VPNAVY VP-5 Mercury Capsule Recovery
http://www.vpnavy.org
VPNAVY Address

HistoryVP-92 HistoryHistory

Circa 2007

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...COMRESPATWING Disestablishment Ceremony - June 23, 2007 - Flyer (Squadrons: VP-60, VP-62, VP-64, VP-65, VP-66, VP-67, VP-68, VP-69, VP-90, VP-91, VP-92, VP-93 and VP-94)..." Contributed by ROBIDEAU, AWCS Larry Retired larobidoo@comcast.net [30JAN2008]

DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY COMMANDER RESERVE PATROL WING NAVAL AIR STATION
JOINT RESERVE BASE
WILLOW GROVE, PENNSYLVANIA 19090-5010

June 23, 2007

Dear Reserve VP Alumni,

It is a distinct pleasure to welcome you to the Reserve VP reunion. Many of you have traveled great distances and arranged your busy schedules to attend this celebration with your shipmates; your presence truly makes this a memorable occasion. Thank you for coming.

This evening's event is a commemoration of our service to country, and the camaraderie we have attained through our common experiences. I'm confident it will afford each of you the opportunity to rekindle and share memories of times gone by, with much fondness and laughter.

Since their inception in 1970, Reserve Patrol Wing squadrons have played a significant role in the United States Navy's maritime strategies. You, the Citizen Sailors of yesterday and today, were and continue to be an indispensable component of our Navy. From both coasts of our great nation and everywhere in between, you and your shipmates left homes and careers behind, answering America's call. You flew and maintained the venerable P2 Neptune and P-3 Orion aircraft, training for missions and detaching worldwide. You leave behind a proud legacy. I congratulate each of you and I'm honored to call all of you "shipmates."

We must also remember to pay tribute to our families, for their sacrifice has been great. They, too, have borne the burden of service, and are most deserving of our gratitude. If your family is not present this evening, please pass to them my sincere thanks and admiration.

As this chapter in the annals of the United States Navy closes, let us remember that the legacy continues. The Navy you helped build remains strong, proud, and incredibly capable. Fair Winds and Following Seas!

Christopher A. Patton
CAPT USN

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...COMRESPATWING Disestablishment Ceremony - June 23, 2007 - Brochure (Squadrons: VP-60, VP-62, VP-64, VP-65, VP-66, VP-67, VP-68, VP-69, VP-90, VP-91, VP-92, VP-93 and VP-94)..." Contributed by ROBIDEAU, AWCS Larry Retired larobidoo@comcast.net [30JAN2008]

COMRESPATWING SQUADRONS

COMMANDER RESERVE PATROL WING SENDS ITS SINCERE THANKS AND GRATITUDE TO ALL WHO HAVE SERVED, AND IS GRATEFUL TO ALL THOSE CIVILIANS WHO HAVE SUPPORTED THEIR CITIZEN SOLDIERS/SAILORS FOR NEARLY FOUR DECADES.

The following squadrons and command were assigned to Commander Reserve Patrol Wing:
               SQUADRON  NICKNAME                  LOCATION
                VP-60 	"Cobras"              NAS Glenview, Illinois
                VP-62 	"Broadarrows"         NAS Jacksonville, Florida
                VP-64 	"Condors"             NAS Willow Grove, Pennsylvania
                VP-65 	"Tridents"            NAS Point Mugu, California
                VP-66 	"Liberty Bells"       NAS Willow Grove, Pennsylvania
                VP-67 	"Golden Hawks"        NAS Memphis, Tennessee
                VP-68 	"Black Hawks"         NAF Washington, D.C.
                VP-69 	"Totems"              NAS Whidbey Island, Washington
                VP-90 	"Lions"               NAS Glenview, Illinois
                VP-91 	"Black Cats"          NAS Moffett Field, California
                VP-92 	"Minutemen"           NAS Brunswick, Maine
                VP-93 	"Executioners"        NAF Detroit, Michigan
                VP-94 	"Crawfishers"         NAS New Orleans, Louisiana
                Reserve ASW Training Center   NAS Willow Grove, Pennsylvania

Commander Reserve Patrol Wing
Command History

Commander Reserve Patrol Wing (COMRESPATWING) became the Navy's largest Patrol Wing in January 1999 following the consolidation of the former COMRESPATWINGPAC located at Moffett Federal Airfield, CA and COMRESPATWINGLANT located at NAS Norfolk, Virginia. Commander Reserve Patrol Wing became responsible for the training, readiness and oversight of seven assigned Maritime Patrol Aviation (MP A) Squadrons, the Reserve Anti-Submarine Warfare Training Center (RA TCEN), three Weapons System Trainer detachments, and two Mobile Operations Command Centers (MOCCs). The Wing was an Echelon IV command under the administrative and operational control of Commander, Naval Air Force Reserve. The Command's mission served two primary purposes 1) achieve and sustain combat readiness ensuring the availability of combat ready units capable of immediate employment in the event of war or national emergency; and 2) provide operational support during peacetime. At its pinnacle, COMRESPATWING included over 2,500 Drilling Reservists and Full Time Support personnel operating and maintaining 45 P-3 "Orion" aircraft.

The birth of Reserve Patrol Wing can be traced back to a major restructuring of the Naval Air Reserve that took place in 1970. The restructuring established two Reserve Patrol Wings, one East Coast Wing and one West Coast Wing, and 13 Reserve Patrol Squadrons.

The Squadrons first flew the SP2H "Neptune" but soon transitioned to the P-3 "Orion" during the mid-1970s. From the initial P-3A models, Reserve aircrews transitioned to the more capable P-3B TACNA V MOD and then onto the P-3C. Eventually, COMRESPATWING Squadrons came to operate the most modem P-3Cs in the fleet, which included AlP, BMUP and Update III aircraft.

Throughout the 1970s and 1980s, Reserve MP A maintained a significant Cold War anti-submarine warfare force, and the Squadrons were part of the fabric of the entire country with units based from coast to coast. The Squadrons included, VP-60 and VP-90 (NAS Glenview, Illinois), VP-62 (NAS Jacksonville, Florida), VP-64 and VP-66 (NAS Willow Grove, Pennsylvania), VP-65 (NAS Point Mugu, California), VP-67 (NAS Memphis, Tennessee), VP-68 (NAF Washington, D.C.), VP-69 (NAS Whidbey Island, Washington), VP-91 (NAS Moffett Field, California), VP-92 (NAS South Weymouth, Massachusetts), VP-93 (NAF Detroit, Michigan), and VP-94 (NAS Belle Chase, LA).

With the fall of the Soviet Union and the resulting reduction in the size of the Navy, six Reserve Squadrons were disestablished and the East and West Coast Wings were consolidated into a single Wing, which became Commander Reserve Patrol Wing, currently located at NAS Willow Grove, Pennsylvania. Post-Cold War, COMRESPATWING Squadrons expanded their role by routinely integrating into Fleet operations and deploying year-round to worldwide locations in support of Fleet Commanders.

With the start of the 21st Century, a new challenge arose for the Reserve Patrol Community. Years of heavy usage on the nation's P-3 force took its toll and many aircraft started to reach the end of their service life. In order to provide a bridge to the follow-on Patrol Aircraft, the P-8A Poseidon, COMRESPATWING Units were called upon to embark upon an unprecedented integration and asset sharing initiative. To assure the maximum return on national assets, COMRESPATWING transferred its most capable P-3s to its Squadrons co-located with Active Component Squadrons and concurrently disestablished stand-alone P-3 Squadrons. With the disestablishment of COMRESPATWING on 30 June 2007, two remaining Reserve Patrol Squadrons will continue to serve the nation under the control of their Active Component Wings. The thousands of Officers, Chiefs, and Sailors who have served in Reserve Patrol Wing Units leave behind a proud legacy of professionalism, service and camaraderie.
                             COMMANDERS OF RESERVE PATROL WING 
			
                CAPT Joseph E. K1ause, USN 	        Oct 1970   Oct 1972 
                CAPT James A. McCraig, USN 	        Oct 1972   Sep 1974 
                CAPT William H. Saunders, III, USN 	Sep 1974   Ju1 1976 
                CAPT Donald R. Yeager, USN 		Jul 1976   Jul 1978 
                CAPT Richard J. Lanning, USN 		Jul 1978   Jul 1980 
                CAPT Richard K. Chambers, USNR 		Jul 1980   Aug 1982 
                CAPT Earl R. Riffle, USN 		Aug 1982   Sep 1984 
                CAPT Michael A. Nash, USN 		Sep 1984   Sep 1986 
                CAPT Gerald H. Mollencop, USNR 		Sep 1986   Jul 1989 
                CAPT Michael T. Korbet, USN 		Jul 1989   Jul 1991 
                CAPT Douglas R. Birr, USNR 		Jul 1991   Oct 1993 
                CAPT David C. Hull, USN 		Oct 1993   Apr 1995 
                CAPT Patrick B. Peterson, USNR 		Apr 1995   Jul 1996 
                CAPT Frederick S. Gay, USN 		Jul 1996   Jan 1998 
                CAPT Riley J. Gladden, USNR 		Jan 1998   Jul 1999 
                CAPT Robert A. Sinibaldi, Jr., USNR 	Jul 1999   Jul 2001 
                CAPT David L. Montgomery, USNR 		Jul 2001   Jul 2003 
                CAPT Michael J. Szostak, USN 		Jul 2003   Jun 2005 
                CAPT Christopher A. Patton, USN 	Jun 2005   Jun 2007 

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...COMRESPATWING Disestablishment Ceremony - June 23, 2007 - CD History (Squadrons: VP-60, VP-62, VP-64, VP-65, VP-66, VP-67, VP-68, VP-69, VP-90, VP-91, VP-92, VP-93 and VP-94)..." Contributed by ROBIDEAU, AWCS Larry Retired larobidoo@comcast.net [30JAN2008]

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HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...VP-92 - The Minutemen - Deactivation Ceremony - October 13, 2007..." [18NOV2007]

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HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...VP-92 air squadron marks end of an era - 10/15/2007 - By James Mixon, Times Record Contributor - With permission of The Times Record..." WebSite: TimesRecord http://www.timesrecord.com/ website/ main.nsf/ news.nsf/ 0/ 49D47352B00966B1052573750058C452? Opendocument [16OCT2007]

BRUNSWICK — Amid mixed emotions, an era ended Saturday at NAS Brunswick, Maine. The Navy's Minutemen Patrol Squadron 92 — VP-92 in air base parlance — was deactivated.

Commissioned in 1970, VP-92 was one of three Naval reserve patrol squadrons whose day-to-day duties included anti-submarine and anti-surface warfare, surface surveillance and intelligence, as well as counter-narcotics operations, mining and search and rescue.

The squadron, known as the "Minutemen," originally flew the Lockheed P2V Neptune but moved to the P-3 Orion in 1974 and has been flying them ever since.

"The transition from the P2 to the P-3 was like going from a stagecoach to a train," explained Ed Sabatini, a Minuteman and Plank Owner from 1970 to 1991. "The P2 wasn't pressurized, when it rained you got wet, you froze your butt off because the heaters didn't work."

The decision to deactivate the squadron was ultimately made by Rear Adm. Jeffrey Lemmons, who assured those in attendance Saturday during a ceremony to mark the squadron's demise that the deactivation was in no way related to the upcoming base closure in 2011. He did outline his reasons for a change: First, the P-3 is old and needs replacement. In 2013, the Navy will move to the bigger and more current P-8, maintaining its current stock of P-3s during the transition period.

Second, as Lemmons explained on Saturday, "The needs are many, the resources are few," and as the Navy finds itself engaged in a new type of war, its leaders see a need to rearrange the reserve and active duty to provide the best fleet readiness and operational capability for modern warfare.

VP-92's original mission was anti-submarine warfare during the Cold War. The enemy, largely, was the Soviet fleet. That's no longer the case.

"The problem is that when the Soviet Union went belly up, what we did came to an end," Sabatini said. "The Russians just parked their submarines."

Since then, the P-3s have been used for other things, but the plan is to transition the 300 or so remaining members of VP-92 into active duty positions, an arrangement that will better suit U.S. military needs in a post-Cold War environment that pits an all-volunteer U.S. military against enemies whose links are defined by ideological ties rather than national boundaries.

"This is a great squadron," Lemmons said on Saturday. "Performance was not part of this decision. VP-92 has always been full of top performers."

But even so, the air was somber and emotional in a hangar at BNAS, where close to 600 people came out to gather as the era of the Minutemen came to a close.

"Most of these guys flew together for 30 years," said recently retired Senior Chief Martin McCormack through wet eyes. "It's sad. Everyone has emotions about what happened, but we all understand. A lot of wet eyes here today."

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Navy to decom Maine anti-sub squadron - By Chris Amos - Staff writer..." WebSite: Navy Times http://www.navytimes.com/ news/ 2007/ 02/ ntpatrolsquadron070223/ [24FEB2007]

Waiting for permission to post entire article.


Circa 2006

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Naval Air Station Brunswick Brunswick, ME 11/21/2006 - (Squadrons Photograph's: VP-8, VP-10 & VP-26 and VP-92)..." WebSite: Topgun Photography http://topgunphotography.net/basevisits/Nasb/index.htm [16MAR2007]

Waiting for permission to post entire article.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...2006 Reserve Sailor of the Year Selected - Story Number: NNS060427-15 - Release Date: 4/27/2006 9:19:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Barrie Barber, Commander, Navy Reserve Force Public Affairs..." WebSite: Navy NewsStand http://www.news.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=23382 [28APR2006]

WASHINGTON (NNS) -- The U.S. Navy Reserve selected as the 2006 Reserve Sailor of the Year a Sailor who served under fire with the Marines in Operation Iraqi Freedom, in a ceremony held at Henderson Hall here April 27.

Chief of the Navy Reserve Force Vice Adm. John G. Cotton and a board of five force master chiefs selected Hospital Corpsman 1st Class David L. Worrell, leading petty officer for 3rd Battallion, 25th Marines, Regimental Combat Team 2, 2nd Marine Division.

Worrell, assigned to Navy Operational Support Center, Akron, Ohio, was chosen from among five finalists and 43,000 enlisted Navy Reservists nationwide and in service around the world.

The Dover, Ohio, native who works as a department manager at a hospital, served seven months in combat in Al Anbar, Iraq.

He oversaw the setup of temporary medical aid stations, repeatedly participated in patrols that came under insurgent attack, helped hunt for land mines and rendered life-saving medical aid to dozens of wounded Marines.

"I am extremely humbled," he said at the awards ceremony. "I was the last one of the group (of finalists) that I felt was going to get this award. It could have been any one of us. You all deserve it."

He will be meritoriously promoted to chief petty officer in a ceremony in the courtyard of the Pentagon in July.

"Worrell stands as a well-spoken, energetic Sailor and combat veteran who represents the best among Reservists," said Cotton.

According to Cotton, each finalist stood out as a high-achieving go-getter.

"They're all accomplished; they're all very well-qualified; they're all going to be chiefs," Cotton said.

The other finalists were Aviation Electronics Technician 1st Class Todd P. Brooks, assigned to VP-92 at NAS Brunswick, Maine; Hospital Corpsman 1st Class Aaron P. Clifford, assigned to 3rd Reconaissance Battalion, 3rd Marine Division at the Navy Operational Support Center, Fort Richardson, Alaska; Hospital Corpsman 1st Class Richard F. George, assigned to 4th Air and Naval Liaison Co., Navy Operational Support Center, West Palm Beach, Fla.; and Aviation Warfare Systems Operator 1st Class Robert F. Weber, assigned to Helicopter Squadron (HS) 75, NAS Jacksonville, Fla.

Navy Reserve Force Master Chief David R. Pennington, who oversaw the selection board, said the five finalists were well-rounded Sailors, each of whom received the Navy/Marine Corps Commendation Medal for their achievement.

According to Pennington, each has broadened their mind, given from their heart, worked with their hands, and worked in tough job assignments.

"None of them recognized themselves as heroes," said Command Master Chief Teresa Carroll, a selection board member from Naval Coastal Warfare Squadron 33. "That's what's so incredible. You could see the passion in their eyes."

"[Worrell] had a little of everything," Pennington said. "He is a fantastic ambassador for the Navy."

Readiness Command Mid-Atlantic Command Master Chief Dwight M. Holt, a selection board member, said Worrell showed he had faced the reality of combat bravely.

"He stood the watch, and he put himself in harm's way to save others," Holt said. "Those he could not save, you could see in his eyes it was part of him."

The hospital corpsman who joined the Navy Reserve three months after he left the active component said he enjoys the different opportunities the Navy Reserve has offered him.

"I absolutely love it," he said. "I wouldn't want to do anything else. I like the camaraderie and the teamwork in the Marines. It's a lot more job satisfaction."

During a three-day stay in the nation's capital, the Sailors and their spouses toured the White House, the Pentagon and visited national monuments and memorials.

The finalists also met privately with high-ranking military leaders, including Cotton, Assistant Secretary of Defense for Reserve Affairs Thomas F. Hall, Medal of Honor awardee Harvey "Barney" Barnum, and Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy (SS/AW) Terry Scott.

For related news, visit the Commander, Navy Reserve Force Navy NewsStand page at http://www.news.navy.mil/local/nrf/.


Circa 2005

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...//NO1650// - MSGID/GENADMIN/CNO N09F/10A/APR// - SUBJ/CNO ANNUAL AVIATION SAFETY AWARDS// - REF/A/DOC/OPNAVINST 1650.28// - NARR/REF A IS CHIEF OF NAVAL OPERATIONS AVIATION-RELATED SAFETY AWARDS// - POC/E. K. THOMPSON/CIV/NAVSAFECEN 10A/LOC:NORFOLK - /TEL:DSN 564-3520 X7226// - GENTEXT/REMARKS/1. PER REF A THE FOLLOWING COMMANDS HAVE BEEN SELECTED AS WINNERS OF THE CALENDAR YEAR 2005 CNO - AVIATION SAFETY AWARD (Few Squadrons Mentioned: VP-10, VP-92, VPU-2, VQ-1, VQ-2 and VX-1)..." WebSite: Safety Center http://safetycenter.navy.mil/awards/CNO_SafetyMsg05.txt [05JUN2006]

A. COMNAVAIRLANT

B. COMNAVAIRPACC. COMMARFORCOM
    MARINE TRANSPORTATION SQUADRON 1
    MARINE LIGHT/ATTACK HELICOPTER SQUADRON 167
    MARINE MEDIUM HELICOPTER SQUADRON 264
    MARINE TACTICAL ELECTRONIC WARFARE SQUADRON 1
    MARINE FIGHTER ATTACK SQUADRON 251
    MARINE MEDIUM HELICOPTER SQUADRON 266
    MARINE LIGHT/ATTACK HELICOPTER SQUADRON 269
    MARINE FIGHTER ATTACK SQUADRON 115
    MARINE AERIAL REFUELER TRANSPORT SQUADRON 252
    MARINE ALL WEATHER FIGHTER ATTACK SQUADRON 533
D. COMMARFORPAC
    MARINE LIGHT ATTACK HELICOPTER SQUADRON 369
    MARINE MEDIUM HELICOPTER SQUADRON 364
    MARINE HEAVY HELICOPTER SQUADRON 465
    MARINE MEDIUM HELICOPTER SQUADRON 262
    MARINE ALL WEATHER FIGHTER ATTACK SQUADRON 242
    MARINE AERIAL REFUELER TRANSPORT SQUADRON 152
    MARINE HEAVY HELICOPTER SQUADRON 363
    MARINE HEAVY HELICOPTER SQUADRON 466
    MARINE FIGHTER ATTACK TRAINING SQUADRON 101
    MARINE ATTACK SQUADRON 211
    MARINE MEDIUM HELICOPTER TRAINING SQUADRON 164
    MARINE MEDIUM HELICOPTER SQUADRON 161
    MARINE CORPS AIR STATION YUMA
E. COMNAVAIRFORESF. CG FOURTH MAW
    MARINE LIGHT ATTACK HELICOPTER SQUADRON 773
    MARINE MEDIUM HELICOPTER SQUADRON 774
    MARINE MEDIUM HELICOPTER SQUADRON 764
    MARINE FIGHTER ATTACK SQUADRON 142
    MARINE AERIAL REFUELER TRANSPORT SQUADRON 452
G. NATRACOMH. COMNAVAIRSYSCOM
    AIR TEST AND EVALUATION SQUADRON 20
2.   REQUEST CONTROLLING CUSTODIANS DISSEMINATE INFO TO ALL WINNERS. CITATIONS AND PLAQUES WILL BE FORWARDED TO COGNIZANT CONTROLLING CUSTODIANS FOR PRESENTATION.

3.   THESE AWARD WINNERS ARE RECOGNIZED FOR THEIR COMMITMENT TO PROFESSIONALISM, SOLID LEADERSHIP AND COMPETENT RISK MANAGEMENT THAT LEAD TO SAFE AND EFFECTIVE OPERATIONS. VERY WELL DONE TO ALL HANDS.//

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Navy Marine Corps News - Aug 13, 2005 - Active/Reserve Integration - VP-26, VP-30 and VP-92...VIDEO..." WebSite: Navy News http://www.news.navy.mil/management/videodb/player/video.aspx?ID=5344 [14AUG2005]


Circa 2004

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...2004 Navy Reserve Photographer of the Year Selected - Story Number: NNS041015-09 - Release Date: 10/15/2004 10:40:00 PM - By Chief Journalist Maria R. Escamilla, Commander, Naval Reserve Force Public Affairs..." Navy News Stand http://www.news.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=15546 [02MAR2005]

NEW ORLEANS (NNS) -- A panel of judges selected Journalist 2nd Class Leslie A. Shively, from San Antonio, as the 2004 Navy Reserve Photographer of the Year, Oct. 13.

Shively's winning portfolio was chosen from a pool of entries sent in by Navy Reserve photographers from around the world.

Shively, a professional civilian journalist, is currently assigned to Navy Office of Community Outreach Det. San Antonio. Her contest photos were taken while she was assigned to Naval Mobile Construction Battalion 22, Det. San Antonio, Fort Worth, Texas.

This is the second time Shively has been selected as Navy Reserve Photographer of the Year. Her first time was in 2002.

"I've got the best job in the Navy!" Shively said. "I get to serve my country and fellow citizens doing what I love — talking to people, photographing what we do during training, and spreading the news about the important work our Navy people are doing here and overseas battling terrorism."

Shively was also awarded first place in separate categories for combat camera, news and illustrative photography.

Other first place winners are Ensign Darin Russell, of Naval Air Warfare Center 0276, China Lake, Calif., for picture story, portrait/personality and pictorial; Photographer's Mate 1st Class Gary P. Bonaccorso, VP-92, NAS Brunswick, Maine, for feature; and Photographer's Mate 1st Class Timothy P. Duckworth, Naval Special Warfare Command Operation Support Team 2, Little Creek, Va., for sports.

Other winners who placed in the category competitions are Photographer's Mate 1st Class Dean M. Dunwody, Mobile Public Affairs Team Det. 208; Utilitiesman 2nd Class Kenneth J. Irwin, Naval Construction Force Support Unit 2, Port Hueneme, Calif.; and Journalist 2nd Class Mark E. O'Donald, Navy Information Bureau Det. 101, Newport, R.I


Circa 2003

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Patrol Plane Commander Board...Pitchlocked Prop In Action - by Lcdr. Todd Kousky/ P-3 - Lcdr. Kousky is the SELRES ASO for VP-92..." Naval Safety Center WebSite: http://www.safetycenter.navy.mil/media/approach/vault/articles/2003/0563.htm [04JUN2005]

Propeller malfunctions on the P-3 Orion are considered the most dangerous and complex emergencies. The prop procedures have evolved over the years to encompass some challenging conditions which weigh conflicting requirements. In one mishap, a rotating pitchlocked propeller pumped all oil out of the gear box, which subsequently overheated, and the crew watched the 1000 pound prop melt and fall off the plane. In another mishap, a pitchlocked prop blade separated, sliced through the fuselage, securing all engines and electric power, resulting in the crew performing a forced ditch in the sea with all crewmen making it out unharmed.

It's no surprise that many Patrol Plane Commander (PPC) boards include a propeller malfunction, embellished with foreign field operations and a few other odds and ends thrown in, to allow the prospective PPC to exercise judgment and apply NATOPS procedures/CRM. The upgrading pilots often claim "that scenario would never happen", but in fact there have been enough HAZREPS and Approach articles documented over the years to prove otherwise. Recently I experienced a propeller malfunction and felt like I was living out one of these PPC board scenarios. In my case, there was no dramatic outcome like a prop melting off or a ditch into the sea, but never the less there were a few challenges along the way.

In April/May of 2003, I was the second pilot of Patrol Squadron 92's crew 7, detached to FOL Manta Ecuador to conduct counter-narcotics operations. We remained vigilant throughout our detachment ops because we were operating at a relatively new location that had no terminal radar and were dealing with air traffic controllers who spoke very little conversational English. On the day of the emergency, we were fueled for a standard 10-hour mission. About 45 minutes into the flight while descending to our operating area, our number four engine oversped to 103.5%. That is the range, for which on certain malfunctions, the propeller may pitchlock fixing the blade angle of what is normally a variable pitch prop to prevent further change. Sometimes the overspeed may be caused electronically by the propeller synchrophaser and, if not pitchlocked, the overspeed may be corrected simply by turning off the sync switch. The prop procedures are written to encompass numerous malfunctions and are written after an "if-then fashion". If you "have this, do that"; if you "have this go to step so and so".

The incident occurred while in a descent to onstation. Immediately we stopped the descent and leveled off while initiating the propeller malfunction procedures. We did not know at this time that the prop was indeed pitchlocked. As we leveled we observed the RPM come back to 100% from 103.5%, with a fuel flow of 580 pph and engine turbine inlet temperature (TIT) of 600 deg C, all text book indications of a propeller that has decoupled from the engine's power section. We reached the point in the procedures where we determine if the prop is pitchlocked.

Now, only 30 seconds into the procedure, our CRM had broken down. The propeller was pitchlocked, but remained coupled to the engine. By coincidence, we initially had indications that the engine and prop were decoupled. Exercising the procedures, the pilot and copilot realized the prop was coupled, but the flight engineer (FE) still believed it was decoupled. In the P-3 the FE reads the procedures from the NATOPS manual and he began to proceed down the decoupled propeller section. After reading a few paragraphs, the Plane Commander realized that the cockpit crew had gone in two different directions so he stepped back to get the cockpit crew on the same page.

After reaching a stabilized condition, we turned toward base and remained VFR. We dumped the fuel that we could jettison from the center fuselage tank to reduce our landing weight. We began our coordination with the foreign controllers and the comms were exceptionally smooth. Next we had to decide whether or not to hold over the field and burn our fuel down, or to land at a maximum overweight of 114,000 pounds. The runway was long, 10,000 feet, and dry. The calculated landing ground roll distance was 4000 feet. We also checked climb performance, for a mildly sloping terrain upfield, in the event of a waveoff in the hot environment and overweight condition. Considering that prop blades may separate with certain pitchlocked malfunctions, the NFO's did not sit at their stations, which are in the propeller 'plane of rotation'. Weighing all the factors and utilizing good CRM, we decided to land at the max landing weight while conditions were relatively stable vice burning down to a lower weight and risking some unforeseen complication developing down the road.

With a pitchlocked prop the procedure calls for fuel chopping the engine prior to landing at a position far enough from the runway that power and control changes can be established prior to touchdown. There are three possible outcomes. The prop may reach certain conditions indicating enough prop fluid remaining to feather the propeller; it may windmill in the airstream (like a pinwheel) coupled to the engine; or it may windmill decoupled. We decided to fuel chop the engine just prior to the turn to a long ILS final. Our prop remained coupled to the engine and windmilled. The PPC made a standard approach and landing experiencing minimal control difficulty. The prop had been fixed at a very large (favorable) blade angle, and stopped rotating after landing rollout. Maintenance quickly determined that an internal failure of the propeller control had caused all propeller fluid to enter the atmospheric sump.

This event serves as a testament to successful CRM training, NATOPS procedures, and overall P-3 in-flight and simulator training. With a complex malfunction and confusing indications, good CRM skills kept our flight station coordinated. NATOPS states that it, "cannot cover every conceivable malfunction" and allows for PPC judgment, especially if faced with conflicting requirements. Judgment, CRM and headwork are some of the skills evaluated on PPC boards. We create scenarios to mirror this real world incident. In the boardroom the scenarios are academic and may seem far-fetched, but sometimes these complex events really do happen.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...TSC changes hands - By JO1 Jeremy Allen, NAR PAO - 10/19/2003 7:30 AM EST - Naval Reserve NAS Brunswick, Maine http://reserves.navy.mil/ Public/ Staff/ Centers/ Forces+Command/ Centers/Naval+Air+Reserves/ Centers/ Brunswick/ WhatsNew/ ReservistNews/ TSC+CoC.htm..." [25APR2005]

NAR BRUNSWICK—Saturday September 20, at a ceremony held at the Surface Reserve Center the Naval Reserve Tactical Support Unit (TSC) 0197 changed their leadership.

Cmdr. Darwin Webster, who is heading for the NR Commander, Submarine Development Squadron Twelve Detachment 101 unit in New London, Conn., was replaced by the new Commanding Officer Cmdr. Gregory Brown, who is coming from VP-92.

"To me the best thing is being a part of the U.S. Navy," said Cmdr. Darwin Webster, while reflecting on his ceremony. "It has less to do with the particular billet or unit, although I could not have asked for a better assignment. I honestly believe that the U.S. Navy is composed of the most professional and dedicated people in the world. Just having the opportunity to work with the Selected Reservists and the active duty personnel assigned to Commander Patrol and Reconnissance Wing Five (CPRW-5) has been my greatest reward. A close second would be the privilege of helping junior people advance in their careers."

Thou these two men will come from different backgrounds they now share the one thing in common. Leading the men and women of TSC 0197.

"I've been a reservist since early 1994," said Cmdr. Gregory Brown who hails from Newton, Mass., "Being selected as the new commanding officer was obviously a great honor. I hope to be able to rise to the high standard of professionalism and dedication the members of the TSC have already set."

When asked what he will miss most about his post, Cmdr Webster had this to say.

"Hopefully, very little," said Cmdr. Webster. "I plan to continue to maintain contact with many of the great people that I have worked with over the past two years. It really doesn't get any better than this."

The new commanding officer has already set his sites on a new goal.

"I would like to make recruiting and retention a priority during my two years here," said Cmdr. Brown, of what he would like to do first. "Of course serving CPRW-5 in the best possible way is our first priority. But I'm looking forward to the next two years."

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Noel Davis Trophy Winners Announced - Story Number: NNS030408-02 - Release Date: 4/7/2003 6:57:00 PM...http://www.news.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=6710..." WebSite: Navy NewsStand http://www.news.navy.mil/ [08APR2003]

Noel Davis Trophy Winners Announced
Story Number: NNS030408-02
Release Date: 4/7/2003 6:57:00 PM
From Commander, Naval Reserve Force Public Affairs

NEW ORLEANS (NNS) -- Commander, Naval Air Force Reserve recently announced the winners of the 2002 Noel Davis trophies, an award which signifies battle efficiency.

"Your outstanding achievements reflect tremendous teamwork and dedication to the Naval Air Reserve team," said Commander, Naval Air Reserve Force Rear Adm. Dan Kloeppel to the winning squadrons.

Naval Reserve squadron winners were:

- Helicopter Combat Support Squadron (HCS) 5 of NAS Point Mugu, California, currently deployed to 5th Fleet in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom. HCS-5 operates HH-60H helicopters in combat search and rescue operations.

- Patrol Squadron (VP) 92 of NAS Brunswick, Maine. VP-92 is engaged in anti-submarine warfare, flying P-3C Orion aircraft.

- Fighter Squadron (VFA) 201 of NAS Joint Reserve Base Fort Worth, Texas, currently deployed on USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71) engaged in Operation Iraqi Freedom. VFA-201 flies F/A-18C Hornet strike fighters.

- Adversary Fighter Squadron (VFC) 13 of NAS Fallon, Nevada. VFC-13 flies F-5 Tiger aircraft.

- Fleet Tactical Support Squadron (VR) 53 of Naval Air Field Washington. VR-53 operates C-130T Hercules, a heavy-lift aircraft.

- Fleet Tactical Support Squadron (VR) 56 of NAS Oceana, Virginia, which operates the C-9B Skytrain medium-lift aircraft.

- Fleet Tactical Support Squadron (VR) 61 of NAS Whidbey Island, Washington, which also operates the C-9B Skytrain. All of the VR squadrons are currently rotating aircraft through worldwide deployments.


Circa 2002

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...UNITAS Atlantic Phase Hones Readiness Level of Multinational Naval Force - Story Number: NNS021122-17 - Release Date: 11/25/2002 5:00:00 AM - By LT. j.g. Ligia Cohen, U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command..." Navy News Stand http://www.news.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=4711 [02MAR2005]

SALVADOR, Brazil (NNS) -- The complexities of 12 surface combatants, two submarines, and several helicopters and fix-wing aircraft from six nations operating together as a combined force was the hallmark of UNITAS Atlantic Phase.

Hosted by the Brazilian Navy, naval forces from Argentina, Spain, Uruguay, Venezuela and the United States spent 20 days engaged in exercises designed to improve interoperability and to foster understanding among the naval forces of the participant nations.

Rear Adm. Vinson E. Smith, Commander U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command, commands the UNITAS task force and is in charge of all the U.S. naval forces participating in the four phases of this annual exercise. UNITAS Atlantic phase concluded this year's cycle, which started in February with the Caribbean phase hosted by the United States. In July, Chile hosted the Pacific Phase, while the amphibious phase was conducted bilaterally with several South American nations during a four-month deployment of USS Portland (LSD 37) and the embarked 2nd Marine Expeditionary Force.

Under the operational command of Capt. James L. Martin, Commander Destroyer Squadron 6, the U.S. task group engaged in training and operations in electronic, anti-submarine, anti-surface and submarine warfare. Communications, air defense and maritime interdiction operations were also heavily emphasized during UNITAS.

The U.S. participation included guided-missile cruiser USS Thomas S. Gates (CG 51), guided-missile frigate USS Simpson (FFG 56), P-3C aircraft from VP-92 and VP-61, two SH-60B helicopter detachments, a Fleet Maritime Patrol Mobile Operations Control Center, a detachment from Fleet Composite Squadron (VC) 6 and a communications assistance team.

"The wide range of naval operations covered in UNITAS Atlantic phase presented a great opportunity for participants to operate and train in a multiship environment," said Martin. "It's not just the surface portion, but also submarine and air exercises keep the crews focused on areas not normally exercised in this area of operations."

The at-sea portion of the exercise started off with demanding close-range tactical maneuvering operations. At times operating as close as 250 yards, the ships executed different types of formations for war fighting and practiced ship handling during evolutions, such as underway replenishments, restrictive waterways transit and air defense.

"These exercises allowed me to experience the challenges of working in extremely demanding situations and creating successful solutions," said Lt.j.g. Denise Garcia aboard USS Thomas S. Gates, homeported in Pascagoula, Miss. "Every (bridge) watch brought a new scenario and helped sharpen my problem-solving skills."

A series of opposed underway replenishments, vertical replenishments and refueling at sea operations were carried out to hone a key element in the ability of naval forces to sustain operations at sea, and the procurement of goods and supplies. During the exercise, the multinational force was refueled at sea by the Brazilian ship BNS Almirante Gastao Motta (G 23) and by the Venezuelan ship ARBV Ciudad Bolivar (T 81), while the air safety of the ships was ensured by the Brazilian ship BNS Bosisio (F 48), which was responsible for identifying and clearing all aircraft approaching within 50 nautical miles of the task group.

"The exercises tested the task group's ability to conduct replenishments at sea while under simultaneous attacks by diesel submarines, fast patrol boats and fighter aircraft," said Chief Operations Specialist (SW) Frederick Warren from U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command.

Thomas S. Gates led the training on maritime interdiction operations (MIO). These evolutions are widely conducted during coalition operations to fight illegal traffic and maintain the safety of the sea-lanes. During the MIO training, the Thomas S. Gates team boarded the Spanish ship SRS Reina Sofia.

"During a boarding, the team has three main goals: take control of the bridge, the engineering plant and the crew," said Senior Chief Gunner's Mate Dionicio Delgado, the MIO/ VBSS (visit, board, search and seizure) boarding team leader. "MIO boardings are inherently dangerous operations, and the training allows us to focus in the safety aspects of the evolution."

In support of one of the main goals of the exercise, to develop the force ability to coordinate attacks and battle group defense, the ships conducted a variety of live fire evolutions ranging from .50-caliber guns to surface-to-air missiles. The U.S. flagship Thomas S. Gates scored an impressive skin-on-skin kill on the first pass of the remote-controlled BMQ-64E aerial target drone launched by VC-6. On its part, the Mayport, Fla.-based frigate USS Simpson displayed readiness by successfully engaging the target.

"We got everything together and demonstrated how a successful missile shoot is done," said Fire Controlman 2nd Class (SW) Drew Holm, the weapons console operator aboard Simpson. "It was very exciting when I saw birds affirm and when I got batteries release."

"Once the bird leaves the rail, there is a combined feeling of relief and pride knowing that you got your job done," added Fire Controlman 1st Class (SW) Jason Fowler, Simpson's weapons control officer.

Later during the exercise, the participating ships conducted a three-day freeplay scenario, which involved a combined multinational response to enforce international sanctions similar to existing U.N. resolutions, which the Navy has been upholding for the previous decade.

"Submarines, aircraft and surface combatants combined to enforce an embargo. They established a no-fly zone and conducted a naval blockade against the aggressor," said Warren. "Additional challenging exercises conducted include a coordinated helo (penguin) attack, surface gunnery firing and a choke point transit exercise."

More than 60 operational events were completed during UNITAS Atlantic Phase. Each event was designed by naval experts from all nations involved to resemble to real-world situations.

"The Brazilian navy was a great host and put together an excellent schedule of events," said Commodore Martin. "This phase of UNITAS was extremely beneficial for the defense cooperation among all the participating countries."

After 59 years of existence, UNITAS, the premiere naval exercise in the region, continues to be a uniting force, bringing nations together to enhance the region defense and military interoperability.


Circa 2001

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "... Elite Venture 2001 Tests Reservists for Drug - By Kerry Morrow..." WebSite: NAVSEA http://www.navsea.navy.mil/ featurestories_content.asp?txtDataID=1089&txtType ID=4 [07FEB2007]

Naval Reservists from Pennsylvania and Michigan shed their civilian attire in early June for a chance to suit up for some hard core simulated drug-interdiction training.

Elite Venture 2001 was held at Selfridge Air National Guard Base in Michigan to test the skills of Reservists who could find themselves assigned to a drug-interdiction mission.

Every aspect of Elite Venture, hosted by Tactical Support Center (TSC) 1173, an element of Naval Air Reserve Activity Center (NARA) Detroit, Mich., was planned to mirror real-time missions.

Active-duty personnel from Mobile Operation Control Center (MOCC) NAS Willow Grove, Pennsylvania, arrived a few days prior to the exercise to help the Reservists train for drug-interdiction scenarios.

Reserve aircrews from the Fixed Wing VP-92, NAS Willow Grove, Pennsylvania, brought a P-3-II plane to fly mission scenarios over Lake Superior, Lake Huron and Michigan's Upper Peninsula.

"Our yearly MOCC is the best training evolution we do here in Michigan," said Cmdr. Anthony T. Bell, TSC 1173's commanding officer. "We're so happy the Willow Grove VP-92 unit is flexible enough to come to Michigan to help us train."

The communications equipment and aircraft were protected 24-hours a day throughout the exercise by members of Force Protection Law Enforcement Security Unit (FP LEPSU) 0192, NARA Detroit. Elite Venture provided LEPSU personnel with valuable watch-standing experience. Each mission began with an intelligence briefing from Joint Forces Intelligence Command (JFIC) 0846.

Scenarios included a simulated "black list" of freighters suspected of dumping drugs overboard for pickup, and locations of possible drug processing labs.

Flight crews were instructed to make up to two attempts to identify a freighter, and if unable to do so, request permission from the watch commander for additional passes.

Aircrew would communicate a freighter's identity and location to personnel from TSC 1173 and TSC 0273, also based at NARA Detroit.

TSC Sailors plotted the position and course of each contact and logged the information into a computer database. Coordinates of hypothetical drug labs located deep in a Michigan forest were also logged. A debriefing was held after each mission to evaluate results.

Since 1998, the TSC units at NARA Detroit have held similar annual training exercises.

Exercises such as Elite Venture provide the valuable training needed to fulfill the unit's support mission with the Fleet's drug interdiction and Anti-Submarine Warfare activities.


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