VPNAVY VP-5 Mercury Capsule Recovery
http://www.vpnavy.org
VPNAVY Address

HistoryVP-8 HistoryHistory

Circa 2009

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Haiti's Shattered Landscape: A View From Above - Navy crew sets out to capture images of a shattered landscape by Timothy J. Gibbons - Story updated at 1:31 AM on Monday, Jan. 25, 2010. Squadron Mentioned: CPRW-11, VP-8, VP-16 and VP-26..." WebSite: Florida-Times Union http://jacksonville.com/ [25JAN2010]

Waiting for permission to post entire article.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCamera090714-N-2491R-045 JACKSONVILLE, Fla. (July 14, 2009) "...Rear Adm. Bill Moran, commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Group, holds an all hands Admiral's call attended by VP-5, VP-8, VP-16, and VPU-1 stationed atNAS Jacksonville, Florida. Moran stressed the importance of the patrol and reconnaissance communities' role in the anti submarine warfare mission and also discussed the upcoming platform transition to the P8 Poseidon from the P-3C Orion aircraft. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Charles E. White/Released)..." WebSite: NavyNews http://www.navy.mil/ [22JUL2009]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCamera090714-N-3013W-035 JACKSONVILLE, Fla. (July, 14 2009) "...Rear Adm. Bill Moran, commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Group, holds an all hands Admiral's call attended by VP-5, VP-8, VP-16, and VPU-1 stationed atNAS Jacksonville, Florida. Moran stressed the importance of the patrol and reconnaissance communities' role in the anti submarine warfare mission and also discussed the upcoming platform transition to the P8 Poseidon from the P-3C Orion aircraft. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Charles E. White/Released)..." WebSite: NavyNews http://www.navy.mil/ [22JUL2009]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...VP-8 "Fighting Tigers" Write New Chapter in Squadron History By LT(jg) Donald Lauderdale, VP-8 PAO - Thursday, June 18, 2009..." WebSite: JaxAirNews http://www.jaxairnews.com/ [19JUN2009]

June 10 marked the beginning of a new chapter in the 66-year history of VP-8 when the squadron's last P-3C arrived at NAS Jacksonville, Florida from the Middle East.

The crew included "Fighting Tigers" Commanding Officer Cmdr. Sean Liedman. They were welcomed by Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing Eleven Capt. Kyle Cozad, Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing Five Capt. Jim Hoke, and NAS Jacksonville, Florida Commanding Officer Capt. Jack Scorby Jr. at a special ceremony held at their new home in Hangar 511.

The Fighting Tiger's skipper and his crew were met by squadron members, families, friends, local representatives and base employees gathered to officially welcome them to their new home.

"On this last deployment, you set the bar. You made a difference. You went to some of the world's most dangerous places and supported our warfighters," said Hoke.

"As we saw with the Maersk Alabama situation, when there were things that had to be done in theater, the Tigers were the first to be called. Today is kind of bittersweet for me because this is the beginning of the end of CPRW-5 and squadrons at NAS Brunswick, Maine. This is the fifth time VP-8 has moved during the span of their history and each time you have set the standards and I have no doubt you will do that here. Thank you for your service, thanks for what you did with Wing Five and thanks for what you did for your country during the past six months," said Hoke.

The squadron was then officially welcomed by their new wing commodore. "In addition to thanking VP-8, I'd like to thank the folks who have made this happen. This is a historic move and for the past two and a half years, we have all looked forward to making this move a reality. I especially want to thank the families for helping with this move and welcome home the Tigers. You are home!" added Cozad.

"Thank you for welcoming VP-8 to our new homeport at NAS Jacksonville, Florida," Liedman told the crowd from the podium. "Today is historic, because as VP-8 closes out 38 years of service at NAS Brunswick, Maine we open a new chapter at NAS Jacksonville, Florida. I can't think of a better way to put a bookmark between those two chapters than to do it in conjunction with returning from our highly successful deployment to the Middle East and Africa."

"During our deployment, this incredible team of men and women standing proudly in front of you in their desert uniforms safety executed more than 600 sorties and 4,400 flight operations. And, they achieved that remarkable record despite operating in some harsh environments.

These remarkable Sailors pressed on to accomplish the mission, conquering every challenge with pride and professionalism," continued Liedman. "But in my opinion, the real heroes to this story are the Tiger families. In addition to overcoming the normal challenges in the absence of their spouses, many of these families executed a 1,300-mile journey from NAS Brunswick, Maine to NAS Jacksonville, Florida. Now we look forward to adding to our 66-year legacy at our new home at NAS Jax."

VP-8 deployed in December 2008 from their former homeport at NAS Brunswick, Maine. During their six-month deployment to Al Udeid Air Base in Qatar and Camp Lemonier, Djibouti, the squadron flew in support of Operations Enduring Freedom, Iraqi Freedom and coalition counter-piracy operations in the Gulf of Aden and Somali Basin.

The Fighting Tigers generated an impressive 97 percent mission completion rate during the deployment despite the challenges of operating from the expeditionary environments of Qatar and Djibouti.

Aircrews from VP-8 were the first Department of Defense asset to come to the aid of the motor vessel Maersk Alabama and provided round-the-clock surveillance until the rescue of the ship's captain, Richard Phillips.

At NAS Jacksonville, Florida, VP-8 will take up residence in the newly opened Hangar 511. The relocation from New England to Florida comes as NAS Brunswick, Maine is scheduled to close under the Base Realignment and Closure plan.

"There are a lot of people who are really going to miss Maine, " said LT(jg) Liz Bennett.

"But we have a lot to look forward to here in NAS Jacksonville, Florida. I know there are a bunch of us that can't wait to hit the beach and start our summer."

Over the next year, VP-8 will be followed by VP-10 and VP-26 as they depart NAS Brunswick, Maine on deployment before relocating to NAS Jacksonville, Florida. With the return from deployment of VP-8's last aircraft, the Fighting Tigers look forward to opening a new chapter in their storied squadron history.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCamera090610-N-3666B-002 JACKSONVILLE, Fla. (June 10, 2009) "...Patrol Squadron Eight (VP-8) Commanding Officer Cmdr. Wes Naylor greets wife and daughter after returning home on VP-5's last plane from deployment. (U.S. Navy Photo by Naval Air Crewman Airman Scott Beach/Released)..." WebSite: NavyNews http://www.navy.mil/ [10AUG2009]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCamera090610-N-3666B-001 JACKSONVILLE, Fla. (June 10, 2009) "...A P-3C Orion assigned to the "Tigers" of Patrol Squadron Eight (VP-8) returns to its new homebase at NAS Jacksonville, Florida after a six-month deployment to the Middle East. (U.S. Navy photo by Naval Air Crewman Airman Scott Beach/Released)..." WebSite: NavyNews http://www.navy.mil/ [10AUG2009]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCamera090610-N-3013W-019 JACKSONVILLE, Fla. (June 10, 2009) "...The NAS Jacksonville, Florida Fire Department welcomes Commanding Officer Cmdr. Sean Liedman and the "Fighting Tigers" of VP-8 from a six-month deployment to their new home port in NAS Jacksonville, Florida. Patrol squadrons based in NAS Brunswick, Maine are transitioning to NAS Jacksonville, Florida. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Charles White/Released)..." WebSite: Navy NewsStand http://www.navy.mil/ [29JUN2008]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...One P-3 squadron comes home, another joins the flock - One helped fight pirates and the other aided in a plane crash search - by Timothy J. Gibbons - Thursday, Jun. 11, 2009...Squadrons Mentioned: VP-5 and VP-8..." WebSite: WOKV http://www.jacksonville.com/ [12JUN2009]

Waiting for permission to post entire article.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Squadron Returns After Taking On Somali Pirates by Sam Jordan - June 10, 2009 7:29 PM...Squadrons Mentioned: VP-5 and VP-8..." WebSite: WOKV http://wokv.com/ [11JUN2009]

NAS Jacksonville, Florida has welcomed back an air squadron that helped combat piracy of the coast of Somalia.

For the past six months, the VP-8 "Fighting Tigers" were in Iraq, as well as the Gulf or Aden and Somali Basin, and that's where pirates famously captured Captain Richard Phillips and his Maersk Alabama crew in April.

Commander Sean Liedman says they were the first Department of Defense asset on the scene in that incident and in others.

Meanwhile the VP-5 "Mad Foxes" returned to NAS Jacksonville, Florida Wednesday as well after six months operating overseas.

Among other duties, the squadron of P-3s was called on to help in the search and rescue of Air France Flight 447, which went down off the coast of Brazil last week.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Squadron Returns After Taking On Somali Pirates by Sam Jordan - June 10, 2009 7:29 PM...Squadrons Mentioned: VP-5 and VP-8..." WebSite: WOKV http://wokv.com/ [11JUN2009]

Waiting for permission to post entire article.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...VP-8 Touches Down, Begins Historic Transition by AWVAN Scott Beach - Staff Writer - Thursday, June 4, 2009..." WebSite: JaxAirNews http://adserver1.harvestadsdepot.com/jaxairnews/ss/jaxairnews/ [05JUN2009]

Six months ago, the "Fighting Tigers" of VP-8 bid farewell to their families at NAS Brunswick, Maine as they deployed to the Middle East and Japan. On May 27, some of those same families gathered at Hangar 511 at NAS Jacksonville, Florida to welcome the first of the squadron's P-3C Orion aircraft to their new duty station.

Friends and families awaiting the afternoon arrival found it difficult to contain their anticipation. Every P-3 flying over the base excited them as they hoped it was "their crew." Then, precisely at 1 p.m.– VP-8 Orion number 295 landed and taxied down the ramp with an American flag flying from the overhead hatch of the cockpit. After cutting engines and securing the aircraft, VP-8 Executive Officer Cmdr. Jiancarlo Villa led his crew down the ladder to a historic homecoming.

"This is exciting," said Villa after he greeted his family. "We're just trying to get everyone settled into the routine of a new duty station. The families sacrificed greatly to move from Maine to Florida during deployment. For us, it's exciting to be some of the first to get down here. We're all really looking forward to integrating with the other squadrons and becoming part of the Jacksonville community."

After AW2 Scott Wagner hugged and kissed his wife, Stephanie, she introduced him to their daughter, Grace, who was born during his deployment.

"I've never felt like this – it is an amazing feeling to come home from a successful deployment and finally see my daughter," said Wagner. "Maine is a beautiful place, but I'll take warmth over snow any time. It's definitely going to be a great lifestyle down here."

The Fighting Tigers are in the process of moving into their new spaces at Hangar 511, a home it will share with VP-5, VP-16, VP-62 and VPU-1.

"In the first two weeks of June, we'll be welcoming our maintainers' airlift, plus, three more P-3s," said Villa. "Our final P-3 is scheduled to arrive June 10 with our skipper, Cmdr. Sean Liedman and Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing Five Capt. Jim Hoke."

As part of the BRAC 2005 realignment, VP-Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing Eleven will assume the administration, operation and oversight for the three squadrons (VP-8, VP-10, VP-26) moving to NAS Jacksonville, Florida. NAS Brunswick, Maine is scheduled for closure in May 2011.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraVP-8 History "...VP-8: Liedman Assumes Command From Wiese - Thursday, May 7, 2009..." WebSite: JaxAirNews http://adserver1.harvestadsdepot.com/jaxairnews/ss/jaxairnews/ [08MAY2009]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...FLOOR SCHEDULE FOR WEDNESDAY, APRIL 22, 2009 - H.Res. 339 – Expressing the sense of the United States House of Representatives regarding the hijacking of the Maersk Alabama, the kidnapping of Captain Richard Phillips by Somali pirates, the rescue of Captain Phillips by United States Navy SEALs and the crews of the USS Bainbridge, USS Boxer, USS Halyburton and VP-8 (Reps. Langevin/Welch – Armed Services) ..." WebSite: CongressMatters http://www.congressmatters.com/ [23APR2009]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraVP-40 History "...Fighting Marlins Take Part In Under Sea Warfare Eexercise by LT(jg) Jason Dietz VP-40 - Thursday, March 26, 2009 (Squadrons Mentioned: VP-5, VP-8, VP-9, VP-40, VP-47 and maintainers from CMO-2, CMO-10, CMO-11 and CPRW-2..." WebSite: Northwest Navigator http://www.northwestnavigator.com/ [27MAR2009]

Photograph Caption: The Fighting Marlins of VP-40 recently participated in take part in an under sea warfare exercise with the USS John C. Stennis Strike Group off the coast of Okinawa.The Fighting Marlins of VP-40 recently took part in the USS John C. Stennis Strike Group Under Sea Warfare Exercise (USWEX) out of NAF Kadena, Okinawa, Japan.

One of the largest exercises in recent years, the exercise was conducted overseas in the 7th Fleet area of responsibility. The event took place off the coast of Okinawa and included participants from the Stennis strike group, forward deployed naval forces from CTF-70, maritime patrol forces from CTF-72, three surface ships, three submarines as well as three P-3 aircrews from the Japanese Maritime Self-Defense Force (JMSDF).

The Fighting Marlins, along with VP-5, VP-8, VP-9, VP-47 and maintainers from CMO-2, CMO-10 and CMO-11, formed a combined detachment under the leadership of Commander, CPRW-2, encompassing sixteen combat aircrews and eight P-3s. They provided continuous 24-hour operational support to the Strike Group throughout the exercise and stood ready alerts able to react to any potential real world events.

The exercise spanned over five days of around-the-clock operations including several weeks of joint planning with the Strike Group, who was en-route to their six-month Western Pacific (WESTPAC) deployment.

With an average of three planes airborne at any given time during the exercise, the maintainers tirelessly worked to have aircraft available for real world events including the numerous scheduled exercise events. As expected, they answered the challenge, launching fifty-one sorties of the fifty-two scheduled over the course of the exercise.

For the Combat aircrews from VP-40 the exercise provided invaluable "real world" experience in a dynamic and fast paced environment.

The crews successfully balanced the high operational demands and minimum turn-around times without missing a beat. In the condensed time span of the exercise, the detachment amassed just over three hundred flight hours.

The four Marlin aircrews flew over one hundred hours during sixteen events, which accounted for one-third of the total flight time. They were directly responsible for seven of the fifteen simulated submarine kills by maritime patrol forces during the exercise, highlighting the ASW operational capabilities of the VP Community.

The success of the strike group laid the foundation for future major exercises within 7th Fleet.

© 2009 Sound Publishing, Inc.


Circa 2008

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...P-3 Flight Heralds End For Maine Base The Associated Press - Posted : Friday Nov 28, 2008 15:31:56 EST..." WebSite: NavyTimes http://www.navytimes.com/ [12NOV2009]

Waiting for permission to post entire article.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...The Long Goodbye at BNAS Continues - 12/01/2008 - Posted with permission of The Times Record..." Website: The Times Record http://www.timesrecord.com/ [02DEC2008]

BRUNSWICK — A cold drizzle coated the runway as the first of two Navy P-3 Orions lumbered toward takeoff on Friday morning.

Wives, sons and babies, noses red with crying or cold, waved at the gray planes that would lift away their Navy spouses from home for six months and patrol squadron VP-8 from NAS Brunswick, Maine for good.

The 50 sailors departing Friday morning would lead the squadron's departure from NAS Brunswick, Maine for the last time, starting the migration of planes and Navy personnel to prepare for base closure in May 2011.

At the end of their deployment in June, the squadron that's in the process of leaving now will return to their new headquarters in NAS Jacksonville, Florida, where all of the remaining four squadrons will permanently relocate during the course of the next year.

But neither the squadron's permanent relocation nor the base's closure could outweigh the hard reality of deployment for Jenae Skaugstad, who watched in tears as her husband, Chief Michael Skaugstad, left the morning after Thanksgiving for the couple's second deployment.

"It doesn't get any easier," she said, standing in the hangar doorway.

She's been in NAS Brunswick, Maine a year and a half and will work through the winter while her husband deploys. In the summer, she'll move to NAS Jacksonville, Florida.

Friday morning started a week of such goodbyes as about 375 squadron members leave throughout the coming week.

"The last planes fly out on Friday," said Cmdr. Sean Liedman, the squadron's second in command, after the squadron's commanding officer Cmdr. Eric Wiese led the first planes away. Ending two tours in NAS Brunswick, Maine, Liedman would leave Saturday night taking other squadron members to a second deployment location.

"Of all the places I've drug my family around, this is the one my family considers home," he said.

After deployment, he will return to NAS Brunswick, Maine to pack up his family to move to NAS Jacksonville, Florida when the school year ends.

While it's exciting to execute a mission on deployment, he said, squadron members also realize their departure means farewell to a community and a base they've come to value in the Fighting Tigers' 37-year history in NAS Brunswick, Maine.

"I've been in the Navy 23 years, and I can't think of any other place with a tighter relationship between the base and the wing and the community," said Capt. Jim Hoke, who oversees the base's squadrons as Commodore of Patrol & Reconnaissance Wing 5.

It's a relationship that will become obsolete as the other squadrons follow VP-8's lead, and fly out of NAS Brunswick, Maine for the last time. Three more squadrons will depart this summer. Another departs in December 2009.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Today, it all becomes real: Squadron's departure today marks key phase - 11/28/2008 - Posted with permission of The Times Record..." Website: The Times Record http://www.timesrecord.com/ [29NOV2008]

Today marks the beginning of the end of NAS Brunswick, Maine. The first of its five squadrons, Patrol Squadron 8, leaves NAS Brunswick, Maine for good this morning, starting an outflow of sailors and families who will both close a 65-year-old military installation and irrevocably change a community.

The squadron's first planes depart today, en route to a six-month deployment in the Middle East. The rest of the squadron's nearly 300 personnel will follow during the next week.

When they return in June from the desert's monochromatic environment, they won't be flying into Maine's vibrant green and blue landscape and uncluttered airspace. Instead, they'll start the exodus of Brunswick's P-3 Orion squadrons to their new headquarters in NAS Jacksonville, Florida. Three more squadrons will leave this summer and one more in December 2009 to facilitate the scheduled base closing in May 2011.

Capt. William Fitzgerald, commanding officer at BNAS, said the squadron's departure won't cause any immediate change on the base, which still provides support services for the remaining 85 percent of the base's active military personnel.

But it does serve as reminder of an event constituting the focus of his command.

"I think it's symbolic, certainly, of the beginning of the end of Naval Air Station Brunswick," Fitzgerald said. "If people had doubted if the base closure was going to happen, this ought to be a pretty good reminder that the base closure process has begun."

He said the squadron, which has participated in every major military operation since World War II, has been headquartered in Brunswick since 1971. With its departure, the squadron leaves 37 years of history and tradition in the town.

"I think the community loses something with its going," Fitzgerald said.

To some, 2011 might seem a long way off, but the reality of closure hits today for VP-8 commanding officer Cmdr. Eric Wiese, who according to tradition, will lead the departing squadron in the first plane scheduled to deploy. His take-off was scheduled for 11 a.m. today.

Wiese has spent three tours in Brunswick and is saddened to lead the squadron from Brunswick. This week, he's watched the walls in Hangar Five be divested of VP-8 memorabilia, as the squadron packs up its belongings to leave an empty hangar and a history in Brunswick rooted deep in the Cold War when P-3 Orions tracked and hunted Soviet submarines.

"To sum up, it's the end of an era," he said.

The squadron's departure also has significant personal impact for Wiese and many of the sailors under his command.

"We've made some great friends in our three tours here," he said, about his own family of five children and one foster child.

"It's a very emotional time for families because there's so much to do," he said, not only as squadron jobs become hectic with deployment preparations and family lives grow increasingly chaotic negotiating a move to NAS Jacksonville, Florida.

Aviation Electrician David Adauto has been in Brunswick for more than four years, and his wife and three girls are preparing to leave as soon as he deploys.

"I was really sad they are leaving the base," he said. "You don't worry about violence here. You don't worry about crime. It's a safe environment."

Like some of his squadron members, he'll also miss Maine for other reasons, too.

"The skiing," for one, he said.

"Having four seasons," for another, said Lt. Eliot Weston, who added he had a housemate who vowed he'd return to Brunswick someday.

Some sailors took advantage of a two-week leave period to move their families to NAS Jacksonville, Florida already, so spouses and children won't have to move on their own. In the meantime, they've been living as "geographic bachelors," waiting to deploy.

Other families will move at the end of the school year, when a second squadron departs for good from the base.

And still others will move sometime during the next six months.

"They are like pioneer women," Wiese said. "They're going to move their families on their own during deployment."

Deployment isn't easy for any family, especially during the holidays. Even with the added difficulty of knowing they will not return to Brunswick, the members of VP-8 and their families have stayed focus on the immediate task of preparing for the squadron's departure.

"Brunswick squadrons are known for their professionalism and attention to detail and operational excellence," Wiese said. "That's just been a tradition in Brunswick."

The squadrons' departure ends another Navy tradition in Brunswick, one of cooperation and camaraderie with the community outside the fence.

"I'm not sure that it's sunk in: the impact to the local community and, more importantly, the local economy," said Capt. James Hoke, commanding officer of Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing Five, which encompasses all the Brunswick's squadrons. "This starts the process."

More than most other military installations, Brunswick's base seems to blend seamlessly with the community, he said, recalling stories of how Pleasant Street motel owners welcomed cashless sailors on their first night in town.

Starting now — and especially this summer as the brunt of families leave — military neighbors and friends, who are leaving to play a critical role in the fight overseas, and their families will become fewer and fewer as the squadrons follow VP-8's migration to NAS Jacksonville, Florida, he said.

"It's absolutely sad. This base is such a great set-up. The area is so great for families," he said. "But the nation has made a decision, so we press ahead and comply with the law."

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraAircrew Wings "...Wings Oof Gold Awarded To New Aircrew by LT Phillip Sautter - VP-30 Public Affairs Officer (VP-1, VP-4, VP-5, VP-8, VP-10, VP-16, VP-26, VP-30, VP-16, VP-40 and VP-46. ) - Thursday, October 9, 2008..." WebSite: JaxAirNews http://adserver1.harvestadsdepot.com/jaxairnews/ss/jaxairnews/ [09OCT2008]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "... NASCAR Fleet Honorees Visit Upstate New York Youth Center - Story Number: NNS080813-05 - Release Date: 8/13/2008 3:32:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Jeremy J. Siegrist..." WebSite: NavyNews http://www.navy.mil/ [15AUG2008]

ELMIRA, N.Y. (NNS) -- A group of Sailors made a few kids happier when they visited the Woodlawn Youth Center in Elmira Aug. 8.

Six Sailors from VP-8 were recognized as Fleet Honorees at the Zippo 200 NASCAR Nationwide Series race in Watkins Glen, N.Y. Before the race, the Fleet honorees visited the youth center to eat pizza, play video games and spend time with the children who regularly visit the center.

"Having the Sailors come in and just play video games and share some pizza with the kids is tremendous for them," continued Jodi Crane, Woodlawn founder, "it has definitely brightened their day."

Crane founded the center in December 2003 after she noticed a high need in and around the Hathorn neighborhood of Elmira.

"I watched every day and there were a ton of kids with nothing to do. I started the whole thing just by handing out lunches and playing kickball with them, this was a big need that just grew." said Crane.

Since its inception, the Woodlawn Youth Center has grown and now regularly sees 30 to 35 children a day come through its doors, to a place where they can relax and just be themselves.

"The kids really enjoyed themselves, and they enjoyed the positive influences. I would definitely invite Sailors back to the youth center, and I would encourage any other organization to have Sailors come in to visit, anytime," said Crane.

Electronics Technician 2nd Class Scott Tanner helped coordinate the event in Elmira, and is one of the local recruiters in the area attached to Navy Recruiting District Pittsburgh.

"Anytime we can get out there and help kids, or let people see what kind of good the Navy can do, it is a worthwhile cause. Being able to just hang out and interact with these kids was awesome.

Navy driver Brad Keselowski finished sixth at the Zippo 200, moving up to second in the Nationwide Series driver standings.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...PATROL SQUADRON EIGHT - Watkins Glen: Brad Keselowski NASCAR Nationwide Race Preview – The Navy team's Fleet Honoree for this weekend's race at Watkins Glen International is Patrol Squadron Eight (VP-8). VP-8's mission is to employ worldwide deployable combat aircrews in all-weather, maritime patrol and reconnaissance P-3C aircraft. Aircrews are trained and ready to execute decisive and effective Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW), Anti-Surface Warfare (ASUW) and Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance (ISR) operations to directly support the mission of the Warfare Commander or the Ground Force Commander..." WebSite: PaddockTalk.com http://www.paddocktalk.com/ [08AUG2008]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: Wings of Gold Thumbnail "...Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Group - RADM Brian C. Prindle, USN. Wings of Gold - Spring 2008 - Page 6-8. (Squadrons/Wings Referenced: VP-62, VP-69, VQ-1, VQ-2, VPU-1, VPU-2, VP-1, VP-4, VP-5, VP-8, VP-9, VP-10, VP-16, VP-26, VP-30, VP-40, VP-45, VP-46, VP-47, CPRW-2, CPRW-5, CPRW-10 and CPRW-11..." WebSite: Association of Naval Aviation http://www.anahq.org/index.htm [23APR2008]
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HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraVP-8 and VP-30 History "...CHAMGER: Aviators Suffer Same Effects as SCUBA Divers - Thursday, March 6th, 2008..." WebSite: JaxAirNews http://adserver1.harvestadsdepot.com/jaxairnews/ss/jaxairnews/ [07MAR2008]


Circa 2007

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...VP-8 SENDS AIRCREW TO THE MIDDLE EAST - PRESS RELEASE - LTJG Nicholas Hvozda - 01 AUGUST 2007..." WebSite: VP-8 http://www.vp8.navy.mil/ [03SEP2008]

The Fighting Tigers of Patrol Squadron EIGHT wished farewell to their own Combat Air Crew (CAC) Three on Monday, July 30th as they departed on a military airlift for a temporary assignment to the FIFTH FLEET Area of Operations (AOR), which encompasses the Middle East and South-east Asia. While stationed there, the crew will be assigned to Task Group 57.2 as a supplemental aircrew to support ongoing operations in the Arabian Gulf and Iraq. Despite the fact that the assignment falls less than eight weeks after the squadron returned from their scheduled six-month deployment, the eleven members of CAC-3 were forward-thinking and had a positive attitude about their temporary duty. "Several of the crewmembers volunteered to return to the operational environment. They are ready to be involved in Operations IRAQI FREEDOM and ENDURING FREEDOM, especially when they can provide useful support to soldiers and Marines on the ground in Iraq," said LCDR Jess Rivera, VP-8 Operations officer.

The assignment will last approximately six weeks. During that time, the crew will operate solely out of a U.S. controlled airfield, operated by the Air Force, located near the Arabian Gulf. They will endure the hottest months of the year in that region-a hazy, scorching, coastal desert atmosphere where temperatures regularly exceed 100 degrees Fahrenheit. Accommodations will consist of bunk-style living in an air-conditioned tent or trailer with separate public washrooms located nearby. Relief can be found during the off-hours at a swimming pool, theater, or a large covered gathering area located centrally in the living compound. Other conveniences include a gym, library, recreation center, base exchange and a media center.

Combat Aircrew Three consists of LT Harry Feigel, serving as Patrol Plane Commander and Mission Commander; LTJG Michael Hartmann and LTJG Jacob Lasota as Co-pilots; LT Ryan Ingram, Tactical Coordinator; LT Chris Curtin, Navigator; AD1 Carl Olesen and AM2 Michael Wall, Flight Engineers; AW3 Chad Woehler, Radar Operator; AW2 Juan Crespo-Camacho and AW3 Edwin Ware as Acoustic Operators; and AT3 Cristel Luther as the In-flight Technician.

In the next several months, VP-8 will be providing additional combat ready aircrews and maintenance personnel to support Task Group 57.2 in the FIFTH FLEET AOR as part of a plan to bolster the operational readiness of the deployed maritime patrol force.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...PATROL SQUADRON EIGHT - CELEBRATES NATIVE AMERICAN HERITAGE MONTH..." WebSite: VP-8 http://www.vp8.navy.mil/ [08MAR2008]

Patrol Squadron Eight
Public Affairs Office
Unit 60164
FPO AE 09501-5904
(207) 921-2108

PRESS RELEASE
LTJG Sean Dusa
7 December 2007

PATROL SQUADRON 8 CELEBRATES NATIVE AMERICAN HERITAGE MONTH

Patrol Squadron (VP) EIGHT celebrated Native American Heritage Month on November 30 by welcoming Donna Loring, Penobscot tribal member and Penobscot Indian Nation representative to the Maine state legislature, and Penobscot Indian Nation tribal elder Charles Norman Shay. After touring the VP-8 hangar spaces, both guests spoke at the NAS Brunswick Reserve Center auditorium to an audience from all commands across the base including Captain Tyrone Payton, Commodore Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing FIVE and Commander Peter Garvin, Commanding Officer Patrol Squadron EIGHT.

In her remarks Representative Loring, a Vietnam veteran, said "The Maine tribes have taken part in every war that America has fought from the War for Independence to Afghanistan and Iraq." Mr. Shay, a distinguished Army veteran who earned a Silver Star on the beaches of Normandy during World War II and a Bronze Star in Korea, echoed her sentiments. The event also featured a performance by the Red Hawk Medicine Drum Group and native arts from Chuck Hagan, the Hudson Museum, and the Maine Indian Basket Makers Alliance.

Native American Heritage Month traces its roots to 1915 when President Calvin Coolidge issued a proclamation making the second Saturday of each May "American Indian Day." Since 1990, a national proclamation each year has designated the month of November as "National American Indian Heritage Month" to recognize the significant contributions the first Americans made to the establishment and growth of the United States of America. The themes for this year's month are "Guiding Our Destiny with Heritage and Traditions" and "A Native Prescription: Balancing Mind, Body & Spirit." The events at NAS Brunswick were planned by Patrol Squadron EIGHT Diversity Committee chaired by Intelligence Specialist First Class (Surface Warfare) Chandra Clifton.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...PATROL SQUADRON EIGHT - One Man's IA..." WebSite: VP-8 http://www.vp8.navy.mil/ [08MAR2008]

Patrol Squadron Eight
Public Affairs Office
Unit 60164
FPO AE 09501-5904
(207) 921-2108

PRESS RELEASE
LT Justin Lehnig
26 NOVEMBER 2007

One Man's IA


Individual Augmentation (IA's) orders are generally looked upon with doubt and skepticism by service members; most often due to fear of the unknown. Some common questions that arise when faced with an IA are: where am I going, what will I be doing, how will I be trained, etc.? This article is the first in a series that will follow ASC Joseph Mahoney of Patrol Squadron EIGHT throughout his IA, hopefully dispelling some of the associated fears.

ASC Mahoney volunteered for his IA to serve as part of an Embedded Training Team. Embedded Training Teams are comprised of logistic, medical, and maintenance mentors from the Army, Navy and Air Force who are being trained to advise Host Nation Armies (HNA's) in countries like Iraq and Afghanistan, making those forces more self reliant. Drawing on vast experience garnered from a career in Naval Aviation, ASC Mahoney will train HNA's as a Maintenance Mentor. These Host Nation Armies work hand in hand with US forces now, but will soon operate on their own as US forces draw down in those countries. ADM Michael Mullen, Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, was recently quoted as saying "These teams are really the answer for us to getting out of Iraq and Afghanistan." This statement shows how important an IA can be and how committed the United States military is to the success of the IA program.

ADM Mullen was quoted at Camp Funston, Kansas, where most of the training for the Embedded Training Teams is conducted. ASC Mahoney is presently training at Camp Funston as well. His course of instruction has included education in cultural awareness, language, combat tactics, weapons systems, night qualification on the M4 and driving the High Mobility Multipurpose Military Vehicle (HMMMV), or Humvee, at night on Night Vision Goggles (NVG's). Though these "ground force" orientated subjects may be unfamiliar to most Sailors, ASC Mahoney is excelling in all facets of this challenging training environment.

As ASC Mahoney's training progresses, he will deploy to the Central Command Area of Responsibility to put this training to good use. Look to the Patroller for future installments of our series on ASC Mahoney's IA.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...PATROL SQUADRON EIGHT - VP-8 HOSTS CHILDREN FROM NAS BRUNSWICK FOR A "HAUNTED HANGAR"..." WebSite: VP-8 http://www.vp8.navy.mil/ [08MAR2008]

Patrol Squadron Eight
Public Affairs Office
Unit 60164
FPO AE 09501-5904
(207) 921-1179

PRESS RELEASE
LTJG Sean Dusa
15 NOV 2007

VP-8 HOSTS CHILDREN FROM NAS BRUNSWICK FOR A "HAUNTED HANGAR"


Patrol Squadron 8 held its annual "Halloween Haunted Hanger" on October 31. For the event each work center transformed their respective space with sometimes scary, sometimes mild Halloween decorations and handed out candy to eager Trick or Treaters. The event was open to all children from the NAS Brunswick community and turnout was excellent with a steady flow of costumed revelers throughout the afternoon and early evening. Special congratulations go to the Administration department for being judged the best decorated shop but all participants deserve praise for providing a fun and safe event for the base's children while still executing a full day's flight schedule.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...PATROL SQUADRON EIGHT - RUN FOR RELIEF 5K RAISES MONEY FOR NAVY-MARINE CORPS RELIEF SOCIETY..." WebSite: VP-8 http://www.vp8.navy.mil/ [08MAR2008]

Patrol Squadron Eight
Public Affairs Office
Unit 60164
FPO AE 09501-5904
(207) 921-2108

PRESS RELEASE
LTJG Nicholas Hvozda
19 OCT 2007

RUN FOR RELIEF 5K RAISES MONEY FOR NAVY-MARINE CORPS RELIEF SOCIETY


The Patrol Squadron (VP) 8 Officers Spouses' Club sponsored a 5K run titled the "Run for Relief" on October 12th. The group organized the event to raise money for the Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society. Mrs. Tonya Hartsell, who organized the race, noted, "The Spouse's club has held this event for numerous years. We choose to donate to the Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society because it keeps the money in the house; it benefits Navy personnel directly."

The Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society is a private non-profit charitable organization providing financial, educational, and other assistance to members of the Naval Services of the United States. They are committed to "ensure that all available resources are used to assist personnel of the Naval Services-active, retired, and their eligible family members-to achieve financial self-sufficiency and find solution to emergency needs."

Race day brought a Nor'Easter with constant rain, yet the run was held as planned. Twenty-seven intrepid personnel from VP-8, VPU-1, and AIMD gathered at the starting line at noon for the race. The course looped through NAS Brunswick beginning and ending at the Thrift Shop. The environmental conditions that day added a challenge for the runners with wind, rain and puddles. A water table was staged along the route to provide relief for thirsty runners. Mr. Paul Austin from the NAS Brunswick Morale, Recreation, and Welfare office helped the volunteers from the club set the course and provided cones and traffic guides along the route for safety.

At the finish line, the race organizers awarded medals to the top male and female finishers in each of three age categories: 18-29, 30-39, and 40 and Over. The winners were: Male 18-29, LT Michael Donnelly; Male 30-39, LTJG Chris Himes; Male 40 Plus, CDR Dave Clement; Female 18-29, AZ3 Valerie Cook; Female 30-39, Rosemary Rivera; Female 40 Plus, No Entry.

The Officer's Spouses club accepted a donation as an entry fee for the race, and each runner who donated $25 or more received a "Run for Relief" race t-shirt, yet the bulk of the money raised for the event came from over a dozen local business sponsors. In all, the club raised $1258 for the Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society to whom they will present a check in the near future.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...PATROL SQUADRON EIGHT - VP-8 OBSERVES HISPANIC HERITAGE MONTH..." WebSite: VP-8 http://www.vp8.navy.mil/ [08MAR2008]

Patrol Squadron Eight
Public Affairs Office
Unit 60164
FPO AE 09501-5904
(207) 921-2108

PRESS RELEASE
LTJG Nicholas Hvozda
15 OCT 2007

VP-8 OBSERVES HISPANIC HERITAGE MONTH


Patrol Squadron EIGHT celebrated National Hispanic Heritage month on October 12th with a potluck lunch of ethnic Hispanic food and a few words from LCDR Jess Rivera, VP-8's Operations Officer. The theme of the month was "Hispanic Americans: making a positive impact on American Society."

The ceremony was conducted in the squadron snack bar located in Hangar Five South. Various Hispanic dishes were prepared by VP-8 Sailors and donations for the luncheon were accepted to benefit the VP-8 Morale, Welfare, and Recreation fund.

LCDR Rivera reflected on the service of Admiral David Farragut, the son of a Spanish merchant captain, during his remarks. Admiral Farragut served in the Navy from the age of twelve and is known as the first "full" Admiral in the US Navy. His contributions as the Commanding Officer of various vessels and squadrons in the Civil War were instrumental to Union victory. His career exemplifies Hispanic-American contributions to the US Navy, American society and our nation as a whole.

This luncheon is the first in a series of events planned by the Fighting Tiger Diversity Committee. The Committee is drawn from all pay grades within VP-8 and is designed to celebrate America's diverse cultural backgrounds and our rich heritage. Our nation was founded on the motto: "E Pluribus Unum." Which is Latin for "Out of Many, One." Celebrate!

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...PATROL SQUADRON EIGHT - VP-8 VISITS SCOTLAND FOR EXERCISE NEPTUNE WARRIOR..." WebSite: VP-8 http://www.vp8.navy.mil/ [08MAR2008]

Patrol Squadron Eight
Public Affairs Office
Unit 60164
FPO AE 09501-5904
(207) 921-2108

PRESS RELEASE
LT Chad Tyler
4 October 2007

VP-8 VISITS SCOTLAND FOR EXERCISE NEPTUNE WARRIOR


Patrol Squadron EIGHT's (VP-8) Combat Aircrew (CAC) Two recently returned from Neptune Warrior, a multi-national NATO exercise that took place off the coast of northwestern Scotland. CAC-2 was accompanied by twenty squadron maintainers and two aircrews from VP-26.

The three aircrews flew a total of 15 missions with two airplanes during the 10-day exercise in September. 100% aircraft availability was a testament to the outstanding work performed by the VP-8 maintenance crew led by Aviation Structural Mechanic (AM) Chief Stephen Berris and AM1 Kraig Osborne.

Flying from Royal Air Force Station Kinloss, Scotland to operating areas in the North Atlantic near and among the Hebrides Islands of Scotland provided invaluable experience for all three aircrews. Each crew flew against diesel and nuclear-powered submarines in exercises ranging from 'one versus one' encounters to all-out war scenarios involving complex, coordinated operations with ships, submarines and aircraft from other countries.

The countries represented in the exercise by their Naval and Air Forces were the United States, United Kingdom, France, Spain, Germany, Norway and New Zealand. The objective of the exercise was to prepare the participating NATO nations to work together successfully in a maritime environment. Exercise Neptune Warrior provided a joint training environment that allowed the nations to develop common procedures, learn from each other and practice interoperability.

While everyone involved worked hard, the trip was not all work. The Kinloss area is rich with history and sightseeing opportunities. Sailors toured distilleries and learned the history and methods of making Scotch whisky on the famous "Whisky trail." They also took the opportunity to tour the many castles in the area, the battlefield of Culloden, and a historic highland fort, Fort George. Some took time to tee-off in the birth land of golf while others visited Loch Ness and tried their luck at finding the legendary creature "Nessie."

While the Loch Ness Monster proved impossible to find, the aircrews successfully located their assigned submarines during the exercise which is what being on patrol is all about!

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...PATROL SQUADRON EIGHT - VP-8 SAILOR SAVES BOY'S LIFE..." WebSite: VP-8 http://www.vp8.navy.mil/ [08MAR2008]

Patrol Squadron Eight
Public Affairs Office
Hangar 5 South
Brunswick, ME 04011
(207) 921-2108

PRESS RELEASE
LCDR Paul Hockran
10 SEPTEMBER 2007

VP-8 SAILOR SAVES BOY'S LIFE


Patrol Squadron (VP) 8's Aviation Structural Mechanic Second Class (AM2) William Henninger is credited with saving the life of a 6 year-old boy last week at a housing unit located on Naval Air Station Brunswick.

It was an ordinary Friday night at 24 Antietam Street in NAS Brunswick housing. Petty Officer Henninger was on his deck in the backyard grilling dinner with his father and son. A couple of young boys, ages 6 and 3, from the neighborhood came out of the backyard trees and walked up to pet the neighbor's chained dog.

As the 6 year-old crossed into the dog's comfort zone, the dog attacked. The dog latched onto the boy's throat and began to savagely shake him. Petty Officer Henninger jumped from his deck and rushed to the boy. He struck the dog three or four times but the dog retained his grip on the boy's throat. AM2 mustered up all that he had and struck the dog one last time - the dog, dazed, let go of the boy.

Blood was squirting from the wounds on the boy's neck. AM2 applied direct pressure to the boy's wounds and carried him safely away from the dog. AM2's father dialed 911 while AM2 continued to apply pressure and talk to the boy, who was in shock.

Paramedics arrived and transported the boy to the emergency room. After being released from the hospital on Sunday, the boy stopped by to thank Petty Officer Henninger and ask "How did you get the dog off of me?"

Petty Officer Henninger does not think he did anything special, "I just reacted. If it had been my child, I hope someone would have done the same thing."

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...PATROL SQUADRON EIGHT - MASTER CHIEF ANDERSON ASSUMES POST OF FIGHTING TIGER COMMAND MASTER CHIEF..." WebSite: VP-8 http://www.vp8.navy.mil/ [08MAR2008]

Patrol Squadron Eight
Public Affairs Office
Unit 60164
FPO AE 09501-5904
(207) 921-1179

PRESS RELEASE
LTJG Nicholas Hvozda
20 AUGUST 2007

MASTER CHIEF ANDERSON ASSUMES POST OF FIGHTING TIGER COMMAND MASTER CHIEF


Patrol Squadron (VP) 8 recently welcomed Command Master Chief (SW) David L. Anderson as their new Command Master Chief. Anderson assumes this title following a highly successful tour as Command Master Chief aboard USS Vicksburg (CG 69), homeported at Naval Station Mayport, Fla. He replaces Command Master Chief (AW/SW/NAC) Jerry Holloman in the position, who will be moving on to become the Command Master Chief for Naval Air Station Brunswick.

Master Chief Anderson graduated from William T. Sampson High School in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba in 1982. He enlisted in the Navy in 1984 and attended Basic Training and Basic Electricity and Electronics (BEE) School in Orlando, Florida. He then attended Fire Controlman class "A" and "C" schools in Great Lakes, Illinois.

At sea, Master Chief Anderson's assignments have been aboard USS Marvin G. Shields (FF 1066), USS Badger (FF 1071), USS Russell (DDG 59), USS Carney (DDG 64), and USS Vicksburg (CG 69) as the Command Master Chief where the crew earned the coveted "Battle Efficiency" or Battle "E" Award for 2006.

Ashore, Master Chief Anderson's assignments include a tour as recruiter in charge in Hilo, Hawaii, instructor duty at AEGIS Training and Readiness Center, Dahlgren, Va., and as the Fire Controlman Lead Detailer in Millington, Tenn.

He has completed deployments in the Western and Eastern Pacific, Atlantic and Indian Oceans; the Mediterranean Sea, Sea of Japan, Red Sea, Gulf of Aden, Gulf of Oman and the Arabian Gulf.

His personal decorations include the Meritorious Service Medal, Navy Commendation Medal (two awards), Navy Achievement Medal (five awards), Volunteer Service Medal, Good Conduct Medal (six awards), Pistol and Rifle Expert, and various service and campaign awards.

He is a graduate of the Navy's Senior Enlisted Academy (class 114 brown) and Command Master Chief course of instruction.

Master Chief Anderson-who has served aboard cruisers and destroyers his entire career-noted, "I'm happy to wear these brown shoes: I'm here to knock down barriers. My biggest challenge will be wrapping my arms around the new vocabulary [in the aviation community]. Leadership is leadership, and Sailors are Sailors." Anderson also mentioned his eagerness for the opportunity to earn a new warfare qualification, Enlisted Aviation Warfare Specialist (EAWS). "It has been twenty years since I have worked for a new qualification," he said.

Master Chief Anderson will be stationed with the Tigers for three years. His wife, Candy, and their children, Alexis (20) and Sean (16), plan to remain in Jacksonville, Florida. anticipating VP-8's future homeport change.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...PATROL SQUADRON EIGHT - FIGHTING TIGERS WIN STATE OF MAINE SOFTBALL TITLE..." WebSite: VP-8 http://www.vp8.navy.mil/ [08MAR2008]

Patrol Squadron Eight
Public Affairs Office
Hangar 5 South
Brunswick, ME 04011
(207) 921-2108

PRESS RELEASE
LTJG Nicholas Hvozda
02 AUGUST 2007

VP-8 FIGHTING TIGERS WIN STATE OF MAINE SOFTBALL TITLE


Last Sunday, July 29th, VP-8's Fighting Tigers softball team beat Scarborough Muffler Center to win the Men's Class E South slow-pitch softball title for the State of Maine. To secure the victory, the Tigers outplayed a field of 18 teams during the course of a weekend tournament held in the adjacent towns of Saco and Biddeford, Maine.

The Fighting Tigers won five straight games in the double-elimination tournament to gain a place in the finals-including a victory over the Scarborough Muffler Center team. As the Tigers approached the finals in the winner's bracket, Scarborough continued winning in the consolation bracket to secure a position in the final game. When the two teams faced off in the finals on Sunday, Scarborough was the victor, 4-2; yet, each team had suffered only one loss and a rematch was required for the trophy. In the final game, VP-8 succeeded with a 10-5 win.

Aviation Structural Mechanic Chief (AMC) Steve Berris commented on how the team played: "Our defense was amazing; no team scored more than seven points against us in a single game."

The tournament was an officially sanctioned and regulated invitational event of the Maine Amateur Softball Association (http://www.maineasa.org).

The team, managed by Aviation Warfare Systems Specialist Second Class (AW2) Justin McEntire, has been an intramural establishment at VP-8 for several years. They took second place in the same Class E tournament and second place in the NAS Brunswick tournament last year. Though they missed most of the NAS Brunswick intramural games this season due to their scheduled six-month deployment, the team has been practicing regularly since the squadron returned in June.

The Fighting Tiger team has remained on the field. They played in and won the NAS Brunswick intramural softball tournament on July 31st, beating the USS Stinson in the finals. They also played in the Maine Class D tournament the weekend of August 4th.

Participation in that tournament qualifies the Tiger team for the Military World Series held in Orlando, FL on the weekend of August 18th-which they plan to attend if able. For now, the State of Maine Class E trophy will be displayed proudly in the VP-8 squadron spaces at Hangar 5 South, Brunswick, ME.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...PATROL SQUADRON EIGHT - RETURNS TO NAS BRUNSWICK..." WebSite: VP-8 http://www.vp8.navy.mil/ [08MAR2008]

Patrol Squadron Eight
Public Affairs Office
Unit 60164
FPO AE 09501-5904
(207) 921-2108

PRESS RELEASE
LTJG Nicholas Hvozda
09 JUNE 2007

PATROL SQUADRON EIGHT RETURNS TO NAS BRUNSWICK


On June 9th, the "Fighting Tigers" of Patrol Squadron EIGHT concluded their six-month deployment to Southwest Asia and the Western Pacific. Patrol Squadron EIGHT, a Navy Maritime Patrol squadron based at Naval Air Station (NAS) Brunswick, Maine, consists of nine P-3C Orion aircraft and over 400 active duty Navy men and women. Though the bulk of the squadron had arrived on P-3C aircraft and contracted airlifts throughout the week prior, the final aircraft returned on June 9th with the squadron's Commanding Officer, Commander Peter Garvin, on board marking the official end of the deployment.

During their six-month deployment, Patrol Squadron Eight flew over 1300 sorties and over 8000 flight hours supporting Operations IRAQI FREEDOM and ENDURING FREEDOM. Many of the missions flown in support of Operation IRAQI FREEDOM included sorties in Iraqi airspace providing real-time Imagery, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance (ISR) to U.S. and coalition ground forces.

Patrol Squadron EIGHT also flew maritime patrols in international waters promoting security and stability in the maritime shipping environment and to complement the counter-terrorism and security efforts of partner nations in the region. In the process, Tiger aircrews operated in the Arabian Gulf, Gulf of Oman, Arabian Sea, Gulf of Aden, Indian Ocean and the Red Sea. The Tigers also participated in maritime interoperability exercises with several allies in their Area of Responsibility (AOR), supporting the Chief of Naval Operations' 1000-ship Navy concept: an approach that would integrate other nations' ships with U.S. fleets as needed to accomplish specific missions and operations around the globe.

In addition to supporting operations in the CENTCOM area of responsibility, aircrew and maintenance personnel supplemented Patrol Squadron FOUR's Western Pacific deployment. Patrol Squadron FOUR is home-ported in at MCAS Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii. In the Pacific, Tiger crews were able to practice and apply the P-3C Orion's traditional anti-submarine warfare mission. They also conducted two real-world search and rescue missions, providing assistance to distressed mariners.

Throughout the deployment, the squadron's maintenance and support branches worked hard and showed exceptional performance in maintaining the venerable Orion. The challenge of maintaining mission-ready aircraft in the Middle-eastern theater was amplified by adverse environmental conditions, detachment locations, and operational tempo. Ambient temperatures in the AOR often exceeded 110 degrees Fahrenheit. Nevertheless, the Fighting Tiger maintenance team kept the squadron's aircraft flying with a record-setting mission completion rate.

The Fighting Tigers are happy to be returning to their home base of NAS Brunswick, Maine to spend the summer with their families and friends. They are thankful for the support shown by local area organizations and schools while away. The Fighting Tigers will enjoy some post-deployment leave and then start training and preparing for their 2008 deployment.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...PATROL SQUADRON EIGHT - HOLDS 58th CHANGE OF COMMAND CEREMONY..." WebSite: VP-8 http://www.vp8.navy.mil/ [08MAR2008]

Patrol Squadron Eight
Public Affairs Office
Unit 60164
FPO AE 09501-5904
(207) 921-2108

PRESS RELEASE
LTJG Nicholas Hvozda
16 MAY 2007

PATROL SQUADRON EIGHT
HOLDS 58th CHANGE OF COMMAND CEREMONY

The U.S. Navy's Patrol Squadron EIGHT held its 58th Change of Command on May 16th at Al Udeid Air Base, Qatar. During the ceremony, Commander Peter A. Garvin relieved Commander Christopher P. Ramsden and became the Fighting Tigers' 59th Commanding Officer. Rear Admiral Arthur Johnson, Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Force FIFTH and SEVENTH Fleet, oversaw the ceremony and offered remarks as the guest speaker.

Patrol Squadron EIGHT flies the P-3C Orion, Aircraft Improvement Program (AIP) aircraft. The Orion, a military derivative of the Lockheed Electra was originally designed for maritime patrol. The P-3C Orion is recognized throughout the world for its capabilities as a Maritime Patrol Under-Sea Warfare (USW), and Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance (ISR) platform. Patrol Squadron EIGHT has been flying a version of the Orion since October 1962, when it became the fleet's first operational P-3A Orion squadron.

CDR Ramsden, a native of Windham, New Hampshire, graduated from Norwich University in 1989 with a Bachelor of Science degree in Physics.

CDR Garvin, born in Poughkeepsie, New York, lived the majority of his youth in Boca Raton, Florida. He graduated with merit from the United States Naval Academy in 1989 earning a Bachelor of Science degree in Aerospace Engineering.

Commander Eric S. Wiese, a 1990 graduate of the United States Naval Academy, assumed duties as the Executive Officer.

The FIGHTING TIGERS, normally based at Naval Air Station Brunswick, Maine, are currently deployed to Al Udeid Air Base, Qatar, conducting detachments in Iraq and other sites in support of ongoing military operations. The squadron has safely flown over 7000 hours and over 1200 sorties in support of Operations IRAQI and ENDURING FREEDOM, JTF Horn of Africa, and FIFTH and SEVENTH Fleet this deployment. The squadron will complete their six month deployment and return stateside in early June.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Maine news briefs - June 06, 2007 6:00 AM - Patrol Squadron Eight back at Brunswick base..." WebSite: Seacoastonline http://www.seacoastonline.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070606/NEWS/706060369/-1/NEWS01 [07JUN2007]

BRUNSWICK, Maine (AP) — Patrol Squadron Eight is back home at Brunswick Naval Air Station after a six-month deployment in which it flew missions over Iraq.

The squadron, known as the "Flying Tigers," began returning last week after completing a six-month deployment to the Middle East and the Pacific. On Monday, some of the last 400 members arrived aboard a chartered jet.

The Fighting Tigers' detachment of P-3 Orions provided U.S. and coalition forces in Iraq with real-time imagery, surveillance and reconnaissance data. It also participated in two search-and-rescue operations, officials said.

The squadron was deployed overseas in December, flying some missions out of Qatar, an Arab state on the Persian Gulf. Cmdr. Peter A. Garvin was sworn in as the squadron's new commander last month during a ceremony at the Al Udied Air Base in Qatar.

The squadron flew more than 1,300 missions and logged more than 8,000 flight hours, said Nicholas Hvozda, the squadron's public affairs officer.

Fighting Tiger members began arriving in small numbers last week. The largest contingent — more than 100 members — landed in Brunswick around 3:35 p.m. Monday.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Patrol Squadron Returns To BNAS - POSTED: 11:29 am EDT June 5, 2007..." WebSite: WMTW.COM http://www.wmtw.com/news/13445026/detail.html [06JUN2007]

BRUNSWICK, Maine -- Patrol Squadron 8, which flew missions over Iraq, is back home at Brunswick Naval Air Station.

The squadron known as the Flying Tigers began returning last week after completing a six-month deployment to the Middle East and the Pacific. On Monday, the last of the 400 members arrived aboard a chartered jet.

The Fighting Tigers' detachment of P-3 Orions provided U.S. and coalition forces in Iraq with real-time imagery, surveillance and reconnaissance data.

The squadron's public affairs officer said the airplanes flew more than 1,300 missions and logged more than 8,000 flight hours. No serious injuries or damage were reported during the deployment.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Warm welcome at BNAS - Family members are relieved and happy to watch the return of Patrol Squadron Eight from the war zone. By DENNIS HOEY Staff Writer June 5, 2007..." WebSite: Portland Press Herald http://pressherald.mainetoday.com/story.php?id=110707&ac=PHnws [06JUN2007]

BRUNSWICK — Stephanie Polson, hands clasped, stared intently at the chartered jet that had just taxied to the entrance of one of Brunswick Naval Air Station's cavernous hangars.

Polson, wearing a bright pink jacket, waited another 30 minutes or so before the men and women from Patrol Squadron Eight began to emerge from the jet. When she saw her fiance, Kenny Ritz, she bolted for him.

Polson jumped into the air, wrapping her legs around Ritz's waist just as he dropped his bag to catch her. They have been engaged for about a year and will be married on Sept. 1.br>
"I'm not going to let go of him," Polson said. "They (the Navy) have had him for the last six months. Now he's mine."

Polson, who flew to Maine from her home in Colorado, was among a crowd of about 150 relatives and friends who gathered at the air station on Monday afternoon to welcome back members of Patrol Squadron Eight -- also known as The Fighting Tigers.

Last week the squadron began returning to Brunswick after completing a six-month deployment to the Middle East and the Pacific. Crews flew many missions over Iraq.

The Fighting Tigers' detachment of P-3 Orion airplanes provided U.S. and coalition forces on the ground in Iraq with real-time imagery, surveillance and reconnaissance data.

No serious injuries to squadron members or damage to airplanes were reported during the deployment.

Nicholas Hvozda, the squadron's public affairs officer, said the squadron, which has more than 400 members, flew more than 1,300 missions and logged more than 8,000 flight hours.

The squadron was deployed overseas in December, flying some missions out of Qatar, an Arab state on the Persian Gulf.

Cmdr. Peter A. Garvin was sworn in as the squadron's new commander last month during a ceremony at the Al Udied Air Base in Qatar.

Hvozda said Patrol Squadron Eight also assisted with two search-and-rescue operations. In one case, air crews provided life rafts and medical supplies to mariners whose vessel had caught fire.

Fighting Tiger members began arriving in small waves last week, with the largest contingent -- more than 100 members -- landing in Brunswick around 3:35 p.m. Monday. Their chartered jet flew into Brunswick from Iceland, where it stopped to refuel on Sunday night.

"It was a long flight, but it feels really good to be home," said Ritz. "It was really hot over there. I think the temperatures got up to 140 degrees."

Ritz is an air mechanic, but on his Middle East tour he did a stint as a base security guard -- an assignment that had his family worried about his safety.

"We're very proud of him," said his mother, Lisa Ritz, who along with her husband, Paul, drove more than 2,200 miles from their home outside Denver to greet their son.

The Ritzes not only wanted to see their son, but they wanted to make sure he would have a car to drive when he returned.

That's why the couple took four days to drive their son's Ford Mustang to Brunswick.

Steven Schedlbauer's 8-year-old son, Bryce Schedlbauer, had one word to describe his father's long-awaited return.

"Happy," the boy said as he leaned his head against Steven Schedlbauer's leg.

Schedlbauer is a squadron storekeeper, who makes sure its members are supplied with all the provisions they need.

He was greeted by his wife, Misty, and daughters Ralynne, 15, and Alyssa, 13. Schedlbauer said he was looking forward to picking up his youngest daughter, Bayley, 2, from day care.

"We just got into Brunswick last August from Jacksonville," Misty said. "It was the first time we had seen snow. Steven left me with the snow blower."

Their summer plans call for taking in a few movies and doing a couple of barbecues.

"Steven kept telling me (when he was overseas) that he misses beef. I think he is looking forward to grilling some burgers and hot dogs," she added.

Seth Eisenmerget is a P-3 Orion navigator.

"We flew a lot of missions," he said, referring to the squadron's 1,300 sorties. "It was a lot of hard work and a lot of long hours."

He commended the squadron's maintenance crews, which had to keep airplane engines and equipment running smoothly despite sand being blown into them from desert winds.

"Without them, we could not have accomplished what we did over there," he said.

Staff Writer Dennis Hoey can be reached at 725-8795 or at dhoey@pressherald.com.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...BRUNSWICK: Executive officer assumes command of BNAS squadron..." WebSite: MaineToday.com http://pressherald.mainetoday.com/story.php?id=106364 [19MAY2007]

Peter A. Garvin assumed command of the NAS Brunswick, Maine`s VP-8 this week.

Garvin replaced outgoing Commander Christopher P. Ramsden during a ceremony at the Al Udeid Air Base in Qatar, where the Fighting Tigers squadron is deployed.

Ramsden served as Squadron Commander for a year. During that time, the squadron flew more than 7,000 hours in support of U.S. military activity in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Garvin has served as the Squadron`s Executive Officer since May 2006.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VP-8 Patch ThumbnailCameraVP-8 Desert Prowl "...VP-8 Deployment PATRON Al Udeid Air Base, Qatar Dec 2006 - Jun 2007..." Contributed by LT Donald W. Hartsell donald.hartsell@navy.mil [03MAY2007]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VP-8 Patch ThumbnailCameraOperation Enduring Freedom "...VP-5, VP-8, VP-10, VP-26, VP-40 and VP-45 - Deployment PATRON Al Udeid Air Base, Qatar Dec 2006 - Jun 2007..." Contributed by LT Donald W. Hartsell donald.hartsell@navy.mil [03MAY2007]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...VP-8 Command Structure..." WebSite: VP-8 http://www.vp8.navy.mil/ [03MAY2007]

History ThumbnailCameraCO - Christopher Ramsden VP-8 Commanding Officer, Cdr Christopher Ramsden

A native of Windham, NH, CDR Ramsden graduated from Norwich University in June 1989 with a Bachelor of Science degree in Physics and was commissioned an Ensign. Following flight training he received his wings in Sacramento, California in 1990

In April of 1991, after FRS training at Patrol Squadron THIRTY in Jacksonville, Florida he reported to Patrol Squadron TWENTY-SIX in Brunswick, Maine and deployed to Roosevelt Roads, Puerto Rico, and twice to Sigonella, Sicily supporting Operations DESERT CALM, SOUTHERN WATCH and SHARP GUARD. His assignments included Readiness/SORTS Officer and NFO NATOPS Officer. In 1994 he was selected to fire the first Navy Maverick Missile (War-shot) launched from a fleet operational P-3C Orion.

From October 1994 to August 1996 he was assigned to the staff of Commander, Patrol Wings Atlantic/Task Force Eight Four in Norfolk, Virginia as Flag Lieutenant. During this tour he deployed from July to November 1995 to Guantanamo Bay, Cuba with Joint Task Force ONE SIX ZERO during Operation SEA SIGNAL where he assumed the additional duties of Flag Secretary and Security Officer.

In September 1996 he reported aboard USS JOHN C. STENNIS where he served as Operations Administration Officer, Command Security Manager and Officer of the Deck, completing a six month Arabian Gulf deployment and home port change to San Diego, CA.

In October 1998 upon transfer to VP-30, he qualified as a Fleet Replacement Squadron NFO Instructor and served as Fleet Training Officer in the newly established Weapons Tactics Unit. His duties included leadership of the AIP Fleet Introduction Team, the Combined Fleet Instructor Under Training Team, the Aircrew Coordination Training Model Manager and the Special Projects Team.

From June 2000 to August 2002 he served as a Department Head in Patrol Squadron FIVE and was assigned as CTG 84.1 Operations Officer, Tactics Officer, Training Officer, CTG 67.1 Operations Officer and Squadron Operations Officer.

Following his department head tour, he reported to PMA-205/290 where he served as the Assistant Program Manager for Training Systems for the Multi-Mission Maritime Aircraft (P-8A) where he developed the training structure for the follow-on aircraft to the P-3C.

CDR Ramsden has been awarded the Meritorious Service Medal, the Joint Service Commendation Medal, Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal (Six Awards), the Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medal and various other unit and individual awards. Additionally he is authorized to wear the Basic Parachutist Badge and the Submarine Warfare Insignia.

History ThumbnailCameraXO - CDR Peter A. Garvin Born in Poughkeepsie, New York, Commander Pete Garvin lived the majority of his youth in Boca Raton, Florida. He graduated with merit from the United States Naval Academy in 1989 earning a Bachelor of Science degree in Aerospace Engineering. He subsequently reported to Pensacola, Florida and Corpus Christi, Texas for flight training and received his pilot wings in August 1992. Upon completion of Fleet Replacement Squadron (FRS) training at Patrol Squadron THIRTY (VP-30), Commander Garvin reported to the "Pelicans" of Patrol Squadron FORTY FIVE (VP-45) stationed aboard Naval Air Station Jacksonville, Florida. While there he served as the Ordnance Branch Officer, Readiness Officer and Pilot NATOPS Officer and completed deployments to Keflavik, Iceland, Roosevelt Roads, Puerto Rico and Sigonella, Sicily. He was selected as the Association of Naval Aviation's (ANA) "Pilot of the Year" for 1995. In June 1996, Commander Garvin reported as Flag Lieutenant to Commander, Patrol Wings Atlantic, Commander, Task Force EIGHTY FOUR (CTF-84) in Norfolk, Virginia. Upon completion of his 'loop' tour, he reported aboard the amphibious assault ship USS KEARSARGE (LHD-3) as Navigator in January 1998. He deployed to the Mediterranean in support of Operations NOBLE ANVIL, SHINING HOPE, ALLIED FORCE, JOINT GUARDIAN and AVID RESPONSE and served as Flag Navigator for the embarked Amphibious Squadron SIX. While onboard KEARSARGE, he qualified as a Surface Warfare Officer (SWO). In October 1999 Commander Garvin reported to VP-30 where he served as Administrative Department Head and Fleet Replacement Squadron Instructor Pilot. In August 2000 he reported to the "Mad Foxes" of Patrol Squadron FIVE (VP-5) for his operational department head tour. He completed a deployment to the Mediterranean in support of Operation ENDURING FREEDOM and served as Command Services Officer, Assistant Maintenance Officer, CTF-60 VP LNO, Officer In Charge – VP Detachment Souda Bay, Crete, and Maintenance Officer. In November 2002, Commander Garvin reported to the Bureau of Naval Personnel in Millington, Tennessee where he served as Assistant Washington DC Placement Officer. In August 2004, Commander Garvin moved to Washington to further his education at the National War College where he earned a Master's Degree in National Security Strategy and completed his Joint Professional Military Education. Upon graduation in June 2005, Commander Garvin reported as executive assistant to Commander, Patrol Wing and Reconnaissance Wing FIVE and completed training to assume duties as Executive Officer, Patrol Squadron EIGHT (VP-8) His awards include the Meritorious Service Medal, Navy Commendation Medal (four awards), Navy Achievement Medal (three awards), and various unit and campaign decorations.

History ThumbnailCameraCMC(AW/SW/NAC) - Jerry Holloman Master Chief Holloman was born in Ruislip, England. He enlisted under the delayed entry program in September 1982 and completed basic training in June 1983. Master Chief Holloman is a graduate of the Navy Senior Enlisted Academy and earned an Associate of Arts Degree from New Hampshire College.

Master Chief Holloman served aboard Patrol Squadron Twenty Three (VP-23), two tours, Patrol Squadron Ten (VP-10), and U.S.S. Enterprise (CVN 65). During his career, he completed deployments to the Arabian Gulf, Mediterranean, Atlantic, North Atlantic, and Caribbean theaters.

Ashore, Master Chief Holloman served as Fleet Replacement Squadron Instructor at Patrol Squadron Thirty (VP-30), Jacksonville, Florida, Operations Leading Chief Petty Officer at Commander, Patrol Wing Five, Brunswick, Maine and Department Leading Chief Petty Officer at Maritime Command and Control System School, Dam Neck, Virginia.

In June 2005, he reported to Patrol Squadron EIGHT (VP-8), for his current assignment as Command Master Chief.

His personal awards include the Air Medal (three awards), Navy Commendation Medal (five awards), Navy Achievement Medal (four awards) and various service and campaign awards.


Circa 2006

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Tigers doing what Tigers do!..." WebSite: VP-8 Enlisted Support Group http://vp8.phpnet.us/ [03SEP2008]

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HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Naval Air Station Brunswick Brunswick, ME 11/21/2006 - (Squadrons Photograph's: VP-8, VP-10 & VP-26 and VP-92)..." WebSite: Topgun Photography http://topgunphotography.net/basevisits/Nasb/index.htm [16MAR2007]

NAS Brunswick, Maine was constructed in March of 1943 and commissioned on April 15, 1943. The primary mission was training of the RCAF pilots. The first U.S. squadron to arrive at NAS Brunswick, Maine was VS-1D1, a scouting squadron. In October of 1946 the base was deactivated and turned over to Bowdoin College and the University of Maine . The Navy on March 15, 1951 raised the national ensign on the flag pole re-commissioning the dormant base back to a Naval Air Facility. They were to established a mission of supporting 3 land-plane patrol squadrons and one Fleet Aircraft Service Squadron.

The Navy requested $35 Million from Congress to transform this into a Master Jet base. Such a base required dual 8,000 foot runways. In 1951 Congress requested an additional 20 Million for additional barracks, officers quarters, and such to make it a permanent installation. The squadrons based at NAS Brunswick, Maine flew the P2V Neptune Patrol Bomber.

On July 1st, 1971, Commander Patrol Wings US Atlantic Fleet / Commander Patrol Wing Five established NAS Brunswick, Maine as their Headquarters. At present 3 Patrol squadrons (VP-10, VP-26 & VP-8) and 2 Reserve Squadrons (VP-92 & VPU-1) fly the P-3 Orion. A Fleet Support unit, VR-62 operates the C-130T out of NAS Brunswick, Maine.

I had the chance to visit NAS Brunswick, Maine and spend a few hours with VP-10, known as the Red Lancers. A little history of their patch, the insignia represents the mission of the Compass Rose as a backdrop. The Dipper and Polaris is superimposed to show how long overseas patrol is necessary for navigation. The lightning bolts represent the importance of sending and receiving radio information. The bomb in the middle of their unit patch represents their secondary mission as a VP Squadron.

The P-3 units deploy to the Mediterranean and throughout the Atlantic including successful deployments in Keflavik , Iceland , the Azores, Rota Spain , and many others. The P-3's main roll is land based, long range anti-submarine warfare (ASW). It has advanced submarine detection equipment such as sensors, directional frequency and sonar buoys. The P-3 can carry a variety of internal weapons on it pylons like the Harpoon anti-surface missile, MK-50 torpedo and the MK-60 Mine.

While walking the ramp with LTJG Christina Evans of the unit VP-10 & PAO Lt. Gomez, we were able to capture some shots of the ground crews working on a few aircraft. One had just finished some engine work and I was allowed to watch the engine run ups. There were multiple P-3s in the pattern flying touch and goes or landing and taxing back for another take off.

On our way back one of the crews were preparing to hang a dummy missile. I was allowed to take some pictures of how they hang this to the outside wing pylon. After this I went outside the base to capture some images of the P-3s in the pattern.

The BRAC recommendation is to close NAS Brunswick, Maine and move all the P-3s down to NAS Jacksonville FL. I appreciate the time LTJG Evans and Lt Gomez gave me during my visit. NAS Brunswick, Maine plans to host an Air Show featuring the Blue Angels this year.

Copyright © 2006-2007 Dave O'Brien - http://www.topgunphotography.net

VP-8 Aircraft at NAS Brunswick, Maine
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VP-10 Aircraft at NAS Brunswick, Maine
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VP-26 Aircraft at NAS Brunswick, Maine
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VP-92 Aircraft at NAS Brunswick, Maine
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Other Aircraft at NAS Brunswick, Maine
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HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Fighting Tigers Photo Gallery - Command Summer Picnic at Thomas Point Beach - August 25, 2006..." WebSite: VP-8 http://www.vp8.navy.mil/index.php?id=608&secid=17 [22SEP2006]

Left To Right:

    Patrol Squadron (VP) 8 Command Master Chief Jerry Holloman taunts a crowed of on-lookers while waiting to get dumped into a dunk tank during VP-8's Command Picnic held at Thomas Point Beach.
    U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communications Specialist Seaman Christopher Little
    060825-N-1714L-001

    One of Patrol Squadron (VP) 8's littlest tigers relaxes after having his face decorated by Ensign Lyndsay Mayer during VP-8's Command Picnic held at Thomas Point Beach August 25th.
    U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communications Specialist Seaman Christopher Little.
    060825-N-1714L-002

    Aviation Electricians Mate First Class John Benson goes feet first after getting dumped into a dunk tank during VP-8's Command Picnic held at Thomas Point Beach August 25th.
    U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communications Specialist Seaman Christopher Little.
    060825-N-1714L-004

    Aviation Electricians Mate First Class, John Benson taunts the camera after getting dumped into a dunk tank during VP-8's Command Picnic held at Thomas Point Beach August 25th.
    U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communications Specialist Seaman Christopher Little.
    060825-N-1714L-005

    Members of Patrol Squadron (VP) 8 keep the fire stoked and the burgers, dogs, and chicken cooking during VP-8's Command Picnic held at Thomas Point Beach August 25th.
    U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communications Specialist Seaman Christopher Little.
    060825-N-1714L-007

    Ensign, Lyndsay Mayer of Patrol Squadron (VP) 8 paints designs on a junior tiger during VP-8's Command Picnic held at Thomas Point Beach August 25th.
    U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communications Specialist Seaman Christopher Little.
    060825-N-1714L-003
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HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Fighting Tigers Photo Gallery - Secretary of the Navy, The Honorable Dr. Donald C. Winter - Visits VP-8's Hangar January 20, 2006..." WebSite: VP-8 http://www.vp8.navy.mil/index.php?id=608&secid=17 [22SEP2006]

Left To Right:

    Secretary of the Navy(SECNAV) Dr. Donald C.Winter and Commanding Officer of Patrol Squadron EIGHT (VP-8) CDR Michael Napolitano exit a P-3C Orion aircraft. Dr. Winter is in New England to tour Navy and industrial base facilities.
    U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 3rd Class Shannon R. Smith.
    060120-N-3122S-001

    Commanding Officer of Patrol Squadron EIGHT (VP-8) CDR Michael Napolitano explains the capabilities of the P-3C Orion aircraft to the Secretary of the Navy (SECNAV) Dr. Donald C.Winter. Dr. Winter is in New England to tour Navy and industrial base facilities. U.S. Navy Photo by Petty Officer Third Class Shannon R. Smith.
    U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 3rd Class Shannon R. Smith.
    060120-N-3122S-002

    Secretary of the Navy(SECNAV) Dr. Donald C.Winter and Commodore of Patrol Reconnaissance Wing Five Captain Mike Hewitt discuss matters on the flight line. Dr. Winter is in New England to tour Navy and industrial base facilities.
    U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 3rd Class Shannon R. Smith.
    060120-N-3122S-004

    Commanding Officer of Patrol Squadron EIGHT (VP-8) CDR Michael Napolitano explains the capabilities of the P-3C Orion aircraft to the Secretary of the Navy (SECNAV) Dr. Donald C.Winter. Dr. Winter is in New England to tour Navy and industrial base facilities. U.S. Navy Photo by Petty Officer Third Class Shannon R. Smith.
    U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 3rd Class Shannon R. Smith.
    060120-N-3122S-003

    Secretary of the Navy(SECNAV) Dr. Donald C.Winter shakes hands with Aviation Structural Mechanic Third Class Philip Morrow from San Antonio, Texas of Patrol Squadron EIGHT (VP-8). Dr. Winter is in New England to tour Navy and industrial base facilities.
    U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 3rd Class Shannon R. Smith.
    060120-N-3122S-005

    Secretary of the Navy(SECNAV) Dr. Donald C.Winter shakes hands with Aviation Structural Mechanic Third Class Philip Morrow from San Antonio, Texas of Patrol Squadron EIGHT (VP-8). Dr. Winter is in New England to tour Navy and industrial base facilities.
    U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 3rd Class Shannon R. Smith.
    060120-N-3122S-006

    Secretary of the Navy(SECNAV) Dr. Donald C.Winter shakes hands with Aviation Ordnanceman First Class Clement Dickson of Patrol Squadron EIGHT (VP-8). Dr. Winter is in New England to tour Navy and industrial base facilities.
    U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 3rd Class Shannon R. Smith.
    060120-N-3122S-007

    Secretary of the Navy(SECNAV) Dr. Donald C.Winter receives a P-3C Orion Tail Plaque from Commodore of Patrol Reconnaissance Wing Five Captain Mike Hewitt and Patrol Squadron EIGHT (VP-8) Command Master Chief Jerry Holloman. Dr. Winter is in New England to tour Navy and industrial base facilities.
    U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 3rd Class Shannon R. Smith.
    060120-N-3122S-008
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HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VP History ThumbnailCamera060120-N-3122S-008 Brunswick, Maine (Jan. 20, 2006) "...Secretary of the Navy (SECNAV) the Honorable Dr. Donald C. Winter receives a P-3C Orion Tail Plaque from Commodore of Patrol Reconnaissance Wing Five, Capt. Mike Hewitt and Patrol Squadron Eight (VP-8) Command Master Chief Jerry Holloman. Dr. Winter is in New England to tour Navy and industrial base facilities. U.S. Navy Photo by Photographer's Mate 3rd Class Shannon R. Smith (RELEASED)..." WebSite: Navy Newsstand http://www.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=31446 [04MAR2006]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VP History ThumbnailCamera060120-N-2568S-045 Brunswick, Maine (Jan. 20, 2006) "...Commodore Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing Five (VPU-5), Capt. Mike Hewitt, left, Commanding Officer Patrol Squadron Eight (VP-8), Cmdr. Mike Napolitano, discusses the various missions of a P-3 squadron with Secretary of the Navy (SECNAV) the Honorable Dr. Donald C. Winter during his visit to the northeast. U.S. Navy photo by Chief Journalist Craig P. Strawser (RELEASED)..." WebSite: Navy Newsstand http://www.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=31417 [04MAR2006]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VP History ThumbnailCamera060120-N-2568S-022 Brunswick, Maine (Jan. 20, 2006) "...Commanding Officer Patrol Squadron Eight (VP-8), Cmdr. Mike Napolitano, explains the various missions of a P-3 squadron to Secretary of the Navy (SECNAV), the Honorable Dr. Donald C. Winter during his visit to the northeast. U.S. Navy photo by Chief Journalist Craig P. Strawser (RELEASED)..." WebSite: Navy Newsstand http://www.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=31416 [04MAR2006]


Circa 2005

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VP History ThumbnailCameraVP-8 History "...President Smith presents the RADM A.C. Read Navigator of the Year Award to VP-8's LTjg Jim Cardosi - ANA - Wings OF Gold - Summer 2005 - Page 34..." WebSite: Association Of Naval Aviation http://www.anahq.org/about/index.htm [20OCT2005]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VP History ThumbnailCamera050415-N-3122S-003 Okinawa, Japan (April 15, 2005) "...Aviation Ordnancemen assigned to the "Fighting Tigers" of Patrol Squadron Eight (VP-8) download Sonobuoys from a P-3C Orion. Sonobuoys are "active" and "passive" search stores carried on the P-3C Orion. Active buoys are mini-sonars, which "ping" for submarines and transmit the information up to the aircraft. Passive buoys are underwater microphones (hydrophones) that passively listen to all sounds in the water. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 3rd Class Shannon R. Smith (RELEASED)..." WebSite: Navy Newsstand http://www.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=23841 [13JUL2005]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VP History ThumbnailCamera050415-N-3122S-001 Okinawa, Japan (April 15, 2005) "...Aviation Ordnancemen assigned to the "Fighting Tigers" of Patrol Squadron Eight (VP-8) download Sonobuoys from a P-3C Orion. Sonobuoys are "active" and "passive" search stores carried on the P-3C Orion. Active buoys are mini-sonars, which "ping" for submarines and transmit the information up to the aircraft. Passive buoys are underwater microphones (hydrophones) that passively listen to all sounds in the water. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 3rd Class Shannon R. Smith (RELEASED)..." WebSite: Navy Newsstand http://www.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=23840 [13JUL2005]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VP History ThumbnailCamera050415-N-3122S-014 Okinawa, Japan (April 15, 2005) "...Aviation Machinist Mates, assigned to the " Tigers" of Patrol Squadron Eight (VP-8), work together to lower an auxiliary power unit (APU) of a P-3C Orion during maintenance. The APU is a relatively small self-contained generator used to start the main engines with compressed air, and to provide electrical power and air-conditioning while on the ground. The APU can be operated in flight for electrical power use, when bleed air is not available. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 3rd Class Shannon R. Smith (RELEASED)..." WebSite: Navy Newsstand http://www.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=23675 [13JUL2005]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VP History ThumbnailCamera050415-N-3122S-002 Okinawa, Japan (April 15, 2005) "...Aviation Ordnanceman 3rd Class Martin Hardwick, assigned to the "Tigers" of Patrol Squadron Eight (VP-8), aligns sonobuoy tubes prior to loading. Sonobuoys are search stores carried on the P-3C Orion and are loaded into the underside of the rear fuselage of the aircraft. More are carried internally and can be launched out of three pressurized chutes or the free fall chute. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 3rd Class Shannon R. Smith (RELEASED)..." WebSite: Navy Newsstand http://www.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=23674 [13JUL2005]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VP History ThumbnailCamera050329-N-3122S-010 Okinawa, Japan (Mar. 29, 2005) "...Aviation Electronics Technician 2nd Class Duncan Woodbury prepares to cover the engine intakes on a P-3C Orion, assigned to the "Tigers" of Patrol Squadron Eight (VP-8) at Kadena Air Base in Okinawa, Japan. VP-8 is home-based in Brunswick, Maine and is currently on deployment to Okinawa, Japan. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 3rd Class Shannon R. Smith (RELEASED)..." WebSite: Navy Newsstand http://www.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=23117 [13JUL2005]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VP History ThumbnailCamera050325-N-3122S-003 Okinawa, Japan (Mar. 25, 2005) "...Lt.j.g. Matt Delgado, left, gives a tour of a P-3C Orion, assigned to the "Tigers" of Patrol Squadron Eight (VP-8), to Yuma Tanaka and his family during a flight-line tour at Kadena Air Base in Okinawa, Japan. The special tour was arranged for Tanaka, who receives treatment for muscular dystrophy by the Make-A-Wish Foundation Japan, the U.S. Navy and the U.S. Air Force. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 3rd Class Shannon R. Smith (RELEASED)..." WebSite: Navy Newsstand http://www.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=23090 [13JUL2005]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VP History ThumbnailCamera050325-N-3122S-002 Okinawa, Japan (Mar. 25, 2005) "...Lt.j.g. Matt Delgado, left, gives a tour of a P-3C Orion, assigned to the "Tigers" of Patrol Squadron Eight (VP-8), to Yuma Tanaka and his family during a flight-line tour at Kadena Air Base in Okinawa, Japan. The special tour was arranged for Tanaka, who receives treatment for muscular dystrophy by the Make-A-Wish Foundation Japan, the U.S. Navy and the U.S. Air Force. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 3rd Class Shannon R. Smith (RELEASED)..." WebSite: Navy Newsstand http://www.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=23089 [13JUL2005]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VP History ThumbnailCamera050311-N-3122S-011 Okinawa, Japan (Mar. 11, 2005) "...Aviation Ordnanceman Airman Joseph Pfelisticker and Airman Llyod Lewis clean bomb racks on a P-3C Orion, assigned to the "Tigers" to Patrol Squadron Eight (VP-8) in Okinawa, Japan. VP-8 is home-based in Brunswick, Maine and is currently on deployment to Okinawa, Japan. Originally designed as a land-based, long-range, anti-submarine warfare (ASW) patrol aircraft, the P-3C's mission has evolved in the late 1990s and early 21st century to include surveillance of the battle-space, either at sea or over land. Its long range and long loiter time have proved invaluable assets during Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF) as it can view the battle-space and instantaneously provide that information to ground troops, especially U.S. Marines. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 3rd Class Shannon R. Smith (RELEASED)..." WebSite: Navy Newsstand http://www.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=22654 [13JUL2005]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VP History ThumbnailCamera050311-N-3122S-010 Okinawa, Japan (Mar. 11, 2005) "...Aviation Ordnancemen download an inert CATM-84K Standoff Land Attack Missile-Expanded Response (SLAM-ER) training missile from a weapons pylon on a P-3C Orion, assigned to the "Tigers" to Patrol Squadron Eight (VP-8) in Okinawa, Japan. The AGM-84K SLAM-ER is an air-launched, day/night, adverse weather, over-the-horizon, precision strike missile. VP-8 is home-based in Brunswick, Maine and is currently on deployment to Okinawa, Japan. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 3rd Class Shannon R. Smith (RELEASED)..." WebSite: Navy Newsstand http://www.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=22653 [13JUL2005]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VP History ThumbnailCamera050311-N-3122S-008 Okinawa, Japan (Mar. 11, 2005) "...Aviation Ordnancemen download an AN/AWW-13 Advanced Data Link pod from a weapons pylon on a P-3C Orion, assigned to the "Tigers" to Patrol Squadron Eight (VP-8) in Okinawa, Japan. The AN/AWW-13 Advanced Data Link allows the operator to select an aim point for weapon impact, and provides the only currently available link between munition seekers and humans. This link generally requires electro-optical/infrared acquisition in clear weather. The pod is typically used by the Standoff Land Attack Missile-Expanded Response (SLAM-ER) missile. VP-8 is home-based in Brunswick, Maine and is currently on deployment to Okinawa, Japan. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 3rd Class Shannon R. Smith (RELEASED)..." WebSite: Navy Newsstand http://www.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=22652 [13JUL2005]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VP History ThumbnailCamera050311-N-3122S-005 Okinawa, Japan (Mar. 11, 2005) "...A P-3C Orion, assigned to the "Tigers" to Patrol Squadron Eight (VP-8), taxis through a wash rack upon returning from a mission in Okinawa, Japan. VP-8 is home-based in Brunswick, Maine and is currently on deployment to Okinawa, Japan. Originally designed as a land-based, long-range, anti-submarine warfare (ASW) patrol aircraft, the P-3C's mission has evolved in the late 1990s and early 21st century to include surveillance of the battle-space, either at sea or over land. Its long range and long loiter time have proved invaluable assets during Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF) as it can view the battle-space and instantaneously provide that information to ground troops, especially U.S. Marines. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 3rd Class Shannon R. Smith (RELEASED)..." WebSite: Navy Newsstand http://www.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=22651 [13JUL2005]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VP History ThumbnailCamera050311-N-3122S-003 Okinawa, Japan (Mar. 11, 2005) "...Aviation Structural Mechanic Equipment 2nd Class Lucus Green services the emergency walk-around oxygen bottles from a P-3C Orion, assigned to the "Tigers" to Patrol Squadron Eight (VP-8), in Okinawa, Japan. VP-8 is home-based in Brunswick, Maine and is currently on deployment to Okinawa, Japan. Originally designed as a land-based, long-range, anti-submarine warfare (ASW) patrol aircraft, the P-3C's mission has evolved in the late 1990s and early 21st century to include surveillance of the battle-space, either at sea or over land. Its long range and long loiter time have proved invaluable assets during Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF) as it can view the battle-space and instantaneously provide that information to ground troops, especially U.S. Marines. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 3rd Class Shannon R. Smith (RELEASED)..." WebSite: Navy Newsstand http://www.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=22650 [13JUL2005]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VP History ThumbnailCamera050311-N-3122S-001 Okinawa, Japan (Mar. 11, 2005) "...Airman Lawrence Than salutes a P-3C Orion, assigned to the "Tigers" to Patrol Squadron Eight (VP-8), prior to take-off in Okinawa, Japan. VP-8 is home-based in Brunswick, Maine and is currently on deployment to Okinawa, Japan. Originally designed as a land-based, long-range, anti-submarine warfare (ASW) patrol aircraft, the P-3C's mission has evolved in the late 1990s and early 21st century to include surveillance of the battle-space, either at sea or over land. Its long range and long loiter time have proved invaluable assets during Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF) as it can view the battle-space and instantaneously provide that information to ground troops, especially U.S. Marines. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 3rd Class Shannon R. Smith (RELEASED)..." WebSite: Navy Newsstand http://www.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=22649 [13JUL2005]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...VP-8 and VP-4 Help In Tsunami Relief - By LT Abess and LT Nichols - This is a follow-on account to Naval Aviation operations in the wake of the tsunami tragedy. Two articles in the last issue of Wings of Gold focused on USS Abraham Lincoln relief activities. The following highlights Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance achievements - Wings of Gold - Spring 2005 - Page 70 and 71 - Association of Naval Aviation http://www.anahq.org/about/index.htm..." [10JUN2005]

History - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge Thumbnail

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...VP-8 Assists in Rescuing Four Philippine Fishermen - Story Number: NNS050415-02 - Release Date: 4/15/2005 11:47:00 AM - From U.S. 7th Fleet Public Affairs..." WebSite: Navy News Stand http://www.news.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=17933 [16APR2005]

YOKOSUKA, Japan (NNS) -- P-3 Orion aircraft from Patrol Squadron (VP) 8 played a critical role in the rescue April 10 of four Philippine fishermen whose vessel had been adrift in the South China Sea.

The fishing vessel Maria Emelyn II had been adrift since March 21. The U.S. Navy offered search-and-rescue assistance after repeated attempts by the Republic of the Philippines navy and coast guard to locate the fishermen were unsuccessful.

Missions were flown from Kadena Air Base on Okinawa, Japan. The squadron also established a detachment in Subic Bay, Philippines. The detachment was able to increase the number of hours spent in the search-and-rescue operation.

VP-8 began search operations April 6, and located the stranded vessel April 9, 60 nautical miles north-northeast of the outer limit of the Spratly Islands.

VP-8 and the Philippine navy's newest ship, the high-speed BRP General Mariano Alvarez (PS 38), helped direct the fishermen to safety. Alvarez is an ex-Cyclone-class vessel provided to the Philippines in April 2004 under the Excess Defense Articles Program.

Cmdr. Gerry Benavente, 7th Fleet air operations officer, said the operation was a team effort.

"The rescue was a great effort to save the four fishermen, who had already run out of food and water," said Benavente. "Both the air and ground crew of VP-8 put in a tremendous amount of work."

This rescue was particularly profound, Benavente pointed out, as both navies had recently completed a similar scenario.

"The cooperation was outstanding. Just a few weeks ago, a Philippine ship exercised control of our P-3 and a Republic of Philippines navy Islander patrol aircraft in order to practice our cooperative rescue efforts," said Benavente. "The combined rescue of these fishermen is another real-world example of the importance of the United States and Philippines training together."

VP-8, based at NAS Brunswick, Maine, is on a routine six-month deployment to the 7th Fleet area of responsibility.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VP-8 History ThumbnailCamera050217-N-3122S-004 Okinawa, Japan (Feb. 17, 2005) "...Aviation Ordnanceman Airman Llyod Lewis finishes loading a MK-65 Quickstrike mine on a P-3C Orion, belonging to the "Fighting Tigers" of Patrol Squadron Eight (VP-8). Originally designed as a land-based, long-range, anti-submarine warfare (ASW) patrol aircraft, the P-3C's mission has evolved in the late 1990s and early 21st century to include surveillance of the battle-space, either at sea or over land. Its long range and long loiter time have proved invaluable assets during Operation Iraqi Freedom as it can view the battle-space and instantaneously provide that information to ground troops, especially U.S. Marines. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 3rd Class Shannon R. Smith (RELEASED)..." Navy News Stand http://www.news.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=22016 [01MAR2005]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VP-8 History ThumbnailCamera050217-N-3122S-003 Okinawa, Japan (Feb. 17, 2005) "...Lt. Cmdr. Alan Marblestone checks a MK-65 Quickstrike mine, during an aircraft preflight on a P-3C Orion belonging to the "Fighting Tigers" of Patrol Squadron Eight (VP-8). The MK-65 Quickstrike mine is a shallow-water, aircraft-laid mine used primarily against surface ships. VP-8 is home-based in Brunswick, Maine, and is currently on deployment to Okinawa, Japan. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 3rd Class Shannon R. Smith (RELEASED) ..." Navy News Stand http://www.news.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=22015 [01MAR2005]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VP-8 History ThumbnailCamera050217-N-3122S-002 Okinawa, Japan (Feb. 17, 2005) "...Sailors assigned to the "Fighting Tigers" of Patrol Squadron Eight (VP-8), tow one of the squadron's P-3C Orion aircraft. VP-8 is home-based in Brunswick, Maine, and is currently on deployment to Okinawa, Japan. Originally designed as a land-based, long-range, anti-submarine warfare (ASW) patrol aircraft, the P-3C's mission has evolved in the late 1990s and early 21st century to include surveillance of the battle-space, either at sea or over land. Its long range and long loiter time have proved invaluable assets during Operation Iraqi Freedom as it can view the battle-space and instantaneously provide that information to ground troops, especially U.S. Marines. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 3rd Class Shannon R. Smith (RELEASED) ..." Navy News Stand http://www.news.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=22014 [01MAR2005]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VP-8 History ThumbnailCamera050109-N-3122S-001 Utapao, Thailand (Jan. 9, 2005) "...Aviation Ordnanceman 3rd Class Terry DeLoof stands by as he prepares to recover a P-3C Orion, assigned to the "Fighting Tigers" of Patrol Squadron Eight (VP-8), in Utapao, Thailand. VP-8 is currently on a regularly scheduled deployment to Japan. Four air crews are detached to Thailand in support of Operation Unified Assistance, the humanitarian relief effort to aid the victims of the tsunami that struck Southeast Asia. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 3rd Class Shannon R. Smith (RELEASED) ..." Navy News Stand http://www.news.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=21918 [01MAR2005]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VP-8 History ThumbnailCamera050108-N-3122S-001 Utapao, Thailand (Jan. 8, 2005) "...A P-3C Orion, assigned to the "Fighting Tigers" of Patrol Squadron Eight (VP-8), taxis at an airfield in Utapao, Thailand. VP-8 is currently on a regularly scheduled deployment to Japan. Four air crews are detached to Thailand in support of Operation Unified Assistance, the humanitarian relief effort to aid the victims of the tsunami that struck Southeast Asia. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 3rd Class Shannon R. Smith (RELEASED) ..." Navy News Stand http://www.news.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=21917 [01MAR2005]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VP-8 History ThumbnailCamera041231-N-3122S-001 Utapao, Thailand (Dec. 31, 2004) "...Aviation Warfare Systems Operators monitor the acoustic station during the flight of a P-3C Orion, assigned to the "Fighting Tigers" of Patrol Squadron Eight (VP-8). VP-8 is currently on a regularly scheduled deployment to Japan. Four air crews are detached to Thailand in support of Operation Unified Assistance, the humanitarian relief effort to aid the victims of the tsunami that struck Southeast Asia. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 3rd Class Shannon R. Smith (RELEASED) ..." Navy News Stand http://www.news.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=21916 [01MAR2005]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VP-8 History ThumbnailCamera050215-N-3122S-001 Okinawa, Japan (Feb. 15, 2005) "...Aviation Ordnanceman Airman Joseph Pfelifticker mans a fire hose as he sprays-down the starboard side of a P-3C Orion, assigned to the "Fighting Tigers" of Patrol Squadron Eight (VP-8), during an aircraft wash in the hangar bay. Aircraft washes are conducted every 28 days as part of preventive maintenance and a corrosion control schedule. VP-8 is home-based in Brunswick, Maine, and is currently on deployment to Okinawa, Japan. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 3rd Class Shannon R. Smith (RELEASED) ..." Navy News Stand http://www.news.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=21893 [01MAR2005]


Circa 2004 - 2005

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VP-8 Patch ThumbnailCameraVP-8 Deployment Patch "...WESTPAC 04-05 - NAF Kadena, Okinawa, Japan and NAF Misawa, Japan in support of Operation Unified Assistance..." Contributed by LT Donald W. Hartsell donald.hartsell@navy.mil [31JAN2006]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VP-8 Patch ThumbnailCameraVP-8 Deployment Patch "...WESTPAC 04-05 - NAF Kadena, Okinawa, Japan and NAF Misawa, Japan in support of Operation Unified Assistance..." Contributed by LT Donald W. Hartsell donald.hartsell@navy.mil [31JAN2006]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VP-8 Patch ThumbnailCameraVP-8 Deployment Patch "...WESTPAC 04-05 - NAF Kadena, Okinawa, Japan and NAF Misawa, Japan in support of Operation Unified Assistance..." Contributed by LT Donald W. Hartsell donald.hartsell@navy.mil [31JAN2006]


Circa 2004

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Seventh Fleet units help in tsunami relief operations - U.S. Seventh Fleet public affairs..." WebSite: Skywriter https://www.atsugi.navy.mil/skywriter/2005/7Jan05/page2.html [02MAR2006]

As directed by U.S. Pacific Fleet, Commander U.S. Seventh Fleet is providing humanitarian assistance and disaster relief to the governments of Indonesia, Sri Lanka, Thailand, and other affected nations to mitigate the effects of the recent earthquakes and tsunamis.

The ships of the USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72) Carrier Strike Group, and the ships of Expeditionary Strike Group (ESG) 5, will be diverted to the affected areas to conduct humanitarian relief operations.

As well, P-3C Orion surveillance aircraft from VP-8 and elements of VP-4, based at NAF Kadena, Okinawa, Japan have been deployed in support of search and rescue operations in the area, operating out of U-Tapao, Thailand.

The P-3's long range and long loiter time capability is an invaluable asset for search and rescue operations as it can view a large area and rapidly provide that information to regional Rescue Coordination Centers. While not able to physically rescue a survivor from the water, the P-3's communications suite and abilities to stay on station, survey for long periods of time, and deploy life rafts in the vicinity of any survivors make it an important component of any search and rescue operation.

Seventh Fleet is prepared to provide an assortment of assets, including ships, aircraft and personnel, to respond as required by higher authority. The U.S. Navy is well equipped and trained for these situations. Because of that, when called upon, units have the capabilities to deliver assistance to areas of the world that need it.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY:  History ThumbnailCameraSurvey Operations "...An EP-3C Orion surveillance plane assigned to the "Tigers" of Patrol Squadron 8, NAS Brunswick, Maine, deployed to U-Tapao Royal Thailand Air Force Base, Thailand, for survey operations Dec. 29, 2004. It was in support of disaster relief after a tsunami hit coastal regions throughout Southeast Asia. U.S. Navy photo..." WebSite: U. S. Department of State http://www.state.gov/r/pa/ei/pix/b/eap/40096.htm [24DEC2005]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY:  History ThumbnailCamera040204-N-3122S-002 Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Tucson, Ariz. (Feb.4, 2004) "...Aviation Machinist Mate 1st Class Frederick Berger signs a U.S. Navy P-3C Orion, aircraft number 321, assigned to the "Tigers" of Patrol Squadron Eight (VP-8). Petty Officer Berger and fellow aircrew made the flight to Tucson, Ariz., to induct the aircraft into the Aerospace Maintenance and Regeneration Center (AMARC) located at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base. AMARC is responsible for the storage and maintaining of aircraft for future redeployment, parts, or proper disposal following retirement by the military. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 3rd Class Shannon R. Smith. (RELEASED)..." Navy News Stand http://newshome.news.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=11983 [05MAR2005]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VP-8 History ThumbnailCamera041229-N-3122S-004 Okinawa, Japan (Dec. 29, 2004) "...P-3C Orion aircraft assigned to the "Tigers" of Patrol Squadron Eight (VP-8) sits on the flight line at Kadena Air Force Base, Japan prior to a mission. VP-8 is currently on a six-month deployment to Japan. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 3rd Class Shannon. R. Smith (RELEASED) ..." Navy News Stand http://www.news.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=20319 [01MAR2005]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VP-8 History ThumbnailCamera041229-N-3122S-002 Okinawa, Japan (Dec. 29, 2004) "...P-3C Orion aircraft assigned to the "Tigers" of Patrol Squadron Eight (VP-8) sits on the flight line at Kadena Air Force Base, Japan prior to a mission. VP-8 is currently on a six-month deployment to Okinawa, Japan. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 3rd Class Shannon. R. Smith (RELEASED)..." Navy News Stand http://www.news.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=20318 [01MAR2005]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VP-8 History ThumbnailCamera041229-N-0000X-001 Utapao, Thailand (Dec. 29, 2004) "...A P-3C Orion assigned to the "Tigers" of Patrol Squadron Eight (VP-8) sits on the flight line at Utapao Royal Thai Air Force Base, Thailand. VP-8 deployed to Utapao to conduct humanitarian support and aerial surveys as part of larger disaster relief efforts for coastal regions throughout Southeast Asia, following a massive Tsunami event Dec. 26. VP-8 is homeported at Naval Air Station Brunswick, Maine. U.S. Navy photo (RELEASED) ..." Navy News Stand http://www.news.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=19832 [01MAR2005]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...7th Fleet Units Help in Relief Operations in Southeast Asia - Story Number: NNS041230-01 - Release Date: 12/30/2004 9:08:00 AM..." Navy News Stand http://www.news.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=16449 [31DEC2004]

7th Fleet Units Help in Relief Operations in Southeast Asia
Story Number: NNS041230-01
Release Date: 12/30/2004 9:08:00 AM

From Commander, U.S. 7th Fleet Public Affairs

YOKOSUKA, Japan (NNS) -- As directed by U.S. Pacific Command, Commander U.S. 7th Fleet is preparing to provide humanitarian assistance and disaster relief to the governments of Indonesia, Sri Lanka, Thailand and other affected nations to mitigate the effects of the recent earthquakes and tsunamis.

According to Lt. Gilbert Gay, 7th Fleet Task Force 72 (CTF 72) public affairs officer, six P-3C Orion surveillance aircraft from Patrol Squadron VP-8 and elements of VP-4, based at NAF Kadena, Okinawa, Japan, have been deployed to take part in a survey operation in the area, operating out of Utapao, Thailand. Approximately 110 personnel are involved in the operation.

"The P-3's long range and long loiter time capability is an invaluable asset for search and rescue operations as it can view a large area and rapidly provide that information to regional Rescue Coordination Centers," said Gay. "While not able to physically rescue a survivor from the water, the P-3's communications suite and abilities to stay on station, survey for long periods of time and deploy life rafts in the vicinity of any survivors make it an important component of any search and rescue operation."

Humanitarian assistance assessment teams from U.S. Pacific Command are expected to be deployed to identify requirements for temporary military-specific support that can be provided to the governments affected by this disaster.

The U.S. Navy is well equipped and trained for these situations. Because of that, when called upon, units have the capabilities to deliver assistance to areas of the world that need it.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Valhalla for 'Val' After Years of NASKEF Service..." Navy News Stand http://www.news.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=11706 [02APR2004]

Valhalla for 'Val' After Years of NASKEF Service
Story Number: NNS040302-02
Release Date: 3/2/2004 9:30:00 AM
From Naval Air Station Keflavik Air Ops Public Affairs

NAVAL AIR STATION KEFLAVÍK, Iceland (NNS) -- For nearly 19 years, NAS Keflavik, Iceland's (NASKEF) UP-3A aircraft, Valkyrja, affectionately known as Val, served NASKEF's personnel. Jan. 26, Val was retired and flown to Davis-Mothan Air Force Base, where she was inducted into the aircraft "boneyard."

"The loss of Val not only marks the end of an era of NAS Keflavik, Iceland having a base aircraft, but more importantly, has impacted the base's ability to get personnel to professional conferences, symposiums and training seminars," said Lt. Cmdr. Joe Dickinson, NASKEF's air operations officer.

Her moniker, Valkyrja, is drawn from the Norse name for the "female chooser of the slain." The helmeted battle maidens would fly on supernatural horses over battlefields, determining the course and victors of war. The Valkyries' primary duty was to choose the bravest of the warriors slain on the battlefield, gathering their souls to escort them to Valhalla.

She was delivered to the Navy Aug. 29, 1962, making her much older than many of the personnel who currently fly and maintain her. During her faithful years of service in NAS Keflavik, Iceland, she has carried more than 22,000 personnel to more than 15 countries, while accumulating just over 10,000 mishap-free flight hours, including 5,675 landings. In total, Val has accumulated 20,108 mishap-free flight hours and flown more than 7 million miles--the equivalent of two years, three months, and 18 days in the air, 282 trips around the equator, or 14 trips to and from the moon. Prior to being stationed in NAS Keflavik, Iceland, she was assigned to VP-30, VP-8, VXN-8, VP-94, and Naval Aerological Support Center, Miami.

The 34 personnel in the Operations Maintenance Division, under the leadership of Lt. Mike Hersey, were responsible for the upkeep and "TLC" of the Navy's best-kept UP-3A, and they maintained an astonishing 89 percent "mission capable" rate. Although stationed in NAS Keflavik, Iceland, Val aircrews provided time-critical logistical support to Commander, Task Force 67 during Operations Enduring Freedom (OEF), Iraqi Freedom (OIF), and numerous task force exercises. Over a three-month period, Val flew 25 logistics missions in direct support of OEF/OIF and exercises Booming, Blue Game and Baltops. NAS Keflavik, Iceland aircrews flew more than 150 hours across six different countries, providing time-critical, intra-theater wartime transport throughout the Mediterranean and European areas of responsibility for more than 500 duty personnel and 50,000 lbs. of cargo.

"In addition to providing base support to professional functions throughout Europe and CONUS, Val provided a huge quality of life boost to the base service members and dependents as a space-available transportation opportunity," said Dickinson.

Val's last local flight was completed Jan. 22 with Capt. Mark Laughton, commanding officer of NAS Keflavik, Iceland, and Dickinson at the controls. The pilots, air crew and maintenance personnel will deeply miss Val, as will all who enjoyed the benefits of having a station aircraft.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: Squadron ThumbnailCameraVP-8 Patch Contributed by Tom Grannis grannis1@earthlink.net [10NOV2003]


Circa 2003

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Iraq Mission Over - 'Flying Tigers' Heading Home - By Kendra Helmer, Stars and Stripes - European edition, Tuesday, August 5, 2003..." WebSite: Stars and Stips http://www.stripes.com/ [15SEP2008]

SIGONELLA, Sicily — Patrol Squadron Eight is wrapping up an eventful six-month deployment to Sigonella.

For the first time, the squadron's P-3 Orion turboprop aircraft came under fire while surveying enemy troop movements in Iraq.

Sailors flew operations over the Balkans, did surveillance operations near Liberia and searched for potential terrorist camps in countries in the eastern Mediterranean. At one time, the squadron had planes in five different countries, said VP-8's commanding officer, Cmdr. Robert Dishman.

Six stateside Orion squadrons rotate six-month deployments to Sigonella.

"We feel pretty lucky to have been the squadron in place when this [war] happened," said Lt. Cmdr. Art Gibb, 36, VP-8 operations officer.

Over the next week, the VP-8 "Fighting Tigers" are returning to Brunswick, Maine, and turning over operations at Sigonella to the VP45 "Pelicans" from Jacksonville, Fla.

During some of the 100 surveillance missions VP-8 flew over Iraq during Operation Iraqi Freedom, their 116-foot long aircraft came under anti-aircraft fire, a first for the squadron whose primary mission is anti-submarine warfare.

"I think it gave everybody involved kind of an eye-opening perspective in the importance of what we do," said Gibb, from Annapolis, Md.

Crews put in long hours during the war. A crew's maximum airtime is 180 hours a month, said Lt. j.g. Christian Parilla, 25, public affairs officer from Fairfax, Va.

"We were just shy of that," he said. "With such old planes, we're very lucky our planes held up. Our maintainers did an awesome job."

Squadron members said that while the many deployments kept them busy, they were looking forward to returning home.

Petty Officer 2nd Class Dustin Parrish, 22, an aviation mechanic from Lockhart, Texas, couldn't wait to see how much his 4-year-old daughter had grown since February.

"Last I heard she could reach the light switch," he said with a smile on his face.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...I'm Pretty Sure He Saw Them - by Lt. Jim Adams - Approach, July 2003..." WebSite: Navy Safety Center http://www.safetycenter.navy.mil/media/approach/issues/jul03/PrettySure.htm [27JUN2006]

We have been learning the seven skills of crew-resource management for years. It is a basic, some say common-sense, philosophy we use to make sure a mission is accomplished safely and effectively. Failure to use CRM can result in mission failure, loss of life, or just making yourself and your crew look unprofessional. Fortunately, my crew suffered only the latter.

After spending three days on detachment, my crew was preflighting for our return to home plate. The junior of our two flight engineers (FEs) conducted an exterior inspection of our P-3C. As patrol-plane commander (PPC), I also did an exterior inspection. During my inspection, I saw the landing-gear pins still were installed-not unusual, since many FEs leave the pins installed until just before the planeside brief.

We were late starting engines because cargo we were taking back to home plate was delayed. We also were held up because of a fuel spill from an adjacent aircraft. In an effort to expedite our departure, I held the planeside brief while we waited for the cargo. At the brief, I normally make sure the gear pins are inside the aircraft and not in the landing gear. Since we still had time to wait, I did not direct the FE to remove the pins, figuring we would take care of it when we were ready to go.

After a delay of an hour and a half, the cargo arrived, and the emergency vehicles for the fuel spill departed. We made sure everyone was aboard, and we strapped in. The copilot read the before-start checklist, beginning with the first item, "gear pins."

This checklist item requires a response from the FE and the copilot of "removed," indicating each person has verified the gear pins are inside the plane, not in the landing gear. The senior FE and the copilot each responded with "removed."

As it turns out, neither visually had checked the gear pins. Each one thought the other had seen them, when, the truth is, neither had. I also neglected to visually check the pins, assuming the FE and the CP had done so-they responded to the checklist.

We took off and realized the landing gear would not come up-the pins still were installed. We landed right away, pulled the pins, and took off again, minus a big chunk of pride.

CRM, used correctly, is supposed to keep us from making such mistakes. Here's what should have happened:

Assertiveness. Both the copilot and the FE had their doubts about where the pins were, but no one spoke up. Neither did I mention I had not seen them.

Communication. We had a big lack of communication, not only with the copilot and FE but also with the PPC and junior FE. Any one of us could have broken the chain by voicing the concern we each had been whispering in our heads.

Leadership. This one hits me straight to the bone. As PPC and mission commander, it is my job to make sure the crew, myself included, properly performs their duties. Overall responsibility for the aircraft and the mission lies solely with me. I failed miserably as the leader.

Situational Awareness. I think it's obvious: We lost ours.

There are other situations where a lack of CRM could have had more severe consequences. The combined P-3 flight time among our flight-station crew was nearly 9,000 hours; yet, we failed to execute a basic aircrew function.

On every mission:

. Keep up your guard.
. Use CRM.
. Remember the basics; they never change, no matter how long you fly.

Lt. Adams flies with VP-8.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...The Fighting Tigers Return From Deployment - Year of Success Story: 2003 - Date of Submission: 3/26/2004 - Functional Area(s): Air Operations - Region: Navy Region Northeast - Success Story: On July 29, 2003, the "Fighting Tigers" of Patrol Squadron Eight (VP-8) began their return from deployment to NAS Sigonella, Sicily..." http://www.cni.navy.mil/successDetail.aspx%3FID%3D37+%22operation+iraqi+freedom%22+%22vp-8%22&hl=en [19NOV2005]

Six months ago, VP-8 left NASB amid rising tensions in Iraq. Now they are returning with a deep sense of pride and satisfaction for their direct support of Operation "Iraqi Freedom" and several other operations.

The "Fighting Tigers" experienced a challenging and rewarding wartime deployment. The extraordinary planning, training and execution by aircrews and maintenance personnel enabled the safe completion of more than 700 missions and 7,500 flight hours. VP-8 flew more than 260 missions and 2,700 hours in support of Operation "Iraqi Freedom."

VP-8 also supported the Global War on Terrorism through Operation "Enduring Freedom." In addition, the "Fighting Tigers" flew overland missions in Bosnia and Kosovo where they continued the NATO stabilization effort by enforcing the 1995 Dayton Peace Accords.

After arriving in Sigonella, the squadron was immediately spread from one corner of the Mediterranean to the other. From escorting a Carrier Battle Group steaming toward Iraq through the Strait of Gibraltar (STROG), to overland surveillance in Bosnia and Kosovo, to conducting surveillance flights in the eastern Mediterranean, the squadron was tested operationally.

As U.S. naval units steamed to the eastern Mediterranean and Middle East, the "Fighting Tigers" sent most of their crews to Souda Bay, Crete, to be staged closer to the operations area. At the onset of the war, crews were already providing around-the-clock P-3 support for two Carrier Battle Groups in the Mediterranean. VP-10, VP-26 and VP-45 surged aircraft and aircrews from their stateside bases to augment VP-8's presence, demonstrating the "One Team, One Fight" mantra of the Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Force. In all, the augmenting VP-squadrons flew more than 1,100 hours in support of VP-8 and Operation "Iraqi Freedom." As the war surged on through late April, VP-8 crews were averaging nearly 180 flight hours per month.

Though numerous crews augmented VP-8, "Fighting Tiger" maintenance personnel solely supported all operations from Sigonella and Souda Bay, a monumental task, superbly. The "Fighting Tigers" performed at this high level without sacrificing safety standards and continued to log mishap free flight hoursľover 153,000.

VP-8 boasted a well-above average advancement rate of 27 percent for the March advancement exam cycle. The hard work of the command to retain its Sailors resulted in an 83 percent retention rate. For this effort, the squadron received its fourth consecutive Commander, U.S. Atlantic Fleet (COMLANTFLT) Retention Excellence Award.

The "Fighting Tigers" maintained their primary skill in Anti-Submarine Warfare and other war-fighting capabilities through numerous NATO exercises, including Hurd Bank, Dogfish, Baltic Sea Operations, Mare Aperto and the National Training Continuum. At one point in June, VP-8 operated simultaneously from five countries, Italy, Greece, Germany, Spain and Senegal.

On July 4, members of VP-8 were honored to represent the U.S. in southern France. The citizens of France invited VP-8 to participate in their annual ceremonies and festivities that commemorated the long history of French-American relations and the ultimate sacrifice of a World War II U.S. B-24 "Liberator" crew.

In mid July, VP-8 began preparations for their long awaited return home. Rear Adm. Michael Holmes, Commander Task Force 67, met with the "Fighting Tigers on July 25th in Sigonella to present awards to many of the squadron's Sailors for a job well done.

Successful and proven in their wartime deployment, the "Fighting Tigers" are glad to return to NASB and look forward to spending time with family and friends.

"I feel great," said PN1 Randy Mitchell. "It was a long deployment, but I am very glad to be back."

"The Fighting Tigers are proud to have served our country during this critical period in our nation's history," said Cmdr. Bob Dishman, Commanding Officer of VP-8. "We could not have been as successful without the tremendous support of the entire Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Force, from surging additional crews, to logistics and parts support, the teamwork was phenomenal. As we return home, we could not be more appreciative of the support we received from our families and the entire Brunswick community."

Source: Lt. j.g. Christian Parilla, VP-8 Public Affairs Officer

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY:  History ThumbnailCamera030526-N-3122S-005 Naval Air Station (NAS) Sigonella, Sicily (May 26, 2003) "...A P-3C Orion aircraft assigned to the "Tigers" of Patrol Squadron Eight (VP-8) flies over Mt. Etna. VP-8 is home-based in Brunswick, Maine, and is currently deployed to Naval Air Station (NAS) Sigonella providing logistical support for Commander, U.S. Sixth Fleet and NATO forces in the Mediterranean Sea. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate Airman Shannon R. Smith. (RELEASED)..." Navy News Stand http://newshome.news.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=7695 [05MAR2005]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY:  History ThumbnailCamera030526-N-3122S-019 Naval Air Station (NAS) Sigonella, Sicily (May 26, 2003) "...A P-3C Orion aircraft assigned to the "Tigers" of Patrol Squadron Eight (VP-8) flies along the coastline of Taormina, Sicily. VP-8 is home-based in Brunswick, Maine, and is currently deployed to Naval Air Station (NAS) Sigonella providing logistical support for Commander, U.S. Sixth Fleet and NATO forces in the Mediterranean Sea. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate Airman Shannon R. Smith. (RELEASED)..." Navy News Stand http://newshome.news.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=7697 [05MAR2005]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY:  History ThumbnailCamera030526-N-3122S-014 Naval Air Station (NAS) Sigonella, Sicily (May 26, 2003) "...A P-3C Orion aircraft assigned to the "Tigers" of Patrol Squadron Eight (VP-8) flies along the coastline of Taormina, Sicily. VP-8 is home-based in Brunswick, Maine, and is currently deployed to Naval Air Station (NAS) Sigonella providing logistical support for Commander, U.S. Sixth Fleet and NATO forces in the Mediterranean Sea. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate Airman Shannon R. Smith. (RELEASED)..." Navy News Stand http://newshome.news.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=7712 [05MAR2005]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY:  History ThumbnailCamera030506-N-5821W-002 Naval Air Station (NAS), Sigonella, Sicily (May 6, 2003) "...Aviation Warfare Systems Operator 2nd Class Kraig Vavruska explains the Sensor 3 Station to Gary Claudio, manager of General Motors Racing, aboard a P-3 "Orion" aircraft assigned to the "Fighting Tigers" of Patrol Squadron Eight (VP-8). Claudio joined the 2002/2003 GTS Champion Corvette Racing Team to visit NAS Sigonella as part of their 2003 U.S. Navy Tour. NAS Sigonella provides logistical support for Sixth Fleet and NATO forces in the Mediterranean Sea. U.S. Navy photo by Journalist Seaman Stephen P. Weaver. (RELEASED)..." Navy News Stand http://newshome.news.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=7430 [06MAR2005]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY:  History ThumbnailCamera030504-N-3122S-001 Naval Air Station Sigonella, Sicily (May 3, 2003) "...Airman Yesenia Mora performs maintenance on the number four prop of a P-3 Orion aircraft assigned to Patrol Squadron Eight (VP-8). U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate Airman Shannon R. Smith. (RELEASED)..." Navy News Stand http://newshome.news.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=7987 [05MAR2005]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY:  History ThumbnailCamera030503-N-3122S-002 Naval Air Station Sigonella, Sicily (May 3, 2003) "...Ordnanceman Airman Martin Hardwick removes ordinance pins from a P-3 Orion aircraft assigned to Patrol Squadron Eight (VP-8). U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate Airman Shannon R. Smith. (RELEASED)..." Navy News Stand http://newshome.news.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=7988 [05MAR2005]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY:  History ThumbnailCamera030418-N-5821W-003 Naval Air Station, Sigonella, Sicily (Apr. 18, 2003) "...Aviation Structural Mechanic 2nd Class Timothy Harris assigned to the Aircraft Intermediate Maintenance Department (AIMD) uses a metal forming machine to repair a bell mount from a P-3C "Orion" aircraft assigned to the "Fighting Tigers" of Patrol Squadron Eight (VP-8). VP-8 is currently deployed to Naval Air Station (NAS), Sigonella. Naval Air Station (NAS) Sigonella provides logistical support for Sixth Fleet and the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) forces in the Mediterranean Sea. U.S. Navy photo by Journalist Seaman Stephen P. Weaver. (RELEASED)..." Navy News Stand http://newshome.news.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=6904 [06MAR2005]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY:  History ThumbnailCamera030408-N-7375S-009 Sigonella, Sicily (Apr. 8, 2003) "...Pilots and ground crew from Patrol Squadron Eight (VP-8) work together to launch a P-3 Orion aircraft on another mission. VP-8 is currently deployed to Naval Air Station (NAS) Sigonella. NAS Sigonella provides logistical support for Commander Sixth Fleet and North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) forces through out the Mediterranean Sea. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 1st Class Jeremy Siegrist. (RELEASED)..." Navy News Stand http://newshome.news.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=6775 [06MAR2005]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VP History ThumbnailCamera030408-N-7375S-001 Sigonella, Sicily (Apr. 8, 2003)

"...Petty Officer 2nd Class Jose Perez from Miami, Fla., checks for lose propellor blades on one of a P-3 Orion aircraft assigned to the "Tigers" of Patrol Squadron Eight (VP-8). VP-8 is currently deployed to Naval Air Station (NAS) Sigonella. NAS Sigonella provides logistical support for Commander Sixth Fleet and North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) forces through out the Mediterranean Sea. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 1st Class Jeremy Siegrist. (RELEASED)..." Navy WebSite: http://www.news.navy.mil/list_single.asp?id=6773 [28FEB2005]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY:  History ThumbnailCamera030327-N-8807Z-004 Naval Air Station, Sicily (Mar. 27, 2003) "...Aviation Structural Mechanic Airman Richard Brown from Jersey City, N. J., Aviation Machinist's Mate 3rd Class Alfredo Cosme from Jackson Heights, N.Y., Airman Yesenia Mora from Los Angeles, Calif., and Aviation Ordnanceman Airman Josh Coker from Pelzer, S.C., all members of the "Tigers" of Patrol Squadron Eight (VP-8) assist in the upload of a AGM-65 Maverick air to surface guided missile onto the wing of a P-3C Orion aircraft during a training exercise at NAS Sigonella. VP-8 is homeported out of Brunswick, Maine and is currently on deployment to the Mediterranean. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate Airman M.L. Zambrana. (RELEASED)..." Navy News Stand http://newshome.news.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=6745 [06MAR2005]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY:  History ThumbnailCamera030326-N-3122S-001 Naval Air Station Sigonella, Sicily (Mar. 26, 2003) "...A P-3C Orion Aircraft from the "Tigers" of Patrol Squadron Eight (VP-8) makes its final approach to Naval Air Station (NAS) Sigonella. VP-8 provides anti-submarine warfare for forces in the Mediterranean Sea. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate Airman Shannon R. Smith. (RELEASED)..." Navy News Stand http://newshome.news.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=5847 [07MAR2005]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY:  History ThumbnailCamera030314-N-0780F-017 Souda Bay, Crete, Greece (Mar. 14, 2003) "...Patrol Squadron Eight (VP-8) Lineman, Airman Timothy Aulman directs a "Fighting Tiger" P-3C Orion aircraft after its return from a mission. VP-8, home ported at Naval Air Station Brunswick, Maine, is currently deployed to the Mediterranean theater with detachments at Naval Air Station Sigonella, Sicily and Naval Support Activity Souda Bay. The P-3C is a land-based, long-range, anti-submarine warfare (ASW) patrol aircraft. It has advanced submarine detection sensors and can carry a mixed payload of weapons internally and on wing pylons. U.S. Navy photo by Paul Farley. (RELEASED)..." Navy News Stand http://newshome.news.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=5186 [07MAR2005]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY:  History ThumbnailCamera030314-N-0780F-050 Souda Bay, Crete, Greece (Mar. 14, 2003) "...Patrol Squadron Eight (VP-8) aircrew members walk to their P-3C Orion aircraft to prepare for their next mission. VP-8, home ported at NAS Brunswick, Maine, is currently deployed to the Mediterranean theater with detachments at Naval Air Station Sigonella, Sicily and Naval Support Activity Souda Bay. The P-3C is a land-based, long-range, anti-submarine warfare (ASW) patrol aircraft. It has advanced submarine detection sensors and can carry a mixed payload of weapons internally and on wing pylons. U.S. Navy photo by Paul Farley. (RELEASED)..." Navy News Stand http://newshome.news.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=5187 [07MAR2005]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY:  History ThumbnailCamera030314-N-0780F-056 Souda Bay, Crete, Greece (Mar. 14, 2003) "...Patrol Squadron Eight (VP-8) Combat Air Crew (CAC) 2 members walk away from their "Fighting Tiger" P-3C Orion aircraft after returning from a mission. VP-8, home ported at NAS Brunswick, Maine, is currently deployed to the Mediterranean theater with detachments at Naval Air Station Sigonella, Sicily and Naval Support Activity Souda Bay. The P-3C is a land-based, long-range, anti-submarine warfare (ASW) patrol aircraft. It has advanced submarine detection sensors and can carry a mixed payload of weapons internally and on wing pylons. U.S. Navy photo by Paul Farley. (RELEASED)..." Navy News Stand http://newshome.news.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=5188 [07MAR2005]


Circa 2002 - 2003

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VP-8 Patch ThumbnailCameraVP-8 Deployment Patch "...OIF patch from previous deployment 02-03 IRAQ..." Contributed by LT Donald W. Hartsell donald.hartsell@navy.mil [31JAN2006]


Circa 2002

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY:  History ThumbnailCamera020919-N-3122S-003 Brunswick, Me. (Sep. 19, 2002) "...A P-3C "Orion" attached to the "Tigers" of Patrol Squadron Eight (VP-8) heads to a bombing exercise loaded with MK-20 "Rockeye" cluster bombs. MK-20 cluster bombs deliver 247 bomblets, which, upon detonation, release a jet of super heated and pressurized gas, which can penetrate 10 inches of steel and 31 inches of reinforced concrete. The P-3C is a land-based, long-range, anti-submarine warfare (ASW) patrol aircraft. The weapon's dispersion area is roughly the size of a football field. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate Airman Shannon Smith. (RELEASED)..." Navy News Stand http://newshome.news.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=2861 [09MAR2005]


Circa 2001

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Preflight Not Unplugged - by Lt. Matt Corey - Mech Jul-Sep 2001..." WebSite: Navy Safety Center http://www.safetycenter.navy.mil/media/approach/issues/mar03/Uneventful.htm [28JUN2006]

Sometimes in this complicated world of naval aviation the small things we take for granted sneak up and surprise us.

We had just begun a six-month deployment, and I had been called to do a high-power turn on one of our aircraft. The evolution was a man-on-the-stand turn, in which you closely examine the engine while the engine is turning. The engine isn't the big deal; rather, it's the propeller spinning at over 1,000 rpm only a few feet away from your shipmate's head.

Although I had done man-on-the-stand runs before, I never had done one at night. The mechs and turn crew briefed, which is required in our squadron SOP. Both the flight engineer and I spent considerable time making sure the maintenance stands were positioned and chained down, and we knew exactly what the mechs would be doing. We reviewed the lineman's signals and made sure the two light carts would provide enough light to do the turn. I had used operational risk management (ORM) to prepare for the turn (proper lighting, communications, environmental factors, and possible emergencies), and I felt sure this would be a safe event.

As we began to turn the No. 2 engine, one of the outside observers signaled immediately for us to secure the engine. As we shut it down, my flight engineer and I began to wonder what could have gone wrong.

The outside observer told us the fifth and 10th stage bleed-air plugs were still installed. I made my way back to the port overwing window, looked out, and sure enough, they still were installed.

During preflight, when I had looked out the same window, I had been more concerned with the position of the maintenance stands, or assumed my aft observer also would be looking for the items I normally check during my preflight. We removed the plugs and completed the turn with no hitches.

I was frustrated, though, having made such a stupid and simple mistake. Later, as I thought about the whole evolution, I realized I had made a few basic mistakes and learned some important lessons that night:

First, don't treat your ground-turn preflight differently than a normal preflight. I got "scope-locked" into making sure everything about the man-on-the-stand turn was set up properly. Had I concentrated on doing a standard preflight and taken some extra time to check the equipment, I would have noticed the plugs.

Second, pay attention to the details, especially at night. Think about some of the small things you do during the day that may not jump out at you at night. I think if this turn had happened in daylight, one of the crew would have caught the plugs. During a preflight in the dark, which we do often during our deployments, you need to take a closer look at those parts of the aircraft more difficult to see (e.g., static wicks or hydraulic, oil, and fuel leaks).

Third, you need to fess up when you make a mistake. Like the adage says, "Experience is learning from your mistakes; wisdom is learning from those of others." I'm a bit more experienced now.

It was frustrating to make this mistake, and I'm relieved it wasn't serious, but it reinforces the need to understand and practice ORM. If we had used it more effectively, this turn would have gone off without a hitch. The last thing I expected to go wrong was a normal preflight item.

Lt. Matt Corey wrote this article when he was the ground-safety officer with VP-8.


Circa 2000

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY:  History ThumbnailCameraDogfish 2000 "...Lt.J.G. Pete Hakewessell of US NAvy Patrol Squadron EIGHT (VP-8) "Fighting Tigers" tracks a Spanish submarine off the coast of Sicily as part of Dogfish 2000, the largest NATO antisubmarine exercise. (NATO/USN photo by Airman John Looney)..." Allied Forces Southern Europe http://www.afsouth.nato.int/images/Dogfishimages.htm [21MAR2005]


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