VPNAVY VP-5 Mercury Capsule Recovery
http://www.vpnavy.org
VPNAVY Address

HistoryVP-64 HistoryHistory

Circa 2007

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VP-64 History ThumbnailCameraVP-64 Crew 6 "...Members of VP-64 Crew 6 who attended the disestablishment of the COMRESPATWING NASJRB Willow Grove, Pennsylvania on June 30, 2007. LEFT TO RIGHT KNEELING: TACCO CAPTAIN Lou DiLullo, NAVIAGATOR CAPTAIN Jim Neve, 2P LT Steve Spero, and PPC CAPTAIN Joe Gareffa. LEFT TO RIGHT STANDING: FE2 Al Zimmerman, FE ADC Willie Wilson, SS2 AW1 Bill Restle, SS1 AWCS Larry Robideau, ORDINANCE AO1 Pete McCaughley, FE AMCS Paul Wintje, FCO AT1 Walt Eife, FE AMCS Bobby Kral and SS3 AW1 Joe Dolan. Core crew members served together as a crew from June 1973 until March, 1984...." Contributed by ROBIDEAU, AWCS Larry Retired larobidoo@comcast.net [19FEB2008]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...COMRESPATWING Disestablishment Ceremony - June 23, 2007 - Flyer (Squadrons: VP-60, VP-62, VP-64, VP-65, VP-66, VP-67, VP-68, VP-69, VP-90, VP-91, VP-92, VP-93 and VP-94)..." Contributed by ROBIDEAU, AWCS Larry Retired larobidoo@comcast.net [30JAN2008]

DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY COMMANDER RESERVE PATROL WING NAVAL AIR STATION
JOINT RESERVE BASE
WILLOW GROVE, PENNSYLVANIA 19090-5010

June 23, 2007

Dear Reserve VP Alumni,

It is a distinct pleasure to welcome you to the Reserve VP reunion. Many of you have traveled great distances and arranged your busy schedules to attend this celebration with your shipmates; your presence truly makes this a memorable occasion. Thank you for coming.

This evening's event is a commemoration of our service to country, and the camaraderie we have attained through our common experiences. I'm confident it will afford each of you the opportunity to rekindle and share memories of times gone by, with much fondness and laughter.

Since their inception in 1970, Reserve Patrol Wing squadrons have played a significant role in the United States Navy's maritime strategies. You, the Citizen Sailors of yesterday and today, were and continue to be an indispensable component of our Navy. From both coasts of our great nation and everywhere in between, you and your shipmates left homes and careers behind, answering America's call. You flew and maintained the venerable P2 Neptune and P-3 Orion aircraft, training for missions and detaching worldwide. You leave behind a proud legacy. I congratulate each of you and I'm honored to call all of you "shipmates."

We must also remember to pay tribute to our families, for their sacrifice has been great. They, too, have borne the burden of service, and are most deserving of our gratitude. If your family is not present this evening, please pass to them my sincere thanks and admiration.

As this chapter in the annals of the United States Navy closes, let us remember that the legacy continues. The Navy you helped build remains strong, proud, and incredibly capable. Fair Winds and Following Seas!

Christopher A. Patton
CAPT USN

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...COMRESPATWING Disestablishment Ceremony - June 23, 2007 - Brochure (Squadrons: VP-60, VP-62, VP-64, VP-65, VP-66, VP-67, VP-68, VP-69, VP-90, VP-91, VP-92, VP-93 and VP-94)..." Contributed by ROBIDEAU, AWCS Larry Retired larobidoo@comcast.net [30JAN2008]

COMRESPATWING SQUADRONS

COMMANDER RESERVE PATROL WING SENDS ITS SINCERE THANKS AND GRATITUDE TO ALL WHO HAVE SERVED, AND IS GRATEFUL TO ALL THOSE CIVILIANS WHO HAVE SUPPORTED THEIR CITIZEN SOLDIERS/SAILORS FOR NEARLY FOUR DECADES.

The following squadrons and command were assigned to Commander Reserve Patrol Wing:
               SQUADRON  NICKNAME                  LOCATION
                VP-60 	"Cobras"              NAS Glenview, Illinois
                VP-62 	"Broadarrows"         NAS Jacksonville, Florida
                VP-64 	"Condors"             NAS Willow Grove, Pennsylvania
                VP-65 	"Tridents"            NAS Point Mugu, California
                VP-66 	"Liberty Bells"       NAS Willow Grove, Pennsylvania
                VP-67 	"Golden Hawks"        NAS Memphis, Tennessee
                VP-68 	"Black Hawks"         NAF Washington, D.C.
                VP-69 	"Totems"              NAS Whidbey Island, Washington
                VP-90 	"Lions"               NAS Glenview, Illinois
                VP-91 	"Black Cats"          NAS Moffett Field, California
                VP-92 	"Minutemen"           NAS Brunswick, Maine
                VP-93 	"Executioners"        NAF Detroit, Michigan
                VP-94 	"Crawfishers"         NAS New Orleans, Louisiana
                Reserve ASW Training Center   NAS Willow Grove, Pennsylvania

Commander Reserve Patrol Wing
Command History

Commander Reserve Patrol Wing (COMRESPATWING) became the Navy's largest Patrol Wing in January 1999 following the consolidation of the former COMRESPATWINGPAC located at Moffett Federal Airfield, CA and COMRESPATWINGLANT located at NAS Norfolk, Virginia. Commander Reserve Patrol Wing became responsible for the training, readiness and oversight of seven assigned Maritime Patrol Aviation (MP A) Squadrons, the Reserve Anti-Submarine Warfare Training Center (RA TCEN), three Weapons System Trainer detachments, and two Mobile Operations Command Centers (MOCCs). The Wing was an Echelon IV command under the administrative and operational control of Commander, Naval Air Force Reserve. The Command's mission served two primary purposes 1) achieve and sustain combat readiness ensuring the availability of combat ready units capable of immediate employment in the event of war or national emergency; and 2) provide operational support during peacetime. At its pinnacle, COMRESPATWING included over 2,500 Drilling Reservists and Full Time Support personnel operating and maintaining 45 P-3 "Orion" aircraft.

The birth of Reserve Patrol Wing can be traced back to a major restructuring of the Naval Air Reserve that took place in 1970. The restructuring established two Reserve Patrol Wings, one East Coast Wing and one West Coast Wing, and 13 Reserve Patrol Squadrons.

The Squadrons first flew the SP2H "Neptune" but soon transitioned to the P-3 "Orion" during the mid-1970s. From the initial P-3A models, Reserve aircrews transitioned to the more capable P-3B TACNA V MOD and then onto the P-3C. Eventually, COMRESPATWING Squadrons came to operate the most modem P-3Cs in the fleet, which included AlP, BMUP and Update III aircraft.

Throughout the 1970s and 1980s, Reserve MP A maintained a significant Cold War anti-submarine warfare force, and the Squadrons were part of the fabric of the entire country with units based from coast to coast. The Squadrons included, VP-60 and VP-90 (NAS Glenview, Illinois), VP-62 (NAS Jacksonville, Florida), VP-64 and VP-66 (NAS Willow Grove, Pennsylvania), VP-65 (NAS Point Mugu, California), VP-67 (NAS Memphis, Tennessee), VP-68 (NAF Washington, D.C.), VP-69 (NAS Whidbey Island, Washington), VP-91 (NAS Moffett Field, California), VP-92 (NAS South Weymouth, Massachusetts), VP-93 (NAF Detroit, Michigan), and VP-94 (NAS Belle Chase, LA).

With the fall of the Soviet Union and the resulting reduction in the size of the Navy, six Reserve Squadrons were disestablished and the East and West Coast Wings were consolidated into a single Wing, which became Commander Reserve Patrol Wing, currently located at NAS Willow Grove, Pennsylvania. Post-Cold War, COMRESPATWING Squadrons expanded their role by routinely integrating into Fleet operations and deploying year-round to worldwide locations in support of Fleet Commanders.

With the start of the 21st Century, a new challenge arose for the Reserve Patrol Community. Years of heavy usage on the nation's P-3 force took its toll and many aircraft started to reach the end of their service life. In order to provide a bridge to the follow-on Patrol Aircraft, the P-8A Poseidon, COMRESPATWING Units were called upon to embark upon an unprecedented integration and asset sharing initiative. To assure the maximum return on national assets, COMRESPATWING transferred its most capable P-3s to its Squadrons co-located with Active Component Squadrons and concurrently disestablished stand-alone P-3 Squadrons. With the disestablishment of COMRESPATWING on 30 June 2007, two remaining Reserve Patrol Squadrons will continue to serve the nation under the control of their Active Component Wings. The thousands of Officers, Chiefs, and Sailors who have served in Reserve Patrol Wing Units leave behind a proud legacy of professionalism, service and camaraderie.
                             COMMANDERS OF RESERVE PATROL WING 
			
                CAPT Joseph E. K1ause, USN 	        Oct 1970   Oct 1972 
                CAPT James A. McCraig, USN 	        Oct 1972   Sep 1974 
                CAPT William H. Saunders, III, USN 	Sep 1974   Ju1 1976 
                CAPT Donald R. Yeager, USN 		Jul 1976   Jul 1978 
                CAPT Richard J. Lanning, USN 		Jul 1978   Jul 1980 
                CAPT Richard K. Chambers, USNR 		Jul 1980   Aug 1982 
                CAPT Earl R. Riffle, USN 		Aug 1982   Sep 1984 
                CAPT Michael A. Nash, USN 		Sep 1984   Sep 1986 
                CAPT Gerald H. Mollencop, USNR 		Sep 1986   Jul 1989 
                CAPT Michael T. Korbet, USN 		Jul 1989   Jul 1991 
                CAPT Douglas R. Birr, USNR 		Jul 1991   Oct 1993 
                CAPT David C. Hull, USN 		Oct 1993   Apr 1995 
                CAPT Patrick B. Peterson, USNR 		Apr 1995   Jul 1996 
                CAPT Frederick S. Gay, USN 		Jul 1996   Jan 1998 
                CAPT Riley J. Gladden, USNR 		Jan 1998   Jul 1999 
                CAPT Robert A. Sinibaldi, Jr., USNR 	Jul 1999   Jul 2001 
                CAPT David L. Montgomery, USNR 		Jul 2001   Jul 2003 
                CAPT Michael J. Szostak, USN 		Jul 2003   Jun 2005 
                CAPT Christopher A. Patton, USN 	Jun 2005   Jun 2007 

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...COMRESPATWING Disestablishment Ceremony - June 23, 2007 - CD History (Squadrons: VP-60, VP-62, VP-64, VP-65, VP-66, VP-67, VP-68, VP-69, VP-90, VP-91, VP-92, VP-93 and VP-94)..." Contributed by ROBIDEAU, AWCS Larry Retired larobidoo@comcast.net [30JAN2008]

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Circa 2004

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Change of Command, Mission for Condors - Story Number: NNS040922-02 - Release Date: 9/22/2004 8:16:00 AM - By Senior Chief Journalist (SW) Doug Hummel, NAS JRB Willow Grove Public Affairs..." http://www.news.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=15230 [16NOV2004]

NAVAL AIR STATION JOINT RESERVE BASE WILLOW GROVE, Pa. (NNS) -- Cmdr. Mark R. Greenwood relieved Cmdr. Stephen R. Speed as commanding officer of VP-64 "Condors" in a change of command ceremony in their hangar Sept. 18.

It did not take long for Greenwood to get started at his new job. As soon as he took charge of the Condors, the squadron changed missions and roles in support of the global war on terrorism as they transitioned to a fleet logistic support squadron (VR).

"The part that has me excited is, very shortly after this ceremony, we're going to have aircraft on the ramp. Before you know it, those Navy-painted C-130s are going to be flying in and out of the Grove on local training flights as we continue to train our people, so we're back in business," said Greenwood. "As a VR squadron, we're looking forward to supporting the fleet by bringing the warfighters the tools they need to get the mission done."

Since the day the Condors found out they were going to transition into VR-64, Speed has been at the helm focused on preparing the squadron so it would be ready for its new mission.

"The biggest hurdles have been getting people trained. It's a whole new platform with a whole new mission," said Speed, the last commanding officer of VP-64, who will now report to the Naval Reserve Chief of Naval Operations Management Analysis Office in Washington, D.C. "What these Condors have accomplished over the past few months is nothing short of phenomenal. I've been amazed at their dedication. I've been amazed at what they have accomplished, and I've been amazed at the way they have continued to tackle the many obstacles that have been thrown in front of them."

Even though the squadron has not received their inventory of aircraft yet, they have done everything else to be ready for their new role. Gone are their C Orions and the radars needed to conduct anti-surface warfare, antisubmarine warfare and aerial mine warfare operations. Personnel have been trained and maintenance equipment has been acquired to support the C-130 Hercules planes that will provide transportation for troops, supplies and gear all over the globe.

"I'm real excited about being done with training, and getting back to work and doing something for the Navy. I know that the mission is important, but the C-130 mission seems to have more of a direct impact [on the war on terrorism] because we'll be supporting the troops on the front lines in Iraq," said Aviation Structural Mechanic 3rd Class Burton Rheutan, an air framer in the Condors maintenance department who has been training to became a loadmaster on the C-130. "This transition has given me an opportunity to broaden my horizon, and to do something new and exciting."

"I feel very fortunate to be part of this," said Greenwood about being the first commanding officer of VR-64. "I don't know if I necessarily feel that much different than the most junior Sailor in the command who's going to be a plankowner of this new command. For me, it's just an opportunity to see the great work that people are doing in support of the effort overseas."

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...REDESIGNATION OF PATROL SQUADRON SIX FOUR (VP-64) TO FLEET LOGISTICS SUPPORT SQUADRON (VR-64)..." WebSite: http://neds.nebt.daps.mil/Directives/notices/3111_89.pdf [13OCT2004]

Canc frp: August 27, 2004
OPNAVNOTE 3111
Ser N09B16/4U681861

August 27, 2004

OPNAV NOTICE 3111

From:  Chief of Naval Operations
Subj:  REDESIGNATION OF PATROL SQUADRON SIX FOUR (VP-64) TO FLEET LOGISTICS SUPPORT SQUADRON (VR-64)

Ref:  (a)  OPNAVINST 3111.14V

(b)  SNDL (OPNAVNOTE 5400 of 18 Jun 03)

1.  Purpose. To approve subject realignment of Commanding Officer, Patrol Squadron SIX FOUR (VP-64) under the administrative command of the Chief of Naval Operations per reference (a).

2.  Background and Mission. Patrol Squadron SIX FOUR (VP-64) has six P-3C aircraft operating in support of the maritime patrol mission that will be replaced by three C-130 aircraft. After conversion to the C-130, squadron designation will change to Fleet Logistics Support Squadron SIX FOUR (VR-64).

3.  Organizational Changes. Rename Commanding Officer, Patrol Squadron SIX FOUR (VP-64) to Commanding Officer, Fleet Logistics Support Squadron SIX FOUR (VR-64), effective 18 September 2004.

The following applies:

    a.  From
Commanding Officer Commanding Officer
VP-64
Naval Air Station
Joint Reserve Base
Willow Grove, PA 19090-5010
(PLA: PATRON SIX FOUR)
(SNDL: 42P3) (UIC: 09172)
(PDS: Willow Grove, PA)
    a.  To:
Commanding Officer VR-64
Naval Air Station
Joint Reserve Base
Willow Grove, PA 19090-5010
PLA: FLELOGSUPPRON SIX FOUR)
(SNDL: 42Q3) (UIC: 09172)
(PDS: Willow Grove, PA)
    b. Mission. To provide responsive, flexible, and rapidly air logistics support required to sustain combat operations at sea. During peacetime, squadrons provide air logistics support for all Navy commands as well as provide continuous quality training for mobilization readiness.

    c. Major Claimant. COMNAVRESFOR

    d. OPNAV Resource Sponsor. N095

    e. Administrative Chain of Command

    Echelon    Administrative Chain of Command

    2      Commander, Naval Reserve Force
    3      Commander, Naval Reserve Forces Command
    4      Commander, Naval Air Force Reserve
    5      Commander, Fleet Logistics Support Wing
5.  Action
    a.  This is advance change 55-04 to enclosure (5) of reference (b).

    b.  Master Update Authority, Honolulu, HI will revise the Plain Language Addresses (PLA) in the Central Directory Component effective 18 September 2004 unless otherwise directed via official correspondence. Correspondence concerning the PLA should be forwarded to NAVNETSPAOPSCOM (Code N31), 5280 Fourth St., Dahlgren VA 22448-5300.

    6.  Cancellation Contingency. This notice may be retained for reference purposes. The organization action will remain effective until changed by DNS.
W. L. RIDDLE
Captain, U.S. Navy
Deputy Director, Navy Staff
Distribution:
Electronic only, via Navy Directives Website http://NEDS.NEBT.DAPS.MIL

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Change of Command, Mission for Condors..." [24OCT2004]

Change of Command, Mission for Condors
Story Number: NNS040922-02
Release Date: 9/22/2004 8:16:00 AM

By Senior Chief Journalist (SW) Doug Hummel, NAS JRB Willow Grove Public Affairs

NAS Whiting Field, Milton, Florida (NNS) -- Cmdr. Mark R. Greenwood relieved Cmdr. Stephen R. Speed as commanding officer of Patrol Squadron (VP) 64 "Condors" in a change of command ceremony in their hangar Sept. 18.

It did not take long for Greenwood to get started at his new job. As soon as he took charge of the Condors, the squadron changed missions and roles in support of the global war on terrorism as they transitioned to a fleet logistic support squadron (VR).

"The part that has me excited is, very shortly after this ceremony, we're going to have aircraft on the ramp. Before you know it, those Navy-painted C-130s are going to be flying in and out of the Grove on local training flights as we continue to train our people, so we're back in business," said Greenwood. "As a VR squadron, we're looking forward to supporting the fleet by bringing the warfighters the tools they need to get the mission done."

Since the day the Condors found out they were going to transition into VR-64, Speed has been at the helm focused on preparing the squadron so it would be ready for its new mission.

"The biggest hurdles have been getting people trained. It's a whole new platform with a whole new mission," said Speed, the last commanding officer of VP-64, who will now report to the Naval Reserve Chief of Naval Operations Management Analysis Office in Washington, D.C. "What these Condors have accomplished over the past few months is nothing short of phenomenal. I've been amazed at their dedication. I've been amazed at what they have accomplished, and I've been amazed at the way they have continued to tackle the many obstacles that have been thrown in front of them."

Even though the squadron has not received their inventory of aircraft yet, they have done everything else to be ready for their new role. Gone are their P-3C Orions and the radars needed to conduct anti-surface warfare, antisubmarine warfare and aerial mine warfare operations. Personnel have been trained and maintenance equipment has been acquired to support the C-130 Hercules planes that will provide transportation for troops, supplies and gear all over the globe.

"I'm real excited about being done with training, and getting back to work and doing something for the Navy. I know that the P-3 mission is important, but the C-130 mission seems to have more of a direct impact [on the war on terrorism] because we'll be supporting the troops on the front lines in Iraq," said Aviation Structural Mechanic 3rd Class Burton Rheutan, an air framer in the Condors maintenance department who has been training to became a loadmaster on the C-130. "This transition has given me an opportunity to broaden my horizon, and to do something new and exciting."

"I feel very fortunate to be part of this," said Greenwood about being the first commanding officer of VR-64. "I don't know if I necessarily feel that much different than the most junior Sailor in the command who's going to be a plankowner of this new command. For me, it's just an opportunity to see the great work that people are doing in support of the effort overseas."

For related news, visit the Naval Air Station Joint Reserve Base Willow Grove, Pa., Navy NewsStand page at http://www.news.navy.mil/local/nasjrbwg.


Circa 2003

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...XO Takes Charge of Patrol Squadron 64 - Story Number: NNS030610-08 - Release Date: 6/10/2003 7:06:00 AM - From Patrol Squadron 64 Public Affairs..." [14JUN2003]

WILLOW GROVE, Pa. (NNS) -- The executive officer of VP-64 stepped up to the squadron's commanding officer slot during a change-of-command ceremony held in their hangar May 17.

Cmdr. Stephen R. Speed relieved Cmdr. Richard S. Cline, who transferred to Commander, Reserve Patrol Wing.

Speed, a native of Dover, Del., joined the squadron in October 1996 and has since served in seven different positions, including tours as the training officer, operations officer and maintenance officer.

He earned his bachelor of science degree from the U.S. Naval Academy in 1985, entered flight training at NAS Pensacola, Florida, and was designated a naval aviator at NAS Corpus Christi, Texas, in August 1986.

During his 18 years of service, Speed has earned the Navy Achievement Medal and various other personal, unit and theater awards. He has also accumulated more than 5,000 flight hours in P-3 Orion aircraft.


Circa 2002

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...July 11, 2002 - Naval Air Reserve Norfolk taps PR1 Rose as Sailor of the Year - BY JO2 SARAH R. LANGDON..." The Flagship http://www.flagshipnews.com/archives_2002/july112002_11.shtml [09MAY2005]

While many sailors spend their entire careers working and perfecting their knowledge in a specific job field, others seek change and possibly a completely different job field as another way to reach success.

PR1(AW/MTS) Clayton E. Rowe is a parachute rigger who has spent most of his career in aircraft squadrons, working on aircraft, aircraft equipment and in other aviation supporting positions. Three years ago he arrived at Naval Air Reserve, Norfolk not to work in one of the NAR's reserve squadrons, but to join the NAR training department as an instructor supervisor. A few months ago he became the command's Sailor of the Year for 2001.

Rowe decided to join the Navy in 1989, he said. He was 20 years old, had gone to college for two years near his hometown of Dongola, Ill., and decided wanted to do something different with his life.

"I wanted to better myself," Rowe explained. "I also wanted joined up for education purposes initially to get the (Montgomery) G.I Bill.

"When I went to the recruiters' office and talked to the recruiter, he asked if I wanted to go aboard ship," he continued. "I was a newlywed and had been married less than a year so of course I said no. So, he made me a TAR, Training and Administration of Reservists. At the time I had no idea what that was."

Rowe began his indoctrination into the Navy in February 1989, through Recruit Training at Great Lakes, Ill., followed by 2 1/2 months at Parachute Rigger "A" school in Lakehurst, N.J. It was there, as a PRAN, that Rowe learned that he was different than everyone else in his class they were all active duty in other words, deployable aboard ships.

"It wasn't until "A" school that I learned what being a TAR really meant," Rowe said. "It was almost the end of the school and here comes my senior chief yelling at me across the room that he couldn't believe I was a TAR. Before he found that out his plan was to have me assigned to the same ship he was getting sent to. This was before he realized I wasn't going to a ship. When I told him I had no idea what he meant, he explained that TARs weren't deployable and that everyone else in my class was. He told me I was lucky."

Rowe traveled to his first official duty station, not to a ship headed to sea, but to Naval Air Station Joint Reserve Base Willow Grove, Pa., where he joined the ranks of the sailors assigned to VP-64 to work with the P-3 Orion aircraft.

During the four years he was attached to VP-64, Rowe worked as the flight gear custodian and learned how to do maintenance on the P-33s. He also reached the rank of second class petty officer in the first 2 1/2 years he was stationed with the squadron.

Rowe's greatest influence at the time, and the greatest of his career, he said, was his shop supervisor at VP-64, AME1 Don McCoy, who is now a master chief, working in New Orleans.

"One of the best experiences I had in the Navy was working under him and learning the Navy from him," Rowe said. "He was a big influence in my decision to stay in the Navy. He believed that you should always push to better yourself and always keep learning.

"When you get to a new command, (McCoy) said, you should share everything you know with the people you work with," Rowe continued. "He believed it was important to share your experience, your trials and tribulations and then to pass that on."

According to Rowe, those are a few things he's kept in mind over the course of his career as well as practice.

Aside from the influence of McCoy, the squadron's frequent 30-day deployments also left a favorable impression on Rowe.

"I really enjoyed my time spent there (VP-64)" he recalled. "The best part was going on deployment. We would fly over to places like Puerto Rico, Bermuda and Rota, Spain. I had a chance to travel the world and that was really nice. If I had stayed in Illinois I never would have left the state."

Rowe enjoyed the deployments so much, he said, that decided to re-enlist for six years before heading to his second duty station, Naval Air Station Glenview, Ill., where he went to work with another P-3 squadron, VP-60.

Rowe stayed with the VP-60 squadron just about a year, working primarily in the quality assurance department. The base closed shortly after his arrival and in 1994 he headed back to Willow Grove to work with VP-66 the same hangar as VP-64, he said, just the other end.

He spent three years of that tour temporarily assigned to the base Aircraft Intermediate Maintenance Department and was promoted to the rank of first class petty officer just before transferring in March 1999.

Before arriving at NAR, Norfolk, Rowe's current duty station, he attended a 30-day instructor training school, a course that qualifies its graduates to teach and train sailors both active duty, TAR and reservists in many fields throughout the Navy. According to Rowe, the experience so far has been rewarding.

"I needed a deviation in my career path and receiving this qualification, attending the 9502 school, was a requirement for the billet here," Rowe explained. "It's great because I get to teach. I love to teach. While I do miss being in a squadron, this has helped me learn more about training.

"We (training department) work with the command and drilling reservists on all kinds of training," he said. "We keep the reservists up to date on their rating knowledge, training and military knowledge. It's very challenging because we have to anticipate what training they are going to have to have done in the future."

Rowe is also responsible for giving the non-prior service reservists a two-week indoctrination class into the Navy. While he said he is proud of the job he does, he said he was surprised when he received the sailor of the year award.

"I was overwhelmed and I was surprised," Rowe explained. "There were many others who deserved it, but it's definitely a nice feather in the cap. I just try to stay organized, keep my uniform squared away and lead by example. It's just doing your job."

According to Rowe, the real reason for his success in the Navy is his family, his wife, Laura ,and his sons ,Bryce, 12, Ryan, 11, and Aaron, 8.

"I have to give my family all the credit," he said. "My wife takes the brunt of a lot of stuff. She stayed behind while I was on deployment taking care of things. She takes the kids to school, to soccer and baseball practice. I give her and them lots of credit."

Rowe, who is due to transfer from the NAR in December 2003, is currently working on his bachelor's of science degree.


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