 1948 at NAS Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii. Equipped with Bat racks outboard of numbers 1 and 4 engines, the squadron was able to "attack" shipping and other targets from about 7 miles distant with the 1600 pound ASM-2 glide bomb which directed itself to the target using a small radar in its nose. VP-25 was disestablished in the fall of 1949 by mistake! VP-22, its companion squadron at was supposed to receive the ax but sloughed the blow off on VP-25! I joined the squadron in the fall of 48 as a freshly winged Aviation Midshipman and was commissioned in April 1949. We deployed to NAS Agana, Guam, NAF Naha, Okinawa, Japan, MCAS Tsingtao, China, and NS Sangley Point, Philippines. CDR Norris A. Johnson was C. O., LCDR George Ghesquirre was Exec, and LCDR Bill Luce was Ops Officer. The squadron won the Pacific VP "Meatball" which recognized its proficiency in all VP missions and, as well, its guided missile role in which the squadron scored in excess of 80% direct hits with inert missiles...." Charles H. Welling Jr. wellingco@earthlink.net [27APR99]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: UNIT: VP-22 PREVIOUS DES: VP-HL-2 NAME: Blue Geese TAIL CODE: HC/LH ACTIVATED: 9-1-48 DEACTIVATED: TYPICAL LOCATION(S): NAS Barbers Point, Hawaii
Books"Title: Lockheed P2V Neptune An Illustrated History by Wayne Mutza wmutza@wi.rr.com...A Schiffer Military History Book...ISBN: 0-7643-0151-9...286 pages full of pictures and history!


Circa 1945

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Patrol Squadron TWENTY-TWO (VPB-22) - War Diary from 01JUN45 to 30JUN45..." Official U. S. Navy Documention [19OCT2013]

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HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Patrol Squadron TWENTY-TWO (VPB-22) - U. S. Action with Enemy on - 23MAR45..." Official U. S. Navy Documention [19OCT2013]

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HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Patrol Squadron TWENTY-TWO (VPB-22) - U. S. Action with Enemy on - 20MAR45..." Official U. S. Navy Documention [19OCT2013]

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HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Patrol Squadron TWENTY-TWO (VPB-22) - U. S. Action with Enemy on - 14MAR45..." Official U. S. Navy Documention [19OCT2013]

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HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Patrol Squadron TWENTY-TWO (VPB-22) - U. S. Action with Enemy on - 07MAR45..." Official U. S. Navy Documention [19OCT2013]

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HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Patrol Squadron TWENTY-TWO (VPB-22) - War Diary from 01NOV45 to 01DEC45..." Official U. S. Navy Documention [19OCT2013]

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HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Patrol Squadron TWENTY-TWO (VPB-22) - War Diary from 01OCT45 to 01NOV45..." Official U. S. Navy Documention [19OCT2013]

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HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Patrol Squadron TWENTY-TWO (VPB-22) - War Diary from 01SEP45 to 01OCT45..." Official U. S. Navy Documention [19OCT2013]

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HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Patrol Squadron TWENTY-TWO (VPB-22) - War Diary from 01AUG45 to 01SEP45..." Official U. S. Navy Documention [19OCT2013]

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HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Patrol Squadron TWENTY-TWO (VPB-22) - War Diary from 01JUL45 to 01AUG45..." Official U. S. Navy Documention [19OCT2013]

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HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Patrol Squadron TWENTY-TWO (VPB-22) - War Diary from 01MAY45 to 31MAY45..." Official U. S. Navy Documention [19OCT2013]

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HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Patrol Squadron TWENTY-TWO (VPB-22) - War Diary from 01APR45 to 30APR45..." Official U. S. Navy Documention [19OCT2013]

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HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Patrol Squadron TWENTY-TWO (VPB-22) - War Diary from 01MAR45 to 31MAR45..." Official U. S. Navy Documention [19OCT2013]

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HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Patrol Squadron TWENTY-TWO (VPB-22) - War Diary from 01FEB45 to 28FEB45..." Official U. S. Navy Documention [19OCT2013]

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HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Patrol Squadron TWENTY-TWO (VPB-22) - War Diary from 01JAN45 to 31JAN45..." Official U. S. Navy Documention [19OCT2013]

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HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...WWII US NAVY Aviators (LT(jg) W. G. Booze) FLight Logbook - VPB-22 July - September 1945..." WebSite: EBay http://www.ebay.com [30DEC2011]


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HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...US Navy WW II Pilot's (LT Wayne G. Booze) Flight Log Plus Collection of Personal Papers Records. Photographs: LEFT: VP-22 00OCT1945 RIGHT: VP-209 00MAY1944..." WebSite: EBay http://www.ebay.com/ [30NOV2011]

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HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: Naval Aviation News Magazine "...28 Units Receive Commendation - Naval Aviation News - October 1945.." WebSite: http://www.history.navy.mil/nan/backissues/1940s/1945/15oct45.pdf [10NOV2004]

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HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...USS Salisbury Sound (AV-13)...Squadrons Supported: VP-1, VP-2, VP-4, VPB-21, VP-22, VPB-26, VP-40, VP-42, VP-46, VP-47, VP-48, VP-50, FAW-1 ..." Contributed by Patrick Clancey Pat.Clancey@central.sun.com, WebMaster The HyperWar Project [30NOV2000]

USS Salisbury Sound (AV-13)
http://www.ibiblio.org/hyperwar/USN/ships/dafs/AV/av13-history.html


USS Salisbury Sound (AV-13), a Seaplane Tender, is named for Salisbury Sound, Alaska, a strategically located basin near Sitkawitch, which forms a natural harbor especially suited for seaplane base operations.

Salisbury Sound was built by the Los Angeles Shipbuilding and Drydock Company of San Pedro, California, which became Todds, San Pedro shipyard before her completion. Her keel was laid 10 April 1943 and she was launched 18 June 1944, under the sponsorship of Mrs. John D. Price, wife of Rear Admiral Price, Commander of Fleet Air Wing Two, Air Forces US Pacific Fleet. The Seaplane Tender was placed in commission on 26 November 1945, Captain Doyle G. Donaho, USN, in command.

Salisbury Sound is capable of supporting two (2) fifteen plane squadrons of the Mariner type, both in material upkeep and repair and personnel subsistence. Her facilities include engine repair, hydraulic repair, carburetor repair, metal, parachute, and photographic shop. In addition to her own officers and crew she is able to billet over 120 squadron officers and 200 crew members. Her most striking feature is her large after-deck where two huge seaplanes can be hoisted aboard and serviced at the same time. Two enormous cranes, one on her after-deck and one on her superstructure, can lift the planes with ease. Her hospital ward is fitted with 18 beds and a great number can be made available in event of emergency. high speed boats can be lowered over her sides by cranes and dispatched to refuel planes or boats at sea, and if necessary, tow them to safety. Supplies, trained mechanics, and medical rescue teams stand by ready to the blown over vast ocean reaches and parachuted to me immediate relief of planes or vessels in distress.

Salisbury Sound got underway from San Pedro on 27 December 1945 for training out of San Diego. She cleared port on 12 February 1946 and arrived at Pearl Harbor on the 20th. After final exercises in the Hawaiian area, she sailed on 1 March to load 6 fighter planes and a torpedo bomber at Guam (13-15 March), then reported for duty to Commander Air Wing One at Buckner Bay, Okinawa, 19 March 1946. After conducting familiarization flights and gunnery tracking drills for planes of Patrol Squadron Twenty-One, she got underway on 8 June for tender service of Patrol Bombing Squadron Twenty-Six at Shanghai (11 June-5 July); Tsingtao (6-17 July), returning to Buckner Bay on 10 July to resume duties at that base. She again sailed on 13 September to tend planes of Patrol Bombing Squadron Twenty-Six at Tsingtao, returning to 6 October 1946. Having repaired some 26 planes and directed several air-sea search and rescue missions which saved the life of a number of men, she put to sea on 4 November 1946 for return to the United States. Steaming by the way of the Philippines ports of Puerto Princessa, Manila and Guiuan, she arrived at San Diego on 23 December 1946. After upkeep and local training exercises, she cleared San Diego on 29 March 1947 again bound for Buckner Bay, Okinawa. She arrived at the latter base on 18 April 1947 to commence a second tour of duty as a mobile repair and seadrome control unit for the maintenance of patrol planes at that port, Tsingtao, China and Apra Harbor, Guam. She departed Buckner Bay on 27 July for another stay of service at Tsingtao until 30 August, then loaded planes and aviation cargo at Manila for delivery to Apra Harbor on 9 September 1947. She then set course for return to San Diego, 22 September 1947.

Salisbury Sound underwent overhaul in the Hunters Point Naval Shipyard 26 September 1947 to 16 February 1948, then shifted to her base at San Diego for refresher exercises in the area off San Clemente Island. She cleared San Diego on 12 March 1948 and steamed by the way of Pearl Harbor to deliver aviation cargo at Apra Harbor, Guam, and Manila, Philippine Islands, before arrival at Buckner Bay, Okinawa, 7 April 1948. After off-load of aviation cargo, she got underway the following day for similar deliveries at Tsingtao and Yokosuka. She returned to Buckner Bay on 30 April and got underway for tender services at Yokosuka (18 May-2 July); Tsingtao (5-21 July); and Shanghai (23-26 July). She resumed duty at Buckner Bay on 20 July 1948 and returned to Tsingtao on 14 August to tend patrol planes of Fleet Air Wing One. On 5 September 1948, at Tsingtao, she acted as conference ships for Rear Admiral R.P. McDonnell (Commander Fleet Air Wing One); Captain J.B. Taylor (Commander Destroyer Division (One); Vice Admiral Oscar C. Badger (Commander Naval Forces, Western Pacific); and Dr. Stuart (American Ambassador to China). Having embarked passengers, she got underway from Tsingtao on 22 September to load aviation cargo at Apra Harbor, Guam, then picked up an amphibious plane and passengers at Ponape in the Caroline Islands on 1 October 1948. She put to sea on the latter date and embarked more passengers at Pearl Harbor before arrival at San Diego on 15 October 1948. Upkeep at San Pedro (18 October 1948-10 January 1949), was followed by training in local areas out of San Diego.

Salisbury Sound cleared San Diego on 15 January and arrived at Port Hueneme, California, the following day to embark men of the Naval Schools Construction Battalion Center and their snow-removal equipment before her arrival at Seattle, 19 January 1949. She became the Flagship of Commander Fleet Air Wing Four, 27 January, and got underway for Takutat, Alaska. She arrived at the latter port on 30 January, debarking her student passengers and their equipment for special exercises ashore until 6 February, when the last of her student passengers and their equipment were again aboard. She put to sea the following day for Kokiak, where Commander Air Wing Four hauled down his flag on 15 February 1949. After touching at Seward, Alaska (17-21 February); and Seattle (25-26 February), she debarked her student passengers at Port Hueneme on 3 Mar, returned to her base at San Diego the following day. She became the Flagship of Vice Admiral G.F. Bogan (Commander First Task Fleet) on 25 March 1949. Training in local waters off San Diego and off San Clemente Island were conducted until 17 June, when Vice Admiral Bogan departed the ship. She entered the Hunters Point Shipyard for upkeep and repairs on 29 June and returned to San Diego on 10 September 1949 for a busy schedule of refresher training off Coronado Roads and San Clemente Island.

Salisbury Sound departed San Diego on 24 November 1949 and reached Pearl Harbor six days later. She got underway on 4 November and anchored two miles off Kussie Island, East Carolines, 13 Nov. She embarked a Congressional party of 10 persons and Rear Admiral L.S. Fiske, Deputy Commissioner of Trust Territories, along with his staff for an inspection tour of Kussie and Mokil Islands. She debarked the party at Ponape Island on 17 November 1949 and steamed by way of Guam and Manila to arrive at Hong Kong on 1 December 1949. She tended planes of Patrol Squadron Forty-Two at that port until 6 February 1940, then shifted to Subic Bay in the Philippine Islands. She resumed duty at Hong Kong on 12 April and cleared port on 11 May for exercises off Sangley Point, Luzon before loading aircraft at Guam (27-29 May 1950). She put to sea on the latter day and steamed by way of Pearl Harbor for return to San Diego on 13 June 1950. After voyage repair in the San Francisco Naval Shipyard, she embarked passengers, including men of Patrol Squadron Forty-Two, and sailed from San Diego on 26 July bound for the Far East. She debarked her passengers at Pearl Harbor on 1 August and to sea the next day, carrying some 700 passengers destined for the Patrol Squadron One, Patrol Squadron Two, and Patrol Squadron Four of Fleet Air Service Squadron and Army units in Japan. Four helicopters and an equal number of SNBS of the Fleet Air Service Squadron were loaded on her seaplane deck. She reached Yokosuka on 11 August 1950, debarking her passengers and their equipment, and took on new aviation cargo and passengers for transport to Apra Harbor, Guam. She arrived at the latter port on 20 August, debarked her passengers, then loaded patrol bomber spare parts and eight jet fighters for delivery to Naha Harbor, Okinawa, 25 August 1950. She reported to Commander Seventh Fleet for duty that day and shifted to Buckner Bay for operations under Commander Service Squadron Three (Commander Task Group 70.7). On 3 September she serviced seven Mariners of Patrol Squadron Forty-Six and two Sunderlands of the 88th Royal Air Force Squadron, which had sortied on typhoon evacuation from their base at Iwakuni, Japan.

On 6 September 1950, Salisbury Sound arrived at Iwakuni, Japan, and reported for duty to Commander Fleet Air Wing Six. She commenced service to Patrol Squadron Forty-Two and Forty-Seven, which had eleven Mariners present on that day plus three Sunderlands of the 88th Squadron of the Royal Air Force. These units comprised the seaplane and reconnaissance of Task Force Ninety-Six supporting the operations of Task Force Seventy-Seven and Task Group 96.5. Four additional Mariners had arrived on 9 September 1950 when Salisbury Sound became Flagship of Commander Fleet Wing Six. She now became the operating base for all seaplanes in the Patrol and Reconnaissance Force (*Task Force 99) tending eight Sunderlands of the 88th Squadron of the Royal Air Force, seven planes of Patrol Squadron Forty-Seven and nine planes of Patrol Squadron Forty-Two. On 16 September Commander Fleet Air Wing Six shifted his Flag, along with pilots and crew of Patrol Squadron Forty-Seven, to sea plane tender Curtis (AV-4), controlling all flights from that ship. Salisbury Sound continued seadrome control until 18 September, then took on aviation fuel at Kure, returning to Iwakuni on 21 September 1960. She reported for duty to Commander Air Wing One (task Group 70.6) on 23 September and shifted to base at Buckner Bay, Okinawa, on the 26th. She laid 18 buoys in the seaplane anchorage and on 2 October five Mariners of Patrol Squadron Forty-Six (Southern Search and Reconnaissance Force), arrived from the Pescadores Islands to escape the fury of a typhoon. These planes conducted nightly reconnaissance and patrol flights of the Formosa Straits from the Salisbury Sound until 10 October, when they again terminated their flights in the Pescadores. Meantime she had hoisted the flag of Commander Fleet Air Wing One on 5 October 1950. Winds and heavy seas again threatened the seadrome in the Pescadores on 19 October, and Mariners of Patrol Squadron Forty-Six there once again shifted gradually to base from Salisbury Sound. On 2 November 1950 she entered the harbor of Naha, transferring 30,000 gallons of gasoline to Y-53 for delivery to the Naval Base before return to Buckner Bay the same day. She continued direction and tending of the Mariners' search and reconnaissance flights until 27 November 1950 when Commander Fleet Wing One shifted his flag to Gardiners Bay (AVP-39).

Salisbury Sound arrived at Iwakuni, Japan 20 November 1950, and hoisted the flag of Commander Air Wing Six. She relived Curtis (AV-4) of seadrome control and began tending nine Mariners of Patrol Squadron Forty-Two and four Royal Air Force Sunderlands, operating from Iwakuni. On 1 December, seven Mariners of Patrol Squadron Forty-Seven arrived, and on the 21st, Commander Fleet Air Wing Six transferred his flag to Curtis. On 15 December 1950, Salisbury Sound returned to Buckner Bay and relieved Gardiners Bay (AVP-39) as flag ship of Commander Fleet Air Wing One. She now commenced service for the detachment of five Marines of Patrol Squadron Forty-Six, stationed at Buckner Bay, and three Mariners of the same squadron, stationed at Sangley point, Luzon, Philippine Islands. These units conducted search and reconnaissance flights out of Buckner Bay and completed courier flights between Sangley Point and Hong Kong. Commencing 6 January 1951, she supported Anti-Submarine Warfare Training Element 7016 comprising a Land Plane Air Search and Attack Unit (9 P2V4s of Patrol Squadron Twenty-Two); a Seaplane Air Search and Attack Unit (9 Mariners of Patrol Squadron Forty-Six); and Fleet Submarine Besugo (SS-321). This duty terminated on 16 January 1951 and Salisbury Sound resumed her daily direction of reconnaissance flight and tender services.

Commander Fleet Air Wing One departed Salisbury Sound on 30 day emergency leave on 2 March 1951, and her Commanding Officer assumed the flag duties until the 9th when she arrived at Sangley Point, Luzon, Philippine Islands. She got underway on 11 March for return to the west coast of United States, touching at Guam and Pearl Harbor before her arrival at San Diego, 31 March 1951. She conducted training exercises out of that port with visits to Monterey and San Francisco. On 24 May 1951 she broke the flag of Vice Admiral A.D. Struble, Commander First Fleet, who departed the ship on 3 June. Five days later she embarked men of Patrol Squadron Forty-Seven, then sailed for Whidbey Island, Washington, where operational readiness was completed on the 18th for the Mariners who took off for return to the Naval Air Station at Alameda. Salisbury Sound returned to San Diego where on 26 June she embarked the Chief of Staff of Fleet Air Wing Fourteen and stood out to sea for operational readiness inspection, terminated 28 June 1951. She completed a similar inspection on 23 July and cleared San Diego on 1 August 1951 for another tour of duty in the Far East. Steaming by way of Pearl Harbor, she arrived at Boko Ko, Pescadores Islands, 22 August 1951. That same day she relieved Pine Island as Flagship of Commander Fleet Air Wing One and became the base for Mariner planes of Patrol Squadron Forty-Seven. She departed Boko Ko 10 October 1051 and sailed by way of Hong Kong to base at Buckner Bay, Okinawa (18 October 1951-21 February 1952). On the latter date she was relieved as Flagship of Commander Air Wing One by Pine Island (AV-12).

Salisbury Sound served as flagship of Commander Fleet Air Wing Six at Iwakuni, Japan (24 February-31 March 1952), and hauled down his flag at Yokosuka on 2 April. She put to sea the same day for return to San Diego, 16 April 1952. She entered the Hunter's Point Shipyard on 29 April for overhaul until 16 July 1952, followed by refresher training out of San Diego. She sailed from Long Beach on 15 August 1952 and reached Yokosuka, Japan, on 2 September. Clearing that port on the 5th, she arrived at Buckner Bay on 7 September 1952. The next day she broke the flag of Rear Admiral T.B. Williamson, Commander Task Force Seventy-Two. The Mariner planes of Patrol Squadron Forty came to base aboard, temporarily, on 10 September for repairs and service, and Salisbury Sound arrived at Keelung, Formosa, 8 October 1952. While in that port on 11 October, Rear Admiral Williamson held conference on board with the Honorable Karl Ranking, United States Minister to China; and Major General Chase, Chief of the Military Assistance Advisory Group. After visits to Takao, Formosa (220-22 October) and Hong Kong (23-28 October), she commenced tending Mariners of Patrol Squadron Forty at Buckner Bay. She got underway from the latter port on 30 November to base at Subic Bay in the Philippine Islands (3-20 December), then touched at Kaohsiung, Formosa (22 December) before resuming operations at Buckner Bay on the 24th. On 28 February 1953 the Mariner planes of Patrol Squadron Forty were relieved by planes of Patrol Squadron Forty-Six. Commander Task Force Seventy-Two transferred his flag to Pine Island on 7 March and detachments of Patrol Squadron Forty-Two also left the Salisbury Sound for that Seaplane Tender. That same day Task Force Seventy-Two was established as the Formosa Patrol Force under Rear Admiral Williamson in Pine Island.

Relieved of her duties in the Far East, she sailed by way of Guam and Pearl Harbor to reach Alameda, California, 25 March 1953. She underwent overhaul in the Hunter's Point Shipyard (31 March-27 April 1953). She put into the harbor of Long Beach on 28 April, embarking Commander Mine Squadron Five, and got underway on the 30th with other ships of Task Unit 11.7 for landing assault exercises of Ayliso Beach, California. This duty terminated on 7 May and the ships underwent alternations in the Hunter's Point Shipyard (11 May-30 June), followed by gunnery exercises in local areas from the naval Air Station at Alameda. She cleared the latter port on 21 July and arrived at Boko Ko, Pescadores Islands, 12 August 1953. On that day she became the flagship of Rear Admiral Truman J. Hedding, Commander Formosa Patrol Force (Task Force Seventy-Two) and Commander Fleet Air Wing One. Tending the planes of Patrol Squadron Forty-Eight, she departed Boko Ko on 26 August to base at Buckner Bay until 12 September 1953. Thereafter, she based her operations at Boko Ko (14-19 September); Keelung, Formosa (20-25 September); Kaohsiung, Formosa (29-30 September); Keelung, Formosa (8-14 October); Buckner Bay (15-29 October); Hong Kong (1-7 November); Buckner Bay (11-28 November); Kaohsiung, Formosa (30 November); and Manila (1 December-6 January 1954). She arrived at Sangley Point on 13 January and Commander Task Force Seventy-Two (Formosa Patrol Force) shifted his flag to Pine Island on 18 February 1954. Salisbury Sound put to sea that day and steamed by way of Buckner Bay and Pearl Harbor to arrive at San Francisco, 11 March 1954. She shifted to the Naval Air Station, Alameda, the next day and entered the Mare Island Navy Yard on 8 April for overhaul until 28 June 1954.

Salisbury Sound conducted refresher training out of San Diego and cleared Alameda on 3 August 1954 for another tour of duty in the Far East. She arrived at Yokosuka on 23 August and became the flagship of Rear Admiral F.N. Kivette, Commander of the Formosa Patrol Force (Task Force Seventy-Two) at Boko Ko, Pescadores Islands, 31 August 1954. In the following months she made repeated calls at Formosa port of Kaohsiung and Keelung; Yokosuka, Japan; and spent much of her time in operations while based at Buckner Bay, Okinawa. She was relieved as flagship of the Formosa Patrol Force at the latter port on 28 February 1955 and put to sea for return to Alameda on 19 March 1955.

Salisbury Sound engaged in a rigorous schedule of training maneuvers off the California coast until 23 September 1955 when she cleared Alameda to arrive at Yokosuka, Japan, 13 October 1955. That same day she hoisted the flag of Rear Admiral G.W. Anderson, Jr., Commander of the Formosa Patrol Force and Fleet Air Wing One. She commenced duty at Buckner Bay, Okinawa on 20 October 1955, making frequent cruises to Manila Bay; Kaohsiung and Keelung, Formosa. The Formosa Patrol Force was redesignated Taiwan Patrol Force, effective 1 November 1955 and Salisbury Sound arrived at Manila on 9 February 1956 to participate in "Operation Firmlink" with Joint Task Force Nineteen. This operation was a joint maneuver of the SEATO (South East Asia Treaty Organization) forces to demonstrate their readiness to preserve the peace and ward off any aggressive action which might be taken against any of the member nations (Australia, France, New Zealand, Philippines, Thailand, United Kingdom, and United States). Units participating in this operation was USS Salisbury Sound, USS Princeton (CVS-37), USS McDermott (DD-667), HMS Newfoundland, HNS Comus, HMS Tobruk, and HMNZA Consort.

Salisbury Sound embarked 9 official observers, 40 officers and 526 troops of the First Battalion, 9th Infantry Regiment, Third Division of the Philippine Armed Services and cleared Manila with the Joint Task Force which conducted tactical maneuvers and battle exercises enroute to Bangkok, Thailand. She arrived at Bangkok on 15 February 1956 and her passengers-troops went ashore to take part in a demonstration of readiness which included parachute demonstrations, helicopter landings, and equipment displays. The demonstration was completed by 18 February and Salisbury Sound debarked the Philippine Army Forces at Manila on the 23rd. She resumed operations at Buckner Bay on 6 March 1956 and was relieved as flagship of the Taiwan Patrol Force at Yokosuka, 23 March 1956. She cleared port the next day and returned to Alameda on 12 April 1956.

Salisbury Sound remained at Alameda until 12 June 1956 when she steamed for visits to Astoria and Portland, Oregon. She entered the Mare Island Naval Shipyard on 14 June for overhaul until 29 August 1956. After refresher training she departed Alameda on 13 November 1956 for Yokosuka where she arrived 2 December 1956. The next day she became the flagship of Rear Admiral R.E. Dixon, Commander Taiwan Patrol Force. Mariners of Patrol Squadron Forty commenced operating from her seadrome at Buckner Bay on 12 December 1956 and rescued the crew of a United States Air Force seaplane from the sea on 5 January 1957. Intervening these operations were cruises for visits at Hong Kong; Manila, Kaohsiung and Keelung, Taiwan; and Apra Harbor, Guam. Mariners of Patrol Squadron Forty-Six commenced operations from her seadrome on 26 March 1957 and she conducted exercises in the area east of Tsugen Jima Island before clearing port of 17 April. She touched at Keelung (18-20 April), then visited Iwakuni, Japan before her arrival at Yokosuka on the 28th. Commander of the Taiwan Patrol Force hauled down his flag at Yokosuka on 6 May 1957 and Salisbury Sound sailed for return to Alameda on 23 May 1957. During the remainder of the year she participated in combined fleet maneuvers off the California coast, and engaged in refresher training exercises while operating from Alameda and San Diego.

Salisbury Sound sailed from Alameda on 8 January 1958 and reached the British Crown Colony of Hong Kong on 4 February to become flagship of Rear Admiral F.E. Stoop, Commander Taiwan Patrol Force. Rear Admiral Stoop was relieved of his command 10 February by Rear Admiral P. Blackburn, Jr., who retained his flag in Salisbury Sound. She commenced operations in the Philippines area on 26 February, alternating between Dingalan, Subic and Manila Bays, then shifted to Buckner Bay, Okinawa on 18 March with occasional cruises for visits to Kaohsiung, Taiwan; Boko Ko, Pescadores Islands, and Hong Kong. She cleared Buckner Bay on 5 June 1958 and was relieved as flagship of the Taiwan Patrol Force at Sasebo on 13 June by USS Pine Island. She put to sea the following day and returned to Alameda on 3 July 1958. Upkeep in the Bethlehem Steel Shipyard of San Francisco (8 August-2 September) was followed by final overhaul period in the Todd Shipyard at Alameda (2 September-4 November 1958). After refresher training, she cleared Alameda on 27 December 1958 and arrived at Yokosuka on 13 January 1959.

Salisbury Sound arrived at Buckner Bay on 25 January and the following day relieved Orca as flagship of Rear Admiral P.P. Blackburn, Jr., Commander Taiwan Patrol Force. Seadrome operations at that base were again intervened by visits to ports of the Philippines, Taiwan, and Japan. In addition to these ports, she visited Saigon, Viet Nam (1-4 June) and Jesselton Harbor, North Borneo (8-11 June). She departed Buckner Bay on 23 June and was relieved as flagship of the Taiwan Patrol Force at Yokosuka, 30 June 1959 by Pine Island. She sailed from Yokosuka on 2 July and reached Alameda, California on 14 July 1959.

Following a leave and upkeep period in Alameda, Salisbury Sound conducted periods of ISE at sea off San Francisco. During the period from 14 November to 29 November, she was in San Diego for special weapons exercises. In early December, seadrome operations were conducted in Drakes Bay just northwest of San Francisco.

Salisbury Sound got underway from Alameda on 11 January 1960 for her 15th deployment to the Western Pacific. arriving at Pearl Harbor on 18 January for a two-day stop over and then proceeding to Yokosuka, Japan. Following post-voyage repairs, she got underway for Kobe, where on 9 February 1960 the flag of Rear Admiral J.W. Cannon (Commander Taiwan Patrol Force) was shifted from the USS Frontier (AD-25). She then proceeded to Buckner Bay, Okinawa, where seadrome operations were conducted until 9 March. She arrived in Hong Kong on 12 March for a 5-day visit prior to departing for Kaohsiung, Taiwan where along with other Seventh Fleet units she participated in operation "Blue Star." After returning to Buckner Bay on 29 March, the Salisbury Sound was needed to assist a downed P5M Marlin at Fukuoka, Japan on 14 April. Almost a year to the day since an accidental emergency at Fukuoka necessitated transporting a disabled aircraft to Iwakuni, history repeated itself. The stricken aircraft was hoisted aboard and taken to Iwakuni via the Shimoniseki Straits. The ship returned to Buckner Bay on 23 April. Seaplane operations were conducted at Okinawa until 20 May when Salisbury Sound departed for refueling at Subic Bay then on to Sangley Point, R.P., arriving there on 23 May. She departed Sangley for Hong Kong on 26 May. After a brief visit to the British Crown Colony (28 May-2 June) she departed for Buckner Bay and seaplane operations. On 22 June she left Buckner for Yokosuka, arriving there on 25 June and after voyage repairs she headed for Alameda, California on 2 July 1960.

The ship remained in EastPac during the remainder of 1960 and early part of 1961. Operations consisted primarily of independent ships exercises and type training. She underwent extensive overhaul at U.S. Naval Shipyard San Francisco, California from the last of September until December of this year.

Salisbury Sound operated as a unit of the Seventh Fleet from 1 April 1961 until 17 July 1961. During this period, the ship performed her primary mission of providing an advanced base for seaplane squadrons and served as flagship for U.S. Taiwan Patrol Force. Most of the ship's operations were conducted in Buckner Bay, Okinawa where units of Patrol Squadron Forty and Fifty were supported for periods of short duration. In addition the ship visited the following ports while deployed: Hong Kong, Kaohsiung, Taiwan, Iwakuni, Kobe, Sasebo and Yokosuka, Japan. The ship departed WestPac on 17 July 1961 and arrived in San Francisco on the 31st of that month.

On 21 August, the ship's mid-cycle overhaul period began in Williamette Shipyard at Richmond, California and continued until 22 September. After the yard period, the ship was engaged in type training and independent ship exercises while operating out of the Naval Air Station, Alameda, California.

On 6 November 1961, Salisbury Sound established a seadrome at White Cove, Santa Catalina Island and operated with P5M aircraft from Patrol Squadron Forty-Two for three days. Other operational exercises of short duration were conducted with Patrol Squadron Forth-Eight. Type training and independent ship exercises were continued throughout the spring as the ship prepared for her next WestPac deployment. During the period the ship assisted in the Administrative Inspection of USS Currituck (AV-7), and was given an Operational Readiness Inspection.

Salisbury Sound deployed to WestPac on 28 May 1962. She served as flagship for Rear Admiral B.M. Stran, USN, Commander Patrol Force Seventh Fleet/Commander Taiwan Patrol Force. While in port at White Beach, Buckner Bay, Okinawa, she continually maintained an operational seadrome which operated on a 24-hour, all-weather basis. While deployed, Salisbury Sound operated in support of scheduled exercises with Patrol Squadron Forty from 13 to 17 August and Patrol Squadron Forty from 13 to 16 September.

The ship visited Yokosuka, Kagoshima, Iwakuni, Sasebo, and Kobe, Japan; plus Hong Kong, Kaohsiung, Taiwan, and Sangley Point, Philippine Islands. Significant contributions were made to the people-to-people program through blood, general visiting, and guided tours for special groups.

The ship was relieved by Currituck (AV-7) on 14 November 1962, and sailed for Alameda, California the next day. A gala welcome awaited her arrival on 29 November. The remainder of 1962 was devoted to a leave period while the ship remained in Alameda, California.

On 15 January 1963, Salisbury Sound entered Williamette Iron and Steel Company Shipyard at Richmond, California for her periodic major overhaul. In addition to routine overhaul and maintenance, the ship's wooden seaplane deck was renewed and several new radio antennas were installed. Included in the latter was a large "Decone Cage" antenna installed on the forecastle at frame 5. This added another feature to the silhouette. Dry-docking for cleaning and preserving the underside of the hull, was accomplished during the period 2 to 16 February.

On 1 March 1963, a change of Command ceremony was held at which Capt. Hugh M. Durham, USN, relieved Capt. James L. Holloway, III, USN, as commanding officer. The yard period over and sea trials complete on 16 April, Salisbury Sound rejoined the operating forces. After a short period in Alameda for refitting and replenishment, the ship sailed to San Diego and reported to Commander Fleet Training for operational control and refresher training. The period 13 to 24 May was spent conducting simulated battle problems, ship's drills, and damage control problems while underway. The was followed by a week of Air operations at San Diego Bay , working with aircraft from Patrol Squadron Forty-Eight.

After completion of underway training and a short period in Alameda, Salisbury Sound sailed to Oak Harbor, Washington and reported to Commander Fleet Air Wing Whidbey for operational control. From 17 to 26 June, day an night antisubmarine warfare seaplane operations were conducted with Patrol Squadron Forty-Seven embarked. This advanced training was conducted in Holmes Harbor, an elongated body of water near Saratoga Straits, a component of the Puget Sound complex.

The ships departed Whidbey Island on 28 June 1963 to return to Alameda. The operational schedule for the months of July and August included an Operational Readiness Inspection and an Administration Material Inspection. The ship sailed to San Diego and reported to Commander Fleet Air Wing San Diego on 24 July for the conduct of the Operational Readiness Inspection. Commander Fleet Air Wing Fourteen and Commander Fleet Air Training Group, San Diego, assisted in the inspection. Selected operational exercises involving seamanship, navigation, gunnery, and damage control problems were conducted in the San Diego ocean operation area. These were followed by a simulated battle problem to test the crew's ability to perform as an integrated fighting unit. The final portion of this inspection was conducted in White Cove, Santa Catalina Island, and included the conduct of air exercises and seaplane support exercises applicable to the type ship.

Upon return to Alameda on 2 August, the ship made final preparations for the Administration Inspection to be held by Commander Fleet Air Alameda on 6-7 August. The inspection of administrative organization and procedures was completed the first day, and was followed by a personnel inspection of the brew by Rear Admiral D.J. Welch, USN, on 7 August.

Salisbury Sound received the following Commendations and awards for the competitive year 1962-1963, which were presented to the ship after the close of fiscal year 1963:

A. Ney Award for the best General Mess in type.
B. ComNavAirPac Battle Efficiency Awards for Engineering and Communications.


It was during this period that the Chief of Naval Operations informed the ships that the homeport was to be changed from NAS Alameda, California to NAS Whidbey Island, Washington. The effective date for rthe change for administrative purposes was established as 29 June 1963. However, in view of the ship's forthcoming deployment, the physical shift would not occur until the return from WestPac in March of 1964.

On 26 August 1963, the ship departed Alameda for her scheduled deployment to the Western Pacific. On 7 September, Operational Control was changed to Commander Seventh Fleet. The ship was assigned to Task Force Seventy-Two and further designated Task Group Seventy-Two.

Upon arrival in Yokosuka, Japan on 10 September, action to shift the staff of Commander Patrol Force, Seventh Fleet, from USS Pine Island to USS Salisbury Sound was commenced immediately. The flag of Rear Admiral R.A. MacPherson, USN, was broken on 12 September, and Salisbury Sound officially relieved Pine Island as flagship.

The ship arrived in Buckner Bay on 19 September, and established a seadrome. Air operations with detachments from both Patrol Squadron Forty and Patrol Squadron Fifty were conducted during intervals in port Buckner Bay.

[During September and October, Salisbury Sound made operational visits to Yokosuka (10 Sep), Iwakuni (2 Oct), Beppu, Japan (5 Oct), and to Sangley Point, P.I. (28 Oct).]

At the conclusion of the port visit to the Philippines, the ship established a seadrome in the southern part of Subic Bay. From here, with Patrol Squadron Forty embarked, the command was to participate in a fleet exercise, Operation Yellow Bird. The operation was subsequently canceled; however, the ship, with twelve aircraft from Patrol Squadron Forty conducted operational and training operations from 5-9 November.

A port visit was made to Singapore in the Federation of Malaysia from 28-29 November. Salisbury Sound was the first US warship to visit this port after formation of the federation in October. People-to-People activities were scheduled which included a significant contribution of blood by crew members to the Singapore Blood Bank and a Christmas party for under privileged children. Upon departure from Singapore, the ship crossed the Equator into the Southern Hemisphere at longitude 105º37' E, at 0911 Zulu on 9 December, while on operations prior to return to Okinawa. [Because of the 30-day mourning period for President Kennedy's assination, the usual ceremonies were not performed.]

Arrival in Buckner Bay was on 18 December. The ship remained in port for the remainder of 1963, observing Christmas and New Year holiday period in Okinawa.

On 8 January 1964, Salisbury Sound departed for Keelung, Taiwan and Hong Kong. While in Keelung, Admiral Ni, CINC of the Republic of China Navy called on Rear Admiral MacPherson and Capt. Durham. The ship returned to Buckner Bay on 23 January.

Patrol Squadron Fifty flew in three aircraft to Buckner Bay on 27 January. Heavy winds and sea conditions damaged an engine and a prop on one aircraft necessitating an engine change. No sooner was this engine changed than a second engine failed. The second aircraft was hoisted aboard just prior to the ship getting underway for Sasebo, Japan on 3 February. This engine was changed enroute to and in Sasebo.

Salisbury Sound arrived at Sasebo on 5 February and departed for Buckner Bay on 8 February arriving there on 10 February.

On 16 February 1964, the ship shifted berths to Naha Port in order to shift the flag to USS Currituck. The shift was made on 18 February and immediately following, Salisbury Sound got underway for Oak Harbor, Washington, arriving there on 6 March 1964.

Capt. Merle M. Hershey relieved Capt. Hugh M. Durham on 10 March 1964.

On 28 March Salisbury Sound got underway on two hours notice for Kodiak, Alaska to assist in recovery operations following the tidal wave that hit Kodiak Island on the 27th [the "Good Friday" earthquake]. Arrival was on 31 March and parties were immediately organized to assist in the clean up.

During the 1963-64 competition cycle, Salisbury Sound received Battle Efficiency Awards for the Air and Engineering Departments.

During her operations in Alaska the Salisbury Sound provided electricity, hot water and working parties of up to 40 hands to assist the stricken station to clear debris. For her efforts, she was awarded the Navy Commendation Medal.

On April 10 the ship departed Kodiak and returned to her homeport at Whidbey Island. She arrived four days later and on 16 May held open house at Oak Harbor.

During June, provisions and fuel were taken aboard in preparations for a cold weather cruise. Aviation gasoline was pumped aboard from the ship's sister, the Pine Island, and the ship's fuel tanks were topped off readying her for her 15 June departure for Cold Bay, Alaska.

Once anchored in Cold Bay 20 June, seadrome operations with VP-47 seaplanes commenced. On securing these operations 30 June 1964 and heaving in the anchor, the ship cruised the coast of Alaska stopping at Haines, Juneau and Sitka. She was in Haines for the Fourth of July celebrations. On 11 July, the ship departed Alaska for her return voyage and arrived back at Oak Harbor 13 July.

She remained at anchor until 6 August and then sailed up Puget Sound to Seattle, where she remained at Pier 91 for four days. On the 10th, the Salisbury Sound returned to Oak Harbor by way of Bangor, Washington, where she loaded ammunition.

On 17 August, she pulled out of Oak Harbor and set sail for San Francisco. She was in San Francisco three days before cruising beneath the Golden Gate Bridge and heading north to Oak Harbor.

Salisbury Sound was anchored at Oak Harbor until 10 September when she moved to Astoria, Oregon and commenced seaplane operations for 10 days. She returned home 22 September and remained there until 8 October except for a one-day dependents' cruise on 3 October.

She sailed to San Diego, California for supplies 12 October and then went to Long Beach Naval Station for minor repairs.

On 19 October 1964, the Salisbury Sound anchored in White Cove, California off Catalina Island and commenced seaplane operations. She returned to Whidbey Island 26 October and remained there until departing for a Far East cruise.

On pulling into Yokosuka, Japan, the Salisbury Sound tied next to the Pine Island, her sister ship, and on 1 December the Commander Patrol Force Seventh Fleet shifted his command to the AV-13. Four days later the Salisbury Sound left for Buckner Bay, Okinawa.

The ship spent Christmas and New Year's in Buckner Bay and on 6 January 1965 lifted anchor for Keelung. She stood in Keelung two days on 8 January left for Kaohsiung and then on 14 January pulled into Naha, Okinawa.

She returned to her homeport overseas, Buckner Bay, 19 January and remained there until 5 February when she departed for Manila Bay.

She stood off Sangley Point in Manila Bay on four hours standby until the next day when she steamed for DaNang, South Viet Nam.

For five days from 12 February she operated a seadrome at DaNang. She returned to Sangley Point and then to Buckner Bay where she pulled in 23 February.

On 25 February, Captain Earnest R. Horrell relieved Captain Merle M. Hershey as Commanding Officer.

March 22 the Salisbury Sound left Buckner Bay for Hong Kong where she anchored for six days. The American Counsel General visited the ship 26 March.

March 31 the Salisbury Sound left the world's most populated city for Buckner Bay arriving there 3 April.

On 30 April the ship left Buckner Bay for Subic Bay, Philippines, arriving there 3 May. Five days later she left Subic Bay and steamed into Manila Bay and then to Poula Condore, South Viet Nam, arriving 11 May and setting up a seadrome the next day. On 20 May the Salisbury Sound secured seaplane operations and sailed for Bangkok, Thailand.

While in Bangkok the ship was visited by officials of the Thai Royal navy and British naval officers.

Culao Cham Island, South Viet Nam was the next port of call. Leaving Bangkok 27 May, the ship was refueled at sea while underway 29 May. She arrived at her destination 31 May and set up seadrome operations.

On 5 June she closed down her seaplane operations and sailed for Subic Bay, where she anchored for two days before returning to the United States. The trip across the Pacific took 18 days and the Salisbury Sound arrived at Oak Harbor 26 June.

On 5 August the Salisbury Sound reported to Seattle for the Sea Fair, the Navy's part in the World Fair being held in Seattle. She remained in Seattle for four days before returning to Oak Harbor.

At her next port of call, Juneau, Alaska, the Salisbury Sound once again set up a seadrome on arrival 10 September. Three days later she lifted anchor and sailed for Kodiak, Alaska where she was warmly greeted on 15 September as a visitor after her timely help following the earthquake of the year before. After a five day visit, she sailed for Anchorage, arriving 21 September. Two days later she heaved in the anchor and returned to Oak Harbor.

From 27 September until 5 February 1966 the Salisbury Sound remained on the West Coast, moving only to pick up supplies or undergo repairs prior to her final cruise.

After visits to San Diego for supplies, Bangor, Washington for ammunition and Bremerton shipyards for repairs, the Salisbury Sound departed the United States from San Diego 5 February for Yokosuka, Japan. The ship left Yokosuka 23 February and made quick stops in Kobe, Japan and Buckner Bay, Okinawa before getting back to the business of tending her seaplanes in Cam Ranh Bay, South Viet Nam. She arrived there on 4 March.

Capt. Clarence E. Mackey relieved Capt. Earnest R. Horrell as Commanding Officer of the Salisbury Sound 7 March. It was the first time a United States man-o-war changed Captains in Viet Nam.

On March 26 the ship secured her seadrome operations and pulled out of Cam Ranh Bay and set her charts for Subic Bay, P.I., arriving there two days later for a five day stay before steaming to Hong Kong.

It was a 24-hour journey from Buckner Bay to Keelung, Taiwan, and after three days in port there, the Salisbury Sound headed for Kaohsiung, Taiwan, arriving 9 May. Returning to Cam Ranh Bay, South Viet Nam on 15 May, the ship set up her seadrome and tendered her planes until 3 June, when she lifted anchor and steamed for Bangkok, Thailand, for a four-day goodwill visit. She went back to Subic Bay for provisions and rest for the crew before beginning nearly three months of seaplane operations: in Buckner Bay from 17 June to 6 July, in Cam Ranh Bay from 10 July to 6 August, and again in Buckner Bay from 12 to 29 August.

On the 29th, the ship headed for Sasebo, Japan for a goodwill visit and rest for the crew arriving 31 August. After a ship's party, the USS Salisbury Sound pulled out of Sasebo 9 September and headed to Buckner Bay for fueling and supplies. The ship departed Buckner Bay 27 September and headed for Subic Bay, where she moored alongside the Currituck, her sister ship, on 30 September, and transferred the Commander Patrol Force Seventh Fleet, Rear Adm. Roy M. Isaman to the Currituck before heading to Cam Ranh Bay on 5 October.

During her last operations in Cam Ranh Bay, from 7 to 27 October, the ship pumped her millionth gallon of aviation fuel to her attached seaplanes, setting a record for a Seaplane Tender for number of gallons pumped during one cruise. On 27 October, the Salisbury Sound hoisted a 540-foot homeward bound pennant and steamed from Cam Ranh Bay for the last time.

Another rarity, a double hoist, was accomplished for the trip from Cam Ranh Bay to Sangley Point in Manila Bay when a second Martin Marlin seaplane developed engine trouble just before departure time, forcing the Salisbury Sound to accommodate the second plane on her deck. After off-loading the giant planes in Manila Bay, the ship sailed for Subic Bay, arriving the same day, 29 October.

On 2 November the ship pulled out of Subic Bay and steamed for Buckner Bay for refueling before starting across the Pacific bound for the United States. The long-awaited trip back began 5 November. The Salisbury Sound pulled into Oak Harbor for the last time 21 November, in time for her crew to enjoy Thanksgiving, Christmas, and New Year's celebrations.

The ship bid farewell to her homeport 3 January 1967, and started her last voyage to Bremerton, Washington, where she docked at Pier Delta at the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard.

The ship's Executive Officer, Commander Austin V. Young relieved Capt. Clarence E. Mackey as Commanding Officer 13 January 1967.

On 31 March 1967, the USS Salisbury Sound was decommissioned and joined the Reserve Fleet, ending a 21-year career.

Circa 1944 - 1949

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraPB4Y-2 Squadron Assignments "...PB4Y-2 Squadron Assignments 1944 - 1949 by W. T. Larkins 5-11-1984. A review of the aircraft history cards for the 740 aircraft 59350-60009 and 66245-66324 allows the following squadrons with one or more aircraft. Unfortunately the original assignment on many in 1944 is simply "PAC" for Pacific area. No card was found to verify VB-200 as the first squadron delivery or any Marine Corps squadrons. Squadrons listed include VP-12, VP-21, VP-22, VP-23, VP-25, VP-26, VP-27, VP-28, VP-29, VPB-100, VPB-101, VPB-10, VPB-102, VPB-104, VPB-106, VPB-107, VPB-108, VPB-109, VPB-111, VPB-114, VPB-115, VPB-116, VPB-117, VPB-118, VPB-119, VPB-120, VPB-121, VPB-122, VPB-123, VPB-124, VPB-143, VPB-197, VPB-200, VP-HL-1, VP-HL-2, VP-HL-4, VP-HL-6, VP-HL-7, VP-HL-8, VP-HL-9, VP-HL-10, VP-HL-11, VP-HL-12, VP-HL-13, VPM-1, VPW-1, VPW-2, VPW-3, VX-1 and VX-2..." Contributed by Bill Larkins wtl@earthlink.net [01AUG2010]


Circa 1944 - 1945

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...S1 Joseph J. Daly VP-22 Logbook...May 20th, 1944 through July 31st, 1944 - September 12th, 1944 through September 30th, 1944 - November 2nd, 1944 through July 4th, 1945..." Contributed by Kevin Daly k2florida@yahoo.com [23AUG2013]

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Circa 1944

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Patrol Squadron TWENTY-TWO (VPB-22) - War Diary from 01DEC44 to 31DEC44..." Official U. S. Navy Documention [19OCT2013]

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HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Patrol Squadron TWENTY-TWO (VPB-22) - War Diary from 01NOV44 to 01DEC44..." Official U. S. Navy Documention [19OCT2013]

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HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Patrol Squadron TWENTY-TWO (VPB-22) - War Diary from 01OCT44 to 01NOV44..." Official U. S. Navy Documention [19OCT2013]

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HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...FAW-5 - VPB-22 War Diary - February 1944 - Establishment..." Official U. S. Navy Records (National Archives and Records Administration) via Fold3 http://www.fold3.com/ [31OCT2012]

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HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VPB-22 Cruisebook ThumbnailVPB-22 Cruisebook Roster of Officers and Enlisted Men Tour of Duty 1944-1945 [27JAN2000]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VPB-22 "...Cumberland Sound (the Seaplane Tender VP-22 was assigned 1944-1945)...One story my father loves to tell was, "Our crew was crew 13, the plane was Y-13, when another squadron lost ther crew 13 the CO asked if we wanted to change crew numbers. We said no, we've been 13 since training. Over the tour the number 13 proved good luck for us..." Contributed by Bill Davies davies@shorenetworks.com [03FEB2000]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "07APR44-08JUL64--On 7 April 1944 Patrol Squadron TWENTY-TWO (VP-22), forerunner of Patrol Squadron FORTY-TWO (VP-42) was commissioned at NAS Harvey Point, Hertford, North Carolina. Following an initial training cycle at NAS Harvey Point, Hertford, North Carolina, and Key West, with brief stops at NAS Alameda, California and MCAS Kaneohe, T. H., VP-42 headed for the Pacific Combat Zone to participate in the Wake and Ponape Operation. It was during this period that the squadron's designation was changed to Patrol Bombing Squadron TWENTY-TWO (VPB-22). From 22 January 1945 to 22 June 1945 VP-42 was based aboard the USS CUMBERLAND SOUND (AV-17) at Ulithi, conducting ASW operations against the Japanese-held Western Caroline Islands. The squadron then returned to Saipan and was subsequently moved to Eniwetok Atoll aboard the USS CUMBERLAND SOUND. After a short period of operations aboard the USS Norton Sound at Chimu Wan Bay, Okinawa, the squadron moved to Sasebo, in Japan aboard the USS Pine Island. On IS December 1945, VP-42 returned to NAS North Island, San Diego, California. The squadron was redesignated three times in the next three years, acquiring its present title, Patrol Squadron FORTY-TWO, on I September 1948. Other designations held by the unit included VP-MS-2, and a brief return to the VP-22 designation. During the Korean Conflict, VP-42 operated out of Iwakuni. Japan from 16 August 1950 to 28 March 1951 and from 22 November '95' to I May 1952 with advance base operations at Chinhea, South Korea. In the summer of '953, the squadron deployed to Alaska, and in the fall returned to North Island to replace their PBM's with the Navy's newest seaplane, the P5M. now known as the SP-5B "Marlin". In October of 1954 VP-42 deployed to NS Sangley Point, in the Philippines as the start of a deployment cycle (six months at Sangley and twelve at North Island) that was so last for the following five years. In October 1959 the squadron returned to NAS North Island, San Diego, California, where it remained until the 1964 cruise with only occasional detached units in the Western Pacific. On to April 1963, VP-42 received its first SP-2E "Neptune" and an intensive transition program From seaplanes to landplanes was conduted for the following several months. By August, the last SP-5B was phased out of the squadron. The last flight of "Neptunes" departed North Island for Iwakuni, Japan on 8 July, 1964..Navy Occupation Service Medal-Asiatic-VPB-22-(30SEP/30NOV45) VP-MS-2 (09NOV/05APR48) VP-42 (15JUL49/15JAN50), United Nations Medal-11AUG52-03JUN52, Korean Service Medal (Six Engagement Stars)-11AUG50-03JUN52, China Service Medal-02DEC54-03JUN52, Battleship Efficiency Award (Arnold J. Isbell Trophy)-Fiscal Year 1961, Southeast Asia Expeditionary Medal-September 1964..." Contributed by Terry pb4y-2@sbcglobal.net W Weaver sactek@bellsouth.net


Circa 1943

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...History of CPW-10 - Interview of LCDR Clarence Keller and LT William Janechek in the Bureau of Aeronautics 12 March 1943. Squadrons Mentioned: VP-12, VP-21, VP-22, VP-101 and VP-102..." Official U. S. Navy Records (National Archives and Records Administration) via Fold3 http://www.fold3.com/ [11DEC2012]

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Circa 1942-1945

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...History of FAW-5 - History of Headquarters Squadron Fleet Air Wing Five - 01SEP42 through 01JAN45. Squadron's Assigned: VP-15, VP-16, VP-17, VP-18, VP-21, VP-22, VP-25, VP-26, VP-27, VP-28, VP-31, VP-52, VP-63, VP-81, VP-92, VP-94, VPB-105, VPB-107, VPB-110, VPB-111, VPB-112, VPB-113, VPB-114, VPB-126, VPB-134, VPB-147, VPB-149, VP-201, VP-205, VP-208, VP-209, VP-210, VP-211, VP-212, VP-213, VP-214, VP-215 and VP-216 - Submitted Feburary 1, 1945..." Official U. S. Navy Records (National Archives and Records Administration) via Fold3 http://www.fold3.com/ [27NOV2012]

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Circa 1942

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...After the attack on Pearl Harbor VP-22 received twelve PBY-5's and moved to the Philippines in January 1942..." WebSite: Peter Dunn's AUSTRALIA @ WAR http://home.st.net.au/~dunn/usnavy/vp-22.htm [07OCT2005]

They were assigned to CPW-10 where they were involved in the defence of the Dutch East Indies (now Indonesia) together with VP-101 and VP-102. Three of the four Patrol Squadrons in CPW-10 were decommissioned due to heavy losses. The remaining aircraft and equipment and personnel were absorbed into VP-101. This included VP-22 which had run out of aircraft by 3 March 1942. They relocated to Perth, in Western Australia.

Lieutenant Thomas Moorer was assigned to VP-22 flying the Consolidated PBY Catalina out of NAS Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. On 7 December 1941, he was one of the first pilots to take off in his PBY.

Moorer's PBY-5 Catalina (#18, BuNo. 2306 - ex-22-P-4) was shot down north of Darwin near Bathurst Island, on 19 February 1942 during a Japanese bombing raid. He was unfortunate to be the first victim of the large Japanese force. His Catalina was attacked by nine Japanese "O" Type fighters near the northern tip of Bathurst Island. Lt. Thomas Moorer was forced to crash land the Catalina into the sea. The crew, including 4 wounded men, were then rescued by the freighter Don Isidro, which was later attacked and beached near Bathurst Island. He was rescued by the RAAF four days later. Moorer was one of the wounded and received a Purple Heart.

VP-22 was decommissioned on 18 April 1942. LCDR Frank O'Beirne was the Commanding Officer of VP-22 at that time. Lt. Doyle Donaho was the Executive Officer and Lt. Thomas Moorer the Flight Officer.

Lt. Moorer returned to the US in mid 1942. He went on to retire as U.S. Navy Admiral Thomas Moorer. He was chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff from July 1970 to June 1974 and Chief of Naval Operations from 1967 to 1970. He died on 25 February 2004 at the National Naval Medical Center in Bethesda, MD aged 91 years

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...19FEB42 - Japanese carrier striking force (Vice Admiral Nagumo Chuichi) attacks Darwin, Australia; 189 planes from carriers Akagi, Kaga, Hiryu and Soryu bomb shipping, airfields, and shore installations; carrier bombers sink destroyer Peary (DD 226), 1230'S, 13050'E, U.S. Army Transport Miegs and U.S. freighter Mauna Loa (on board the latter all hands--37-man crew and seven passengers--survive); and damage seaplane tender (destroyer) William B. Preston (AVD-7). U.S. freighter Portmar is damaged and beached (one of her 34-man crew is killed; two of the 300 embarked soldiers perish as well; 12 men are injured); freighter Admiral Halstead (carrying drummed gasoline) is damaged as well (she suffers no casualties). In related actions, U.S. freighter Florence D, under charter to the Army and carrying a cargo of ammunition, rescues eight-man PBY (VP-22) crew (Lieutenant Thomas H. Moorer) off north coast of Australia, near Darwin, and later comes under attack by Japanese carrier aircraft that bomb and sink the ship (one man of Moorer's crew and three of the 37-man ship's complement are killed in action); Australian minesweeper HMAS Warrnambol and mission boat St. Francis rescue the survivors. Japanese carrier planes also bomb and sink Philippine motorship Don Isidro (chartered by the U.S. Army to run supplies to Corregidor) off northwest coast of Bathurst Island, 1100'S, 13000'E; 11 of the 67-man crew and one of the 16 embarked soldiers are killed. HMAS Warrnambol rescues the surviving crew and passengers. Japanese naval land attack planes (Kanoya and 1st Kokutais) bomb airfield at Darwin..." HyperWar WebSite: http://www.ibiblio.org/hyperwar/USN/USN-Chron/USN-Chron-1942.html [16SEP2005]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...History of USN Catalina PBY-5 BUNO: 2305..." http://www.adf-serials.com/otherpages/catalinaA24-30.shtml [15APR2004]

09JAN41  -  New plane, assigned to VP-52, for work out of NAS Norfolk, Virginia, NAS Quonset Point, Rhode Island, and later, NAS Argentia, Newfoundland, Canada - North Atlantic patrols.

16JUN41  -  Re-assigned to VP-43, from VP-52 which was re-equipping with later production, higher modification status, planes

01JUL41  -  VP-43 renumbered to VP-81

25AUG41  -  Assigned to the newly formed VP-51; working out of NAS Norfolk, Virginia and Bermuda.

11DEC41  -  Depart NAS Norfolk, Virginia, reach NAS Alameda, California [Asan Francisco area] 15Dec41

20DEC41  -  Depart NAS Alameda, California, over-night to MCAS/NAS Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii.

01JAN42  -  Now at NAS Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, as 22-P-12. (all VP-51 planes were transfered to VP-22)

02JAN42  -  Depart Hawaii, via Palmyra, Canton, Fiji, Townsville, Darwin, to reach Netherlands East Indies area about 11Jan42, PPC Ens G Howard. [PPC = Patrol Plane Commander]

06FEB42  -  The last recorded flight for Bu 2305 [in War Diary, Commander Aircraft Asiatic Fleet] when it flew to scatter anchorage for the day and returned to Sourabaya that evening.

22FEB42  -  Being broken up for spare parts on ramp at Morokrembangan, Sourabaya, Java. Source - Messimer "In the Hands Of Fate" interview with Lt Antonides, Engineer Officer with Patrol Wing 10.

Bu 2305 ceased to be a flyable or repairable entity when the break-up for parts began about 22Feb42. In the latter days of its life it had two [with-in unit] identities 22-P-12 and PatWing 10 #12.

Its wing and engines were fitted to the fuselage of Dutch Plane Y-72.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...I am an aviation historian resident in a suburb of Perth, Western Australia. I am preparing a Masters thesis titled "The Air War in Western Australia 1939-1945". From March 1942 to August 1944 we had Patrol Wing Ten (Fleet Air Wing Ten from 01 NOV 42) based at Crawley on the Swan River, near Perth. PWTen appears to have doubled as a training and local patrol unit, with patrol squadrons being rotated as the war in the Southwest Pacific progressed. From the Wing's War Diary I have ascertained that the following squadrons were present at Crawley: VP-101 (includes merged VP-21, VP-22 and VP-102 after the evacuation of Java in MAR 42), VP-11, VP-33, VP-34, VP-52. After FAWTen left Perth in AUG 44, a utility training unit, VS-61 continued until well into 1945. I am seeking information on these squadrons when they were in Western Australia. I know of their bases at Geraldton and Exmout Gulf (POTSHOT) but I have a problem with the mobile base, "Heron Haven". I have a copy of Messimer's "In the Hands of Fate" and a few other published references, so have an overall picture. Any help would be appreciated..." Contributed by Lindsay J. Peet (Mr.) ppeetlj@ic-net.com.au [22JUL98]

UPDATE "...Lindsay, Since our recent communication I have delved into the matter of Heron Haven, and have enjoyed doing so.

Since my interest begins with aircraft and their squadrons, I approached this exercise from an "aircraft on aggressive ops. using Seaplane Tenders" point of view. This allowed me to rule out some matters, such as :---

  • 1 Regular seaplane patrols from such as Geraldton.
  • 2 Seaplane mine laying ops from West Bay in Napier Broome Bay which began 17Nov44.

    I set aside some matters temporarily, being :---
  • 1 The seven and then five USN PBY flying Crawley to Townsend Haven to Darwin in Jun43.
  • 2 The joined usage of "Townsend Haven(Heron Haven)".

    I then found that only RAAF Catalinas were thereafter used on aggressive ops from [or returning to] WA advanced bases in my search timeframe and area. I shall list these under "locality" headings, of which there are just three, being
  • 1 Exmouth Gulf
  • 2 Cygnet Bay
  • 3 Yampi Sound
    Exmouth Gulf.

    In Aug43 and Nov43, RAAF Catalinas did mining sorties to Soerabaya Harbour. They flew Darwin, Soerabaya, Heron Haven for fuel, then return to Darwin.

    In both months, tender Preston is mentioned for refuelling.

    Pilot Honan was on the Nov43 Sortie, describes his career in book "That's That", clearly states Heron Haven was at Exmouth Gulf, shows it so on a map.

    Cygnet Bay.

    In Jan44, RAAF investigated Cygnet Bay for use by mine laying Catalinas. It was accepted for RAAF use, perhaps because of radar station at Cape Leveque and protective airfield at Derby. Tidal mudflats were a problem.

    Tender Preston laid moorings and supported the Catalinas. The sorties were flown Cygnet Bay - Balikpapan - Cygnet Bay.

    Cygnet Bay was used only once for RAAF ops, for a set of three mine laying sorties to Balikpapan on 20, 22, and 24Feb44.

    Yampi Sound. [Codename "Shecat"]

    In Apr44 Yampi Sound was selected as advanced base for more minelaying ops to Balikpapan. A radar station was at Cockatoo Island. Tender Childs set the moorings.

    A set of three ops were done this month, flying Yampi Sound - Balikpapan - Yampi Sound.

    More sets of ops were done from Yampi Sound in May, June, and July44, to Balikpapan and to Soerabaya.

    After Jul44, no more aggressive Catalina ops were done from WA coast until West Bay came into use.

    *****************

    So, from the above, I'm happy that Heron Haven was a "common usage" name for Exmouth Gulf, and only Exmouth Gulf. I can't see it as a formal "code name" since it could relate to the operational vessel USS Heron. I see there is a "Heron Point" adjacent Learmonth in Exmouth Gulf.

    Heron may have done a reconnaisance to Cygnet Bay in early Jun43, prior to the VP-101 flights to Darwin in Jun43. As for Heron's dalliance in the Dampier Archipeligo, perhaps the fishing was good. Where was General Blamey just then? No jest!

    There is a "Townshend River" at Cygnet Bay. Perhaps it was Cygnet Bay, by whatever name, where the USN Catalinas refuelled on their way to Darwin in Jun43. Perhaps the USN avoided Exmouth Gulf in Jun43 as the Japanese bombed there [no physical damage] in May43, after which the submarine base was closed.

    I would love to read about the VP-101 flights in context, would appreciate any info you might be able to provide...

    Hope this helps, best wishes, Bruce G..." Contributed by Wynnum B Graham wbg@bigpond.com [26AUG98]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "00JAN42--VP-22 becomes the first US reinforcement unit to reach SW = Pacific at Ambon joining Pat Wing 10..." http://www.halisp.net/listserv/pacwar/1314.html

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Air-to-Air Shoot Downs by Navy and Marine Corps Patrol Type Aircraft During World War II - This Squadron Mentioned...Naval Historical Center ADOBE Download File: http://www.history.navy.mil/avh-vol2/Appen4.pdf [12FEB2004]
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    Open VP History Adobe FileAir-To-Air Shootdowns 118KB


    Circa 1941-1944

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...History of FAW-8 - History from 08JUL41-31DEC44 Submitted April 12th, 1945. Squadron's Assigned: VP-16, VP-18, VP-19, VP-20, VP-21, VP-22, VP-25, VP-26, VP-27, VP-28, VP-43, VP-61, VP-62, VP-63, VP-72, VP-81, VP-82, VP-83, VP-84, VP-92, VP-118, VP-123, VP-133, VP-137, VP-140, VP-142, VP-144, VP-148, VP-150, VP-153, VP-198, VP-205, VP-208 and VP-216..." Official U. S. Navy Records (National Archives and Records Administration) via Fold3 http://www.fold3.com/ [01DEC2012]

    History - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge Thumbnail
    History - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge Thumbnail
    History - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge Thumbnail    

    Circa 1941

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...U.S. CONGRESS JOINT COMMITTEE ON PEARL HARBOR ATTACK, HEARINGS: EXHIBITS OF THE JOINT COMMITTEE, Pt. 16, pp. 2721-27..." WebSite: ibiblio Public Library http://www.ibiblio.org/pha/pha/misc/martin_1.html [16JAN2006]

    From: U.S. CONGRESS JOINT COMMITTEE ON Pearl Harbor ATTACK, HEARINGS: 
    EXHIBITS OF THE JOINT COMMITTEE, Pt. 16, pp. 2721-27.
    
    
                                 EXHIBIT NO. 120
    
    [1]          KIMMEL EXHIBIT 5 TO REPORT OF ACTION
    
                                                PATROL WING TWO
                                            U. S. NAVAL AIR STATION,
                                     Pearl Harbor, T. H., December 19, 1941.
    
    Memorandum for Admiral H. E. Kimmel, U. S. Navy.
    
    MY DEAR ADMIRAL: In accordance with our conversation of yesterday, I am 
    forwarding to you the following information:
    
    1. Availability and Disposition of Patrol Planes on morning of 7 
    December, 1941:
                                Total
    Squadron  In commission   available  Location   Under  Ready   In air
                              for flight            Repair at base
    VP-11     12 PBY-5            12     Kaneohe      0      12         0
    VP-12     12 PBY-5            11     Kaneohe      1      11         0
    VP-14     12 PBY-5        [1] 10     Kaneohe      2       7     [1] 3
    VP-21     12 PBY-3        [2] 11     Midway       1       4     [2] 7
    VP-21      1 PBY-3 (spare)     1     Pearl Harbor 1       0         0
    VP-21      1 PBY-3            12     Pearl Harbor 2      12         0
    VP-22     14 PBY-3            12     Pearl Harbor 1      11         0
    VP-24      6 PBY-5             5     Pearl Harbor 1       1     [3] 4
    
    RECAPITULATION
    
                                Total
    Squadron  In commission   available  Under  Ready   In air
                              for flight Repair at base
    
    At Kaneohe     36          [1] 33       3       30     [1] 3
    At Pearl       33          [3] 28       5       24     [3] 4
    At Midway      12          [2] 11       1        4     [2] 7 
       Total       81              72       9       58        14
    
    [2]                               NOTES
    
    [1] 3 planes armed with two depth charges each conducting search of 
    assigned fleet operating areas in accordance with U. S. Pacific Fleet 
    Letter No. 2CL-41 (Revised) (Task Force NINE Operating Plan (91). 3 
    planes in condition 2 (30 minutes notice).
    
    [2] 5 planes conducting search of sector 120 170  radius 450 miles; 
    departed Midway at 1820 GCT. 2 planes departed Midway at same time to 
    rendezvous with U. S. S. LEXINGTON at a point 400 miles bearing 130  
    from Midway to serve as escorts for Marine Scouting planes. Four planes 
    additional plants armed with 2500 pound bombs each were on the alert at 
    Midway as a ready striking force. These four planes took off at about
    2230 GCT upon receipt of information on the attack on Pearl Harbor and 
    searched sector 060  to 100  radius 400 miles. One plane was under 
    repair in the hangar at Midway. A spare plane was under overhaul at 
    Pearl Harbor.
    
    [3] Four planes conducting inter-type tactics in area C-5 with U. S. 
    Submarine.
    
    [4] All planes except those under repair were armed with machine guns 
    and a full allowance of machine gun ammunition.
    
    [3]  2. Material condition:
    
    (a) Of the 81 available patrol planes 54 were new PBY-5's; 27 were PBY-
    3's having over three years service. The PBY-5's were recently ferried 
    to Hawaii, arriving on the following dates:
    
    Squadron Number Arrival date   Squadron Number Arrival date
             Planes                         Planes
    VP-11      12   28 Oct. 1941    VP-23     12    23 Nov. 1941
    VP-24       6   28 Oct. 1941    VP-14     12    23 Nov. 1941.
    VP-12      12    8 Nov. 1941
    
    (b) The PBY-5 airplanes were experiencing the usual shake-down 
    difficulties and were hampered in maintenance by an almost complete 
    absence of spare parts. In additions a program for installation of 
    leakproof tanks, armor, and modified
    
    engine nose sections was in progress. They were not fully ready for war 
    until these installations were completed, nor were extensive continuous 
    operations practicable until adequate spare parts were on hand.
    
    (c) The 12 PBY-3 airplanes at Pearl Harbor (VP-22) had returned from
    Midway on 5 December after an arduous tour of duty at Midway and Wake 
    since 17 October. This squadron was in relatively poor material 
    condition because of its extended operations at advance bases with 
    inadequate facilities for normal repair and upkeep. In addition 10 of 
    its planes were [4] approaching 18 months service and were due for 
    overhaul.
    
    (d) It should be noted that the material situation of the patrol 
    squadrons made the maintenance of continuous extensive daily searches 
    impracticable. Under such conditions the PBY-5's were to be expected to 
    experience numerous material failures which would place airplanes out of 
    commission until spare parts arrived. The PBY-3's of Patrol Squadron 
    TWENTY-TWO at Pearl were scheduled for a week of upkeep for repair and 
    maintenance.
    
    (e) Under the circumstances, it seemed advisable to continue intensive 
    expansion training operations and improvement of the material military 
    effectiveness at the same time preserving the maximum practicable 
    availability of aircraft for an emergency. Under the existing material 
    and spare parts situation, continuous and extensive patrol plane 
    operations by the PBY-5's was certain to result in rapid automatic 
    attrition of the already limited number of patrol planes immediately 
    available by the exhaustion of small but vital spare parts for which 
    there were no replacements.
    
    (f) In this connection it should be noted that there were insufficient 
    patrol planes in the Hawaiian Area effectively to do the Job required. 
    For the commander of a search group to be able to state with  [5]  some 
    assurance that no hostile carrier could reach a spot 250 miles away and 
    launch an attack without prior detection would require an effective 
    daily search through 360  to a distance of at least 800 miles. Assuming 
    a 16-mile radius of visibility this would require a daily 16 hour flight 
    of 84 planes. A force of not less than 209 patrol planes, adequate spare 
    parts and ample well trained personnel would be required for such 
    operations.
    
                                                 (Signed) P. N. L. BELLINGER
                                                 Rear Admiral, U. S. Navy,
                                                 Commander Patrol Wing TWO.
    
    PW2/A16-3/
    016
    Confidential

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Hearings Before The Joint Committee On The Investigation Of The Pearl Harbor Attack - Congress Of The United States - Seventy-Ninth Congress...Squadrons mentioned: VP-11, VP-13, VP-14, VP-21, VP-22, VP-23, VP-24, VP-31, VP-32, VP-41, VP-42, VP-43, VP-44, VP-51, VP-52, VP-71, VP-72, VP-73, VP-74, VP-81, VP-82, VP-83, VP-84, VP-91, VP-92, VP-93, VP-94, VP-101, VP-102, CPW-1, CPW-2, CPW-3, CPW-4, CPW-5, CPW-7, CPW-8 and CPW-9..." WebSite: The public's library and digital archive http://www.ibiblio.org/pha/pha/misc/rainbow5.html [01APR2005]
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    Open VP History Adobe FileHearings Before The Joint Committee On the Investigation Of The Pearl Harbor Attack 333KB

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Pearl Harbor Attack: 7 December 1941, Online Action Reports: Commander in Chief, Pacific Fleet, Serial 0479 of 15 February 1942..." [09JUL2003]

    PART II -- SITUATION JUST PRIOR TO JAPANESE RAID
    7 DECEMBER 1941.

    Discounting small craft, there were some 86 ships of the Pacific Fleet moored in Pearl Harbor on the morning of 7 December, 1941. Their disposition, according to berth assignment, is shown on the Harbor Chart (enclosure (A)) employed herein in describing the action. Aircraft of Patrol Wings, U.S. Pacific Fleet,

  •  
    were, as set forth in enclosure (E) (CPW-2 report), disposed as follows: Patrol Squadron 21, at Midway; Patrol Squadrons 11, 12, 14, at Haneohe; Patrol Squadrons 22, 23, 24, at Pearl Harbor. Numerically, their disposition was as follows:

    VP-21

    7

     

    4

    planes

     

    planes

    - in the air conducting search 120° to 170° to 450 miles from Midway.

    - on the surface at Midway armed each with 2 dive hundred pound bombs and on 10 minutes notice.

     
    VP-11 12 planes - ready for flight on 4 hours notice.  
    VP-12 6 planes - ready for flight on 30 minutes notice.
      5 planes - ready for flight on 4 hours notice.
    VP-14 3 planes - in the air on morning security patrol armed with depth charges.
      3 planes - ready for flight on 30 minutes notice.
      4 planes - ready for flight on 4 hours notice.
    VP-22 12 planes - ready for flight on 4 hours notice.
    VP-23 11 planes
    VP-24 4 planes - in the air conducting inter-type tactics with submarines.
      1 plane - ready for flight on 30 minutes notice.
    Total 72  
    or, summarizing:
      14   - in the air (7 on a search from Midway).
      58   - on the surface ready for flight in four hours or less.
         9   - undergoing repairs.
      81   - Total

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Squadron Awards..." Contributed by Mahlon K. Miller mkwsmiller@cox.net [23APR2001]

  • Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal
    01 Jul 68 14 Jan 69

  • Meritorious Unit Commendation
    20 Apr 70 01 May 70
    28 Aug 82 07 Sep 82
    0 Oct 82 28 Oct 82
    08 Dec 82 17 Dec 82

  • Navy Unit Commendation
    22 Jan 67 22 Mar 67

  • Presidential Unit Citation
    08 Dec 41 03 Mar 42
    01 Jan 42 03 Mar 42

  • Republic of Vietnam Meritorious Unit Citation (Gallantry)
    21 Nov 68 31 Dec 68
    01 Nov 69 30 Apr 70

  • Coast Guard SOS Ribbon
    1 Feb 88 19 Feb 88

    VP-22 Det OF
  • Meritorious Unit Commendation
    Spring 70

    VP-22 Participating Aircrews
  • Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal
    15 Nov 92 07 May 93

  • Navy Expeditionary Service Medal
    23 May 79 06 Jun 79
    21 Jun 79 01 Dec 79

  • Meritorious Unit Commendation
    20 Apr 70 01 May 70
    01 Feb 72 15 Jul 72

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...UNITED STATES PACIFIC FLEET - PATROL SQUADRON TWENTY-TWO - NAS Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii, December 13, 1941..." http://www.ibiblio.org/hyperwar/USN/rep/Pearl/PatRon22.html [09JAN2001]

    VP22/A16-3/L11-1/A9
    UNITED STATES PACIFIC FLEET
    AIRCRAFT SCOUTING FORCE
    PATROL SQUADRON TWENTY-TWO
    Fleet Air Detachment
    NAS Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii
    December 13, 1941


    From: The Commander Patrol Squadron TWENTY-TWO.
    To: The Commander-in-Chief, PACIFIC FLEET

    Subject: Summary of action and damage during Air Raid on December 7, 1941.
    Reference: CinCPac Conf. despatch 102102 of December 1941.

    The following information is submitted in accordance with reference (a).

    Offensive measures:

    First Attack - A total of three (3) .50 cal. machine guns were manned in three (3) different planes before completion of the attack.

    Second Attack - A total of four (4) .30 cal. machine guns and eight (8) .50 cal. machine guns were manned in four different airplanes during the second attack.

    Ammunition Expenditure - Approximately 2000 rounds of .30 cal. and 2000 rounds of .50 cal. ammunition was expended.

    Damage inflicted - Two (2) enemy planes at which fire was being directed were shot down off the southern end of NAS Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, Hawaii during the second attack and two additional enemy planes were seen shot down during the same attack.

    Losses:

    Personnel - None killed three received minor scratches from first attack.

    Material - One (1) bomb struck Patrol Squadron Twenty-Two parking area (ramp #4), the explosion and subsequent fire completely destroyed six (6) PBY-3 airplanes, damaged one (1) PBY-3 airplane beyond repair and put the remaining five (5) out of commission for from one to ten days. This bomb is believed to be the first one dropped on NAS Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, Hawaii or the adjacent ships.
  • One (1) bomb struck the small arms magazine at North East corner of hangar (building #6) and the resulting fire burned the wooden part of about two-fifths of the hangar and numerous miscellaneous squadron spare parts before being brought under control.
  • One bomb struck the underwater portion of ramp number four.

    Conduct of Personnel:

    The conduct of all personnel was outstanding. Those living ashore reported for duty immediately. Pilots, gunners, and radiomen volunteered to fly and man landplanes with which they were unfamiliar in order to pursue enemy aircraft. A number of these volunteers were assigned to and carried out these duties until regular crews of these aircraft arrived to replace them.

    [signed]
    FRANK O'BEIRNE.

    Copy to:
    Commscofor
    Comairscofor
    Compatwing TWO

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "07DEC41--Patrol Wing TWO (CPW-2), U. S. Naval Air Station, Pearl Harbor. T.H., War Diary Sunday, December 7, 1941...Prior to the sudden attack by Japanese aircraft on Oahu, the forces under the Commander Patrol Wing TWO were disposed as follows: VP-21 at Midway; VP-11, VP-12, and VP-14 at Kaneohe; VP-22, VP-23, and VP-24 at Pearl Harbor. All tenders except the WRIGHT were at Pearl Harbor, the WRIGHT was enroute Pearl from Midway. Following is the exact status of aircraft at the time of attack:

    VP-21 7 planes in air conducting search 120 to 170 degrees to 450 miles from Midway. 4 planes on surface at Midway armed each with 2 five hundred pound bombs and on 10 minutes notice.

    VP-11 12 planes ready for flight on 4 hours notice

    VP-12 6 planes ready for flight on 30 minutes notice. 5 planes ready for flight on 4 hours notice.

    VP-14 3 planes in the air on morning security patrol armed with depth charges. 3 planes ready for flight on 30 minutes notice. 4 planes ready for flight on 4 hours notice.

    VP-22 12 planes ready for flight on 4 hours notice.

    VP-23 11 planes ready for flight on 4 hours notice.

    VP-24 4 planes in the air conducting inter-type tactics with submarines. 1 plane ready for flight on 30 minutes notice.

    Total 72 in the air or ready for flight in 4 hours or less..." http://www.pby.com[14MAY2000]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "07DEC41--The units at NAS Pearl Harbor and their aircraft on 7 Dec 41 were: Patrol Squadron Twenty One (VP-21) based on Midway Island 1 Consolidated PBY-3 Catalina under repair...Patrol Squadron Twenty Two (VP-22) 14 Consolidated PBY-3 Catalinas (12 could be made ready on four hours notice; 2 under repair)...Patrol Squadron Twenty Three (VP-23)12 Consolidated PBY-5 Catalinas (11 could be made ready on four hours notice; 1 under repair)...Patrol Squadron Twenty Four (VP-24) 6 Consolidated PBY-5 Catalinas (4 in the air; 1 ready on 30 minutes notice; 1 under repair)..." World War II Discussion List WWII-L@UBVM.BITNET http://listserv.acsu.buffalo.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A2=ind9312A&L=wwii-l&D=&H=&T=&O=&F=&P=4270

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "00DEC41--Order of Battle December 1941 Patrol Wing Two - NAS Pearl Harbor VP-22 -14 Catalinas PBY3, VP-23 -12 Catalinas PBY5, VP-24 -6 Catalinas PBY5, and VP-21 - 12 Catalinas on Midway..." http://www.halisp.net/listserv/pacwar/1314.html

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...NAS Pearl Harbor was on NAS Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, Hawaii in the middle of Pearl Harbor and served two functions; first, it was home for the four squadrons of Patrol Wing Two (PatWing Two) and second, it was the home base for the carrier based squadrons when the carriers were in port. Generally, the carrier based squadrons would fly off the carriers to NAS Pearl Harbor before the carrier reached port; subsequently, the aircraft would fly back to the carrier when the ship left port. Because it served as a home for carrier aircraft, there were seven spare carrier aircraft present during the Japanese attack. NAS Pearl Harbor was also the home of two utility squadrons flying non-combatant utility aircraft. The units at NAS Pearl Harbor and their aircraft on 7 Dec 41 were: Patrol Squadron Twenty Two (VP-22) 14 Consolidated PBY-3 Catalinas (12 could be made ready on four hours notice; 2 under repair)..." http://listserv.acsu.buffalo.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A2=ind9312A&L=wwii-l&D=&H=&T=&O=&F=&P=4270

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...PATROL WING TWO - U.S. NAVAL AIR STATION - PEARL HARBOR, T.H. - 20 Dec 1941..." http://www.ibiblio.org/hyperwar/USN/rep/Pearl/PatWing2.html [08JAN2001]

    UNITED STATES PACIFIC FLEET AIRCRAFT
    PATROL WING TWO
    FLEET AIR DETACHMENT
    MCAS/NAS Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii
    1 January 1942.


    From: The Commander Task Force NINE (Commander Patrol Wing TWO).
    To: The Commander-in-Chief, United States Pacific Fleet.

    Subject: Operations on December 7, 1941.

    On Sunday morning, December 7, 1941, forces under my command were disposed as follows: Patrol Squadron TWENTY-ONE at Midway, Patrol Squadrons ELEVEN, TWELVE, FOURTEEN at Kaneohe, TWENTY-TWO, TWENTY-THREE and TWENTY-FOUR at pearl Harbor, all tenders except Wright at Pearl Harbor; Wright enroute to Pearl Harbor from Midway.

    The condition of readiness in force was Baker 5 (50% of assigned aircraft on 4 hours notice) with machine guns and ammunition in all planes not undergoing maintenance work. In addition to the above, three squadrons (VP-21 at Midway, VP-23 at Pearl, and VP-11 at Kaneohe) were in condition Afirm 5 (100% of assigned aircraft on 4 hours notice). This was augmented by specific duty assignments on December 7 which required six planes from Patrol Squadrons FOURTEEN, TWENTY-FOUR, and TWELVE to be ready for light on 30 minutes notice.

    The general orders listed above were modified by circumstances and planes actually ready for flight were as follows:

    VP-21 7 planes - in the air conducting search 120 to 170 to 450 miles from Midway.
  • 4 planes - on the surface at Midway armed each with 2 five hundred pound bombs and on 10 minutes notice.

    VP-11 12 planes - ready for flight on 4 hours notice.

    VP-12 6 planes - ready for flight on 30 minutes notice. 5 planes - ready for flight on 4 hours notice.

    VP-14 3 planes - in the air on morning security patrol armed with depth charges.
  • 3 planes - ready for flight on 30 minutes notice.
  • 4 planes - ready for flight on 4 hours notice.

    VP-22 12 planes - ready for flight on 4 hours notice.

    VP-23 11 planes - ready for flight on 4 hours notice.

    VP-24 4 planes - in the air conducting inter-type tactics with submarines.
  • 1 plane - ready for flight on 30 minutes notice.

    Total 72 planes - in the air or ready for flight in 4 hours or less.

    In this connection it may be stated that the 4 hours notice was primarily set to permit rest and recreation of personnel and was in no wise a criterion of material readiness. For example, one plane of VP-23, theoretically on 4 hours notice, was actually in the air 45 minutes after the first bomb dropped.

    To summarize the foregoing, at the moment the first bomb dropped, aircraft of this command were in the following condition:
  • 14 - in the air (7 on a search from Midway).
  • 58 - on the surface ready for flight in four hours or less.
  • 9 - undergoing repairs.
  • 81 - Total.

    Illustrative of the efforts made by personnel, one of the nine planes undergoing repairs took off for a search at 1356, local time, loaded with 4 one thousand pound bombs.

    A narrative of events of the day follows:
  • TIME (LOT)
  • 0700 14-P-1 sank enemy submarine one mile off Pearl Harbor entrance.
  • 0715 Message coded and transmitted to base.
  • 0735 Message and decoded and information received by Staff Duty Officer.
  • 0737 Message relayed to Operations Officer.
  • 0740 Relayed by telephone to Staff Duty Officer of Commander-in-Chief.
  • 0750 Search plan drafted by Operations Officer.
  • 0757 First bomb dropped near VP-22 hangar.
  • 0758 Message ordered broadcasted to all ships present quote "AIR RAID PEARL HARBOR X THIS IS NO DRILL" unquote (An identical message was sent by CinCPac).
  • 0800 Search plan transmitted by radio and telephone (Received by some of the planes in the air at 0805).

    From this time on an accurate chronological account is impracticable.

    The Commander Patrol Wing TWO arrived at the Operations Office during the first attack and approved the orders that had been issued. Telephonic communication with the various squadrons at Pearl harbor was established in order to supplement and possibly accelerate the radio transmissions. As was usually the case, it was difficult to communicate with Kaneohe. The page printer had gone out of commission and it was quite difficult to obtain a telephonic connection. Immediately upon termination of the first attack, an endeavor was made to determine the sectors of the search actually being covered. it was determined, with some difficulty that, of all planes at the bases of Kaneohe and Pearl Harbor, only 3 were still in commission. These were dispatched to fill holidays in what appeared to be the most promising sectors for search. in addition, available planes from the Utility Wing were ordered out. The 2 planes still available for duty at Kaneohe were ordered by telephone to cover the sector between 280 and 300 degrees. The one plane still available at Pearl harbor had some difficulty in being launched due to the wreckage and fires of other planes in the way. Abut this time the second attack came in. Fire was opened by tenders of this command and from machine guns mounted in planes on the ground or removed from the planes to extemporized mountings with greater arcs of fire. As a result of this second attack, all communications, radio, telephone and page printer were knocked out of commission. Immediate steps to restore communications were taken while the second attack was still underway and communications personnel, who unfortunately have not yet been identified, proceeded to repair the radio antenna during the height of the attack. Before the end of the second attack, radio communications were established on the tenders of this command. Shortly thereafter, telephonic communication was reestablished and information was received that the 2 planes at Kaneohe previously reported as ready for service had been destroyed. Accordingly, orders were issued for the 1 plane at Pearl Harbor, which had somehow escaped uninjured during the second attack, to cover the sector from 280 to 300 degrees. The Commander Patrol Wing ONE at Kaneohe felt that the orders to cover the sector 280 to 300, which had been transmitted to him by telephone for the 2 planes on the ground, required his taking action and he accordingly diverted 14-P-1 and 14-P-3 from the sectors that they had been searching. Information of this action was not received by me.

    The Fleet Aviation Officer, Captain A.C. Davis, U.S.N., kept in constant touch by telephone and made many valuable suggestions. Various members of my staff maintained communications with Army information centers and requested that attempts be made to track the retiring Japanese planes by RADAR. Unfortunately, the Curtiss RADAR was placed out of commission by the damage sustained by that vessel. During the mid-afternoon, 14-P-2 reported being attacked by enemy planes and was thereafter not heard from for 2 or 3 hours. As it was felt that this plane had been shot down and a hole thus left in what appeared to be the most promising sector of the search, every effort was made, as additional planes from whatever source became available, to plug the gap.

    All hands exerted their utmost efforts to get more planes ready for flight and to arm them for offensive action. Three more patrol planes were reported ready at Pearl harbor and dispatched, each carrying 4 one thousand pound bombs. Thirteen SBD planes, loaded with 500 pound bombs, came in from Lexington and were pressed into service. Nine were dispatched to search a sector to the north, while the remaining 4 were ordered to attack 4 Japanese troop ships reported off Barbers point. This report proved to be unfounded.

    The accompanying charts indicate the search as actually conducted. The urgent necessity for conducting daily searches since December 7 and for putting all planes possible back in commission, together with urgency for immediate operations, have precluded an exhaustive analysis of the events of the day. Certain highlights however may be of interest:

    All planes in commission had guns on board together with full allowances of service ammunition. During the first attack, fire was opened from the guns as mounted in the planes, and when it was discovered that these were not effective for fire from the ground due to structural interference, many personnel removed these guns from the planes and set them upon benches in vises and opened up an effective fire against the second attack. As nearly as can be determined, a total of 4 Japanese planes were shot down by personnel of patrol plane squadrons by this method.

    Two planes or Utility Squadron One conducted an extensive search although these planes being of a non-combatant type were not equipped with machine guns. Despite the lack of defense against attacks by hostile aircraft, the pilots of these planes persisted in their search until the threatened exhaustion of their fuel forced their return to Pearl Harbor. The devotion to duty of these pilots will be made the subject of a special report.

    These and numerous other instances of distinguished conduct occurred which Commander Task Force NINE has not yet had time to investigate.

    Attention is invited to the following dispatches and mailgrams indicating the extensive searches conducted by units of this command during the period 30 November to 7 December, 1941, from Wake and Midway:

    CinCPac 280450
    280447 of November.
    040237 of December.

    ComTaskForce NINE 291124
  • 292101
  • 292103 of November.
  • 302359
  • 050323 of December.

    [signed] P.N.L. BELLINGER.

    Copy to: Comairscofor.

    Circa 1940

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...VP-29 is not the same as VPB-29. VPB-29 was the last squadron designation from VP-101. That squadron included VP-101 from the Philippines in 1940 plus VP-22, and VP-21 from NAS Pearl Harbor, Hawaii..." Contributed by Larry Katz papakatz@sbcglobal.net [18JUL99]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Circa 1940 AIRCRAFT SCOUTING FORCE - Rear Admiral Arthur L. Bristol - HULBERT (AVD-6) - LCDR J. V. Carney..." Contributed by John Lucas john.lucas@netzero.net [15DEC98]

    PATROL WING ONE - CDR W. K. Harrill

    TENDERS

    USS HULBERT (AVD-6) - LCDR J. V. Carney
    USS PELICAN (AVP-6) - LT H. J. Dyson
    USS AVOCET (AVP-4) - LT R. E. Dixon

    SQUADRONS

    VP-11 - LCDR J. W. Harris
    VP-12 - LCDR C. W. Oexle
    VP-13 - LCDR S. B. Cooke
    VP-14 - LCDR W. T. Rassieur

    PATROL WING TWO - CAPTAIN Patrick N. L. Bellinger

    TENDERS

    USS WRIGHT (AV-1) - CDR J. M. Shoemaker,
    USS WILLIAM B. PRESTON (AVD-7) - LCDR F. J. Bridget
    USS SWAN (AVP-7) - and LT A. R. Truslow, Jr.

    SQUADRONS

    VP-22 - LCDR W. P. Cogswell
    VP-23 - LCDR G. Van Deurs
    VP-24 - LCDR D. C. Allen
    VP-25 - LCDR A. R. Brady
    VP-26 - LCDR A. N. Perkins


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