VPNAVY VP-5 Mercury Capsule Recovery
http://www.vpnavy.org
VPNAVY Address

HistoryVP-65 HistoryHistory

Circa 2007

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...COMRESPATWING Disestablishment Ceremony - June 23, 2007 - Flyer (Squadrons: VP-60, VP-62, VP-64, VP-65, VP-66, VP-67, VP-68, VP-69, VP-90, VP-91, VP-92, VP-93 and VP-94)..." Contributed by ROBIDEAU, AWCS Larry Retired larobidoo@comcast.net [30JAN2008]

DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY COMMANDER RESERVE PATROL WING NAVAL AIR STATION
JOINT RESERVE BASE
WILLOW GROVE, PENNSYLVANIA 19090-5010

June 23, 2007

Dear Reserve VP Alumni,

It is a distinct pleasure to welcome you to the Reserve VP reunion. Many of you have traveled great distances and arranged your busy schedules to attend this celebration with your shipmates; your presence truly makes this a memorable occasion. Thank you for coming.

This evening's event is a commemoration of our service to country, and the camaraderie we have attained through our common experiences. I'm confident it will afford each of you the opportunity to rekindle and share memories of times gone by, with much fondness and laughter.

Since their inception in 1970, Reserve Patrol Wing squadrons have played a significant role in the United States Navy's maritime strategies. You, the Citizen Sailors of yesterday and today, were and continue to be an indispensable component of our Navy. From both coasts of our great nation and everywhere in between, you and your shipmates left homes and careers behind, answering America's call. You flew and maintained the venerable P2 Neptune and P-3 Orion aircraft, training for missions and detaching worldwide. You leave behind a proud legacy. I congratulate each of you and I'm honored to call all of you "shipmates."

We must also remember to pay tribute to our families, for their sacrifice has been great. They, too, have borne the burden of service, and are most deserving of our gratitude. If your family is not present this evening, please pass to them my sincere thanks and admiration.

As this chapter in the annals of the United States Navy closes, let us remember that the legacy continues. The Navy you helped build remains strong, proud, and incredibly capable. Fair Winds and Following Seas!

Christopher A. Patton
CAPT USN

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...COMRESPATWING Disestablishment Ceremony - June 23, 2007 - Brochure (Squadrons: VP-60, VP-62, VP-64, VP-65, VP-66, VP-67, VP-68, VP-69, VP-90, VP-91, VP-92, VP-93 and VP-94)..." Contributed by ROBIDEAU, AWCS Larry Retired larobidoo@comcast.net [30JAN2008]

COMRESPATWING SQUADRONS

COMMANDER RESERVE PATROL WING SENDS ITS SINCERE THANKS AND GRATITUDE TO ALL WHO HAVE SERVED, AND IS GRATEFUL TO ALL THOSE CIVILIANS WHO HAVE SUPPORTED THEIR CITIZEN SOLDIERS/SAILORS FOR NEARLY FOUR DECADES.

The following squadrons and command were assigned to Commander Reserve Patrol Wing:
               SQUADRON  NICKNAME                  LOCATION
                VP-60 	"Cobras"              NAS Glenview, Illinois
                VP-62 	"Broadarrows"         NAS Jacksonville, Florida
                VP-64 	"Condors"             NAS Willow Grove, Pennsylvania
                VP-65 	"Tridents"            NAS Point Mugu, California
                VP-66 	"Liberty Bells"       NAS Willow Grove, Pennsylvania
                VP-67 	"Golden Hawks"        NAS Memphis, Tennessee
                VP-68 	"Black Hawks"         NAF Washington, D.C.
                VP-69 	"Totems"              NAS Whidbey Island, Washington
                VP-90 	"Lions"               NAS Glenview, Illinois
                VP-91 	"Black Cats"          NAS Moffett Field, California
                VP-92 	"Minutemen"           NAS Brunswick, Maine
                VP-93 	"Executioners"        NAF Detroit, Michigan
                VP-94 	"Crawfishers"         NAS New Orleans, Louisiana
                Reserve ASW Training Center   NAS Willow Grove, Pennsylvania

Commander Reserve Patrol Wing
Command History

Commander Reserve Patrol Wing (COMRESPATWING) became the Navy's largest Patrol Wing in January 1999 following the consolidation of the former COMRESPATWINGPAC located at Moffett Federal Airfield, CA and COMRESPATWINGLANT located at NAS Norfolk, Virginia. Commander Reserve Patrol Wing became responsible for the training, readiness and oversight of seven assigned Maritime Patrol Aviation (MP A) Squadrons, the Reserve Anti-Submarine Warfare Training Center (RA TCEN), three Weapons System Trainer detachments, and two Mobile Operations Command Centers (MOCCs). The Wing was an Echelon IV command under the administrative and operational control of Commander, Naval Air Force Reserve. The Command's mission served two primary purposes 1) achieve and sustain combat readiness ensuring the availability of combat ready units capable of immediate employment in the event of war or national emergency; and 2) provide operational support during peacetime. At its pinnacle, COMRESPATWING included over 2,500 Drilling Reservists and Full Time Support personnel operating and maintaining 45 P-3 "Orion" aircraft.

The birth of Reserve Patrol Wing can be traced back to a major restructuring of the Naval Air Reserve that took place in 1970. The restructuring established two Reserve Patrol Wings, one East Coast Wing and one West Coast Wing, and 13 Reserve Patrol Squadrons.

The Squadrons first flew the SP2H "Neptune" but soon transitioned to the P-3 "Orion" during the mid-1970s. From the initial P-3A models, Reserve aircrews transitioned to the more capable P-3B TACNA V MOD and then onto the P-3C. Eventually, COMRESPATWING Squadrons came to operate the most modem P-3Cs in the fleet, which included AlP, BMUP and Update III aircraft.

Throughout the 1970s and 1980s, Reserve MP A maintained a significant Cold War anti-submarine warfare force, and the Squadrons were part of the fabric of the entire country with units based from coast to coast. The Squadrons included, VP-60 and VP-90 (NAS Glenview, Illinois), VP-62 (NAS Jacksonville, Florida), VP-64 and VP-66 (NAS Willow Grove, Pennsylvania), VP-65 (NAS Point Mugu, California), VP-67 (NAS Memphis, Tennessee), VP-68 (NAF Washington, D.C.), VP-69 (NAS Whidbey Island, Washington), VP-91 (NAS Moffett Field, California), VP-92 (NAS South Weymouth, Massachusetts), VP-93 (NAF Detroit, Michigan), and VP-94 (NAS Belle Chase, LA).

With the fall of the Soviet Union and the resulting reduction in the size of the Navy, six Reserve Squadrons were disestablished and the East and West Coast Wings were consolidated into a single Wing, which became Commander Reserve Patrol Wing, currently located at NAS Willow Grove, Pennsylvania. Post-Cold War, COMRESPATWING Squadrons expanded their role by routinely integrating into Fleet operations and deploying year-round to worldwide locations in support of Fleet Commanders.

With the start of the 21st Century, a new challenge arose for the Reserve Patrol Community. Years of heavy usage on the nation's P-3 force took its toll and many aircraft started to reach the end of their service life. In order to provide a bridge to the follow-on Patrol Aircraft, the P-8A Poseidon, COMRESPATWING Units were called upon to embark upon an unprecedented integration and asset sharing initiative. To assure the maximum return on national assets, COMRESPATWING transferred its most capable P-3s to its Squadrons co-located with Active Component Squadrons and concurrently disestablished stand-alone P-3 Squadrons. With the disestablishment of COMRESPATWING on 30 June 2007, two remaining Reserve Patrol Squadrons will continue to serve the nation under the control of their Active Component Wings. The thousands of Officers, Chiefs, and Sailors who have served in Reserve Patrol Wing Units leave behind a proud legacy of professionalism, service and camaraderie.
                             COMMANDERS OF RESERVE PATROL WING 
			
                CAPT Joseph E. K1ause, USN 	        Oct 1970   Oct 1972 
                CAPT James A. McCraig, USN 	        Oct 1972   Sep 1974 
                CAPT William H. Saunders, III, USN 	Sep 1974   Ju1 1976 
                CAPT Donald R. Yeager, USN 		Jul 1976   Jul 1978 
                CAPT Richard J. Lanning, USN 		Jul 1978   Jul 1980 
                CAPT Richard K. Chambers, USNR 		Jul 1980   Aug 1982 
                CAPT Earl R. Riffle, USN 		Aug 1982   Sep 1984 
                CAPT Michael A. Nash, USN 		Sep 1984   Sep 1986 
                CAPT Gerald H. Mollencop, USNR 		Sep 1986   Jul 1989 
                CAPT Michael T. Korbet, USN 		Jul 1989   Jul 1991 
                CAPT Douglas R. Birr, USNR 		Jul 1991   Oct 1993 
                CAPT David C. Hull, USN 		Oct 1993   Apr 1995 
                CAPT Patrick B. Peterson, USNR 		Apr 1995   Jul 1996 
                CAPT Frederick S. Gay, USN 		Jul 1996   Jan 1998 
                CAPT Riley J. Gladden, USNR 		Jan 1998   Jul 1999 
                CAPT Robert A. Sinibaldi, Jr., USNR 	Jul 1999   Jul 2001 
                CAPT David L. Montgomery, USNR 		Jul 2001   Jul 2003 
                CAPT Michael J. Szostak, USN 		Jul 2003   Jun 2005 
                CAPT Christopher A. Patton, USN 	Jun 2005   Jun 2007 

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...COMRESPATWING Disestablishment Ceremony - June 23, 2007 - CD History (Squadrons: VP-60, VP-62, VP-64, VP-65, VP-66, VP-67, VP-68, VP-69, VP-90, VP-91, VP-92, VP-93 and VP-94)..." Contributed by ROBIDEAU, AWCS Larry Retired larobidoo@comcast.net [30JAN2008]

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Circa 2006

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY:  History ThumbnailCameraDecommissioned "...The Navy Reservist - Decommissioned - Volume 32 - Issue Number 6 - June 2006 - Squadron's Mentioned: VP-65, VP-66 and VP-94..." WebSite: Naval Reserve http://www.navyreserve.navy.mil/NR/rdonlyres/03F079BF-D545-42C6-A335-577B42BE2D5D/133151/TNRJune06.pdf [13OCT2006]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY:  History ThumbnailCameraVP-65 History "...VP-65 February 10th, 2006..." Contributed by Norman Haussmann (former CO) nhaussmann@aol.com [21MAR2006]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...VP-65 January 26th, 2006..." Contributed by Norman Haussmann (former CO) nhaussmann@aol.com [21MAR2006]

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HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...VP-65 January 7th, 2006..." Contributed by Norman Haussmann (former CO) nhaussmann@aol.com [19MAR2006]

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HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "..."Tridents" of VP-65 Disestablished - Story Number: NNS060315-06 - Release Date: 3/15/2006 12:02:00 PM - By Journalist 1st Class Elton Shaw, Naval Air Reserve Point Mugu Public Affairs..." WebSite: Navy News Stand http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=22703 [18MAR2006]

POINT MUGU, Calif. (NNS) -- Naval Reserve Patrol Squadron (VP) 65, stationed at Naval Air Station (NAS) Point Mugu, was formally disestablished during a ceremony at the VP-65 hangar March 4.

Among the 300-plus people in attendance for the ceremony were several past commanding officers, officers-in-charge, command master chiefs and Sailors.

"Today, we collectively come together to celebrate more than 35 years of service to our great country. Our mission is to disestablish this fine organization and record the final words, on the final page, of the final chapter of the remarkable Team Trident story," said Cmdr. Kevin Simpson, commanding officer of VP-65.

The Tridents were established Nov. 16, 1970, during a major reorganization of the Naval Air Reserve Force. The squadron, manned by a combination of active-duty, full time support and part-time (selected reserve) personnel, was formed along the lines of fleet Navy squadrons, with nearly identical manning and organization levels.

Throughout the ceremony, Simpson mentioned many of the milestones and accomplishments the squadron achieved over the years and made it clear the uncompromising commitment of Team Trident Sailors was the key.

"Simply put, you delivered excellence in everything you did. You flew and maintained our aircraft like our commanders and taxpayers expected. Moreover, you were loyal to one another. You watched out for one another and you were persistent in your charge to develop tomorrow's leaders," Simpson said.

Since its inception, VP-65 has received many awards, including the AVCM Donald M. Neal Award, the "Golden Wrench" (1981, 1988, 1990 and 1997), presented annually to the best of the Reserve P-3 squadrons for excellence in aircraft maintenance, the "Golden Anchor" (1991, 1995 and 1997) for retention excellence and the Noel Davis "Battle 'E'" Trophy (1972, 1994, and 1997).

VP-65 air crews have successfully completed countless missions around the world, providing consistent operational support spanning from the Cold War to the global war on terrorism.

Rear Adm. Jeffrey A. Lemmons, vice commander, Naval Air Forces and commander, Naval Air Force Reserve was on hand as the guest speaker and to present Simpson with a Meritorious Service Medal for his time as the squadron's final commanding officer.

After he received his award Simpson read the official disestablishment order: "In accordance with Chief of Naval Operations Notice 3111 you are hereby ordered to disestablish VP-65 effective March 31, 2006."

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...VP-65 Stepping Down..." WebSite: KEYT3 Santa Barbara http://www.keyt.com/news/local/2408116.html [06MAR2006]

A Ventura County Naval Base Unit is being fazed out by the military after more than 30 years of service.

Patrol Squadron 65 has been at NAS Point Mugu, California since 1971. It's specialty is flying Lockheed Martin P-3's. Most recently, the planes were used to search for suspicious boats carrying drugs into the U.S.

But now the military say they're no longer needed, and it's time to retire completely. They held their final ceremony Saturday.

Story Created: Mar 4, 2006 at 6:36 PM PST
Story Updated: Mar 4, 2006 at 7:58 PM PST

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...VP-65 Reunion / Distablishment Ceremony..." Contributed by Norman Haussmann (former CO) nhaussmann@aol.com [14JAN2006]

VP-65 Reunion / Disestablishment Ceremony
When: 04 March 2006 at 1300
Where: VP-65 Hangar, NAS Point Mugu, California

Reception to follow. 50 rooms have been held at the Country Inns & Suites in Camarillo @ $94.00 per night. Please make your own reservations. http://www.countryinns.com/camarilloca or 805-983-7171

Additional information is located on: http://www.military.com/Resources/ReunionDisplay/1,11584,30939-202603,00.html

For more information contact:

    LCDR Dennie G. Bourbeau - (805) 989-8128

Circa 2005

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...OPNAV NOTICE 3111 06 Nov 05 - Subject: Diestablishment of Commanding Officer, Patrol Squadron Six Five (Patron Six Five), Commanding Officer, Patrol Squadron Six Six (Patron Six Six), and Commanding Officer, Patrol Squadron Nine Four (Patron Nine Four)..." Contributed by Merrill Kruse kruse@navmar.com [12JAN2006]

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HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...OPNAV NOTICE 3111 29 Nov 05 - From Chief of Naval Operations..." Contributed by Marco P.J. Borst p3orion@planet.nl [02DEC2005]

1. Purpose: To approve disestablishment of subject fleet activities, all under the administrative command of the Chief of Naval Operations.

2. Background: The disestablishment of PATRON SIX FIVE (VP-65), PATRON SIX SIX (VP-66), and PATRON NINE FOUR (VP-94) are in compliance with the Active Reserve Integration (ARI) plan. In adddition, P-3 aircraft fatique issues have required the grounding of 30 aircraft during CY 05, neccessitating an accelerated disestablishment plan to recapitalize scarce aircraft resources.

3. Organizational Changes: Effective 31 March 2006, disestablish VP-65, VP-66 and VP-94.

VP-65 is in NAS Point Mugu, California. VP-66 in NAS Willow Grove, Pennsylvania. VP-94 in NAS New Orleans, Louisiana. None of the three squadrons had any aircraft left on the ramp. Their 12 P-3s were already on temp loan to active squadrons. All 12 will be transfered no later than 01 Feb 06 to either the active fleet or the boneyard at Davis Mothan AFB. IMRL gear and SE are already in process of being shipped to other locations.

This will reduce the Reserve P-3 force to a total of 18 P-3 aircraft in CY 06.


Circa 2004

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...New Chiefs Participate in Base Beautification Project - Story Number: NNS040831-07 - Release Date: 8/31/2004 2:24:00 PM - By Journalist 2nd Class Auburn Hutton, Naval Air Reserve Point Mugu Public Affairs..." http://www.news.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=14940 [16NOV2004]

POINT MUGU, Calif. (NNS) -- Sixteen newly selected chief petty officers from units at Naval Air Station Point Mugu participated in a hands-on base beautification effort in August.

Sailors from VP-65, VR-55, Aviation Intermediate Maintenance Department, Explosive Ordnance Disposal, Mobile Operations Control Center and VAW-116 joined together in an effort to help clean up a few neglected areas of the base, while satisfying the community service portion of their Chief Selectee Transition season.

Chief Personnelman (AW) Katrina Renyer from the Naval Air Reserve Point Mugu (NAVAIRES) is the community service chairman for the season. She coordinated with the Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) office on base to determine which areas needed the most care.

"We ended up focusing on the barbeque pavilion," she said. "It's a facility that everyone on the base utilizes, and it was in desperate need of repair. It needed a face lift."

One chief selectee from NAVAIRES, Chief Aviation Electrician's Mate (sel.) (AW) David Phillips, enjoyed participating in the restoration.

"We cleaned up the playground equipment, replaced light fixtures, cleaned and painted the barbecue grill pits and built four new horseshoe pits," he said. "It was a big job, but it gave us a lot of satisfaction."

When the crew finished the job, the pavilion had a whole new look for Point Mugu residents to enjoy. Phillips feels the project will contribute to more use of the community pavilion.

"It was a wonderful opportunity and a really great thing for the community. It turned out to be so beautiful — a great looking place overall. I think it'll really help invite more people to go over there and spend time with their family."

Community service is just one portion of the Chief Selectee Transition season. The Sailors are also required to participate in extensive classroom and physical training in order to better prepare themselves for life in khakis.

"The whole process is important," said Renyer. "There's a lesson behind everything. I remember going through it myself. You have a whole new perspective on your career when it's over."

Phillips feels the knowledge he gained has helped him evolve into a whole new way of thinking.

"You have to go from being someone who goes to others and asks, ‘What am I supposed to do?' to a person who others go to for the same answers."

During the base beautification process, as well as the other training the chief selectees received, they had a chance to bond and work together as a team. Renyer said the results were incredible.

"You take 30 or so individuals and by the end of the season, they're working together like a smooth engine," she said. "They have to learn a new way of life."

The Chief Selectee Transition season will wrap up Sept. 15 with a pinning ceremony at Naval Base Ventura County, Port Hueneme.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Husband/Wife Team Win SOY..." Navy News Stand http://www.news.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=12159 [02APR2004]

Husband/Wife Team Win SOY
Story Number: NNS040309-16
Release Date: 3/9/2004 2:15:00 PM
By Journalist 2nd Class Auburn M. Hutton, Naval Air Reserves Point Mugu Public Affairs

POINT MUGU, Calif. (NNS) -- A husband and wife team in Colorado Springs, Colo., reached a milestone in their Navy career together when they were both honored as 2003 Sailors of the Year (SOY) for their respective commands in January.

Aircrew Survival Equipmentman 1st Class (AW) Mark Wilde received recognition from his Reserve squadron, VP-65 at NAS Point Mugu, California, and Yeoman 1st Class Kathleen Wilde was recognized twice as SOY, once at her permanent duty station, the Naval Reserve Center in Fort Carson, Colo., and also through Naval Reserve Readiness Command Northwest.

Mark could hardly believe the news when he found out that he and his wife were both chosen for SOY; however, the capacity for this type of success didn't strike him as out of the ordinary.

"Until we stopped and thought about it, we didn't realize how big of an event it was. It's a rush though; major career moment," said Mark, who has been in the Navy for more than 13 years.

His wife was also shocked by the announcement. Kathleen said she did some research and couldn't find a recorded case in Naval Reserve history where another husband and wife teamed up to become SOY.

"I was very surprised. We both worked very hard, but there were a lot of people doing a lot of good things this year, and of course everybody can't get recognized. So to have both of us be recognized at the same time, it's just amazing."

Both members of the Wilde family credit their success mostly to their on-duty efforts. Mark did his two weeks of active duty with VP-65 last year and was the only Reservist to be named a Full Systems Quality Assurance Representative. Kathleen kept her focus on career counseling and family togetherness. She provided 100 percent of Sailors at her unit with counseling, and also implemented several family-oriented programs.

The couple's off-duty activities also kept their lives busy last year. Mark managed to balance his Navy career with a part-time security job, a full-time load of college courses, heavy involvement with his church and approximately 120 volunteer hours as a Colorado Mounted Ranger. Although he said he feels fulfilled, he is always on the move.

"It can get difficult. It works out well for us but makes for a busy lifetime," he said.

Kathleen also has a busy off-duty schedule, doing everything from volunteering at her children's school to participating in food, blanket and coat drives.

Aside from the high demands of the last 15 years she spent in the Navy, she still found time to continue her education. She is just two classes away from earning her bachelor's degree.

Both Mark and Kathleen agree that much of their success came from being able to prioritize their lives.

"It's a juggling act, you know, trying to work hard together to make sure we're both available to complete our missions at the same time," said Kathleen.

Along with all the Navy responsibilities and volunteer time the Wildes' contribute, they still find time for four more very important extra duties--their four children. The Wildes said they spend as much time as possible with John, 12; Stephanie, 11; Eleanor, 3; and Victoria, 4 months, and still manage to have time for each other--even when things get rough.

"It can be really difficult, especially with the four kids here. We have to make time for everybody, make sure everyone gets enough attention," expressed Kathleen.

After all the hard work this year, the Wilde family's dedication to the Navy and their family paid off. Kathleen said one thing makes it all worthwhile.

"For me, seeing my husband being recognized is a major reward."

Mark said that without each other's support, it might not be quite as easy.

"She's my biggest cheerleader and I'm hers. Neither one of us could've done it without the other. I'm fully convinced of that."


Circa 2003

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY:  History ThumbnailCamera030904-N-8500S-002 Curacao, Netherlands Antilles (Sept. 4, 2003) "...Lt. Cmdr. Alan Poremba, assigned to the "Tridents" of Patrol Squadron Sixty Five (VP-65) examines a P-3C Orion's telescopic lens prior to leaving Curacao, the largest island in the Netherlands Antilles. The crew uses the lens to conducted counter drug operations over the waters between Florida and Caribbean Islands. They help to identify suspected air and maritime drug trafficking activity in the area. U.S. Navy Photo by Photographer's Mate 3rd Class Paula Sato. (RELEASED)..." Navy News Stand http://newshome.news.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=10133 [05MAR2005]


Circa 2002

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...VP-65 "Tridents" Tough On Drug Cartels..." Navy News Stand http://www.news.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=1004 [28MAR2002]

VP-65 "Tridents" Tough On Drug Cartels
Story Number: NNS020306-10
3/6/2002
By Patrol Squadron 65 Public Affairs

VENTURA COUNTY, Calif. (NNS) -- Although the world's attention is currently focused on the war on terrorism, Naval Reserve Patrol Squadron (VP) 65 from Naval Base Ventura County has recently returned from an ongoing silent war being waged against a different adversary -- drug smugglers from south of the border.

Working closely with the Coast Guard and Navy warships, the "Tridents" of VP-65 spent six weeks in Latin America fighting the war on drugs. The aircrews, operating P-3C Orion aircraft upgraded with state of the art avionics and optics, patrolled more than 2.5 million square miles of ocean in the Eastern Pacific and the Caribbean in search of elusive "go-fast" boats and support ships used by the drug cartels.

The "go-fasts" are high-powered speedboats capable of transporting tons of illegal contraband. The support ships are fuel and supply replenishment vessels for the speedboats.

"One of the keys to our mission was finding the support ships," explained one aircraft commander. "Once you neutralize these supply vessels, the go-fasts are unable to refuel and reach their destination. The difficulty is, these support ships are often disguised as normal, lawful fishing vessels."

In an effort to distinguish legitimate fishing from suspect vessels, the aircrews used sophisticated camera equipment onboard the aircraft.

"Once we located a go-fast or suspect vessel, we used advanced communications to coordinate with the Coast Guard or naval ships to intercept and board them," described the mission commander. "Coordination was absolutely critical to the successful seizures of the contraband and culprits."

During the six-week detachment, Reservists provided critical logistical, intelligence and maintenance support to VP-65. As a result of this team effort, the Tridents completed numerous missions and assisted in the interdiction of more than 5 metric tons of cocaine with an estimated street value of more than $300 million -- drugs that would have potentially otherwise found their way onto American streets.


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