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Circa 2013

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraVP-62 History "...‘Broadarrows’ return home from WESTPAC deployment By Lt. Amy Hession VP-62 Public Affairs - Posted: December 11, 2013 - 6:13pm..." WebSite: JaxAirNews http://jaxairnews.jacksonville.com/ [12DEC2013]

Members of the VP-62 “Broadarrows” returned home to NAS Jacksonville last week concluding a six-month deployment to Kadena Airbase in Okinawa, Japan, with Commander, Task Group (CTG) 72.2 as part of the Navy’s first mobilization of a Reserve P-3C Orion squadron.

“We’re very pleased with the outcomes and what our crews and our teams have accomplished on these deployments,” said Cmdr. Jon Townsend, VP-62 commanding officer.

“It proves reserve capabilities meeting real-world operational requirements in support of our active-duty counterparts while they transition to the new P-8 Poseidon platform.”

Broadarrow air crew and maintenance personnel joined the VP-26 “Tridents” with several detachments in the Western Pacific, conducting anti-submarine warfare - including an exercise out of Chennai, India - culminating with a leading role in humanitarian assistance and disaster relief in the wake of Typhoon Haiyan’s devastation in the Republic of the Philippines.

The Broadarrows P-3C aircrews flew several missions over the hardest-hit areas since Nov. 11, assessing damage and providing intelligence to support coordination of relief efforts by U.S. and Philippine forces. Over 600 hours were flown, 73 over the Philippines alone.

Imagery was collected and sent in-flight to intelligence specialists who analyzed it and then provided it to Marines on the ground charged with helping to coordinate U.S. military and Philippine government relief efforts.

“The best part of the deployment was the disaster relief. We flew over these mountains and saw destruction and ‘SOS’ painted on the ground,” said Lt. Cmdr. Brett Frazier, a VP-62 pilot.

“We then radioed back for the Marines to send an Osprey and rescue the people stranded below.”

Frazier, who in the civilian world is an agent flying P3s for the U.S. Customs and Border Protection agency, said he and his copilot on the relief mission had a combined 15,000 flight hours and 45 years of experience – an asset in supplementing more junior active duty counterparts.

In recent years, the Broadarrows have primarily flown counter-narcotics missions in the Caribbean and Gulf of Mexico from bases in El Salvador.

“VP-62 is hoping to transition to the P-8A behind our active duty counterparts, but we’re content right now to focus on performing critical missions in the venerable P-3C Orion,” said Townsend.

The P-3C Orion has been in service for 50-years in Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Force. While mission gear has been updated over the years, the P-3 airframe itself is rapidly approaching the end of its service life.

The new P-8A, a military variant of the Boeing 737, features improved airframe reliability, high-altitude surveillance and reconnaissance capability, open-architecture mission systems, in-flight refueling capability and many other modern features.

The squadron has completed Advanced Readiness Program, Operational Readiness Evaluation, Fleet NATOPS Evaluation Team inspection, Conventional Weapons Refresher Training, Conventional Weapons Technical Proficiency Inspection in support of it first iteration of VP Reserve mobilization and deployment cycles.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...VP-26 and VP-62 join in typhoon relief By Lt. Dan Baker - VP-26 Public Affairs - Posted: November 20, 2013 - 5:39pm | Updated: November 20, 2013 - 5:42pm..." WebSite: JaxAirNews http://jaxairnews.jacksonville.com/ [14DEC2013]

In the wake of Typhoon Haiyan’s devastation in the Republic of the Philippines, a massive multinational effort, dubbed Operation Damayan, is underway to bring aid to those affected by the unprecedented storm.

Navy patrol squadrons VP- 26 “Tidents” and VP-62 “Broadarrows” – based at NAS Jacksonville and currently deployed to Kadena Airbase in Okinawa, Japan with Commander, Task Group (CTG) 72.2 – have contributed to this effort by repositioning three P-3C Orions, three aircrews, and a detachment of maintenance professionals to Clark International Airport near Manila.

As the storm approached on Nov. 9, these aircrews were placed on an alert status prior to the storm’s landfall in preparation for the search and rescue missions. When the government of the Philippines requested assistance and declared a national state of calamity on Nov. 11, the aircrews were able to reposition to the Philippines in just a few hours. Immediately upon arrival, they began working with the 3rd Marine Expeditionary Brigade that was in charge of the U.S. military effort, to ensure every hour flown provided benefit to disaster relief operations.

The Tridents and Broadarrows P-3C aircrews have flown missions over the hardest-hit areas since Nov. 11, assessing damage and searching for populations cut off from sources of food, clean water and medical care. The geography of the Philippines makes the determination of where to focus relief efforts particularly difficult. The archipelagic nation, comprised of more than 7,000 islands, includes countless remote and isolated populations in desperate need of relief. P-3C aircrews help solve this problem by searching for and reporting high-need areas so rescue and relief efforts can arrive as quickly as possible.

Among the hardest-hit areas is the small island of Homonhan, in the province of East Samar. The 12-mile long island lay directly in the path of Typhoon Haiyan and was devastated by winds that measured more than 200 miles per hour.

A CTG 72.2 P-3C was the first aircraft on scene and the first to make contact with those on the ground in Homonhan.

VP-62 P-3C Mission Com-mander Lt. Cmdr. Jace Dasenbrock described what his crew witnessed on Nov. 12 as they first approached the Island.

“We arrived on scene at noon in the and immediately saw devastation throughout the entire island. Our first pass around the island saw no sign of life below. Buildings were destroyed, with few structures surviving. The only building left intact was the church that stood on the southeastern edge of the island. A sailboat was in a tree about 20 feet off the ground. After a second pass, a few heads popped out. A third pass around the tiny island saw about 100 residents sending S.O.S. signals. A fourth pass was made to give hope to the survivors. With roads washed out, relief needed to be brought in by air. We were able to identify several areas suitable for helicopters and Marine Ospreys (MV-22B) to land.”

This discovery was the first of several like it for the CTG 72.2 aircrews. The information and photographs they collect are sent in-flight to intelligence specialists who collate the products and provide them to the Marines coordinating U.S. military relief efforts on the ground. This enables U.S. and Philippine commanders and government officials to identify and prioritize humanitarian assistance requirements.

Within days of the first P-3C flight over Homonhan Island, the USS George Washington (CVN-73) Carrier Strike Group re-positioned close enough to bring relief to citizens as well as other communities in the region. SH-60 Seahawks and Ospreys fly countless round trip sorties carrying 20-pound bags of food, water, and medical supplies ashore. The air space has become so crowded with relief aircraft that E-2C Hawkeyes are now orbiting overhead to direct and de-conflict air traffic. The P-3C and E-2C aircrews are coordinating to pass locations of suitable landing zones as well as locations of more un-reached disaster areas to relief aircraft in real time.

The magnitude of the destruction in remote areas like Homonhan Island make restoring infrastructure and rebuilding communities a slow process. For now the U.S. Navy and Marine Corps, with their ever-vigilant forward presence in the Asia-Pacific region, are on station bringing needed support and hope to the people of devastated locations in the Philippines.

VP-26 and VP-62 were among the first to provide crucial information about where to best focus relief efforts in response to this crisis. The Commander of CTG-72.2, Cmdr. Mark Sohaney, is extremely proud of the opportunity to support this effort. “Our thoughts and prayers are with the Philippine people, and we are honored to help them in their time of need,” stated Sohaney, “We are postured to remain as long as the Philippine and U.S. government needs us.”

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Circa 2012

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY:  Maritime Patrol Association Planeside Quarterly NewsletterVP-62 / VP-10 History "...VP-62 / VP-10 'Broadarrows' and 'Red Lancers' Support San Salvador Orphanage... Maritime Patrol Association Planeside Quarterly Newsletter - 2013: Issue 2..." WebSite: Maritime Patrol Association [01MAY2013]
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Open VP History Adobe FileVP-62 / VP-10 'Broadarrows' and 'Red Lancers' Support San Salvador Orphanage - 2013: Issue 2 475KB

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Reserve P-3 Force Prepares for Deployment during RIMPAC - Story Number: NNS120830-12Release Date: 8/30/2012 12:59:00 PM - From Commander, Naval Air Force Reserve Public Affairs ..." WebSite: United States Navy http://www.navy.mil [03SEP2012]

KANEOHE BAY, Hawaii (NNS) -- Four aircrews and more than 50 maintenance personnel from the Broadarrows of VP-62 and the Totems of VP-69 increased their warfighting skills during RIMPAC 2012 this month.

The 23rd biennial Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) exercise ran in and around the Hawaiian Islands from June 29 to Aug. 3 and is the world's largest international maritime exercise.

The exercise involved 25,000 personnel from 22 nations, 40 ships and submarines, and more than 200 aircraft. RIMPAC is designed to foster and sustain the cooperative relationships that are critical to ensuring the safety of sea lanes and security on the world's oceans.

"Our goal at the exercise was to obtain advanced qualifications in our core readiness areas of anti-submarine warfare and anti-surface warfare," said Cmdr. Jerry Dearie, commanding officer of VP-62. "From where I stand, we could not have had a better exercise. The Broadarrows flew 10 coordinated operations sorties accruing more than 50 hours and were awarded 18 advanced crew qualifications.

"RIMPAC has always been a valuable source of multi-nation, combined operational training. I don't remember the last time we missed one," said Dearie, who joined the squadron in 2002 as a new lieutenant commander. "It takes a great effort to get aircrew and maintenance personnel out to a major fleet exercise, but the fantastic return on investment will keep us coming back for years to come."

The theme of RIMPAC 2012 was "Capable - Adaptive - Partners." The participating nations and forces exercised a wide range of capabilities that demonstrate the inherent flexibility of maritime forces. These capabilities range from disaster relief and maritime security operations to sea control and complex warfighting. The realistic and relevant training syllabus at RIMPAC included exercises in a wide array of operational fields, including amphibious ops, missile and gunnery firing, anti-submarine warfare, air defense, counter-piracy, mine clearance, explosive ordnance disposal, and diving and salvage.

"During the next 12 months the VP-69 crews will expand their readiness qualifications to be world-wide deployable. The RIMPAC exercise allowed our combat aircrews to conduct missions and hone their warfighting skills in a challenging real-world environment," said Cmdr. Mike Mineo, commanding officer of VP-69. "The Totems flew more than 50 hours and achieved 14 readiness qualifications. Our crews and maintainers performed exceptionally well and were an outstanding representation of the Navy Reserve."

"We successfully fired a live Maverick missile against a decommissioned target ship as part of a large joint live-fire exercise," said Cmdr. Kris Moorhead, one of VP-62's mission commanders at RIMPAC. "It is a very rare opportunity for us to get live ordnance in a training environment so this has been a fantastic training exercise for the aircrew and maintenance personnel.

"We also dropped a torpedo on an undersea target sled," said Moorhead. "Most of our events were focused on anti-submarine warfare (ASW) and it was a great training. We coordinated our ASW efforts with P-3s from several countries, ASW helicopters, and the newest ASW patrol aircraft, the P-8."

Broadarrow and Totem maintenance personnel also supported the maintenance departments of Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing 2.

Chief Aviation Electrician's Mate (AW/NAC) Brian Norman has been a member of the VP-69 Totems for 12 years, serving as both a P-3 flight engineer and maintenance control supervisor.

"We really fit in well with our active duty counterparts in the maintenance department. Keeping up with a very high operational tempo required a real team effort," Norman said.

"We assisted in operational and maintenance support of eight P-3C aircraft participating in the monthlong multinational maritime operation," said Chief Aviation Structural Mechanic (AW) Tyson Anderson. "My maintenance team worked on avionics systems, power plants, electronics systems as well as airframe related issues on eight P-3C aircraft."

While it has always been a major exercise for the Broadarrows and Totems, RIMPAC 2012 was even more important this year for the VP Reserve units. Next summer, both squadrons will deploy to forward locations to fill a void created by the transition from the P-3 Orion to the P-8 Poseidon.

"VP-69 was proud to demonstrate their Totem tenacity and experience throughout the exercise," said Mineo, who has served as a full-time support officer in both squadrons. "We flawlessly conducted our operational readiness evaluation flight events under the evaluation of Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing 10 in prepare for their upcoming partial unit mobilization in June."

For more information, visit www.navy.mil, www.facebook.com/usnavy, or www.twitter.com/usnavy.

For more news from Patrol Squadron 62, visit www.navy.mil/local/vp62/.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...VP-62 Broadarrows Host Boss Lift - Story Number: NNS120823-11Release Date: 8/23/2012 12:24:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Nicholas Garratt, Patrol Squadron 62 Public Affairs ..." WebSite: United States Navy http://www.navy.mil [03SEP2012]

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. (NNS) -- Eleven Jacksonville-area employers visited Patrol Squadron VP-62 as part of the Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve (ESGR) Boss Lift program Aug. 21.

Boss Lift educates employers about the military reserves by giving them a behind-the-scenes glimpse of the efforts their employees put forth each time they put on a uniform to serve.

Established in 1972, the ESGR promotes understanding and cooperation between Reservists and their civilian employers and to assist in the resolution of conflicts that arise from an employee's military commitments.

"We have over 4,500 volunteers around the country to provide mediation between Reservists and their employers," said retired Army Sgt. Maj. Doug Corbett, executive director of ESGR. "In Many cases employers and reservists don't completely understand the federal Uniformed Services Employment and Reemployment Right Act (USERRA).

USERRA protects the job rights of people who leave a civilian job temporarily to perform military service, and also protects past and present members of the uniformed services from discrimination by employers. This includes people who enlist in the military and leave their civilian jobs and Reservists who deploy.

The group visited hangar 1000 where they toured an operational P-3 Orion and learned about the conditions and capabilities of the aircraft to perform counter-narcotic operations as well as anti-submarine warfare.

"Having the opportunity to experience the type of conditions service members work in is eye opening," said Gena Jankowski, vice president of Human Resources for Brumos. "Once employers see the dedication it takes to be a service member they will understand that hiring one onto their staff will always be a win/win situation.

"Every bit of insight helps to foster the understanding and acceptance that is required in the workplace when one of our members is called up to serve," said Donald Gauthier, assistant vice president of legal for Deutsche Bank.

After departing the hangar the group took turns flying a P-3 in a fully functional simulator.

"Pilots will typically spend 10 or more hours weighted down with gear while on missions," explained VP-62 Lt. Cmdr. Jace Dasenbrock, Naval Air Station instructor pilot.

"It was a great opportunity to fly the P-3 and get a feel for what the flight crew does. I was not expecting the controls to be as tough as they were," said Noel Schoonmaker, the technical recruiter for Ring Power, who has many hours in the air piloting his own plane.

Though the main goal of Boss Lift is to give employers a look at what their reservist employees do while away from the job, just as important is the awards given to employers and the people who constantly support those service members while they are away.

For more information on ESGR or Patriot awards for employers, visit www.esrg.org or call 1-800 336-4590 to speak to a representative.

For more news from Patrol Squadron 62, visit www.navy.mil/local/vp62/.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...VP-62 Receives Safety Award - Story Number: NNS120813-16Release Date: 8/13/2012 3:58:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Christian Eskelund, Patrol Squadron 62 Public Affairs ..." WebSite: United States Navy http://www.navy.mil [03SEP2012]

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. (NNS) -- VP-62 received the Chief of Naval Operations Naval Aviation Safety Award, also known as the 'Safety S,' for 2011, during a presentation Aug. 13.

The award was issued in recognition of performance related to quality contributions to the Naval Aviation Safety Program including control of aviation related mishaps, application of safety programs, timely reporting of hazards, and submission of suggestions for improvements pertaining to all appropriate related issues, such as maintenance and various subjective criteria.

The award was presented to VP-62 by Capt. Eric S. Wiese commodore of Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing 11.

"This award represents the culmination of 32 years of accident free flying and 100,000 hours of Class A mishap free flying," said Cmdr. Jerry Dearie, VP-62's commanding officer.

VP-62 safety officer, Lt. Cmdr. Mark Monturo said, "During all of the 1305 hours flown by VP-62 crews in 2011, the squadron sustained zero mishaps, zero injuries and zero loss of workdays, fostering a command climate of safety.

Squadrons who win this award receive engraved plaques and citations for permanent display, and are entitled to paint a prominent green "S" on their aircraft until the next year's selections are made.

For more information, visit www.navy.mil, www.facebook.com/usnavy, or www.twitter.com/usnavy.

For more news from Patrol Squadron 62, visit www.navy.mil/local/vp62/.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraVP-62 History "...VP-62 Sailor wins Naval Air Reserve Sailor of the Year Posted: February 8, 2012 - 8:00pm - By MCC William Lovelady - VP-62 PAO..." WebSite: JaxAirNews http://jaxairnews.jacksonville.com/ [12FEB2012]

Photo Caption: AE1(AW) Ryan Worthington of VP-62, left, stands with Commander, Naval Air Forces Reserve (CNAFR) Command Master Chief (CMDCM) Bob Bailey after being selected as CNAFR SELRES Sailor of the Year, Jan. 25.

AE1(AW) Ryan Worthington from VP-62 was selected as the first ever Commander, Naval Air Forces Reserve (CNAFR) SELRES Sailor of the Year, Jan. 25.

After being selected as his squadron and wing's Reserve Sailor of the Year, Worthington won Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Group Reserve Sailor of the Year competition before going to NAS North Island to compete with six other first class petty officers representing 28 squadrons and 27 Squadron Augment Units.

Next, he will compete for Navy Reserve Sailor of the Year. That Reservist will be meritoriously promoted to chief petty officer along with the U.S. Fleet Forces Sea Sailor of the Year, U.S. Pacific Fleet Sea Sailor of the Year and Chief of Naval Operations Shore Sailor of the Year.

"I was impressed by all of these Sailors' positive attitude, sharp military bearing, sense of teamwork and impressive accomplishments in supporting the Fleet," said Rear Adm. Chris Sadler, commander, Naval Air Forces Reserve.

"I spoke to them on the trust we place in them as leaders and setting the proper example; being a mentor and finding a mentor; being the expert, since I rely on them to give me the straight scoop and tell me what needs fixing; and to never stop learning about leadership. Finally, I expect all of these SOYs to keep working hard so they can be wearing khakis soon and become contributing members of the Chief's mess. All six candidates were strong competitors and they represented their commands, their echelon IVs and CNAFR with pride and professionalism."

Reflecting on what set him apart from so many of his peers, Worthington recalled a few instances in his Navy career when a mentor gave him some guidance that really made a difference.

"There were two that come to mind," said Worthington.

"When I was a second class in 2008, I started working with NC1 (then AE1) Baker to become a divisional career counselor. Up to that point in my career, I was a 'Must Promote' Sailor who was a bit discouraged by the working conditions in the Combined Maintenance Organization (CMO). I felt things were better in our recently disestablished maintenance department. I found that I had a passion for helping other Sailors that were disgruntled by the CMO transition as well. One thing that Baker taught me were the details of a number of programs that I heard of, such as Montgomery GI Bill, Navy COOL and others, and how to stay current on them and the changes that occur and how to use them to guide Reservists in their careers. As a result, I was able to not only guide my own career but countless others. By guiding others and working within the career counselor program it advanced my career."

"Another was CWO2 Quentin Townsend, who used to be the leading petty officer in work center 220. From the time he took over the LPO position, he constantly challenged me—first to get qualified. Since then, he was my mentor. He has given me good advice several times. Once I became assistant LPO of 220, he advised me to develop those in my shop to be able to take my place if I was ever to move up and to differentiate myself from my peers. This gave me solid direction for my Navy career that I took seriously," Worthington continued.

"At one point it looked like I might have been able to do the career counselor job full time and stop working in the shop. I spoke to Warrant Townsend about the choice I had and he asked me what my career goals were. I said I wanted to make chief. He then told me that I was an AE and if I wanted to be an AE chief to work as an LPO first and a career counselor second. I followed his advice and worked on my qualifications. Without his guidance I would not be here today."

Command Master Chief (SW) Phil Rogers, VP-62's senior enlisted leader, traveled to San Diego with Worthington for the CNAFR event.

"The Sailor of the Year board for CNAFR was full of mentorship training and team building," Rogers said.

"The Sailors that were selected to be at that level were strong competitors and have outstanding backgrounds to justify their nominations. Petty Officer Worthington ranked out well among his peers, and his knowledge and confidence in front of the board—comprised solely of master chiefs—made him the right selection for CNAFR Sailor of the Year."

Read more at Jacksonville.com: http://jaxairnews.jacksonville.com/military/jax-air-news/2012-02-08/story/vp-62-sailor-wins-naval-air-reserve-sailor-year#ixzz1m9k5Sxid


Circa 2011

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...New Commanding Officer Assumes Helm of VP-62 By Lt. j.g. Amy Hession, Patrol Squadron 62 Public Affairs - Story Number: NNS111210-11 - Release Date: 12/10/2011 7:01:00 PM..." WebSite: NAVY.MIL http://jaxairnews.jacksonville.com/ [25FEB2012]

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. (NNS) -- VP-62 held a change of command ceremony onboard Naval Air Station Jacksonville, Dec. 3.

Cmdr. Gerald P. Dearie relieved Cmdr. Brian A. Carpenter as commanding officer. Capt. Trey Wheeler, commodore of CPRW-11, presided over the ceremony.

With the charge "I relieve you, sir," Dearie became the 30th commanding officer of the Broadarrows of VP-62, one of two Reserve VP Squadrons under the operational control of CPRW-11. The squadron consists of 130 drilling Reservists and 119 active component and full-time support personnel. Broadarrow Reservists travel from seven states to train for operational missions in support of national defense.

Under the leadership of Carpenter, the squadron received the Commander, Naval Air Force Reserve Battle Efficiency Award for 2011 and the Retention Golden Anchor Award for 2010.

Carpenter also led the Broadarrows through the restablishment of their maintenance department. He guided the efforts which were comprised of 60 newly assigned full-time personnel, most without P-3 experience. During his term, the squadron passed three standup milestones: the CPRW-11 Maintenance Process assessment, the Commander, Naval Air Force Aviation Maintenance inspection and the Commander Patrol and Reconnaissance Group Conventional Weapons Technical Proficiency inspection. The maintenance department facilitated 375 sorties and 1,400 mishap-free flight hours, completing more than 4,000 maintenance actions and 19,055 accident-free maintenance man hours, resulting in a 93 percent fully mission capable rate and 97 percent mission completion rate.

And, during Carpenter's tenure the squadron detached to participate in a Joint Task Force Exercise (JTFX) off the coast of southern California - flying more than 70 hours in support of the exercise. The Broadarrows were also awarded the CPRW-11 Quarterly Anti-submarine Warfare Symposium Challenge trophy.

Carpenter has received orders to the office of the Chief of Naval Aviation.

Dearie, a second generation P-3 Orion pilot, is from Stone Mountain, Ga. He received his commission from the United States Naval Academy in 1992, graduating with a Bachelor of Science degree in computer science.

Following graduation, Dearie reported to Attack Squadron (VA) 205 at NAS Atlanta, Georgia. He then completed primary and intermediary flight training with VT-27 and advanced flight training with VT-31 as NAS Corpus Christi, Texas. He was awarded his pilot wings in July 1995. After graduation from fleet replacement training at VP-30, Dearie reported to VP-45.

In August 1999, Dearie was selected for the Pilot Exchange Program and reported to Royal Australian Air Force 292 Squadron in south Australia.

Dearie left active duty in July 2002 and joined VP-62 as a drilling Reservist. He held several billets including training officer and operations officer. In 2010, while taking part in Rim of the Pacific Exercise (RIMPAC), Dearie led Crew 8 through the successful launch of a Harpoon (AGM-84) anti-ship missile - the first time a Reserve crew launched a harpoon in more than 10 years. His awards include the Air Medal, Navy Achievement Medal, and Humanitarian Service Medal.

He is currently a proficiency check airman in the Boeing 727, qualified to fly as both a first officer and flight engineer.

Cmdr. Jon R. Townsend assumed duty as the Broadarrow executive officer.

For more news from Patrol Squadron 62, visit www.navy.mil/local/vp62/.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCamera110805-N-JW561-001 JACKSONVILLE, Fla. (Aug. 5, 2011) "...Employers and supervisors of Michigan National Guard members tour a P-3C Orion aircraft assigned to VP-62 at NAS Jacksonville, Florida as part of the Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve program. The program allows for employers to be transported to military training sites to observe National Guard and Reserve members on duty. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Sean Allen/Released)..." WebSite: NavyNews http://www.navy.mil/ [12AUG2011]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...'Broadarrows' pass weapons qualification by MCC William Lovelady - Posted: June 29, 2011 - 2:10pm..." WebSite: JaxAirNews http://jaxairnews.jacksonville.com/ [30JUL2011]

VP-62 Public Affairs

The VP-62 "Broadarrows" completed a conventional weapons technical proficiency inspection (CWTPI) last week, moving the reserve squadron one step closer to full deployability.

"We've been working on this for four months," said AOC(AW) Rob Metts, VP-62 ordnance chief. "To take a shop full of aviation ordnancemen with little P-3 experience and get to this point took a phenomenal effort."

The three-day inspection began with a team of inspectors from the Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Weapon School verifying every team member's ordnance certifications. Then they issued a load plan and the AOs went to work.

"Everything we do is based on publications. We don't do anything from memory," said Metts.

"First they observed our release and control checks, to make sure our ordnance could be launched from the aircraft. Then we inspected our support equipment and started loading weapons."

On day two, the team loaded two inert torpedoes in the bomb bay of a P-3 and two inert missiles on wing pylons. The third day of the inspection, they loaded four inert MK-62 mines for a mining exercise at the Lake George Range in the Pinecastle Range Complex.

In the end, the inspection team led by Lt. Cmdr. Jason Parmley, a lead weapons training officer from Commander Patrol and Reconnaissance Group, certified VP-62 to handle, carry and deliver ordnance.

"CWTPI is one of the measures of a unit's overall combat readiness," said VP-62 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Brian Carpenter. It reflects our preparedness for mobilization for maritime patrol and reconnaissance operations."

"This is just the latest in a series of accomplishments for our squadron since we emerged from the Combined Maintenance Organization (CMO) several years ago," said Carpenter.

"As we reestablished our maintenance department and rebuilt our combat aircrews, we have been certified safe for flight, we completed our Aircraft Maintenance Inspection, then the Fleet NATOPS Evaluation – and now we've passed CWTPI."

Metts added, "VP-62 is like a phoenix in a sense. We went away with CMO. Now with this most recent qualification, we're rising from the ashes."

Metts and his team worked six and seven days a week for several months – loading everyday to make sure they were ready.

"This was my second CWTPI," said AO2 Christopher Ireland.

"My first was with a helo squadron, but the P-3 is definitely more complex with more weapons systems than my previous platform."

"Our biggest challenges were learning the aircraft and weapons systems," said Ireland. "Despite the lack of time, we came together and qualified in less than a year."

"We started out loading sonobuoys every day," said AOAA Matthew Whitson. "When we passed that test, we started training to load weapons safely and efficiently. We had really long schedules and not much time off, but we were ready when we got to CWTPI."

Whitson concluded, "We started out at the bottom of the totem pole and now we're the best ordnance shop on the P-3 flight line."

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...'Broadarrows' Pass Weapons Qualification - June 29, 2011 - 2:10pm - By MCC William Lovelady - VP-62 Public Affairs..." WebSite: JaxAirNews http://jaxairnews.jacksonville.com/ [06JUL2011]

The VP-62 "Broadarrows" completed a conventional weapons technical proficiency inspection (CWTPI) last week, moving the reserve squadron one step closer to full deployability.

"We've been working on this for four months," said AOC(AW) Rob Metts, VP-62 ordnance chief. "To take a shop full of aviation ordnancemen with little P-3 experience and get to this point took a phenomenal effort."

The three-day inspection began with a team of inspectors from the Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Weapon School verifying every team member's ordnance certifications. Then they issued a load plan and the AOs went to work.

"Everything we do is based on publications. We don't do anything from memory," said Metts.

"First they observed our release and control checks, to make sure our ordnance could be launched from the aircraft. Then we inspected our support equipment and started loading weapons."

On day two, the team loaded two inert torpedoes in the bomb bay of a P-3 and two inert missiles on wing pylons. The third day of the inspection, they loaded four inert MK-62 mines for a mining exercise at the Lake George Range in the Pinecastle Range Complex.

In the end, the inspection team led by Lt. Cmdr. Jason Parmley, a lead weapons training officer from Commander Patrol and Reconnaissance Group, certified VP-62 to handle, carry and deliver ordnance.

"CWTPI is one of the measures of a unit's overall combat readiness," said VP-62 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Brian Carpenter. It reflects our preparedness for mobilization for maritime patrol and reconnaissance operations."

"This is just the latest in a series of accomplishments for our squadron since we emerged from the Combined Maintenance Organization (CMO) several years ago," said Carpenter.

"As we reestablished our maintenance department and rebuilt our combat aircrews, we have been certified safe for flight, we completed our Aircraft Maintenance Inspection, then the Fleet NATOPS Evaluation – and now we've passed CWTPI."

Metts added, "VP-62 is like a phoenix in a sense. We went away with CMO. Now with this most recent qualification, we're rising from the ashes."

Metts and his team worked six and seven days a week for several months – loading everyday to make sure they were ready.

"This was my second CWTPI," said AO2 Christopher Ireland.

"My first was with a helo squadron, but the P-3 is definitely more complex with more weapons systems than my previous platform."

"Our biggest challenges were learning the aircraft and weapons systems," said Ireland. "Despite the lack of time, we came together and qualified in less than a year."

"We started out loading sonobuoys every day," said AOAA Matthew Whitson. "When we passed that test, we started training to load weapons safely and efficiently. We had really long schedules and not much time off, but we were ready when we got to CWTPI."

Whitson concluded, "We started out at the bottom of the totem pole and now we're the best ordnance shop on the P-3 flight line."

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...VP-62 passes maintenance milestone by MCC William Lovelady - VP-62 Public Affairs - March 16, 2011 - 1:13pm..." WebSite: JaxAirNews http://jaxairnews.jacksonville.com/ [27MAR2011]

VP-62 recently passed its first Aircraft Maintenance Inspection (AMI) since the squadron reestablished its own maintenance department two years ago.

As part of the Consolidated Maintenance Organization (CMO), VP-62 maintenance shared everything with the other squadrons in Hangar 511.

"When I got here, we had nothing," said AE1(AW) Shawn Bone, leading petty officer of VP-62 aviation electrician shop.

"We had no tools. We didn't even have our own spaces in the hangar. Luckily, I walked into a great group of guys. They are the best workers I've had in 10 years."

Going from standup to passing AMI didn't happen instantly. "Last June, we passed our Safe for Flight inspection that gave us the right to release our own aircraft," said AMCS (AW/SW) Scott Miceli, VP-62 maintenance senior chief.

"Then in October, we went through a maintenance process assessment where our wing inspected our entire maintenance department."

"There are 41 maintenance programs that we built from the ground up after we came out of CMO in August 2009," Miceli continued.

"Of those, the inspectors found only one that was off track. In less than a year we went through three major inspections and reached this huge milestone. That takes a lot of work. From the maintenance officer all the way to the newest Airman, everyone had a hand in this success."

"We have approximately 90 reserve and full time aircrew members that we keep current and qualified to perform maritime patrol missions from peace to war," said Cmdr. Brian Carpenter, the squadron's commanding officer.

"To do that we need aircraft that are ready and safe to perform those missions."

"I was in the squadron during the CMO and saw the effect that it had on retention and morale," said Cmdr Gregory Pritchard, VP-62 instructor tactical coordinator and NATOPS evaluator, who joined the squadron in 2003.

"I was happy to see the shift back to organic maintenance and to see VP-62 regain the ability to deploy in an expeditionary role. The tremendous amount of work that our maintenance department did to get back up and running was very impressive. More than anything else, rather than changes, I have seen a very consistent and professional effort by the squadron and seen it strengthened as new officers and enlisted affiliates have brought new knowledge and expertise as they have become 'Broadarrows.'"


Circa 2010

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...NAS Jax P-3s Join Pacific Live-Fire Exercise By LT(jg) Evita Salles CPRW-2 Public Affairs Officer - Thursday, August 5, 2010. Squadrons mentioned include RAAF, VP-4, VP-5, VP-40, VP-47 and VP-62..." WebSite: JaxAirNews http://www.jaxairnews.com/ [06AUG2010]

Aircrews from NAS Jacksonville, Florida-based VP-5 and VP-62, along with VP-4 and the Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF), 11 Patrol Squadron from Edinburgh, Australia, participated in a live-fire exercise (SINKEX) July 10 as part of the Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) 2010 exercise.

Flying from MCBH Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii, each squadron fired AGM-84D Harpoon missiles at the decommissioned Iwo Jima-class amphibious assault ship ex-USS New Orleans (LPH-11) in the Hawaiian operating area.

The purpose of the SINKEX is to provide P-3C Orion aircrew valuable training in Harpoon missile proficiency. Aircrews train extensively on the simulated usage of the Harpoon missile but rarely get the chance to fire the live weapon.

"It was an outstanding opportunity for our junior officers and air crew to gain valuable experience shooting a forward-firing weapon," said Cmdr. Jason Jorgensen, commanding officer of VP-5 and deputy of Combined Task Group 172.2.

Each aircraft launched an on-target hit on the New Orleans. The SINKEX provided the first opportunity for most of the participating aircrew to fire a live weapon.

"Flying with a live weapon always heightens aircrew and maintenance awareness of tactics, techniques and procedures. The SINKEX serial provided 11 Squadron with a great opportunity to test our individual and collective warfighting skills in a complex coalition environment. It does not get too much better than that," said Wing Commander Phil Champion, commanding officer of 11 Squadron, RAAF.

It was the first time in eight years the RAAF shot a Harpoon missile. The AGM -84D Harpoon is an all-weather, over-the-horizon, anti-ship missile system. The Harpoon's active radar guidance, warhead design, low-level cruise trajectory and sea-skim or pop-up maneuvers assure high survivability and effectiveness. The missile is capable of being launched from surface ships, submarines, shore batteries or aircraft such as the P-3C Orion.

Commissioned in 1968, New Orleans was the third U.S. ship named for the War of 1812 Battle of New Orleans. Throughout its 30 years of service, the ship took part in various amphibious exercises and contingency operations during the Vietnam War, carrying Sailors and Marine ground forces, helicopters and landing craft. The ship was decommissioned in 1997.

VP-4 and VP-47 flew another SINKEX on the ex-USS Monticello (LSD 35) on July 14 using Harpoons and AGM-65 Mavericks to destroy the target. VP-5 and VP-40 conducted the last of the sinking exercises on July 17 using Harpoons and Mavericks against the ex-USS Anchorage (LSD-36). Each crew scored a direct hit, on time.

The AGM-65 Maverick is a tactical, air-to-surface guided missile designed for close air support, interdiction and defense suppression mission. It provides stand-off capability and high probability of strike against a wide range of tactical targets, including ships, air defenses, transportation equipment and fuel storage facilities.

RIMPAC is a biennial, multinational exercise designed to strengthen regional partnerships and improve interoperability. This marks the 22nd exercise in the series since the RIMPAC exercise began in 1971. P-3C Orion aircrews will conduct similar exercises throughout the course of RIMPAC.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCamera100706-N-6855K-030 KANEOHE BAY, Hawaii (July 5th) "...P-3C Orion aircraft VP-4, VP-5, VP-8, VP-40, VP-47, VP-62 and VP-69 line the Rainbow Fleet tarmac of Marine Corps Air Station Kaneohe Bay during the Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) 2010 exercise. RIMPAC is a biennial, multinational exercise designed to strengthen regional partnerships and improve interoperability. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Meagan E. Klein/Released)..." WebSite: NavyNews http://www.navy.mil/ [11JUL2010]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCamera100127-N-6101P-002 JACKSONVILLE, Fla. (Jan. 27, 2010) "...Cmdr. Chris Moorhead, Mission commander of VP-62, reviews the flight plan before an intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance mission over Haiti. (U.S. Navy photo by Clark Pierce/Released)..." WebSite: Navy News Stand http://www.navy.mil/ [29JAN2010]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...VP-62 Flight Engineer Surpasses 10,000 hours By LCDR Alex Hernandez, VP-62- Thursday, January 14, 2010..." WebSite: JaxNews http://www.jaxairnews.com/ [14JAN2010]

On Jan. 7, ADCS Roger Line of VP-62 surpassed a U.S. Navy benchmark few naval aircrewmen ever achieve. Flying a P-3 Orion from a squadron based out of NAS Jacksonville, Florida in support of Operation Enduring Freedom, he joined the small cadre of flight engineers who have amassed over 10,000 mishap-free flight hours in their logbooks.

History ThumbnailCameraPhoto courtesy of VP-62 ADCS Roger Line of VP-62 is saluted by crewmembers after completing 10,000 mishap-free hours of flying in the P-3 "Orion" aircraft Jan. 7.

Having done so, he will most likely be the last of his kind to reach this milestone in a P-3 aircraft. With the introduction of the P-8 in 2013, the Navy's newest maritime patrol aircraft, the number of P-3 aircraft in the fleet will steadily decline through its planned retirement in 2018.

When asked about his achievement, Line stated, "It's a team effort. I can't launch an aircraft by myself. It takes an entire team of well-trained maintainers and crewmen to do that, and I've had the privilege of serving with many over my career."

Line joined the Navy in 1984. He served four years as an aviation mechanic on C-130 aircraft before reporting to Pensacola to begin training as a flight engineer.

History ThumbnailCameraPhoto courtesy of VP-62 ADCS Roger Line and members of VP-62 gather after his 10,000 flight in a P-3.

Over his 26-year naval career, he has trained countless flight engineers and mechanics, as well as having flown P-3 aircraft in support of operations in Kosovo, Bosnia, Panama, Keflavik, Puerto Rico, and throughout the Middle East. In doing so, he has been awarded 15 Air Medals for meritorious achievement.

A squadron mate describes him, "His biggest attribute is that he's a Sailor's Sailor. A great mentor, chief and flight engineer who puts others before himself."

Line hails from Brunswick, Maine, where his wife, Amy teaches Social Sciences at the University of Maine.

He is an avid deer and turkey hunter, enjoys classic 80's rock, working on his '69 Ford Bronco, and is a proud member of American Legion and Veterans of the Foreign Wars.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraCPWR-11 History "...CPRW-11 Holds First ASW Competition - Thursday January 7, 2010...Squadrons Mentioned: VP-5, VP-8, VP-16 and VP-62..." WebSite: JaxNews http://www.jaxairnews.com/ [08JAN2010]


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