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HistoryVP-69 HistoryHistory

Circa 2009

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Command of VP-69 Changes By LCDR Eyran Richards Fighting Totems reporter - Thursday, November 12, 2009..." WebSite: NorthWest Navigator http://www.northwestnavigator.com/ [13NOV2009]

The Totems of Patrol Squadron (VP) 69 at Naval Air Station, Whidbey Island said farewell, Nov. 7, to their 29th commanding officer, Cmdr James A. Nelson, who was replaced by Cmdr. Hebert F. Frederick.

Following active duty assignments with Patrol Squadron (VP) 40 at Moffett Field, Calif., and VP-30 in Jacksonville, Fla., Nelson's association with VP-69 began as a Selected Reservist in 1999 after leaving active duty. Balancing his military commitments with a fulltime career as a MD-80/737 First Officer with Alaska Airlines, Nelson served as a department head in each of VP-69s departments, including Operations and NATOPS/Standardization. After serving as executive officer for 15 months, Nelson assumed command in September 2008.

During Nelson's tour as CO the Sailors of VP-69 successfully completed more than 300 sorties and 1,450 mishap-free flight hours. Moreover, VP-69 crews participated in two 3rd Fleet Anti-Submarine Warfare Exercises, three Strike Group Exercises, and directly supported Counter-Narcotics operations for US Southern Command. In all, the Totems contributed 61 detachment days, 15 sorties, and 107 flight hours of operational support to the fleet.

Nelson will report to the Maritime Partnership Program Detachment 118 in Denver, Colo., where he will serve as the Operations and Training Planner.

Frederick served with VP-46 at NAS Whidbey Island and VP-30 at NAS Jacksonville. In 1999, Frederick transitioned to the Full Time Support officer program and was assigned to the air station, Joint Reserve Base, New Orleans, La. with VP-94 and Commander Reserve Patrol Wing at Willow Grove, Penn. Later he served as the final Officer in Charge for VP-65, and then returned to New Orleans as the VP Program Manager for Commander Navy Air Force Reserve. Frederick reported as executive officer for the VP-69 Totems in July of 2008.

© 2009 Sound Publishing, Inc.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Wing 10 Honors best, Brightest By MC2 Elizabeth Acosta - NPASE Det. NW - Thursday, April 30, 2009 (Squadrons Mentioned: CPRW-10, VP-1, VP-40, VP-46, VP-69, VQ-1 and VQ-2)..." WebSite: NorthWest Navigator http://www.northwestnavigator.com/ [01MAY2009]

Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing (CPRW) 10 held its annual ceremony to recognize the contributions of their Sailors, April 23.

This is the 14th year CPRW-10 and the Oak Harbor community honored the significant accomplishments of Wing 10 Sailors.

"Each of you earned your command's nomination because of your selfless sacrifice and commitment. Your work has made us a better wing and I hope each of you finds pride in your many contributions," Capt. Ken Seliga, commodore of CPRW-10.

The CPRW Sea Sailor of the Year (SOY) was Personnel Specialist 1st Class (AW) Gladys Willis, of VP-1, who was also recognized as the Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Group (CPRG) Pacific Sea SOY in January, and Junior Sailor of the year was Naval Aircrewman Operator 2nd Class (AW/NAC) Mark Hill of VP-1. The Shore Sailor of the Year was Aviation Electronics Technician 1st Class (AW) Danyall Benavides, of CPRW-10, whose contributions also led to recognition by CPRG as their Pacific Shore SOY, and Junior Sailor of the Year was Information Systems Technician 3rd Class Blake Hausman, of CPRW-10. The Reserve Sailor of the year was Naval Aircrewman Operator 1st Class (AW/NAC) Stephen Daley, of VP-69.

"It's pretty big; It feels really good to get this award. It was a very honorable experience" said Benavides.

Gifts were presented by Jim Slowik, Mayor of Oak Harbor, Patrick Travenetti, director, Embry Riddle Aeronautical University, Marjean Knokey, Columbia College, Barbara Bockman, Chapman University, Mike Sevy, USAA Insurance Company, Kim Braylens and Robin King, of Navy Federal Credit Union, to further recognize the contributions these Sailors make.

The Battle Efficiency award was presented to VQ-2, the Commander Naval Air Pacific Isbell Trophy, VP-1, and the Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Aviation Safety award, VQ-1. Also honored at the ceremony was the Aviator of the Year, Lt. Ronald Rumfelt, of VP-40, and Flight crew of the Year, Combat Aircrew 2, of VP-46.

"As we congratulate the winners of each category this morning, I ask that you take a moment to appreciate the momentous commitment and sacrifices our Sailors made during the past year to ensure we were prepared for, and executed, each mission we were asked to complete. And may you especially recall the commitment to excellence of our award winners today- those who went above and beyond to earn the endorsement of their respective command," said Seliga.

© 2009 Sound Publishing, Inc.


Circa 2008

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraVP-69 History "...VP-69 Command Changes - By MC2 Tucker Yates Fleet PACEN NW - Friday, September 12, 2008..." WebSite: Navy Northwest Navigator http://www.northwestnavigator.com/ [12SEP2008]

Photograph Caption: MC2 Tucker Yates - Patrol Squadron (VP) 69 outgoing commanding officer, Cmdr. Scott Jones, reads his orders as he relinquishes command of VP-69 during a change-of-command ceremony in Hangar 7 on NAS Whidbey Island, Washington, Sept. 6. Cmdr. James Nelson relieved Jones as commanding officer of VP-69 during the ceremony.

The Patrol Squadron (VP) 69 "Totems", held a traditional change of command ceremony at Naval Air Station Whidbey Island, Sept. 6. Cmdr. James Nelson assumed the role of VP-69 commanding officer from Cmdr. Scott Jones.

The event was presided over by Rear Adm. Jeffrey Lemmons, Reserve Deputy Chief of Naval Operations for Integration of Capabilities and Resources, and Capt. Ken Seliga, commodore of CPRW-10.

"I want to commend you on your ability to grasp change and embrace it as a means to shape the future. No one likes change, it's hard to do, but you have done exceedingly well. Jones, my hat's off to you, you saw the vision, you grabbed it, you ran with it, and you did it really well," said Lemmons.

Jones, from Sacramento, Calif. served six years as an enlisted electronics warfare technician before receiving his degree of a bachelor degree in business administration from National University in 1987. He received his commission upon completion of Aviation Officer Candidate School in 1988.

He departed active duty for the reserves in 1995. Upon relief, Jones will report to the National War College in Fort McNair, Washington, D.C.

"The Navy Reserves are only as strong or weak as you in uniform in this audience," said Jones. "My challenge to you is to feel the legacy of the organization that you are a part of. It's greater than any one of us alone."

"It has been my honor and privilege to serve as your twenty-eighth commanding officer. I'll never forget a one of you, as you are all permanently etched in my heart; and for that, I am the most fortunate Sailor in this hangar," added Jones.

Seliga reflected back upon his assuming command, his first impressions of Jones, and the success that followed for VP-69 under Jones' tutelage.

"Almost immediately (upon meeting), I noted Skipper Jones to be an action-oriented, people-first leader who has the innate ability to set clear expectations while keeping mission-focus at the forefront of his squadron's priorities," said Seliga. "

Under Jones' leadership, every VP-69 air crewman passed the testing phase of the Fleet Naval Aviation Training and Operating Procedures Standardization evaluation; his squadron received first in the Annual Wing 10 Anti-submarine Warfare Competition for 2008; and performed proficiently in the 2008 annual Rim of the Pacific exercise.

Nelson is from Shell, Wyo., and holds a bachelor degree political science from the U.S. Naval Academy. He was commissioned in 1990. He crossed over from active duty to reserve status in 1999.

"I am honored to serve in this capacity in a military system that has never been about conquest and exploitation, but has been characterized by defending liberty and promoting freedom to people who would have never known these privileges otherwise," said Nelson.

© 2008 Sound Publishing, Inc.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: Wings of Gold Thumbnail "...Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Group - RADM Brian C. Prindle, USN. Wings of Gold - Spring 2008 - Page 6-8. (Squadrons/Wings Referenced: VP-62, VP-69, VQ-1, VQ-2, VPU-1, VPU-2, VP-1, VP-4, VP-5, VP-8, VP-9, VP-10, VP-16, VP-26, VP-30, VP-40, VP-45, VP-46, VP-47, CPRW-2, CPRW-5, CPRW-10 and CPRW-11..." WebSite: Association of Naval Aviation http://www.anahq.org/index.htm [23APR2008]
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Open VP History Adobe FileMaritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Group Article 166KB


Circa 2007

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...COMRESPATWING Disestablishment Ceremony - June 23, 2007 - Flyer (Squadrons: VP-60, VP-62, VP-64, VP-65, VP-66, VP-67, VP-68, VP-69, VP-90, VP-91, VP-92, VP-93 and VP-94)..." Contributed by ROBIDEAU, AWCS Larry Retired larobidoo@comcast.net [30JAN2008]

DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY COMMANDER RESERVE PATROL WING NAVAL AIR STATION
JOINT RESERVE BASE
WILLOW GROVE, PENNSYLVANIA 19090-5010

June 23, 2007

Dear Reserve VP Alumni,

It is a distinct pleasure to welcome you to the Reserve VP reunion. Many of you have traveled great distances and arranged your busy schedules to attend this celebration with your shipmates; your presence truly makes this a memorable occasion. Thank you for coming.

This evening's event is a commemoration of our service to country, and the camaraderie we have attained through our common experiences. I'm confident it will afford each of you the opportunity to rekindle and share memories of times gone by, with much fondness and laughter.

Since their inception in 1970, Reserve Patrol Wing squadrons have played a significant role in the United States Navy's maritime strategies. You, the Citizen Sailors of yesterday and today, were and continue to be an indispensable component of our Navy. From both coasts of our great nation and everywhere in between, you and your shipmates left homes and careers behind, answering America's call. You flew and maintained the venerable P2 Neptune and P-3 Orion aircraft, training for missions and detaching worldwide. You leave behind a proud legacy. I congratulate each of you and I'm honored to call all of you "shipmates."

We must also remember to pay tribute to our families, for their sacrifice has been great. They, too, have borne the burden of service, and are most deserving of our gratitude. If your family is not present this evening, please pass to them my sincere thanks and admiration.

As this chapter in the annals of the United States Navy closes, let us remember that the legacy continues. The Navy you helped build remains strong, proud, and incredibly capable. Fair Winds and Following Seas!

Christopher A. Patton
CAPT USN

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...COMRESPATWING Disestablishment Ceremony - June 23, 2007 - Brochure (Squadrons: VP-60, VP-62, VP-64, VP-65, VP-66, VP-67, VP-68, VP-69, VP-90, VP-91, VP-92, VP-93 and VP-94)..." Contributed by ROBIDEAU, AWCS Larry Retired larobidoo@comcast.net [30JAN2008]

COMRESPATWING SQUADRONS

COMMANDER RESERVE PATROL WING SENDS ITS SINCERE THANKS AND GRATITUDE TO ALL WHO HAVE SERVED, AND IS GRATEFUL TO ALL THOSE CIVILIANS WHO HAVE SUPPORTED THEIR CITIZEN SOLDIERS/SAILORS FOR NEARLY FOUR DECADES.

The following squadrons and command were assigned to Commander Reserve Patrol Wing:

VP-60
"Cobras"
NAS Glenview, Illinois

VP-62
"Broadarrows"
NAS Jacksonville, Florida

VP-64
"Condors"
NAS Willow Grove, Pennsylvania

VP-65
"Tridents"
NAS Point Mugu, California

VP-66
"Liberty Bells"
NAS Willow Grove, Pennsylvania

VP-67
"Golden Hawks"
NAS Memphis, Tennessee

VP-68
"Black Hawks"
NAF Washington, D.C.

VP-69
"Totems"
NAS Whidbey Island, Washington

VP-90
"Lions"
NAS Glenview, Illinois

VP-91
"Black Cats"
NAS Moffett Field, California

VP-92
"Minutemen"
NAS Brunswick, Maine

VP-93
"Executioners"
NAF Detroit, Michigan

VP-94
"Crawfishers"
NAS New Orleans, Louisiana

Reserve ASW Training Center
NAS Willow Grove, Pennsylvania
Commander Reserve Patrol Wing
Command History

Commander Reserve Patrol Wing (COMRESPATWING) became the Navy's largest Patrol Wing in January 1999 following the consolidation of the former COMRESPATWINGPAC located at Moffett Federal Airfield, CA and COMRESPATWINGLANT located at NAS Norfolk, Virginia. Commander Reserve Patrol Wing became responsible for the training, readiness and oversight of seven assigned Maritime Patrol Aviation (MP A) Squadrons, the Reserve Anti-Submarine Warfare Training Center (RA TCEN), three Weapons System Trainer detachments, and two Mobile Operations Command Centers (MOCCs). The Wing was an Echelon IV command under the administrative and operational control of Commander, Naval Air Force Reserve. The Command's mission served two primary purposes 1) achieve and sustain combat readiness ensuring the availability of combat ready units capable of immediate employment in the event of war or national emergency; and 2) provide operational support during peacetime. At its pinnacle, COMRESPATWING included over 2,500 Drilling Reservists and Full Time Support personnel operating and maintaining 45 P-3 "Orion" aircraft.

The birth of Reserve Patrol Wing can be traced back to a major restructuring of the Naval Air Reserve that took place in 1970. The restructuring established two Reserve Patrol Wings, one East Coast Wing and one West Coast Wing, and 13 Reserve Patrol Squadrons.

The Squadrons first flew the SP2H "Neptune" but soon transitioned to the P-3 "Orion" during the mid-1970s. From the initial P-3A models, Reserve aircrews transitioned to the more capable P-3B TACNA V MOD and then onto the P-3C. Eventually, COMRESPATWING Squadrons came to operate the most modem P-3Cs in the fleet, which included AlP, BMUP and Update III aircraft.

Throughout the 1970s and 1980s, Reserve MP A maintained a significant Cold War anti-submarine warfare force, and the Squadrons were part of the fabric of the entire country with units based from coast to coast. The Squadrons included, VP-60 and VP-90 (NAS Glenview, Illinois), VP-62 (NAS Jacksonville, Florida), VP-64 and VP-66 (NAS Willow Grove, Pennsylvania), VP-65 (NAS Point Mugu, California), VP-67 (NAS Memphis, Tennessee), VP-68 (NAF Washington, D.C.), VP-69 (NAS Whidbey Island, Washington), VP-91 (NAS Moffett Field, California), VP-92 (NAS South Weymouth, Massachusetts), VP-93 (NAF Detroit, Michigan), and VP-94 (NAS Belle Chase, LA).

With the fall of the Soviet Union and the resulting reduction in the size of the Navy, six Reserve Squadrons were disestablished and the East and West Coast Wings were consolidated into a single Wing, which became Commander Reserve Patrol Wing, currently located at NAS Willow Grove, Pennsylvania. Post-Cold War, COMRESPATWING Squadrons expanded their role by routinely integrating into Fleet operations and deploying year-round to worldwide locations in support of Fleet Commanders.

With the start of the 21st Century, a new challenge arose for the Reserve Patrol Community. Years of heavy usage on the nation's P-3 force took its toll and many aircraft started to reach the end of their service life. In order to provide a bridge to the follow-on Patrol Aircraft, the P-8A Poseidon, COMRESPATWING Units were called upon to embark upon an unprecedented integration and asset sharing initiative. To assure the maximum return on national assets, COMRESPATWING transferred its most capable P-3s to its Squadrons co-located with Active Component Squadrons and concurrently disestablished stand-alone P-3 Squadrons. With the disestablishment of COMRESPATWING on 30 June 2007, two remaining Reserve Patrol Squadrons will continue to serve the nation under the control of their Active Component Wings. The thousands of Officers, Chiefs, and Sailors who have served in Reserve Patrol Wing Units leave behind a proud legacy of professionalism, service and camaraderie.

COMMANDERS OF RESERVE PATROL WING

CAPT Joseph E. K1ause, USN
Oct 1970 - Oct 1972

CAPT James A. McCraig, USN
Oct 1972 - Sep 1974

CAPT William H. Saunders, III, USN
Sep 1974 - Ju1 1976

CAPT Donald R. Yeager, USN
Jul 1976 - Jul 1978

CAPT Richard J. Lanning, USN
Jul 1978 - Jul 1980

CAPT Richard K. Chambers, USNR
Jul 1980 - Aug 1982

CAPT Earl R. Riffle, USN
Aug 1982 - Sep 1984

CAPT Michael A. Nash, USN
Sep 1984 - Sep 1986

CAPT Gerald H. Mollencop, USNR
Sep 1986 - >Jul 1989

CAPT Michael T. Korbet, USN
Jul 1989 - Jul 1991

CAPT Douglas R. Birr, USNR
Jul 1991 - Oct 1993

CAPT David C. Hull, USN
Oct 1993 - Apr 1995

CAPT Patrick B. Peterson, USNR
Apr 1995 - Jul 1996

CAPT Frederick S. Gay, USN
Jul 1996 - Jan 1998

CAPT Riley J. Gladden, USNR
Jan 1998 - Jul 1999

CAPT Robert A. Sinibaldi, Jr., USNR
Jul 1999 - Jul 2001

CAPT David L. Montgomery, USNR
Jul 2001 - Jul 2003

CAPT Michael J. Szostak, USN
Jul 2003 - Jun 2005

CAPT Christopher A. Patton, USN
Jun 2005 - Jun 2007

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...COMRESPATWING Disestablishment Ceremony - June 23, 2007 - CD History (Squadrons: VP-60, VP-62, VP-64, VP-65, VP-66, VP-67, VP-68, VP-69, VP-90, VP-91, VP-92, VP-93 and VP-94)..." Contributed by ROBIDEAU, AWCS Larry Retired larobidoo@comcast.net [30JAN2008]

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HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Totems bid farewell to skipper - Friday, June 1, 2007..." WebSite: NorthWest Navigator http://www.northwestnavigator.com/ index.php/navigator/whidbey/totems_bid_farewell_to_skipper/ [02JUN2007]

The Totems of VP-69, based at NAS Whidbey Island, Washington are bidding farewell to their 28th commanding officer.

Cmdr. Randy Johnson's association with VP-69 began in 2003 when he was assigned as officer-in-charge. He became executive officer in 2005 and commanding officer in 2006.

Under his direction, VP-69 crews detached to Guam, South Korea, Japan, Thailand and Brunei, and participated in exercises Foal Eagle, Tyclone and Carat.

Also during Johnson's tour as CO, VP-69 successfully completed 602 sorties and 2,175 mishap-free flight hours while developing and maintaining combat readiness for Reserve surge crews assigned to the CNO's Fleet Response Plan.

Johnson said he is most proud of the dedication and commitment by part-time Reserve air crewmen in completing the additional training demands necessary to maintain combat readiness. This was evident by two VP-69 aircrews flying in combat missions in support of Operation Enduring Freedom.

Johnson will report to Commander, Naval Reserve Forces Command in New Orleans as deputy chief of staff for air operations.

Replacing Johnson will be Cmdr. Scott Jones, a selected reservist and first officer for United Airlines based in San Francisco, Calif. He lives in North Bend, Wash.

© 2007 Sound Publishing, Inc.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraPhoto by MC2 Elizabeth Acosta "...Wing 10 recognizes its best - By Lt.j.g. Evan Larsen - Wing 10 reporter - Friday, March 30, 2007 - Squadrons Mentioned: , VP-1, VP-46, VP-69, VQ-1 and VQ-2..." WebSite: Northwest Navigator http://www.northwestnavigator.com/ index.php/navigator/whidbey/ wing_10_recognizes_its_best/ [31MAR2007]

Photograph Caption: Award-winning CPRW-10 squadrons and individual personnel take the spotlight for their impressive work over the past year.

CPRW-10 honored its top squadrons, flight crews and personnel March 23. Capt. David Taylor, Commander, CPRW-10, hosted the ceremony alongside distinguished visitors to present the awards to the awardees.

VP-46 and VQ-1 won the Pacific Fleet Battle Efficiency (E) award for 2006. The Battle ‘E' focuses on a naval unitís overall readiness to complete assigned warfare missions.

The Grey Knights of VP-46 returned from a Western Pacific Deployment last December, during which they demonstrated superior readiness and combat operations in support of Operation Enduring Freedom-Philippines and Exercise Valiant Shield.

Throughout 2006, VP-46 maintained sustained their commitment to professionalism and aviation safety reflected with more than 292,000 mishap-free flight hours spanning 43 years of service.

The World Watchers of VQ-1 maintained a continuous 365-day presence in the Fifth and Seventh Fleet Areas of Responsibility, contributing vital intelligence the respective Regional Combatant Commanders.

In 2006, VQ-1 flew over 4,000 mission hours spread among over 500 sorties, demonstrating unit efficiency and flexibility with limited assigned aircraft.

Other mentionable unit awards included VP-1 receiving the Arleigh Burke trophy, as well as VQ-2s nomination for the Chief of Naval Operations Safety Award.

The Flight Crew of the year honor went to VP-1s Crew 10, while the Electronic Warfare Crew of the Year honors went to VQ-2s Crew 26. Also recognized was VP-46s Crew 4 as the Order of Daedalianís Crew of the Year.

For individual awards, Lt. Jamie Delcore of VQ-1 was recognized as aviator of the year. Additionally, his nomination as Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Groupís Naval Flight Officer of the Year was recognized during the ceremony.

Likewise from VQ-1, Aviation Electronics Technician 1st Class Joseph Medina was recognized as CPRW-10 and Patrol and Reconnaissance Groupís Aircrewman of the Year.

Among the maintenance awards, VP-69s Aviation Structural Mechanic 1st Class Gerald Campbell was recognized as CPRW-10s Maintenance Professional of the Year for his leadership while on a Search and Rescue detachment to Guam.

Taylor emphasized the importance this yearís ceremony placed in recognition of CPRW-10s many 2006 accomplishments, but he stressed the need to remember those Sailors unable to attend who are forward deployed in harmís way.

© 2007 Sound Publishing, Inc.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraAW1 (AW/NAC) Matthew Robinson "...Wing 10 selects year's top Sailors - By Lt.j.g. Evan Larsen - CPRW-10 reporter - Friday, January 26, 2007. (CPRW-10, VP-1, VP-40, VP-46, VP-69, VQ-1 and VQ-2 menioned)..." WebSite: Northwest Navigator http://www.northwestnavigator.com/ index.php/navigator/whidbey/ wing_10_selects_years_top_sailors/ [01FEB2007]

Photograph Caption: AW1 (AW/NAC) Matthew Robinson is seen on patrol in Iraq during Individual Augmentation duty.

Aviation Warfare Systems Operator 1st Class (AW/NAC) Matthew Robinson was recognized, Jan. 19, by Commodore David Taylor as the 2006 CPRW-10, Shore Sailor of the Year.

His selection came as a result of his tremendous professionalism and steadfast sacrifice exerted during a 300-day Individual Augmentation while supporting the U.S. Army's 13th Sustainment Command in Iraq. As a member of the Joint Crew Composite Squadron One, and aligned with ground combat troops, he utilized his electronic warfare expertise to develop training and maintenance programs for ground forces which mitigated the radio-controlled improvised electronic device threat.

While conducting a routine ground combat patrol, he demonstrated uncommon valor during an attack on his patrol by stabilizing the wounded and preparing a landing zone for a medical evacuation helicopter.

Additionally, he showed the initiative to continue the patrol and search for secondary IEDs, resulting in a Meritorious Service Medal awarded from the Brigade's Commanding General.

Aviation Ordnanceman 1st Class (AW/NAC) Robert Parish of Patrol Squadron 69 (VP-69) received top honors as CPRW-10 Senior Sea Sailor of the Year for 2006.

A consummate expert and extraordinary leader, his enthusiasm, professionalism and dedication to his shipmates' career advancement and education resulted in his selection as the Sea Sailor of the Year.

One of only five full system Quality Assurance Representatives, he proved invaluable during a number of engine changes and the quality inspection of countless work center repairs which directly contributed to the high level of operational success achieved by the six operational squadrons assigned to CPRW-10.

The award for CPRW-10 Shore Junior Sailor of the Year went to Aviation Warfare Specialist 2nd Class (NAC) Carey Langley of CPRW-10.

Her expertise proved crucial in supporting 36 forward-deployed aircrews, as a result of her keen analysis from over 260 missions. As a leader in her field, Langley's attention-to-detail led to critical enhancements in our national security.

CPRW-10 Junior Sea Sailor of the Year honors went to Avionics Electrician Mate 2nd Class (AW) Justin Leetham, currently serving in VP-46. Leetham recently returned from deployment with VP-46 in which he proved to be an exceptional leader.

He demonstrated honesty, integrity and an absolute dedication to duty. While at VP-46, his actions increased aircraft availability that executed 220 combat sorties and over 2,000 mishap-free flight hours in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom.

Oak Harbor Mayor Pro-Tem Danny Paggao, along with several local business and educational organizations, took time to pay homage at all the Sailors of CPRW-10.

As in the past, they provided gifts to recognize the winners and participate in recognition of the finest examples the Navy has to offer.

Every command in CPRW-10 had their senior and junior Sailors of the Year present for the presentation ceremony. These included;

-- VP-1 Senior Sailor of the Year, PS1(AW) Jared Zdrojowy; Junior Sailor of the Year, AW2(AW) Michael Headings;

-- VP-40 Senior Sailor of the Year, AM1(AW) David Anderson; Junior Sailor of the Year, AM2(AW) Matthew Vitello;

-- VP-46 Senior Sailor of the Year, AW1(AW) Gamorro Cameron; Junior Sailor of the Year, AE2(AW) Justin Leetham;

-- VP-69 Senior Sailor of the Year, AO1 (AW/NAC) Robert Parish; Junior Sailor of the Year, AT2(AW/NAC) David A. Smith; Selected Reserve PR1 (AW) Mark Wilde;

-- VQ-1 Senior Sailor of the Year, AM1 (AW) Luigi Giugliano; Junior Sailor of the Year, YN2(AW) Nicholas Hulse;

-- VQ-2 Senior Sailor of the Year, AM1(AW) John Bouquio; Junior Sailor of the Year, AT2 (AW/NAC) Peter Benninger;

-- Mobile Operations Command and Control Center Golf Senior Sailor of the Year, ET1(SW) William Lewis, Junior Sailor of the Year, ET2 Colleen Colver; and

-- CPRW-10 Shore Sailor of the Year, AW1 (AW/NAC) Matthew Robinson; Junior Sailor of the Year AW2 (NAC) Carey Langley.

© 2007 Sound Publishing, Inc.


Circa 2006

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCamera060808-N-4205W-001 Maura, Brunei Darussalam (Aug. 8, 2006) "...Lt. Cmdr. John Wigglesworth of Patrol Squadron Six Nine (VP-69) explains the controls in the cockpit of a P-3C Orion to Royal Brunei Air Force Capt. Dzulkiflee Shamsol during an aircraft familiarization event as part of the Brunei phase of Cooperation Afloat Readiness and Training (CARAT). Maritime surveillance techniques is one of numerous skills being shared during CARAT, an annual series of bilateral maritime training exercises between the United States and six Southeast Asia nations designed to build relationships and enhance the operational readiness of the participating forces. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Kathryn Whittenberger (RELEASED)..." WebSite: NavyNews http://www.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=37827 [12AUG2006]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraU.S. Navy Photo "...Johnson Set To Lead Fighting Totems - By Lt. Cmdr. Michael Joyner - Totems Reporter - Friday, June 23, 2006..." WebSite: Northwest Navigator http://www.northwestnavigator.com/index.php/navigator/whidbey/johnson_set_to_lead_fighting_totems/ [24JUN2006]

Photograph Description: Cmdr. Randy Johnson takes command of the U.S. Navy's Patrol Squadron 69 (VP-69) Fighting Totems.

Patrol Squadron 69 (VP-69), based at Naval Air Station, Whidbey Island, Wash., bid farewell to their 26th commanding officer, Cmdr. Michael Krueger, a current resident of Woodinville, Wash., June 3.

Krueger passed command to Cmdr. Randy Johnson in the Navy's time-honored change of command ceremony. VP-69 is a Reserve Maritime Patrol Squadron/Fleet Response Unit flying the P-3C aircraft on global anti-submarine, anti-surface and reconnaissance missions in support of the nationís Global War on Terror.

Krueger leaves the Totems after 15 months of unrivaled accomplishments. After transitioning to the P-3C Aircraft Improvement Program aircraft, the squadron completed highly successful detachments to the Western Pacific in support of the Chief of Naval Operations Fleet Response Plan. The signed Memorandum of Agreement between Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Group and Commander, Naval Air Force Reserve facilitated the Fighting Totemís training with Active Component squadrons and deploying front-line AIP aircraft to Commander, 7th Fleet.

Under his leadership, aircrews rose to the occasion, completing 23 sorties for more than 100 hours while detached to the Western Pacific. His highly effective leadership ensured squadron aircrews performed superbly while conducting Seventh Fleet Area of Responsibility missions in Japan, Korea, Guam and other countries in the region. During his command, the Fighting Totems achieved their 24th year, with a total of 75,000 flight hours of mishap-free flying.

Assuming command is Cmdr. Randy Johnson, a Full Time Support (FTS) officer, who served in P-3C squadrons and wings on both coasts. The Anacortes resident and 1987 graduate of the U.S. Naval Academy looks forward to taking the reins and continuing the tradition of excellence in VP-69.

© 2006 Sound Publishing, Inc.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraPhoto by ATC Richard Stickney "...Totems fully integrated in west Pacific - By Lt. Cmdr. Matt Hill - Totems reporter - Friday, May 26, 2006..." WebSite: Northwest Navigator http://www.northwestnavigator.com/index.php/navigator/whidbey/totems_fully_integrated_in_west_pacific/ [26MAY2006]

Photograph Description: Active/Reserve integration works. Here VP-69s AM2 Michael Zamora instructs AMAN Richard Riccitelli of VP-1 how to verify break away torque during a tire change.

Three Patrol Squadron 69 (VP-69) Combat Aircrews recently returned from highly successful detachments to the Western Pacific after fully integrating with Patrol Squadron One (VP-1).

This successful integration was the result of ongoing close coordination between VP-1 and VP-69 personnel in support of the CNOís Fleet Response Plan and the Memorandum of Agreement between Active Component and Reserve Component P-3C commands.

The signed MOA between Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Group and Commander, Naval Air Force Reserve allows Reserve Component crews the ability to provide operational support to the Active Component squadrons during deployment periods. As a result, Reserve Component crews surged overseas to support their active duty shipmates, demonstrating on station performance during their semi-annual training periods.

In keeping with the MOA, VP-69 assembled a detachment consisting of three combat aircrews, maintenance, operations and support personnel over a six-week period from March 5 to April 15. The detachment deployed in support of Commander, Task Group 72.2, based out of Kadena Air Base, Japan flying 16 sorties in variety of missions from Carrier Strike Group coordinated operations, anti-submarine warfare, and support for the global war on terror.

VP-69 aircrew members from Combat Aircrews 6, 11 and 12 operated throughout the Commander Seventh Fleet Area of Responsibility, completing sorties in Japan, Korea, Guam and other countries in the region. VP-69 crews took part in exercises such as Foal Eagle and other emerging operations.

The detachment team, which included key individuals in maintenance and intelligence roles, provided valuable experience and skills during the high operational tempo deployment and gained praise from deployed Operational Commanders.

The VP Reserve Force is a veteran organization, with its members having served previously on active duty. Its members bring vast experience from their years of active service, as well as from varied civilian backgrounds.

Many of the aircrew members have experience in excess of 20 years, supporting the fleet throughout the world.

The detachment added to the list of firsts for VP-69. This was the first time that back-to-back crews completed the Advanced Readiness Program training and became surge-ready under the Fleet Training and Readiness Matrix prior to heading overseas.

VP-69 plans to flow additional combat aircrews through ARP over the next 12 months, providing more surge-ready aircrews to support CPRW-10 deployments.

The Totems further advanced the interoperability of the Active/Reserve Integration program through their seamless integration into the Active Component, and these crews set the standard for future Reserve Component aircrews by their superior performance.

VP-69 Executive Officer Cmdr. Randy Johnson, who flew numerous missions during the detachment, remarked on the training and on the on-station performance.

"The ARP training provided by CPRW-10 at NAS Whidbey Island, Washington prior to detachment and the mission accomplished in the Western Pacific clearly demonstrated our ability to train and fight as one team," he said. "We're excited about future plans to fly alongside VP-46 combat aircrews on their coming deployment."

© 2006 Sound Publishing, Inc


Circa 2005

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCamera050308-N-8770A-006 Whidbey Island, Wash. (Mar. 8, 2005) "...Culinary Specialist Seaman Desiree Thomas of Roanoke Rapids, N.C., left, and Culinary Specialist 3rd Class Mary Wright of Fayetteville, N.C., prepare a food display to be used at the Admiral Nimitz Dining Hall on board Naval Air Station Whidbey Island, Wash. Petty Officer Thomas is assigned to Patrol Squadron Six Nine (VP-69) and Petty Officer Wright is assigned to Patrol Squadron One (VP-1). U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 3rd Class Elizabeth Acosta (RELEASED) ..." WebSite: NavyNews http://www.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=22623 [12AUG2006]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraPhoto by PH1 Tim Comerford "...VP-69, VP-46 showcase active-reserve integration - By Lt.j.g. D.J. Litrun - Grey Knights' reporter - Friday, December 16, 2005..." WebSite: Northwest Navigator http://www.northwestnavigator.com/index.php/navigator/whidbey/vp_69_vp_46_showcase_active_reserve_integration/ [16DEC2005]

Photograph Description: Vice Adm. Jim Zortman converses with VP-69 CO, Cmdr. Mike Krueger, right center, Cmdr. Mike Rabe, center, and Lt. Cmdr. Bob Collins, far left.

During his three-day visit to NAS Whidbey Island, Washington, Commander, Naval Air Forces Vice Adm. Jim Zortman took the opportunity to visit Patrol Squadrons 69 and 46. The purpose for his stop at hangar seven was to observe a fully integrated active-reserve operational squadron team in the course of daily operations.

While visiting the Totems of VP-69 and the Grey Knights of VP-46, Zortman saw renovations being made hangar seven to accommodate the cohabitation of these two squadrons. He also met with a recently deployed tactical crew from VP-69.

Since December of 2004, VP-46 and VP-69 have been working to integrate as a cohesive and fully functional team. The two squadrons operate a single merged Maintenance Department that shares the workloads of maintenance control, asset management and maintenance production. Known as Active Reserve Integration, the commanders of the patrol squadron community are closely monitoring this process.

Zortman had the opportunity to personally review the progress of these efforts during his stay at NAS Whidbey Island, Washington. Not only was he able to see how the process was actually working between the members of the squadrons, he also gained a first-hand impression of measures taken to facilitate the merger during his tour by witnessing the current renovations that will precede the remainder of VP-69's move into the hangar in the coming weeks. He understood the renovations themselves are a good news story in that NAS Whidbey Island, Washington and the Whidbey Island Naval Air Reserve Center have teamed up to fund the bulk of the work effort.

Zortman also met personally with the VP-69 aircrew that recently returned crew from deployment. Combat Aircrew 7 spent time in the COMSEVENTHFLEET area of responsibility operating with the Fighting Marlins of VP-40 as another aspect of active-reserve integration. The admiral was interested to learn how the crew handled the requirements of forward deployment and further integration issues as it performed tactical missions in the Western Pacific.

The Grey Knights and the Totems enjoyed getting the opportunity to give the admiral a deckplate view of what active-reserve integration is all about.

© 2005 Sound Publishing, Inc.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Totems triumph in WestPac - By Lt. Kurt Wilson - Totem Reporter - Friday, December 9, 2005..." WebSite: Northwest Navigator http://www.northwestnavigator.com/index.php/navigator/whidbey/totems_triumph_in_westpac/ [10DEC2005]

VP-69s Combat Aircrew Seven recently completed a successful and historic detachment to the Western Pacific.

"Lucky Seven" solidified their spot in CPRW-10 history as the first Reserve Component aircrew to participate in an operational detachment since the recent Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) between Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Group and Commander, Naval Air Force, Reserve was made effective.

The memorandum states that the Reserve Component crews are to support the Active Component squadrons through their surge annual training periods as part of the CNO's Fleet Response Plan.

In keeping with the MOA, VP-69 assembled a detachment consisting of aircrew, maintenance, operations, and intelligence personnel. The detachment deployed from Nov. 3 to 19 in support of Commander, Task Group 72.2, based out of Kadena Air Base, Japan.

The detachment functioned superbly, with CAC-7 flying six sorties in numerous mission areas throughout the CTF 72.2 area of responsibility.

The detachment team provided valuable support during a high operational tempo deployment. The crew earned praise from several sources for their professionalism and tactical achievement on-station.

VP-40 Commanding Officer and current Commander of Task Group 72.2, Cmdr. Ken Bowen said, "When the Reserve Component from VP-69 joined our efforts in Seventh Fleet, they increased the combat capability of Task Group 72.2 measurably. They engaged in the global war on terror with direct action and performed superbly. It was truly a pleasure to have them join us in the fight."

The VP Reserve Force is a veteran organization, with its members having served previously on active duty. VP-69 members bring vast experience from their previous service, as well as from varied civilian backgrounds.

The detachment added to the list of firsts for VP-69s CAC-7.

Additionally, they are the first Wing 10 Reserve Component aircrew to complete the Advanced Readiness Program, as well as the first to become surge-ready under the Fleet Training and Readiness Matrix.

VP-69 plans to flow eight additional combat aircrews through ARP over the next 18 months, providing more surge-ready aircrews to support Wing 10 deployments. The Totems proved the merits of Active-Reserve Integration through their seamless integration into the Active Component, and CAC-7 set the standard for future Reserve Component aircrews by their superior performance.

© 2005 Sound Publishing, Inc.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraVP-40 Photo "...Fighting Marlins prepare to return home - By Lt.j.g. Blake Whetstone - Fighting Marlins' reporter - Friday, December 9, 2005 - (VP-40, VP-45 and VP-69 mentioned)..." WebSite: Northwest Navigator http://www.northwestnavigator.com/index.php/navigator/whidbey/fighting_marlins_prepare_to_return_home/ [09DEC2005]

Photograph Description: The Fighting Marlins of VP-40 are preparing to return home from a six-month deployment in Japan.

It has been an extremely challenging yet rewarding deployment for the Fighting Marlins of VP-40. Early airlift personnel departed on May 24 to prepare for bulk of the squadron to deploy in early June.

Completing the last month of the Fleet Response Plan surge window, VP-40 deployed after finishing its first 18-month Inter-Deployment Readiness Cycle. This time was put to good use, as the Fighting Marlins were the first squadron to deploy with 12 fully qualified combat aircrews.

Additionally, the Maintenance department's efforts, aided by the newly formed Professional Development department, enabled VP-40 to train unprecedented numbers of maintainers to support numerous detachments and exercises in the 7th Fleet theater.

On June 6, Cmdr. Kenneth Bowen, VP-40 commanding officer, assumed operational command as Commander, Task Group 72.2 and 72.4. VP-40 personnel hit the ground running as many went straight from the airlift to turning wrenches, or for the aircrew, attending operational indoctrination briefs.

Once these briefs and indoctrination flights were complete, VP-40 aircrews immediately assumed the ready and began to fly operationally out of Misawa and Kadena. Furthermore, they significantly contributed to the global war on terror in Southeast Asia while flying in Operation Enduring Freedom. VP-40 provided a consistent Forward Airborne Presence throughout the PACOM theater.

The Pelicans of VP-45 augmented the Task Group with a contingent of aircrew and maintainers in Kadena and Misawa the entire deployment. Additionally, the Marlins team in Misawa was responsible for conducting schedule maintenance and inspection on all P-3 aircraft in both the 5th and 7th Fleet. The Marlins and Pelicans worked together in every aspect to provide a well tuned, fighting, and cooperative task group deployment.

Throughout the 2005 deployment, the Fighting Marlins and Pelicans represented the Navy in five major exercises and 42 total exercises in 15 different countries. The Task Group's area of responsibility extends from the Northern Pacific Ocean, down to Australia and west to the middle of the Indian Ocean.

The grand list of countries or sites that VP-40 has visited is as follows: Australia (Townsville and Pearce), Cocos Islands, Brunei (Rimba), Diego Garcia, Fiji, Guam, India (Goa), Indonesia (Juanda), Maldives, Malaysia (Kuantan), Philippine Islands (Subic Bay), Singapore (Paya Lebar), South Korea (Pohang, Chinhae, Seoul and Osan), Kingdom of Tonga and Thailand (Utapao). The total number of hours flown on deployment by VP-40 totals over 5,100 hours, by far greater than anyone expected.

In October, the Totems of VP-69 joined the Marlins in their 7th Fleet reserve augmentation. Led by their OIC, Lt. Cmdr. Bob Collins, the VP-69 aircrew and maintainers seamlessly integrated with the deployed squadron.

After all the work on deployment, VP-40 is ready for a long awaited return to their home in NAS Whidbey Island, Washington. Many members have been counting the days until the last plane leaves Japan and now they are counting the hours. Time has flown, almost as much as the planes, but it does not seem that it flies as fast as most want it to do so.

The crew is looking forward to spending lots of time with our friends and loved ones.

© 2005 Sound Publishing, Inc.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraPhoto by JO2(SW) Alicia Boatwright "...VP-46, VP-69 join forces - By JO2(SW) Alicia Boatwright - Naval Air Reserve - Friday, August 12, 2005..." WebSite: Northwest Navigator http://www.northwestnavigator.com/index.php/navigator/whidbey/vp_46_vp_69_join_forces/ [14AUG2005]

Photo Description: As a result of combining their maintenance departments, personnel from NAS Whidbey Island, Washington squadrons VP-46 and VP-69, such as AD2 Roberto Sampson and ADAN Joseph Ihrig, now work together to maintain the squadrons' aircrafts.

Many people know that today's Reserves are playing a more prominent role in Operation Iraqi Freedom. What may not be known is that many of these "citizen-Sailors" have been providing support to active duty missions for many years, in and out of wartime.

At NAS Whidbey Island, Washington, the Totems of VP-69 have been providing support for over 30 years to their sister active squadrons, VP-46, VP-1 and VP-40.

Recently, the concept of "one Navy" became more than just a concept for two of the island's squadrons.

Reserve Squadron VP-69 (the Totems) and active squadron VP-46 (Grey Knights) have combined their personnel and aircraft into one hangar space, meaning both squadrons' maintenance and aircrew departments are working side-by-side to carry out the Navy's mission.

The P-3C aircraft squadrons' primary missions include submarine/surface warfare, surveillance/reconnaissance and Search and Rescue operations.

VP-46, the oldest continuously operating patrol squadron in the Navy, was commissioned in 1931. VP-69 is one of six Maritime Patrol Squadrons assigned to Commander, Reserve Patrol Wing and was commissioned in 1970.

The shift to total integration began in December 2004 when the base was scrambling for hangar space for a returning squadron.

"There was nowhere for VP-46 to go [when they returned from their deployment]," said VP-69 Officer in Charge Lt. Cmdr. Patrick Sanders.

The squadrons have encountered challenges and benefits along the way. VP-69 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Michael Krueger said one significant challenge has been met.

"We're breaking down the barriers between the active and reserve components by realizing our different backgrounds and educating each other on what each of us brings to the table."

VP-69 Command Master Chief John Callahan said the biggest challenge was the change in leadership within the departments.

"Initially, there were some reservations," he said, adding that the different ways of carrying out tasks also posed a problem.

"Active duty Sailors are more hands on, but the reserve side has a more cautious way of dealing with problems." However, Callahan said, with the top-notch leadership in both commands, the problem was quickly solved.

According to VP-69 air crewman AT2 (AW) Marc Grant, combining both crews into one maintenance department has led to a considerable decrease in workload. "Our hours were pretty extensive [before the integration]. The increased manpower has taken some of the work load off of us."

VP-46 Operations Chief AWC(AW) John Biggs said sharing resources has improved the effectiveness of their mission by reducing the cost of aircraft maintenance.

"[Combining our aircraft] has helped us out tremendously because it has allowed us to accomplish our mission more efficiently," he said.

Sanders noted Reservists are used to solving issues beyond what the billet requires. "They are valuable because they bring a wide range of skills from their civilian jobs," he said. "Active duty Sailors can utilize those skills."

As a result of combining air and maintenance crews, those skills are used to support 12 ready flight crews.

Although Krueger acknowledges that the end result of incorporating Reservists into an active duty squadron has been a more efficient and stronger force, not knowing what is going to happen next causes some concern. "There is some anxiety because the future is uncertain."

Despite the anxiety, the Totems and Grey Knights continue to do their part as a team to make the Navy a more efficient force.

© 2005 Sound Publishing, Inc.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraCmdr. Rick Nielsen "...Krueger takes command of Totems - By VP-69 reporter - Friday, March 25, 2005..." WebSite: Northwest Navigator http://www.northwestnavigator.com/index.php/navigator/whidbey/krueger_takes_command_of_totems/ [18APR2005]

The Fighting Totems of Maritime Patrol Squadron 69 (VP-69), based at Naval Air Station, Whidbey Island, Washington, welcomed their 26th Commanding Officer on Saturday, March 19.

Cmdr. Edward F. Pierson passed the command to Cmdr. Michael J. Krueger in the Navy's time-honored Change of Command ceremony. VP-69 is a Reserve Maritime Patrol (VP) squadron flying the P-3C aircraft in support of global anti-submarine, anti-surface and reconnaissance missions.

Under Pierson's direction, the squadron flew more than 2,700 flight hours, including 300 hours of Counter-Narcotics flights, achieving a 100 percent mission completion rate on detachment. The squadron's many achievements include a seizure of 4.7 metric tons of illegal narcotics and the apprehension of eight narcotics smugglers.

In addition, VP-69 crews performed flawlessly during the RIMPAC 2004 exercise, as well as C2X/JTFX. A Totem crew achieved a successful Harpoon missile shot against a hulk target, scoring a direct hit.

The Totems' team-based safety program incorporated continuous safety awareness and Operational Risk Management into daily squadron operations, enabling the squadron to surpass 23 years and 73,000 mishap-free flight hours. The squadron earned the prestigious "Battle E" award given to the best reserve patrol squadron in the country.

In his civilian career, Pierson is president and CEO of Applied Digital Mapping, a Washington State software company specializing in location-based technologies. He is also an Assistant Football Coach for South Kitsap High School.

Krueger is a pilot with Southwest Airlines flying the Boeing B-737. Designated a Naval Aviator in 1985, he served in VP-49 until 1989, completing deployments to Bermuda and Sigonella, Sicily, along with numerous detachments in Europe and the Caribbean.

After leaving VP-49 in 1989, he served as a Primary and Intermediate Flight Instructor at VT-2, NAS Whiting Field, Milton, Florida.

In January 1992, he reported on board USS Nimitz (CVN-68) as a Catapult and Arresting Gear Officer.

Following release from active duty in January 1995, he joined VP-69 at NAS Whidbey Island, Wash. He has qualified as a Patrol Plane Commander, Mission Commander and Instructor Pilot.

He completed detachments in the Pacific, Caribbean, South American and European theaters and has served as Operations Officer, Maintenance Officer, Administration Officer, Executive Assistant and Executive Officer prior to his recent selection as Commanding Officer.

Among the many guests attending were Rear Adm. Robert Passmore, a former Commanding Officer of VP-69. Capt. Douglas J. Asbjornsen, Commanding Officer of CFWP Det AIMD 0189 and also a former Commanding Officer of VP-69, was guest speaker.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...VP-69 passes 25 years accident-free flying - By Lt. Sam Poteete - CPRW-10 reporter - Friday, March 11, 2005..." WebSite: Northwest Navigator http://www.northwestnavigator.com/index.php/navigator/whidbey/patrol_squadron_69_passes_25_years_accident_free_flying/ [17MAR2005]

Reserve Patrol Squadron 69 (VP-69) recently surpassed a quarter century and 73,000 hours of mishap-free flying. This is a significant achievement for any squadron but especially so for a Reserve squadron maintaining an intense operational schedule. VP-69 was established at NAS Whidbey Island, Washington Nov. 1, 1970, as a Naval Reserve land based patrol squadron. The squadron has flown various models of the P-3 Orion around the world since transitioning from the P2 Neptune to the P-3 Orion in 1973.

Jan. 18, 1981, marked the last Class 'A' mishap for the squadron. That incident had three of the seven crewmen injured in the P-33A landing mishap. The P-3 was approaching runway 13 just before 3 p.m. on that Sunday afternoon. Public Affairs Officer Lt. Rick Chandler, an eyewitness, said the plane "just dropped out of the sky. He described how the plane "turned on its right side, causing the wing to tear partly out of the fuselage." Leaking fuel caught fire, and all seven persons aboard leaped from the aircraft as it came to rest off the side of the runway. There was no loss of life, but damage to the aircraft was extensive enough to be designated a Class 'A' mishap.

Since that day the squadron has earned its long-standing safety record by paying attention to details, using "by the book" maintenance practices and firmly adhering to NATOPS procedures. Commander Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing 10 Capt. Dziminowicz sent a message expressing his gratitude for this achievement and wished the squadron continued success in their duties. This triumph reflects exceptional leadership, a vigilant safety program and superb training. It also exemplifies the professionalism and dedication of the flight crews, maintenance members and support personnel to the principles of Operational Risk Management, Crew Resource Management, and Ground Crew Training. Each "Totem" is personally responsible for this important accomplishment. This milestone would not have been met without the efforts and contributions of every member of the squadron. The entire command culture is based on safely executing their mission.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...VP-69 Crew of Quarter named - By Lt. Sam Poteete - CPRW-10 reporter - Friday, February 18, 2005..." WebSite: Northwest Navigator http://www.northwestnavigator.com/index.php/navigator/whidbey/crew_of_quarter_named/ [06MAR2005]

Cmdr. Ed Pierson, Commanding Officer VP-69, presented certificates for Crew of the Quarter to Combat Aircrew One for Fourth Quarter FY04. The accompanying award from Commander Reserve Patrol Wing exemplified the outstanding operational performance of the crew.

Combat Aircrew One's (CAC-1) sustained superior performance during this period warrants the award. CAC-1 detached to Elmendorf Air Force Base, Alaska last Aug. 9-12 in support of a Chief of Naval Operations Special Projects sponsored water-sampling evolution and flawlessly completed 100 percent of the experiment objectives, earning multiple qualifications.

The crew next participated in a Carrier Strike Group (CSG) exercise at NAS San Diego SCORE Range against a Diesel target from Aug. 28 to 29, again earning multiple qualifications. Exhibiting keen tactical skills, the crew tracked an evasive and quiet target for their entire five-hour on station time, logging three constructive kills and vectoring in multiple CSG assets for additional constructive attacks.

On Sept. 1, CAC-1 represented COMRESPATWING in their first participation of Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing 10's Maritime Patrol Aircraft Anti-Submarine Warfare Rodeo. By employing exceptional experimental Extended Echo Ranging tactics, the crew earned all required ASW qualifications. From Sept. 12 to 24, CAC-1 completed the Reserve ASW Training Center Avionics Improvement Program Fleet Introductory Training, thereby bringing them online with the latest active duty fleet ready crews.

CAC-1 is an exceptional crew and their aggressive pursuit of training and high level of involvement have made them the best qualified and most combat ready VP-69 aircrew. Patrol Squadron Six-Nine is extremely proud to award Combat Air Crew 1 the Fourth Quarter, Fiscal Year-2004, COMRESPATWING Crew of the Quarter.

Cmdr. Mike Krueger, executive officer VP-69, commended CAC-1 for this incredible achievement and their professionalism in maintaining a much valued readiness posture.


Circa 2004

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VP-69 History ThumbnailCamera041001-N-7415V-002 Naval Air Station Whidbey Island, Wash (Oct. 1, 2004) "...Aviation Structural Mechanic 2nd Class Mike Bell, signals the starting of the number two engine to the pilot of a P-3 Orion aircraft assigned to the "Totems" of Patrol Squadron Six Nine (VP-69). U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 1st Class Dave Votroubek (RELEASED)..." Navy News Stand http://www.news.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=18046 [01MAR2005]


Circa 2003

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCamera031016-N-5134H-002 Naval Air Station Whidbey Island, Wa. (Oct. 16, 2003) "...Lt. Cmdr. Warren Clark assigned to the "Totems" of Patrol Squadron Sixty Nine (VP-69), gets his picture taken for his service record by Photographer's Mate 2nd Class Michael Winter. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate Casey R. Hutchens. (RELEASED)..." WebSite: NavyNews http://www.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=10057 [12AUG2006]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Naval Reserve Squadron and Coast Guard Score Major Drug Bust - Story Number: NNS030527-09 - Release Date: 5/27/2003 4:40:00 PM..." http://www.news.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=7602 [27MAY2003]

From Patrol Squadron 69 Public Affairs

OAK HARBOR, Wash. (NNS) -- A Naval Air Reserve P-3C Orion crew and a U.S. Coast Guard cutter recently teamed up to bring about a major drug bust in the Eastern Pacific.

Patrol Squadron (VP) 69's Combat Aircrew 2 detected and monitored a small "Go Fast" drug smuggling vessel during a routine counter-narcotics surveillance flight. The initial detection of the speedboat showcased the talents of a junior radar operator and the capabilities of the P-3C's Inverse Synthetic Aperture Radar. The system was able to detect the craft, despite the vessel's small size and low profile, which makes detection extremely difficult.

The crew maintained contact with the cleverly camouflaged, 40-foot long, hi-performance speedboat for more than eight hours, despite the smugglers persistent efforts to evade surveillance. The P-3's tactical coordinator then coordinated the intercept of the drug runner with the U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Munro (WHEC 724), which was initially positioned more than 300 miles from the smugglers. The P-3 crew extended their on-station time by meticulously managing fuel consumption in order to provide constant updates to Munro. The joint effort enabled Munro's helicopter and crew to arrest five Colombian nationals and seize more than 2,000 pounds of cocaine.

Based upon the bales of cocaine they passed before subduing the smugglers, Munro officers estimate the drug smugglers had dumped an additional 4,000 pounds of cocaine overboard prior to their arrest. The total street value of this interdiction is estimated to be $175 million.


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