VPNAVY VP-5 Mercury Capsule Recovery
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HistoryVP-5 HistoryHistory

Circa 2009

Note NOTICE: "...P2V LA-9 Renovation Underway!...In Memorial for VP-5 lost friends...12JAN62..." [28SEP2009]

P2V LA-9 Renovation Underway!
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In Honor Of Our VP-5 Brothers Of The LA-9 Crew
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UPDATE "...The refurbishment of the P2V on display in Heritage Park aboard NAS JAX has been completed. This aircraft is dedicated to the VP-5 Mad Fox crew of LA-9 who perished on 12 JAN 62 while on routine patrol of the Denmark Straights..." Contributed by Mike Kozak mkozak.mco@gmail.com [18OCT2014]

Since VP-5 is at present on deployment with the 7th fleet this refurbishment was accomplished by members of VP-8 who spent weeks sanding, prepping and painting the aircraft. Many thanks to the following personnel who performed the grunt work:

AM3(AW) Zachary Page;
AM2(AW) Steven Berger;
AM2(AW) Matthew Larkin;
AM3(AW) Quincy Morris.

These men also applied the various markings and insignia that designate this particular P2V as it was dedicated to the LA-9 crew, including the Mad Fox logo on the tail of this aircraft. Many thanks to all involved for a job well done!

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UPDATE "...Work progresses on the LA-9 memorial P2V refurbishment at Heritage Park aboard NAS JAX..." Contributed by Mike Kozak mkozak.mco@gmail.com [26SEP2014]

A contractor was brought in to reset the aircraft onto display stands while the team from VP-8 continues with their efforts to prep and paint the plane. AM3 (AW) Zachary Page paints the rear stabilizer while AM2 (AW) Matthew Larkin spots for him. AM2 (AW) Steven Berger and AM3 (AW) Quincy Morris work on the cockpit windshield. In the last photo Patty (Kozak) Masciantoni speaks with the contractors supervisor, an HS navy vet, /while the refurbishment is underway.

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UPDATE "...The P2V on display in Heritage Park aboard NAS Jacksonville, Florida is presently undergoing a presentation refurbishment. Since it was last painted in 2009, the Neptune had become somewhat weather beaten after years of exposure in the park. In addition, the aircraft was knocked off of its stands by a strong wind gust during a rather strong storm that came through at one point in time.

Since VP-5 is presently on deployment with the 7th Fleet, a team of metalsmiths from the VP-8 "Fighting Tigers" are taking on the task of repainting the P2V. AM1 Dane Allred is the squadron's project manager. LEFT PHOTO: Team consisting of AM3 Zachary Page, AM2 Steven Berger, AM2 Matthew Larkin, AM2 Quincy Morris, AM2 Patrick Esposito and AMAN Edward Meunier. CENTER PHOTOGRAPH: AM2 Steven Berger and AM3 Quincy Morris prep the starboard underside wing. RIGHT PHOTOGRAPH: AM3 Zachary Page sanding the fuselage.

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The first photo shows the P2V shortly after the dedication ceremony in 2009. The other photos show the progress being made to this point. The aircraft will also be remounted on stands as part of the refurbishment.

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An article regarding the refurbishment was also published in the September 18, 2014 edition of Jax Air News (http://www.jaxairnews.com). This project should be completed by the first week of October..." Contributed by Mike Kozak mkozak.mco@gmail.com [26SEP2014]

UPDATE "...I had an opportunity to stop by today at the LA-9 P2V on static display in Heritage Park, NAS Jacksonville, Florida. As I walked around the display I had to admire the tremendous effort of all hands involved in the preparation and painting of this aircraft. The fact that active duty members of VP-5 gave such recognition to a crew from the squadrons history is very much appreciated by members of the "VP-5 Family". To all members of the Mad Foxes---Bravo! Job well done! Thank you!..." Contributed by Mike Kozak mkozak.mco@gmail.com [19NOV2009]

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UPDATE "...'Mad Foxes' Remember 12 Of Their Own - By Clark Pierce, Editor - Last modified Thu., November 12, 2009 - 05:55 PM..." WebSite: JaxAirNews http://jacksonville.com/news/ [13NOV2009]

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On a cool and windy Nov. 6, NAS Jacksonville, Florida Commanding Officer Capt. Jack Scorby Jr. welcomed hundreds of Sailors, families, retirees and other distinguished guests to the unveiling of a special memorial at Heritage Park in honor and remembrance of VP-5 crew LA-9.

"Just a few months ago, this Neptune was in serious distress due to age and corrosion. Since we receive no government funding to maintain our aircraft at Heritage Park, we rely on our NAS Jacksonville, Florida squadrons to adopt a historic aircraft and keep it in good condition," said Scorby. "When I put out the word on our Neptune - VP-5 stepped up immediately and told me about their plan to refurbish the aircraft in honor of 12 'Mad Foxes' who perished in 1962 while flying a patrol out of NAS Keflavik, Iceland."

He added that the young Sailors who worked tirelessly to restore the P2's appearance, did it for all the right reasons.

History ThumbnailCameraPhoto by Clark Pierce Guests arrived early at NAS Jacksonville, Florida Heritage Park Nov. 6 to admire the P2V Neptune recently restored by the VP-5 "Mad Foxes" in honor of their "LA-9" aircrew that was lost Jan. 12, 1962 while on patrol from NAS Keflavik, Iceland.

"Their efforts reflect the dedication, service and sacrifice made by their fallen shipmates of lima-alpha-nine, as well as their families. My thanks and congratulations go out to VP-5 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Frank Naylor, and the VP-5 restoration team led by Lt. Cmdr. Rob Huntington, for their vision and leadership for making today a reality," concluded Scorby.

Naylor reminded the audience, "One of the truly remarkable aspects of naval life is that we honor traditions and we honor sacrifices in ways that our civilian counterparts many times do not. It is that special bond, developed from shared experiences of a group of Sailors, that builds a foundation for that tradition. And it's in that vein that we gather here today to pay tribute to our fellow Sailors who made the ultimate sacrifice in our country's name.

"I want to give you a taste of what life was like when LA-9 went down in 1962. Fortunately, former VP-5 Commanding Officer Capt. Bob Smyth kept a journal of the events of that day and was kind enough to share it with us," said Naylor.

History ThumbnailCameraPhoto by Miriam Gallet The VP-5 "hands on" restoration team included (from left) AM3 Lance Nyffeler, AD3 Zach Barnett, AM3 Christopher Merrill, AM2(AW) Brad Barnes and AM3 Xian Wu.

"Winter weather in Iceland is very unpredictable - in an hour it can go from a hellish artic blizzard to a 'springtime in the Rockies' kind of day. On Jan. 12, 1962, LA-9 set out on a routine mission from NAS Keflavik, Iceland. At about 1030, the squadron duty officer reported no position report in the last hour. LA-9 had taken off at 0800 on a routine anti-submarine patrol in the Denmark Strait. The aircraft was flown that day by our new XO, Cmdr. Bert Kozak. This was his first operational patrol out of NAS Keflavik, Iceland. We had put an additional experienced VP-5 navigator aboard.

LA-9's flight plan was to fly northwest from NAS Keflavik, Iceland across the Denmark Strait and across the east coast of Greenland and over the ice flows for about 500 miles and then return home. It was a nine-hour flight covering about 1,500 miles.

At 1130, we still had had no contact. Every radio station in Iceland, Greenland and Europe was trying to contact LA-9. The clock crept ahead - no position reports. Its estimated arrival time of 1600 passed, but LA-9 did not return. A couple aircraft were sent out to look for the Neptune, but had to return due to deteriorating weather. The next day, we sent out eight search and rescue (SAR) aircraft. On Jan. 14, we sent 16 aircraft out. I was on the first SAR mission that swept the Denmark Strait and all kinds of experts were called in. The weather finally cleared and there was a report of footprints. We flew very low and the prints turned out to be a polar bear.

The search went on for a very long week and was called off Jan. 19. LA-9 and its crew had vanished. They were declared lost at sea - but that was not the end of the story. VP-5 kept looking every day until our return to the U.S. in May 1962."

Naylor continued, "Four and a half years later, on Aug. 6, 1966, the wreckage of LA-9 was found on Greenland's remote Kronborg glacier by an Oxford University geological survey team led by Charles Kent Brooks.

Brooks, who attended the ceremony from his home in Denmark, recalled, "We noted the location of the debris field -but since we had no radio communications capability with our party -it was four weeks before we arrived at Reykjavik, Iceland and reported our discovery to the American embassy," said Brooks.

History ThumbnailCameraPhoto by Miriam Gallet NAS Jacksonville, Florida Commanding Officer Capt. Jack Scorby Jr. congratulates Robert Pettway on completing the mission to commemorate the final recovery of the "LA-9" crew of VP-5.

Fast forward to 1975, when Brooks revisited the crash site via helicopter. He was shocked to find human remains that had been missed in the 1966 recovery effort.

"Later, I was contacted by Robert Pettway, a former VP-5 petty officer, about participating in a final expedition to bring the crew of LA-9 home once and for all. He teamed up with Patricia Masciantoni, Mike and Peter Kozak -the LA-9 pilot's surviving children - and other volunteers, including VP-5 Alumni, to make it happen in 2004," said Brooks. At the Nov. 6 ceremony, Bob Pettway received a special recognition plaque from Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing 11 Capt. Mark Turner.

"Though it took two recovery missions over 47 years, we thank God that the men of LA-9 are home," said Pettway. "This was a team effort and I had a wonderful crew working with me over all these years, including the Kozak family, Dr. Kent Brooks, retired Marine Corps Maj. Gene Cole (who led the 1966 recovery mission), VP-5 Alumni Donald Lattimer and Don Good, and retired Navy Capt. Tom Sparks (who led the 2004 recovery mission)."

History ThumbnailCameraPhoto by Clark Pierce Conditions for the ceremony were cool and clear as Reid Pettway (6) stood with his siblings, Annsley (8) and Regan (10) during the colors presentation by the Clay High School NJROTC Color Guard. Navy Band Southeast A Cappella Quartet performed the national anthem.

Pettway concluded, "Very few things in life are perfect - but today's ceremony and this plane comes as close to perfect as anything I've ever experienced. Thank you all."

LA-9 Crew Members
  • Cmdr. Norbert Kozak

  • Lt. John Brown, M.D.

  • Lt. j.g. Anthony Caswick

  • Lt. j.g. Michael Leahy

  • Lt. j.g. Badger Smith III

  • AT2 Robert Anderson

  • ADR2 Robert Hurst

  • ATN3 Alan Millette

  • ADR3 Frank Parker

  • AT3 Norman Russell Jr.

  • AO3 Grover Wells

  • AEAN Joseph Renneberg


UPDATE History ThumbnailCamera "...The Plaque unveiling was done by Captain Scorby, NAS Jacksonville, Florida C.O., and myself. I had just previously been presented the U.S.Navy Superior Public Service silver medal by Captain Turner, the Commodore of CPRW-11. Standing from left to right are CDR Naylor, VP-5 C.O., Captain Scorby, base C.O., Bob Pettway, Captain Turner, and Lt.Cdr. Taylor, base Chaplain. This was a very moving ceremony. I was honored to be included in the ceremony and was seated on the podium between the two navy Captains, the base C.O. and Commodore of CPRW-11, who presented me with a U.S. Navy Superior Public Service silver medal for my part in the recovery. There were many family and fellow crewmates of the fallen crew at the ceremony. Also in attendance was Dr. Kent Brooks from the University of Copenhagen, who discovered the crash site while on geologic expedition, and Major J.P. Cole, the USMC leader of the 1966 recovery mission. Following the speeches, the C.O. of the base and I unveiled the plaque at the P2V that commemorates the LA-9 crew. I was very humbled to be so honored. It was perfect..." Contributed by PETTWAY, ATR3 Robert L. (Bob) rpettway@epbfi.com [09NOV2009]

UPDATE "...Attached are some photos of the P2V dedication ceremony held at NAS Jacksonville, Florida on 06NOV09. Part of the ceremony involved the presentation of a Navy Superior Public Service Award to Bob Pettway for his tireless efforts to bring the crew of LA-9 home. In the first photo CDR.Wes Naylor, present CO of VP-5, gives comments while CAPT. Jack Scorby, Jr. and Bob Pettway look on. Bob is presented his certificate in the second photo. The presentation group then moved to the aircraft and unveiled a commemorative plaque naming the crew of LA-9. Bob and Gaila Pettway stand with officers participating in the presentation in the last photo...." Contributed by Mike Kozak mkozak.mco@gmail.com [09NOV2009]

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UPDATE "...Attached are photos of the newly painted LA-9 P2V on static display at Heritage Park aboard NAS Jacksonville, Florida...." Contributed by Mike Kozak mkozak.mco@gmail.com [09NOV2009]

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UPDATE History ThumbnailCamera "...Sailors Honored Nearly 50 Years After Plane Crash - Reported by: Denise Douglas Email: ddouglas@ActionNewsJax.com Last Update: 11/06 6:49 pm..." WebSite: ActionNewsJax http://www.actionnewsjax.com/ [09NOV2009]

Photograph Caption: Family and friends say a final goodbye to 12 sailors killed during a training exercise.

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. -- As he stood on base at NAS Jacksonville, Florida, Garey Hurst thought back on some of the good memories he had of his brother.

"I can remember before he left my brother picking me up and putting me on his shoulder and playing with me," he said.

That is one of the last memories Hurst has of his older brother. He was eight when his 22-year-old brother crashed in a plane. Robert and 11 other sailors were on a Cold War training exercise in a P2-V plane when it went down over Greenland.

"All my family, my mother and father especially were sad when they notified us," Hurst said.

Because of the remote location of the wreckage, it took years to find it and even longer to recover the bodies. Now, nearly 50 years since the crash, a refurbished P2-V has been dedicated in their honor at NAS Jacksonville, Florida.

"Finally after 47 years, that's a long time and I am so happy they are doing this for the entire crew," said Ruth Kozak Jacob, whose husband died when the plane went down.

Hurst was amazed at how the plane turned out. "I have a picture of the original plane they were on and it looks identical to it," he said.

For him it's a memory of his beloved brother he can treasure and a way to say goodbye. "I came because I wanted closure for all this," he said.

Copyright 2009 High Plains Broadcasting LLC All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

UPDATE History ThumbnailCamera "...Navy honors fallen air crew, families with ceremony and restored plane at Jacksonville NAS - Rendition of the crew's patrol plane displayed at Jacksonville NAS - By Jeff Brumley - Story updated at 12:50 AM on Saturday, Nov. 7, 2009..." WebSite: JaxAirNews http://jacksonville.com/news/ [07NOV2009]

The freshly painted P2 Neptune looked flight-ready as it glimmered in the morning sun Friday at Jacksonville Naval Air Station.

"It's an absolutely beautiful, wonderful piece of work," Kent Brooks said about the restored plane.

That wasn't the case in 1966, when Brooks was on a geological expedition that discovered an identical plane smashed up on a glacier in Greenland.

"Its belly was covered in ice, its wings were torn off, its engines were 200 yards in front of the crash site," Kent said. "The front was smashed, but the fuselage was intact with the crew inside."

That Jacksonville-based crew of 12 had crashed in bad weather and died in 1962 while on patrol. On Friday, they were honored by the Navy about five years after the last of their remains were recovered from the crash site.

About 200 people - family and former crew mates of the fallen team, as well as retired and active-duty sailors - attended the P2 dedication ceremony held at the base's outdoor plane park.

The service capped a nearly 50-year effort to find and recover the crew of the aircraft.

The saga began Jan. 12, 1962, when the aircraft departed NAS Keflavik, Iceland, for what was supposed to be a routine, nine-hour Cold War mission. When the plane and its crew failed to return on time, a week-long search-and-rescue effort was undertaken. It was eventually assumed the plane crashed at sea.

That changed four years later, when the British geological survey team happened on the crash site on the Kronborg Glacier in Greenland. Some of the effects and remains of the crew were subsequently recovered, but brutal blizzard conditions and its remote location prevented a full excavation of the site until 2004.

Jacksonville resident Nick Mulich was a member of the squadron at the time and participated in the air search for the downed crew.

"We still miss them a lot," Mulich said of his friends lost in the crash. "It could have been any one of us."

To help mark the occasion, a six-member Patrol Squadron 5 Mad Foxes maintenance crew spent 20,000 man-hours since September restoring and repainting the base's existing P2 display into a replica of the crashed plane. The VP-5, which now flies P-3 Orions out of the air station, was the mission crew's squadron.

One of those sailors, Petty Officer 3rd Class Zack Barnett, said the task became an increasingly emotional one for the team as the project neared completion.

"When I first started, I didn't understand it all," Barnett said. "But as people started showing up to look at it, then it got a little bit more personal."

It also was emotional for the families that attended Friday's ceremony.

Garey Hurst of Charleston, S.C., was present with several siblings to honor his brother, Petty Officer 2nd Class Robert Hurst, one of the sailors lost in the crash.

Hurst was 8 when his brother shipped out for Iceland.

"I remember before he left he picked me up on his shoulders and played with me," he said.

And he remembers the shock and sadness of his parents and older siblings when news came his 22-year-old brother and fellow crew mates had been killed.

Hurst said he felt relieved that the service has finally closed that chapter of his family's life.

"I came because I wanted closure and I wish my mom and dad were still here."

jeff.brumley@jacksonville.com, (904) 359-4310

UPDATE "...Air Crew Lost in Cold War Memorialized - Dave Wax - Taren Reed - Created: 11/6/2009 4:39:29 PM - Updated: 11/6/2009 5:44:23 PM..." WebSite: FirstCoastNews http://www.firstcoastnews.com/ [07NOV2009]

NAS JACKSONVILLE, Fla. -- It took more than 47 years, but an air crew lost during the Cold War is finally being honored.

A dedication ceremony was held Friday morning for the crew aboard a P2V patrol aircraft that disappeared in 1962.

On January 12, 1962, the crew aboard the P2V, part of Patrol and Reconnaissance Squadron Five (VP-5), disappeared while flying over Greenland on a routine Cold War mission.

Crews searched for about a week in increasingly harsh conditions, but never found any sign of wreckage, so they assumed the plane and crew had been lost at sea.

In 1966, a team of British geologists found the crash remains on a glacier in Greenland, and a new recovery effort for the crew was launched.

The glacier -- Kronborg -- is very remote, and the environment is quite harsh, so the recovery effort launched in 1966 wasn't concluded until 2004.

Heritage Park at NAS Jax has a P-2V on display, because the VP-5 was attached to NAS Jax in the 1960s.

Beginning in September, a team of Mad Foxes from VP-5 repainted the aircraft to mirror that of LA-9, the tail number of the lost P-2V from 1962.

"It really gives the squadron and entire VP community a chance to honor our fallen comrades and pay tribute to their Cold War service and sacrifice," says Lt. Cmdr. Robert Huntington, maintenance officer for the Mad Foxes. "On a more personal level, it gives us a chance to say thank you to the surviving families and to let them know their loved ones will not be forgotten."

Surviving family members of the crew were on hand for the dedication, along with many people who never gave up the effort to get the crew back home, decades later.

©2009 First Coast News. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, rewritten, or redistributed.

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UPDATE "...AM3 Xian Wu, AD3 Zack Barnett and AM3 Lance Nyffeler (L-R, 1st photo) continue their work on the P2V static display at Heritage Park aboard NAS Jacksonville, Florida. Detail work presenting the aircraft as LA-9 will continue through the week. We are looking forward to the dedication ceremony on 06NOV09!..." Contributed by Mike Kozak mkozak.mco@gmail.com [29OCT2009]

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UPDATE "...Here are the most recent shots of the static P2V in Heritage Park aboard NAS Jacksonville, Florida as of Friday, 23OCT09. The VP-5 crew working on this aircraft have really been putting in a tremendous effort to ready this Neptune as LA-9. Please note that I plan to continue sharing updates of VP-5's progress on this project but will not send out any photos of the finished aircraft until after the dedication ceremony on 06NOV09..." Contributed by Mike Kozak mkozak.mco@gmail.com [24OCT2009]

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UPDATE "...Station's P-2V Neptune Under Refurbishment To Honor "LA-9" Crew - Friday, October 15, 2009..." WebSite: JaxNews http://www.jaxairnews.com/ [17OCT2009]

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UPDATE "...VP-5 personnel continue their work on the renovation of the P2V on static display as LA-9. The aircraft is on display in Heritage Park aboard NAS Jacksonville, Florida. These photos were taken on 14OCT2009..." Contributed by Mike Kozak mkozak.mco@gmail.com [15OCT2009]

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UPDATE "...Meet the crew repainting the P2V on static display at Jax NAS as LA-9..." Contributed by Mike Kozak mkozak.mco@gmail.com [02OCT2009]

LEFT to RIGHT:
    Left - Back Row Left to Right: AD3 Zack Barnett, AM2 Brad Barnes and AM3 Christopher Merrill.
    Front Row Left to Right: AM3 Lance Nyffeler and AM3 Xian Wu

    AD3 Zack Barnett and AM3 Christopher Merrill use power grinders to prep the surface under the tail section.

    AM3 Xian Wu uses a power grinder to sand off old paint while AM3 Lance Nyffeler preps his safety gear before giving a hand.

    AM2 Brad Barnes preps one of the blades on the starboard prop.
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Refurbishment crew was hard at it on the P2V
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UPDATE "...To All - I took my mom out to NAS Jacksonville, Florida yesterday to visit the exchange, credit union, pharmacy, etc. When we went by the P2V on static display there were some Mad Fox sailors out there preping the aircraft for its new paint and markings as LA-9. One of these fellows had spent the last two days sanding and and preping the tail alone. The crew had spent the last week sanding the wings as well. They are also completing some minor body work and will be working on the fuselage next week. I had an opportunity to climb aboard the aircraft as well. It is in fairly decent shape considering its age. The entire squadron is behind this project. They even researched the period correct paint codes in order to have the proper hue used back in the 60's (I believe PPG is mixing up a special batch of paint for this purpose). I'll keep you updated as I get up to Orange Park to check on my mom..." Contributed by Mike Kozak mkozak.mco@gmail.com [28SEP2009]
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HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Celebrating 70 Years of Aviation Excellence By Clark Pierce, Editor - Thursday, November 05, 2009 - 04:26 PM (Mentioned: VP-5 and NAS Jacksonville, Florida)..." WebSite: JaxNews http://www.jaxairnews.com/ [06NOV2009]

Dozens of historically savvy Sailors and civilians gathered at Heritage Park Oct. 30 to be some of the first to receive a pair of posters commemorating the 70th anniversary of NAS Jacksonville. The posters were unveiled by NAS Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Jack Scorby Jr. and Executive Officer Capt. Jeffrey Maclay.

History ThumbnailCameraPhoto by Clark Pierce (From right) NAS Jacksonville, Florida Commandng Officer Capt. Jack Scorby Jr. and Executive Officer Capt. Jeffrey Maclay unveil the first of two posters Oct. 30 commemorating "70 years of naval aviation excellence" at NAS Jacksonville, Florida.

"The first poster artfully displays the contrasts in people and aircraft over the past 70 years," said Scorby. "The second poster displays 114 emblems of squadrons, other commands and community organizations that have played roles in our station's rich history."

The event kicked off a year-long celebration to culminate in October 2010 when the station turns 70.

Scorby engaged the audience with some historic facts about the base: NAS Jacksonville, Florida was commissioned Oct. 15, 1940 with Capt. Charles Mason as the first commanding officer.

  • Walt Disney designed NAS Jacksonville, Florida's first official logo - one of Donald Duck's nephews breaking out of an eggshell and learning how to fly.
  • As a primary flight training base (flying Stearman biplanes), NAS Jacksonville, Florida saw 4,363 trainees earn their pilot wings through Feb. 26, 1943.
  • The station trained more than 30,000 aerial gunners from 1941 to 1945.
  • After World War II, the Navy Flight Demonstration Team, know today as the Blue Angels, was formed at the station in 1946.
  • Oct. 21, 1948 saw Ensign Jesse Brown become the first African-American to receive his naval aviator wings at the Naval Air Advanced Training Command.
  • VP-5 "Mad Foxes" arrive at NAS Jacksonville, Florida in December 1949. They remain the oldest squadron continuously based here.
  • With the BRAC closure of NAS Cecil Field, Jacksonville, Florida in 1999, Sea Control Wing Atlantic and its S-3 Viking squadrons transferred to NAS Jacksonville, Florida.

    Today, NAS Jacksonville, Florida is at the forefront of the global war on terror. As the S-3 Viking squadrons disestablished and the current SH-60 helicopter squadrons are being re-designated as Helicopter Sea Combat and moving to NAS Norfolk, Virginia, new Helicopter Squadron Maritime units are taking their place and moving to the station. Five new P-3 squadrons from NAS Brunswick, Maine also find NAS Jacksonville, Florida as their home.

    History ThumbnailCameraPhoto by Clark Pierce Modern avaitors stand proudly Oct. 30 at the unveiling of two commemorative posters celebrating 70 years of flight operations at NAS Jacksonville, Florida. (From left) NAS Jacksonville, Florida Air Operations Officer Cmdr. Robert Surgeoner, FACSFAC Commanding Officer Cmdr. Curtis Stubbs, NAS Jax Executive Officer Capt. Jeffrey Maclay, NAS Jacksonville, Florida Commanding Officer Capt. Jack Scorby Jr., NAS Jacksonville, Florida Air Operations Admin Officer Lt. Cmdr. Bob Strange, Lt. Chris Walcutt and Lt. Chip Shaw.

    A new $127 million P-3 hangar, the largest in the Navy, became operational in May 2009 and a new $77 million helicopter hangar opened its hangar bays in July.

    This air and industrial base will be homeport to 16 Navy operational, training and reserve squadrons by early 2011. Additional major tenants include Commander, Navy Region Southeast; Fleet Readiness Center Southeast; Navy Medicine Support Command; Naval Hospital Jacksonville; Naval Facilities Engineering Command Southeast; and Fleet Industrial Supply Center Jacksonville. Some 100 other tenant activities also call the station home.

    "These are just a few of the countless stories that make the history of our base so interesting," said Scorby. "Many of the aircraft that helped write naval aviation history are on display right here in Heritage Park. I look forward to celebrating our past throughout 2010. I hope you'll join with me to take pride in our history as we write the next chapter of accomplishments at NAS Jacksonville, Florida."

    The posters were designed by Gwen Shangle of Prizm Graphics and the the NAS Jacksonville, Florida public affairs team. Production supervisor was Miriam Gallet, NAS Jacksonville, Florida public affairs officer.

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...City Planners Learn About Station's Role In Community From Staff - Thursday, October 22, 2009..." WebSite: JaxNews http://www.jaxairnews.com/ [23OCT2009]

    More than a dozen City of Jacksonville planning commissioners and staff members were hosted by the NAS Jacksonville, Florida Community Planning and Liaison Office Oct. 9.

    After receiving a station brief by NAS Jacksonville, Florida Commanding Officer Capt. Jack Scorby Jr., the group boarded a bus for a base tour that included a maritime patrol and reconnaissance brief by the VP-5 "Mad Foxes" at Hangar 511.

    "We value our long-standing relationship with Northeast Florida and the City of Jacksonville," said Scorby. "As our mission evolves, it's important to keep community leaders informed as to how the Navy affects economic growth and quality of life issues."

    History ThumbnailCameraUS Navy photo by IS2 (AW) Kurt Henrickson October 9, 2009- Members of the COJ Planning Board listen to sailors assigned to the Mad Foxes of Patrol Squadron Five (VP-5) as they tour a P3-C Orion aircraft in hangar 511 onboard NAS Jacksonville, Florida.

    "This tour gave our visitors an up-close look at some of the commands that operate at NAS Jacksonville, Florida," said Matt Shellhorn, community planning and liaison officer for the station. "They took a serious interest in what they saw and asked good questions. Our goal is for Navy and community planners to work in partnership to assure air installation compatibility use zones."

    Shellhorn added that a highlight of the tour took place during lunch at the Flightline Café. "NAS Jax Executive Officer Capt. Jeffrey Maclay arranged for some Individual Augmentees who recently returned from overseas deployments to share their experiences with our guests."

    History ThumbnailCameraUS Navy photo by IS2 (AW) Kurt Henrickson Lt. Joshua Lowery of VP-5 explains the operations of the tactical officer station on a P3-C Orion aircraft to Andy Hatzel, a City of Jacksonville planning commission staff member.

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Station's P2V Neptune Under Refurbishment To Honor "LA-9" Crew - Friday, October 15, 2009..." WebSite: JaxNews http://www.jaxairnews.com/ [17OCT2009]

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    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...CLAY: NAVFAC Alone Contributes As Much As $482 Million - Friday, October 15, 200 - (Mentioned: VP-5 and CPRW-11)..." WebSite: JaxNews http://www.jaxairnews.com/ [17OCT2009]

    History ThumbnailHistory Thumbnail

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...MCPON Expresses Gratitude To Ombudsmen By Clark Pierce, Editor - Friday, October 9, 2009 - (Mentioned: VP-5 and VPU-1)..." WebSite: JaxNews http://www.jaxairnews.com/ [09OCT2009]

    Dozens of commanding officers, executive officers and command master chiefs honored 62 volunteer ombudsmen from throughout Navy Region Southeast at the NAS Jacksonville, Florida Officers' Club Sept. 29 to celebrate the 39th anniversary of the Navy Family Ombudsman Program. Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy (MCPON) (SS/SW) Rick West was guest speaker.

    In his welcoming remarks, NAS Jacksonville, Florida Commanding Officer Capt. Jack Scorby Jr. said that recognizing the achievements of command ombudsmen is one of his top priorities.

    "Nobody works harder to enhance our family readiness. Quite frankly, combat readiness and family readiness are tied together - and our leadership aboard this base would not be as successful without the volunteer efforts of our ombudsmen. Please accept our congratulations and thanks for your counsel and dedication," stated Scorby, who also recognized Ombudsman Chair Vivian Alcott, as well as Carolyn McCorvey and Wilhelmina Nash of Fleet and Family Support Center for organizing the event.

    Commander, Navy Region Southeast Rear Adm. Tim Alexander expressed his gratitude. "The ombudsman's role is vital to effectively supporting our warfighters and their families. I'm very pleased to see MCPON West aboard NAS Jacksonville, Florida again. Your being here today adds special meaning to this event and shows the level of importance that we designate to our Navy Family Ombudsman Program," said Alexander.

    As he took the podium, West asked the ombudsmen in attendance to stand for a hearty round of applause.

    "David Rockefeller once described America's greatest resource as the generosity exemplified by our nation's volunteers. Americans are naturally 'giving' people and, according to the U.S. Department of Labor, 64.5 million Americans performed volunteer work in 2008. Today, we honor 62 of those volunteers who worked to make someone else's lives better - and in the process, improved themselves," explained West."Right now, our American way of life is being defended half a world away by our men and women in uniform. Their mission readiness is backed by a direct link to their families, courtesy of the Navy Family Ombudsman Program. Today's all-volunteer force is comprised of the best and brightest that our nation has to offer. But we cannot retain them, if we do not care for their families. That's why the young families whose lives you touch as ombudsmen appreciate your gift of knowledge and compassion," said West.

    He ended with the anonymous quote, "Volunteers are unpaid, not because they're worthless, but because they're priceless."

    One of the 25 honorees attending was VP-5 "Mad Foxes" Ombudsman Sandra Brown, an 11-year Navy wife. In addition to raising two daughters (ages 10 and 12), she has supported her husband through four deployments, including 10 months in Iraq.

    "Naturally, an ombudsman is busiest prior to and during deployments. When the squadron is home, things quiet down, yet I stay in touch with the squadron leadership to lend assistance wherever I can," said Brown. "Email makes a world of difference and is my primary communications pipeline to our families."

    Brown also writes a monthly e-newsletter with information about the squadron and NAS Jax, as well as hurricane preparedness, back-to-school tips and healthcare concerns such as flu vaccinations. VPU-1 "Old Buzzards" Ombudsman Jennifer Lyon attended the luncheon with her husband, AWVC Jake Lyon.

    "This is my 15th year as a Navy spouse. Our household includes two children (ages 6 and 13), so I have lots of real-world experience to share with our squadron's younger families. Because our aircrews and maintainers come-and-go with short notice, it's important to keep communications channels open," said Lyon.

    The national anthem was performed by Navy Band Southeast A Cappella Quartet, comprised of MU2 Mallory McKendry, MU3 Sean Meyer, MU3 Roberta Schardt and MU3 Gene Register.

    Chaplain (Lt. Cmdr.) Atticus Taylor, of Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing 11 delivered the invocation and benediction. "Ombudsmen epitomize the best in each one of us. They represent care, respect, compassion, sacrifice and loyalty. They should be enormously proud of their achievements concerning family issues that are vital to quality of life in today's Navy," said Taylor.

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCamera090924-N-2491R-033 Jacksonville, Florida (Sep 24, 2009) "...Chief Warrant Officer 5 Gerald Skees, assigned to Patrol Squadron (VP) 5, watches over Aviation Ordnancemen as they attach a BDU-45 training bomb to the wing of a P-3C Orion aircraft. The BDU-45 is used to simulate the shape and weight of a 500-pound MK82 bomb for training flights and ordnance handler training. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Harry J. Rucker III/Released)..." WebSite: NavyNews http://www.navy.mil/ [03OCT2009]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCamera090924-N-8490W-034 JACKSONVILLE, Fla. (Sept. 24, 2009) "...Aviation Machinist's Mate 3rd Class Zackary Barnett, Aviation Structural Mechanic 3rd Class Xian Wu, and Aviation Structural Mechanic Airman Lance Nyffeler, assigned to the Mad Foxes of Patrol Squadron (VP) 5, sand the wing of a P2 Neptune aircraft on static display at Aircraft Heritage Park at Naval Air Station Jacksonville. VP-5 is restoring the P2 and re-designating it LA-9 in honor of twelve VP-5 crewmembers who died in 1962 while flying a routine ice patrol from Naval Air Station Keflavik, Iceland. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Jason R. Wilson/Released)..." WebSite: NavyNews http://www.navy.mil/ [02OCT2009]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCamera090923-N-8490W-001 JACKSONVILLE, Fla. (Sept. 23, 2009) "...Aviation Machinist's Mate 3rd Class Zackary Barnett and Aviation Structural Mechanic Xian Wu, both assigned to the Mad Foxes of Patrol Squadron (VP) 5, sand down the hull of a P2 Neptune aircraft static display at Aircraft Heritage Park on Naval Air Station (NAS) Jacksonville. VP-5 is restoring the P2 and re-designating it LA-9 in honor of twelve VP-5 crewmembers that perished in 1962 while flying a routine ice patrol out of NAS Keflavik, Iceland. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Jason R. Wilson/Released)..." WebSite: NavyNews http://www.navy.mil/ [25SEP2009]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCamera090918-N-2491R-024 JACKSONVILLE, Fla. (Sep. 18, 2009) "...Lt. Jamie Kelly, assigned to the Mad Foxes of Patrol Squadron (VP) 5, shows Junior ROTC students a P-3C Orion aircraft on display in Hangar 511 at Naval Air Station Jacksonville. VP-5 hosted the Junior ROTC students to familiarize them with the jobs and equipment of the Navy's maritime patrol and reconnaissance community. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Harry J. Rucker III/Released)..." WebSite: NavyNews http://www.navy.mil/ [25SEP2009]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCamera090915-N-2491R-075 JACKSONVILLE, Fla. (Sep. 15, 2009) "...Sailors assigned to Patrol Squadron (VP) 5 inspect the flight-line in front of hangar 511 At Naval Air Station Jacksonville for foreign object debris or FOD. The FOD walkdown is a daily task conducted by VP-5 personnel to insure the safety of the combat air crews and maintainers that work with the P3-C Orion aircraft. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Harry J. Rucker III/Released) ..." WebSite: NavyNews http://www.navy.mil/ [25SEP2009]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCamera090910-N-2491R-040 JACKSONVILLE, Fla. (Sept. 10, 2009) "...Aviation Ordnanceman 2nd Class Keon Beccles and Aviation Ordnanceman 2nd Class Aaron Newby, both assigned to the Mad Foxes of Patrol Squadron (VP) 5, lift an ordinance rack out of storage for inspection in Hangar 511 at Naval Air Station, Jacksonville. Weapons systems and components are routinely inspected to ensure their operational safety and proper storage. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Harry J. Rucker III/Released)..." WebSite: NavyNews http://www.navy.mil/ [15SEP2009]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCamera090910-N-2491R-039 JACKSONVILLE, Fla. (Sept. 10, 2009) "...Aviation Ordnanceman 2nd Class Keon Beccles, assigned to the Mad Foxes of Patrol Squadron (VP) 5, checks the serial numbers of an ordinance rack in Hangar 511 at Naval Air Station, Jacksonville. Part of Beccles' job as an Aviation Ordnanceman is to ensure the proper storage of unassigned ordnance racks and weapons. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Harry J. Rucker III/Released)..." WebSite: NavyNews http://www.navy.mil/ [15SEP2009]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Mad Foxes At Work..." WebSite: http://www.vp5.navy.mil/ [16AUG2009]LEFT TO RIGHT:

      Skipper Pregmon takes Command, Dodge Ball Team, Color Guard at Change of Command, USS Mad Fox, XO Naylor, AW2 George, MC3 Rucker at the NAS Jax Sports Day, YN3 Ford Makes a Play, P-3C orion taxis on the flight line and Skipper Pregmon takes Command
    History - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge Thumbnail

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCamera090714-N-2491R-045 JACKSONVILLE, Fla. (July 14, 2009) "...Rear Adm. Bill Moran, commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Group, holds an all hands Admiral's call attended by VP-5, VP-8, VP-16, and VPU-1 stationed atNAS Jacksonville, Florida. Moran stressed the importance of the patrol and reconnaissance communities' role in the anti submarine warfare mission and also discussed the upcoming platform transition to the P8 Poseidon from the P-3C Orion aircraft. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Charles E. White/Released)..." WebSite: NavyNews http://www.navy.mil/ [22JUL2009]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCamera090714-N-3013W-035 JACKSONVILLE, Fla. (July, 14 2009) "...Rear Adm. Bill Moran, commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Group, holds an all hands Admiral's call attended by VP-5, VP-8, VP-16, and VPU-1 stationed atNAS Jacksonville, Florida. Moran stressed the importance of the patrol and reconnaissance communities' role in the anti submarine warfare mission and also discussed the upcoming platform transition to the P8 Poseidon from the P-3C Orion aircraft. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Charles E. White/Released)..." WebSite: NavyNews http://www.navy.mil/ [22JUL2009]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCamera090609-N-3013W-036 JACKSONVILLE, Fla. (June 9, 2009) "...Sailors assigned to the "Mad Foxes" of Patrol Squadron (VP) 5 unpack after returning home to NAS Jacksonville, Florida from a six month deployment. The P-3C Orion squadron deployed to Okinawa, Japan with additional detachments throughout Asia. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Charles White/Released)..." WebSite: NavyNews http://www.navy.mil/ [03JUL2009]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...VP-5 'Mad Foxes' Return Home By LT(jg) Kenny Relethford and LT(jg) Jason Bruce, VP-5 - Thursday, June 18, 2009..." WebSite: JaxAirNews http://www.jaxairnews.com/ [19JUN2009]

    After their six-month deployment to NAF Kadena, Okinawa, Japan and to a forward operating location at Comalapa Air Base, El Salvador, the "Mad Foxes" of VP-5 began their transition home June 1.

    VP-5's split-site deployment supported Pacific Command (PACOM) operations in the Western Pacific while simultaneously supporting Southern Command operations in the Caribbean and South America.

    While deployed, the squadron conducted joint and combined military exercises, sent their combat aircrews to multiple PACOM detachment sites and contributed to the local communities that hosted them.

    The Mad Fox Maintenance Department proved flexible by conducting an organizational restructuring during the early part of this intensive deployment. With more than 1,030 mishap-free flights consisting of more than 4,150 hours, the squadron demonstrated their ability to accomplish the diverse warfare missions of the P-3 Orion worldwide.

    Mad Foxes in 7th Fleet

    VP-5 hit the deck running at NAF Kadena, Okinawa, Japan by immediately demonstrating the expeditionary nature of the P-3C Orion by sending a combat aircrew to participate in Cobra Gold, a coordinated exercise with the Thailand Air Force and USS Essex (LHD-2).

    The Mad Foxes also supported the USS John C. Stennis (CVN-74) Carrier Strike Group on several occasions. During an undersea warfare exercise, the squadron was joined by P-3C Orions from VP-47, VP-40, VP-8 and VP-9 to fly multiple sorties where they operated in concert with U.S. Navy assets and Japanese Maritime Self Defense Force (JMSDF) ships and aircraft.

    Several detachments were conducted to the U.S. territory of Guam. One participated in improved extended echo ranging exercises along with search and rescue (SAR) efforts with the U.S. Coast Guard. Another assisted the Palauan Coast Guard and Australian Navy in combating illegal fishing in the vast area between Palau and the Federated States of Micronesia.

    Two separate detachments were sent to the Philippines for training exercises and missions supporting the global war on terrorism, as well as SAR assignments.

    Another detachment visited Pohang, South Korea for Foal Eagle 2009, an annual combined exercise with the Republic of South Korea Navy that reinforces U.S. and South Korean readiness to discourage conflict on the Korea Peninsula.

    A favorite detachment for many Mad Foxes was an exercise with the 11th Squadron Shepherds of the Royal Australian Air Force. Operating out of Edinburgh, Australia, both countries worked together in ASW training. In March, combat aircrews flew to the aide of USNS Impeccable (T-AGOS-23), which was being harassed, by Chinese fishing boats in international waters. The aircraft's presence aided in surveillance and de-escalation of the situation.

    While operating in Okinawa, the Mad Foxes worked routinely with the JMSDF to maintain control of the sea lanes around Japan. The JMSDF also operates the P-3 aircraft performing similar missions. The JMSDF and VP-5 participated in cross-deck training, where crews from each country flew in each other's aircraft to gain an understanding of the differences and similarities of how each force operates.

    Lt. Chris Mergen, a VP-5 tactical coordinator, described his experience with the Japanese as very positive. "The JMSDF are a very professional and capable ally. The training for future combined operations with JMSDF was helpful for both navies in breaking down the language barrier," he said.

    VP-5 in 4th Fleet

    The Mad Foxes in El Salvador consisted of four combat aircrews and three aircraft conducting counter-narco-trafficking missions in South America. Most operations were coordinated with law enforcement ground forces and fast patrol boats from Guatemala, Colombia and Honduras.

    VP-5 crews performed joint and combined missions with air assets from the U.S. Customs/Border Patrol, U.S. Coast Guard, U.S. Air Force, Royal British Air Force, U.S. Navy Airborne Early Warning assets, as well as SH-60B helicopters deployed on U.S. Navy ships. VP-5 completed 140 missions leading to a seizure of more than nine narco-trafficking assets - preventing 29 metric tons of illegal drugs worth over $1 billion from reaching the U.S.

    Shortly before heading home, the Mad Foxes answered the nation's call by immediately responding to the tragic crash of Air France Flight 447 off the coast of Brazil, more than 14 hours away from El Salvador.

    Maintenance transition

    In late 2008, just prior to the squadron's deployment, Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing 11 directed squadrons to return to a legacy structure of one maintenance department per squadron. VP-5 Maintenance Officer Lt. Cmdr. Ryan Smith led the transition and certification process during the squadron's deployment.

    The maintenance department had a tremendous workload during the deployment to ensure the squadron aircraft were available to meet their assigned missions. They managed and performed scheduled and unscheduled maintenance on seven aircraft, which were comprised of four distinct mission system configurations. Altogether, they amassed nearly 30,000 man-hours at the two deployment sites.

    Community relations

    When not flying, the Mad Foxes worked closely with their hosts in both El Salvador and Okinawa and were true ambassadors representing their country with pride and professionalism. In El Salvador, events were organized to allow locals a glimpse of P-3C operations.

    In addition, volunteers from the squadron spent about 300 hours assisting in a community building project. In Okinawa, squadron members cleaned a local park, helped out at a childcare center, practiced English with an elementary class and spent time at a retirement home cleaning and helping out with services.

    Job well done

    On May 1 Cmdr. Matthew Pregmon was relieved by Cmdr. Wes Naylor III as commanding officer of VP-5 in a seamless leadership turnover that saw Cmdr. Jason Jorgensen assume executive officer duties. Naylor praised the squadron's performance in a multitude of missions from two different areas of responsibility.

    "Our Sailors performed beyond expectations. P-3s have always been tasked with anything and everything. Our team answered the call with true professionalism and skill," said Naylor.

    After an 18-hour airlift home or a few days voyage in a P-3C, the Mad Foxes of VP-5 arrived home last week to the newly opened Hangar 511.

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...One P-3 squadron comes home, another joins the flock - One helped fight pirates and the other aided in a plane crash search - by Timothy J. Gibbons - Thursday, Jun. 11, 2009...Squadrons Mentioned: VP-5 and VP-8..." WebSite: WOKV http://www.jacksonville.com/ [12JUN2009]

    Waiting for permission to post entire article.

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Squadron Returns After Taking On Somali Pirates by Sam Jordan - June 10, 2009 7:29 PM...Squadrons Mentioned: VP-5 and VP-8..." WebSite: WOKV http://wokv.com/ [11JUN2009]

    Waiting for permission to post entire article.

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraVP-5 History "...(Feb. 13, 2009) USS Seawolf Participates in Under Sea Warfare Exercise (USWEX)..." WebSite: Commander Submarine Group SEVEN http://www.ctf74.navy.mil/ [01JUN2009]

    Photograph by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Walter M. Wayman

    A P-3C Orion from the "Mad Foxes" of VP-5 patrols as a Los Angeles-class submarine participates in an undersea warfare exercise involving the John C. Stennis Carrier Strike Group and the Japanese Maritime Self-Defense Force. The John C. Stennis Carrier Strike Group is on a scheduled six-month deployment to the western Pacific Ocean.

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraAWC Ryan Kennan "...Naylor Takes Helm from Pregmon May 1 - VP-5 By LT(jg) Kenny Relethford, VP-5 PAO - Thursday, April 30, 2009..." WebSite: JaxAirNews http://adserver1.harvestadsdepot.com/jaxairnews/ss/jaxairnews/ [30APR2009]

    History ThumbnailCameraCDR Frank Naylor Cmdr. Frank Naylor will relieve Cmdr. Matthew Pregmon May 1 in the VP-5 Change of Command ceremony at NAF Kadena, Okinawa, Japan. The VP-5 "Mad Foxes" are in the middle of a six-month deployment supporting operations in both 7th fleet and Southern Command areas of responsibility.

    Naylor, born in Coronado, Calif., grew up in Northern Virginia and Kansas. Upon graduating from the University of Kansas, he was commissioned through the Naval Aviation Officer Cadet Program in June 1990. He went on to earn his pilot "Wings of Gold" at NAS Corpus Christi, Texas

    His first operational tour was with VP-23 of NAS Brunswick, Maine, where he completed two deployments to NAS Sigonella, Sicily, Italy and Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. Nalor also served as the tactical action officer onboard USS John F. Kennedy (CV 67). During his department head tour at VP-5, he completed deployments to the Mediterranean, Arabian Gulf, Iceland and the Caribbean.

    Ashore, Naylor served on the staff of commander, Fleet Air Keflavik in Iceland, as flag aide to commandant Naval District, Washington, and as assistant program manager in P-3 training systems for NAVAIR. He screened for initial aviation operational command in 2006 and was subsequently transferred to the National War College, where he earned a Master of Science in National Security Strategy. Naylor reported to the Mad Foxes as executive officer in 2008.

    History ThumbnailCameraCmdr. Matthew Pregmon During Pregmon's year as commanding officer, VP-5 received its eighth consecutive Retention Excellence Award and reached 30 years of mishap-free flight totaling more than 175,000 hours. He has shaped VP-5 into the squadron that continues to set the standard for maritime patrol aviation.

    Commissioned in 1937 as the Navy's second VP squadron, VP-5 has been a part of every major global conflict, including World War II, Cuban Missile Crisis, Vietnam, Gulf War and the global war on terrorism. The squadron has flown six different types of patrol aircraft, both land- and sea-based.

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraVP-40 History "...Fighting Marlins Take Part In Under Sea Warfare Eexercise by LT(jg) Jason Dietz VP-40 - Thursday, March 26, 2009 (Squadrons Mentioned: VP-5, VP-8, VP-9, VP-40, VP-47 and maintainers from CMO-2, CMO-10, CMO-11 and CPRW-2..." WebSite: Northwest Navigator http://www.northwestnavigator.com/ [27MAR2009]

    Photograph Caption: The Fighting Marlins of VP-40 recently participated in take part in an under sea warfare exercise with the USS John C. Stennis Strike Group off the coast of Okinawa.The Fighting Marlins of VP-40 recently took part in the USS John C. Stennis Strike Group Under Sea Warfare Exercise (USWEX) out of NAF Kadena, Okinawa, Japan.

    One of the largest exercises in recent years, the exercise was conducted overseas in the 7th Fleet area of responsibility. The event took place off the coast of Okinawa and included participants from the Stennis strike group, forward deployed naval forces from CTF-70, maritime patrol forces from CTF-72, three surface ships, three submarines as well as three P-3 aircrews from the Japanese Maritime Self-Defense Force (JMSDF).

    The Fighting Marlins, along with VP-5, VP-8, VP-9, VP-47 and maintainers from CMO-2, CMO-10 and CMO-11, formed a combined detachment under the leadership of Commander, CPRW-2, encompassing sixteen combat aircrews and eight P-3s. They provided continuous 24-hour operational support to the Strike Group throughout the exercise and stood ready alerts able to react to any potential real world events.

    The exercise spanned over five days of around-the-clock operations including several weeks of joint planning with the Strike Group, who was en-route to their six-month Western Pacific (WESTPAC) deployment.

    With an average of three planes airborne at any given time during the exercise, the maintainers tirelessly worked to have aircraft available for real world events including the numerous scheduled exercise events. As expected, they answered the challenge, launching fifty-one sorties of the fifty-two scheduled over the course of the exercise.

    For the Combat aircrews from VP-40 the exercise provided invaluable "real world" experience in a dynamic and fast paced environment.

    The crews successfully balanced the high operational demands and minimum turn-around times without missing a beat. In the condensed time span of the exercise, the detachment amassed just over three hundred flight hours.

    The four Marlin aircrews flew over one hundred hours during sixteen events, which accounted for one-third of the total flight time. They were directly responsible for seven of the fifteen simulated submarine kills by maritime patrol forces during the exercise, highlighting the ASW operational capabilities of the VP Community.

    The success of the strike group laid the foundation for future major exercises within 7th Fleet.

    © 2009 Sound Publishing, Inc.

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCamera090216-N-2491R-008 COMALAPA, EL SALVADOR (Feb. 16, 2009) "...An El Salvadorian insect exterminator sprays Bees that have swarmed on the ladder to the entrance of a Patrol Squadron Five (VP-5) P3-C Orion aircraft. Bees in El Salvador often seek shelter from the heat in aircraft causing operational delays. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Harry J. Rucker III/Released)..." WebSite: NavyNews http://www.navy.mil/ [01MAR2009]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCamera090218-N-2491R-023 COMALAPA, El Salvador (Feb. 18, 2009) "...Capt. Kyle Cozad, Commodore of CPRW-11, speaks to Sailors assigned to the "Mad Foxes" of VP-5 during an all-hands Captain's Call. Cozad is on a visit to deliver a "Bravo Zulu" to VP-5 and CPRW-11 support personnel. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Harry J. Rucker III/Released)..." WebSite: NavyNews http://www.navy.mil/ [21FEB2009]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCamera090212-N-2610F-158 PACIFIC OCEAN (Feb. 12, 2009) "...A P-3C Orion from the "Mad Foxes" of VP-5 patrols as the Seawolf-class submarine USS Seawolf (SSN 21) participates in an under sea warfare exercise involving the John C. Stennis Carrier Strike Group and the Japanese Maritime Self-Defense Force. The John C. Stennis Carrier Strike Group is on a scheduled six-month deployment to the western Pacific Ocean. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Elliott Fabrizio/Released)..." WebSite: NavyNews http://www.navy.mil/ [14FEB2009]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCamera090212-N-8490W-001 OKINAWA, Japan (Feb. 12, 2009) "...Personnel Specialist 3rd Class Lucas Parish, assigned to the "Mad Foxes" of VP-5, plays with children at the Tsukushi-En Childcare Center in Okinawa. Sailors from the "Mad Foxes" danced, sang, and passed out valentines to children as part of a community relations project. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Jason R. Wilson/Released)..." WebSite: NavyNews http://www.navy.mil/ [14FEB2009]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCamera090129-N-8490W-005 OKINAWA, Japan (Jan. 29, 2009) "...Intelligence Specialist Kurt Henrickson, assigned to the "Mad Foxes" of VP-5, picks up trash during a park clean-up community relations project at an Okinawan complex park. VP-5 is on deployment in Okinawa. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Jason R. Wilson)..." WebSite: NavyNews http://www.navy.mil/ [14FEB2009]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCamera090129-N-8490W-004 OKINAWA, Japan (Jan. 29, 2009) "...Sailors from the "Mad Foxes" of VP-5 rake up leaves during a park clean-up community relations project at an Okinawan complex park. VP-5 is on deployment in Okinawa. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Jason R. Wilson/Released)..." WebSite: NavyNews http://www.navy.mil/ [14FEB2009]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCamera090112-N-8490W-003 KADENA AIR BASE, Okinawa (Jan. 9, 2008) "...Aviaton Electrician's Mate Justin Hearn, a maintenance worker assigned to the "Mad Foxes" of VP-5, cleans the port wing of a Navy P-3C Orion aircraft at Kedena Air Base in Okinawa. The "Mad Foxes" are based out of Jacksonville, Fla. and are on a six-month deployment to Okinawa. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Jason R. Wilson/Released)..." WebSite: NavyNews http://www.navy.mil/ [14FEB2009]


    Circa 2008

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraAWC Ryan Kennan "...Keenan awarded Purple Heart By Lt. j.g. Kenny Relethford, VP-5 PAO..." WebSite: JaxAirNews http://adserver1.harvestadsdepot.com/jaxairnews/ss/jaxairnews/ [27NOV2008]

    Photograph Caption: Photo by MC3(AW) Harry Rucker III VP-5 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Matt Pregmon, right, presents AWC Ryan Kennan with the Purple Heart Medal Nov. at All Saints Chapel.

    AWC Ryan Keenan of the VP-5 "Mad Foxes" was recently awarded the Purple Heart Medal in a ceremony at All Saints Chapel for wounds he received as an individual augmentee in Iraq assigned to the First Battalion 506th Infantry Regiment.

    Keenan was serving as a battalion electronic warfare officer in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom. While leading a convoy through Ar Ramadi, Iraq, his Humvee was attacked by an improvised explosive device (IED) that destroyed the vehicle and set it on fire. Disregarding his own injuries, he evacuated three other wounded Soldiers from the vehicle while it was still on fire. After saving the lives of his comrades, Keenan kept his composure and was able to secure the area. He then directed explosive ordnance disposal team operators to disable a second IED nearby.

    Keenan's wife, Denise, watched proudly as VP-5 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Matt Pregmon pinned the Purple Heart Medal to his uniform. The rest of the Mad Foxes stood at attention and listened to the brave actions of their fellow shipmate. These actions reminded each of them of the Navy's core values of honor, courage and commitment. The values will be kept at heart as they prepare for a six-month deployment in December.

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraAircrew Wings "...Wings Oof Gold Awarded To New Aircrew by LT Phillip Sautter - VP-30 Public Affairs Officer (VP-1, VP-4, VP-5, VP-8, VP-10, VP-16, VP-26, VP-30, VP-16, VP-40 and VP-46. ) - Thursday, October 9, 2008..." WebSite: JaxAirNews http://adserver1.harvestadsdepot.com/jaxairnews/ss/jaxairnews/ [09OCT2008]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraLT Jared Raftery "...P-3 Crews Hone Skills In Skies Over First Coast - When not deployed, the anti-submarine and reconnaissance patrols are preparing at Jacksonville Naval Air Station - By Jeff Brumley, The Times-Union - Last modified 8/13/2007 - 6:50 am..." WebSite: JaxAirNews http://adserver1.harvestadsdepot.com/jaxairnews/ss/jaxairnews/ [29SEP2008]

    Photograph Caption: EFF BRUMLEY/The Times-Union - Lt. Jared Raftery, the co-pilot, helps guide the four-engine U.S. Navy P-3 Orion back to base. On Aug. 3, Times-Union reporter Jeff Brumley flew on a training mission aboard a P-3 from CPRW-11 from NAS Jacksonville, Florida to areas off the east coast of Florida.

    P-3 pilot Lt. Cobi Yearian banked the four-engine Orion into a hard right turn as he and his crew searched for a ship that radar told them was four miles ahead but which remained stubbornly invisible to the naked eye in the hazy afternoon.

    Suddenly, the co-pilot, Lt. Jared Raftery, shot forward in his seat and pointed straight ahead.

    "Yeah, I got him," Raftery said before stopping himself. "Oh no, wait, I lost him - no, there he is."

    It had been a rainy morning on the First Coast when the crew of VP-5, the Mad Foxes, took off from NAS Jacksonville, Florida on a training mission. Unfortunately, the weather was the same about 100 miles east of the city, where they had come to practice searching for, identifying and video recording suspicious ships.

    But once they locked eyes on the contact - in this case, a civilian fishing boat - Yearian and Raftery flew around the vessel from about 200 feet up at 250 mph, just as they would for a suspected drug or weapons smuggler.

    "We fly a pattern around it so we can see every aspect," Yearian said. "... If it were a container ship, that might give us an idea of what he has on board."

    First Coast residents could see a P-3 in the skies above them at any point during the year. They are often seen banking sharply over downtown Jacksonville as they follow the St. Johns River back to base. Shoppers at the Target store next to the air station on Roosevelt Boulevard can hear their droning engines throughout the day.

    First delivered to the fleet in 1969, the P-3 Orion was originally designed to hunt Soviet submarines.

    Anti-submarine warfare "is still our primary mission area to this day, but new technologies and weapons systems have allowed us to morph into" battlefield surveillance and reconnaissance roles, said Capt. Sean Buck, Commander of CPRW-11, which runs four P-3 squadrons at NAS Jacksonville, Florida.

    The modern P-3C carries an array of cameras and sensors capable of identifying and targeting all manner of targets at sea and on the ground.

    It is 117 feet long, carries a crew of 11 and up to 20,000 pounds of torpedoes, mines and missiles.

    History ThumbnailCameraVP-5 Crew Lt. Pat Thomas (left), the plane's tactical coordinator, goes over specific tactics and drills to be employed on the upcoming training mission with Lts. Cobi Yearian and Jared Raftery, the pilot and co-pilot.

    'THIS IS A DRILL'

    When the P-3 crews at NAS Jacksonville, Florida aren't deployed to war zones, they are on the First Coast preparing to mobilize, Buck said.

    In addition to identifying surface vessels, Yearian and Raftery's early August flight was to practice laying anti-shipping mines and making sure crew members could find and fight on-board fires, and would know what to do if they had ditch the plane or jump out of it.

    "For a ditch, if there's time, you'll hear the call over the loudspeaker, 'Prepare to ditch, prepare to ditch,' " said Petty Officer 2nd Class Kimberly Townsend, an anti-submarine warfare expert who took part in the training flight over the Atlantic.

    Townsend said being on P-3s is hard work, but beats working at Wal-Mart, which she did in Tennessee before joining the Navy.

    "It's really a pretty awesome job," the Green Cove Springs resident said. "A lot of people don't realize what we do here."

    THE HUB FOR P-3s

    What people also might not realize is that NAS Jacksonville, Florida is becoming P-3 central for the Navy's East Coast operations. The other Atlantic Ocean base that has P-3s, Brunswick NAS in Maine, is set to close. Its squadrons of Orions are to be transferred to Jacksonville beginning in 2009, Buck said.

    And the Jacksonville base is home to the Navy's only training squadron - VP-30 - for P-3 crews.

    The training squadron has 16 planes and about 1,200 people, 500 of them students who rotate in and out every six months or so, said Capt. Tim Brewer, VP-30's commanding officer.

    LAYING (Pretend) MINES

    It may not be the real thing, but even training missions can get the adrenaline flowing, which occurred during the crew's simulated mine-laying exercise.

    "Fifteen hundred feet, 240 knots," Yearian said, confirming the altitude and airspeed that Lt. j.g. Chris McElroy, the crew's navigator, had directed him to attain.

    Yearian pointed to a yellow circle on the cockpit radar screen. It was a point 13 miles ahead where the actual mine run will begin for splash points.

    "Splash points are where the mines will land," Yearian said. "This airspeed and altitude will throw the mine right to those points."

    A few minutes later, McElroy's voice came over the intercom.

    "On course, on speed, stand by weapons drop," he said. "Weapon away, now, now, now."

    Petty Officer 3rd Class Xavier Page was loving it.

    "My friends don't really know what I do because I can't tell them too much," Page said after the mine-laying exercise. "But it's pretty exciting."

    jeff.brumley@jacksonville.com, (904) 359-4310

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraCPO Selectees "...CPO SELECTEES (VP-5, VP-30, VP-62, CPRW-11 and CMO-11) - Thursday, September 4, 2008..." WebSite: JaxAirNews http://adserver1.harvestadsdepot.com/jaxairnews/ss/jaxairnews/ [29AUG2008]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraVP-5 History "...VP-5 Sailor (NC1 Tanarsha Fabian) Honored for 'Bigs in Schools' - Thursday July 10, 2008..." WebSite: JaxAirNews http://adserver1.harvestadsdepot.com/jaxairnews/ss/jaxairnews/ [11JUL2008]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Mad Foxes At Work..." WebSite: Official VP-5 http://www.vp5.navy.mil/ [24JUN2008]

    LEFT TO RIGHT - TOP ROW

      Skipper Pregmon takes command of VP-5, VP-5 Dodge Ball Team, VP-5 Color Guard at VP-5 Change of Command, USS Mad Fox, XO Naylor-AW2 George-MC3 Rucker at the NAS Jax Sports Day and YN3 Ford Makes a Play
    LEFT TO RIGHT - BOTTOM ROW
      A P-3C orion taxis on the flight line, Skipper Pregmon takes command of VP-5, Foxes come home!, VP-5 Tug of War Team and XO Naylor prepares for take off!
    History - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge Thumbnail
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    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraMad Fox Sports "...Mad Fox Sports - Proudly presents our 2008 NAS Jax Softball Champs (even AW1 Cokley made the team!!!)..." WebSite: Official VP-5 http://www.vp5.navy.mil/ [24JUN2008]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "... Commands Go to Battle at MWR Sports Challenge - Story Number: NNS080611-25 - Release Date: 6/11/2008 9:55:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Toiete Jackson, Fleet Public Affairs Center Detachment Southeast. (VP-5 and VR-58)..." WebSite: NavyNews http://www.navy.mil/ [18JUN2008]

    JACKSONVILLE, Fla. (NNS) -- Over 350 Sailors from eight commands aboard NAS Jacksonville, Florida battled it out in the 2008 Command Sports Challenge sponsored by NAS Jacksonville, Florida Morale, Welfare and Recreation Department June 5-6.

    There were record numbers of participants in the team building competition to take on defending champs Personnel Support Detachment Jacksonville.

    "The whole point of the competition is to bring all of the commands together for a friendly competition and to get those that don't particularly participate in intramurals to come out," said Tim McKinney, fitness director for NAS Jax. "There is a traveling trophy that goes around for the commands to show off at their work space."

    The competition began with a 1,500 meter relay. Other events included 3-on-3 basketball, one-pitch softball, an adult tricycle race, and dodgeball.

    The "Mad Foxes" of VP-5 fell to the "Sunseekers" of Fleet Logistics Support Squadron VR-58 in an intense dodgeball match.

    "We knew the Mad Foxes would be tough," said exhausted but elated, Aviation Ordnanceman 2nd Class Michael McCoy assigned to the Sunseekers. "They had us down to one player, but we caught two balls to bring back two teammates, and from there, we closed the deal and moved on to the next round."

    Lance Cpl. James Durnal assigned to Company B, 4th Assault Amphibian Battalion, thought the idea of the competition was awesome even though he was "misinformed" about the auto race.

    "I was all set for the remote control car race that I was signed up for," said Durnal. "I still enjoyed it even when I found out I would be riding an adult-sized tricycle."

    The events on June 6 included 3-on-3 volleyball, washers, tug-of-war, pool relay and the most popular event, the CO's Challenge Canoe Race.

    "This is a great event to have all the commands to come out and show their camaraderie by participating," said Capt. John C. Scorby, NAS Jax commanding officer. "It doesn't matter if you win, as long as you are having fun and from the looks on everyone's face, I think they are."

    The competition ended in a tie for first between NAS Jax and Naval Computer Telecommunications Station Jax, both coming in at 1,150 points and VR-58 taking second place with 1,075 points.

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCamera080605-N-8102J-044 JACKSONVILLE, Fla. (June 5, 2008) "...Yeoman 2nd Class Travis Butler, left, assigned to the "Mad Foxes" of VP-5, performs a fast break during the 2008 Morale, Welfare, and Recreation Command Sports 3-on-3 Challenge basketball tournament while Intel Specialist 2nd Class Allen Tavarez, assigned to the "Pelicans" of VP-45, tries to guard him. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Toiete Jackson (Released)..." WebSite: NavyNews http://www.navy.mil/ [15JUN2008]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraENS. Dan Hansen "...Local Aviator Attends Women's Conference from VP-5 - Thursday, June 12, 2008..." WebSite: JaxAirNews http://adserver1.harvestadsdepot.com/jaxairnews/ss/jaxairnews/ [14JUN2008]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: Wings of Gold Thumbnail "...Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Group - RADM Brian C. Prindle, USN. Wings of Gold - Spring 2008 - Page 6-8. (Squadrons/Wings Referenced: VP-62, VP-69, VQ-1, VQ-2, VPU-1, VPU-2, VP-1, VP-4, VP-5, VP-8, VP-9, VP-10, VP-16, VP-26, VP-30, VP-40, VP-45, VP-46, VP-47, CPRW-2, CPRW-5, CPRW-10 and CPRW-11..." WebSite: Association of Naval Aviation http://www.anahq.org/index.htm [23APR2008]
    Get Adobe Reader
    Open VP History Adobe FileMaritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Group Article 166KB

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCamera080214-N-2491R-045 JACKSONVILLE, Fla. (Feb. 21, 2008) "...Lt. j.g. James Ask assigned to the "Mad Foxes" of Patrol Squadron (VP-5), explains to members of a Congressional Staff how to wear a life preserver aboard a P-3C Orion aircraft before the start of a demonstration flight. The demonstration flight focuses on P-3C missions, current status, and expectations for the future of the Navy's patrol and reconnaissance. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Harry J. Rucker III (Released)..." WebSite: NavyNews http://www.navy.mil/ [26FEB2008]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCamera080214-N-2491R-122 JACKSONVILLE, Fla. (Feb. 21, 2008) "...Aviation Systems Warfare Operator 2nd Class Manuel Castro, assigned to the "Mad Foxes" of Patrol Squadron (VP-5), shows members of a Congressional Staff the sensor 1 and sensor 2 operator stations onboard a P-3C Orion aircraft during a demonstration flight. The demonstration flight focuses on P-3C missions, current status, and expectations for the future of the Navy's patrol and reconnaissance. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Harry J. Rucker III (Released)..." WebSite: NavyNews http://www.navy.mil/ [26FEB2008]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraAT2 Baumgartner and AW2 Supplee "...VP-5 Hosts Students - Thursday, February 21, 2008..." WebSite: JaxAirNews http://adserver1.harvestadsdepot.com/jaxairnews/ss/jaxairnews/ [22FEB2008]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCamera080214-N-2491R-036 JACKSONVILLE, Fla. (Feb. 14, 2008) "...Aviation Warfare Systems Operator 2nd Class Brittany Supplee, assigned to the "Mad Foxes" of Patrol Squadron (VP) 5, shows a visiting JROTC student an internal sonobuoy storage rack aboard a P-3C Orion aircraft. VP-5 hosted the tour to familiarize the students with the jobs and equipment of the Navy reconnaissance community. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Harry J. Rucker III (Released)..." WebSite: NavyNews http://www.navy.mil/ [17FEB2008]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCamera080214-N-2491R-027 JACKSONVILLE, Fla. (Feb. 14, 2008) "...Aviation Electronics Technician 2nd Class Niels Baumgartner, assigned to the "Mad Foxes" of Patrol Squadron (VP) 5 based at Naval Air Station, Jacksonville, explains to a group of visiting JROTC students how a P-3C Orion aircraft uses a sonobuoy. VP-5 hosted the tour to familiarize the students with the jobs and equipment of the Navy reconnaissance community. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Harry J. Rucker III (Released)..." WebSite: NavyNews http://www.navy.mil/ [17FEB2008]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraVP-5 History "...'Mad Foxes' Deck The Halls - Thursday, January 10th, 2008..." WebSite: JaxAirNews http://adserver1.harvestadsdepot.com/jaxairnews/ss/jaxairnews/ [11JAN2008]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCamera090112-N-8490W-003 KADENA AIR BASE, Okinawa (Jan. 9, 2008) "...Aviaton Electrician's Mate Justin Hearn, a maintenance worker assigned to the "Mad Foxes" of Patrol Squadron 5, cleans the port wing of a Navy P-3C Orion aircraft at Kedena Air Base in Okinawa. The "Mad Foxes" are based out of Jacksonville, Fla. and are on a six-month deployment to Okinawa. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Jason R. Wilson/Released)..." WebSite: NavyNews http://www.navy.mil/ [23JAN2009]


    Circa 2007

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraVP-5 History "...'Mad Foxes' of VP-5 Heading OUt on Surge Deployment - Thursday, December 6th, 2007..." WebSite: JaxAirNews http://adserver1.harvestadsdepot.com/jaxairnews/ss/jaxairnews/ [07DEC2007]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraVP-5 ET1 Angelo Echevarria "...Challenge: Key West's Team America Finishes First - Thursday, November 15th, 2007..." WebSite: JaxAirNews http://adserver1.harvestadsdepot.com/jaxairnews/ss/jaxairnews/ [16NOV2007]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraVXS-1 History "...The Mad Foxes by LT(jg) Michael Wiggins - Wings of Gold - Fall 2007 - Page 57..." WebSite: Association Of Naval Aviation http://www.anahq.org/ [15NOV2007]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCamera071025-N-2491R-060 JACKSONVILLE, Fla. (Oct 25, 2007) "...Lt. j.g. James Yach, assigned to the "Mad Foxes" of VP-5, explains to a group of visiting students and their parents how the turbo propeller engines function on a P-3C Orion aircraft. VP-5 hosted the students who were on a field trip with the Christian Home Schooler's Achieving Maximum Potential (CHAMPS) as part of a community relations project. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Harry J. Rucker III (RELEASED)..." WebSite: NavyNews http://www.navy.mil/ view_single.asp?id=52202 [03NOV2007]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCamera071025-N-2491R-025 JACKSONVILLE, Fla. (Oct. 25, 2007) "...Cmdr. Reggie Howard, commanding officer of VP-5, points out to a group of visiting students a P-3C Orion aircraft starting its engines on the flight line. VP-5 hosted the students who were on a field trip with the Christian Home Schooler's Achieving Maximum Potential (CHAMPS) as part of a community relations project. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Harry J. Rucker III (RELEASED)..." WebSite: NavyNews http://www.navy.mil/ view_single.asp?id=52201 [03NOV2007]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraVP-5 Aircrew Olympics "...Aircrew Olympics - Thursday, October 18th, 2007..." WebSite: JaxAirNews http://adserver1.harvestadsdepot.com/jaxairnews/ss/jaxairnews/ [20OCT2007]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraVP-5 History "...VP-5 Participates in Flag-Raising Event - Thursday, September 6th, 2007..." WebSite: JaxAirNews http://adserver1.harvestadsdepot.com/jaxairnews/ss/jaxairnews/ [08SEP2007]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Mad Foxes at Work!..." WebSite: Official VP-5 http://www.vp5.navy.mil/ [08SEP2007]

    TOP ROW:

      YN3 Navarro and YNSN Ford make sure we get the mail, A P-3C orion taxis on the flight line, WWII veterans tour VP-5 spaces and meet and greet our sailors, PS3 Caloca works hard on our records and YN3 "Gonzo" Gonzalez stands watch in NAS Sigonella, Sicily.
    BOTTOM ROW:
      Pre Flight at NAS Brunswick, Foxes come home!, LT Woolard and LCDR Carmona start the props and VP-5 visits local school to demostrate a flag raising.
    History - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge Thumbnail
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    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCamera070824-N-2491R-007 JACKSONVILLE, Fla. (Aug. 24, 2007) "...Lt. j.g. Calvin Staley, Aviation Electronics Technician 2nd Class Nathen Whisler, and Yeoman 2nd Class Soraida Ivanes, assigned to the "Mad Foxes" of VP-5, participate in a flag raising ceremony for the students at Hyde Grove Elementary School. VP-5 Sailors demonstrated to the students the proper way to raise and fold the American flag as part of a community relations project. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Harry J. Rucker III (RELEASED)..." WebSite: NavyNews http://www.news.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=49975 [30AUG2007]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCamera070824-N-2491R-017 JACKSONVILLE, Fla. (Aug. 24, 2007) "...Lt. j.g. Calvin Staley, assigned to the "Mad Foxes" of VP-5, asks students at Hyde Grove Elementary School for volunteers to help fold the American flag. VP-5 Sailors demonstrated to the students the proper way to raise and fold the American flag as part of a community relations project. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Harry J. Rucker III (RELEASED)..." WebSite: NavyNews http://www.news.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=49976 [30AUG2007]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCamera070813-N-2491R-018 JACKSONVILLE, Florida (Aug. 13, 2007) "...Sailors assigned to Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing CPRW-11 inspect the flight line of Naval Air Station NAS Jacksonville, Florida for foreign object debris (FOD). CPRW-11 is comprised of three operational squadrons, VP-5, VP-16, and VP-45, with 38 maritime patrol aircraft deployable worldwide. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Harry J. Rucker III (RELEASED)..." WebSite: NavyNews http://www.news.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=49510 [15AUG2007]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...P-3 crews hone skills in skies over First Coast - When not deployed, the anti-submarine and reconnaissance patrols are preparing at Jacksonville Naval Air Station - By Jeff Brumley, The Times-Union - 8/13/2007 - 6:50 am..." WebSite: Florida Times-Union http://www.jacksonville.com/ tu-online/ stories/ 081307/ met_190903389.shtml [14AUG2007]

    History ThumbnailCameraLt. Jared Raftery EFF BRUMLEY/The Times-Union - Lt. Jared Raftery, the co-pilot, helps guide the four-engine U.S. Navy P-3 Orion back to base. On Aug. 3, Times-Union reporter Jeff Brumley flew on a training mission aboard a P-3 from Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing 11 from Jacksonville Naval Air Station to areas off the east coast of Florida.

    History ThumbnailCameraLt. Jared Raftery EFF BRUMLEY/The Times-Union - Lt. Pat Thomas (left), the plane's tactical coordinator, goes over specific tactics and drills to be employed on the upcoming training mission with Lts. Cobi Yearian and Jared Raftery, the pilot and co-pilot.

    P-3 pilot Lt. Cobi Yearian banked the four-engine Orion into a hard right turn as he and his crew searched for a ship that radar told them was four miles ahead but which remained stubbornly invisible to the naked eye in the hazy afternoon.

    Suddenly, the co-pilot, Lt. Jared Raftery, shot forward in his seat and pointed straight ahead.

    "Yeah, I got him," Raftery said before stopping himself. "Oh no, wait, I lost him - no, there he is."

    It had been a rainy morning on the First Coast when the crew of Patrol Squadron 5, the Mad Foxes, took off from Jacksonville Naval Air Station on a training mission. Unfortunately, the weather was the same about 100 miles east of the city, where they had come to practice searching for, identifying and video recording suspicious ships.

    But once they locked eyes on the contact - in this case, a civilian fishing boat - Yearian and Raftery flew around the vessel from about 200 feet up at 250 mph, just as they would for a suspected drug or weapons smuggler.

    "We fly a pattern around it so we can see every aspect," Yearian said. "... If it were a container ship, that might give us an idea of what he has on board."

    First Coast residents could see a P-3 in the skies above them at any point during the year. They are often seen banking sharply over downtown Jacksonville as they follow the St. Johns River back to base. Shoppers at the Target store next to the air station on Roosevelt Boulevard can hear their droning engines throughout the day.

    First delivered to the fleet in 1969, the P-3 Orion was originally designed to hunt Soviet submarines.

    Anti-submarine warfare "is still our primary mission area to this day, but new technologies and weapons systems have allowed us to morph into" battlefield surveillance and reconnaissance roles, said Capt. Sean Buck, commander of Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing 11, which runs four P-3 squadrons at Jacksonville NAS.

    The modern P-3C carries an array of cameras and sensors capable of identifying and targeting all manner of targets at sea and on the ground.

    It is 117 feet long, carries a crew of 11 and up to 20,000 pounds of torpedoes, mines and missiles.

    'This is a drill'

    When the P-3 crews at Jacksonville NAS aren't deployed to war zones, they are on the First Coast preparing to mobilize, Buck said.

    In addition to identifying surface vessels, Yearian and Raftery's early August flight was to practice laying anti-shipping mines and making sure crew members could find and fight on-board fires, and would know what to do if they had ditch the plane or jump out of it.

    "For a ditch, if there's time, you'll hear the call over the loudspeaker, 'Prepare to ditch, prepare to ditch,' " said Petty Officer 2nd Class Kimberly Townsend, an anti-submarine warfare expert who took part in the training flight over the Atlantic.

    Townsend said being on P-3s is hard work, but beats working at Wal-Mart, which she did in Tennessee before joining the Navy.

    "It's really a pretty awesome job," the Green Cove Springs resident said. "A lot of people don't realize what we do here."

    The hub for P-3s

    What people also might not realize is that Jacksonville NAS is becoming P-3 central for the Navy's East Coast operations. The other Atlantic Ocean base that has P-3s, Brunswick NAS in Maine, is set to close. Its squadrons of Orions are to be transferred to Jacksonville beginning in 2009, Buck said.

    And the Jacksonville base is home to the Navy's only training squadron - Patrol Squadron 30 - for P-3 crews.

    The training squadron has 16 planes and about 1,200 people, 500 of them students who rotate in and out every six months or so, said Capt. Tim Brewer, VP-30's commanding officer.

    Laying (pretend) mines

    It may not be the real thing, but even training missions can get the adrenaline flowing, which occurred during the crew's simulated mine-laying exercise.

    "Fifteen hundred feet, 240 knots," Yearian said, confirming the altitude and airspeed that Lt. j.g. Chris McElroy, the crew's navigator, had directed him to attain.

    Yearian pointed to a yellow circle on the cockpit radar screen. It was a point 13 miles ahead where the actual mine run will begin for splash points.

    "Splash points are where the mines will land," Yearian said. "This airspeed and altitude will throw the mine right to those points."

    A few minutes later, McElroy's voice came over the intercom.

    "On course, on speed, stand by weapons drop," he said. "Weapon away, now, now, now."

    Petty Officer 3rd Class Xavier Page was loving it.

    "My friends don't really know what I do because I can't tell them too much," Page said after the mine-laying exercise. "But it's pretty exciting."

    jeff.brumley@jacksonville.com, (904) 359-4310

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraSailors Of The Quarter "...Sailors Of The Quarter - CPRW-11, VP-5, VP-16 and VP-30 - Thursday, August 9th, 2007..." WebSite: JaxAirNews http://adserver1.harvestadsdepot.com/jaxairnews/ss/jaxairnews/ [10AUG2007]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...VP-5 July Newsletter..." WebSite: VP-5 http://www.vp5.navy.mil/ [06AUG2007]

    History - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge Thumbnail

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraVP-5 ORM Video "...VP-5 Presents the 5 Phases of 'ORM' - WMV File 4.5 MB!..." WebSite: VP-5 http://www.vp5.navy.mil/ [10JUN2007]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraVP-5 History "...Mad Foxes Back In Their Den - June 8, 2007 - Don Burk/The Times-Union..." Contributed by CAVINESS, CAPT Claude P. Retired cavinessfl@fdn.com [10JUN2007]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraPhotograph's by MC1(AW) Melissa "...Mad Foxes return home - Mission accomplished for VP-5 squadron - By MCSN(AW) Harry Rucker III, VP-5 - Last modified Wed., June 06, 2007 - 05:52 PM..." WebSite: Jacksonville.com http://www.jacksonville.com/tu-online/stories/060807/met_175558404.shtml [09JUN2007]

    Waiting for permission to post entire article.

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraDON BURK/The Times-Union "....'Honey, I'm home from work' - Members of a Navy patrol squadron are back from deployment. - By Jeff Brumley, The Times-Union - Last modified 6/7/2007 - 11:52 pm..." WebSite: Jacksonville.com http://www.jacksonville.com/tu-online/stories/060807/met_175558404.shtml [09JUN2007]

    Waiting for permission to post entire article.

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCamera070517-N-2491R-018 SIGONELLA, Sicily (May 17, 2007) "...Aviation Warfare Systems Operator 2nd Class Ashley Peeden, assigned to the "Mad Foxes" of VP-5, defends herself in a jousting contest during the 2007 Armed Forces Command Challenge sponsored by Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR). The event was held so Naval Air Station Sigonella commands could compete against each other for a trophy and bragging rights. VP-5 is forward deployed in support of Maritime Security Operations (MSO) and the global war on terrorism. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Harry J. Rucker III (RELEASED)..." WebSite: NavyNews http://www.news.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=46273 [25MAY2007]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraLjg Sarah Wollard helps serve lunch to the children. "...Raises $1,500 in gifts for local children - By: Lt. j. g. Jared Raftery..." WebSite: VP-5 http://www.vp5.navy.mil/index.php?id=1221&secid=20 [11JUN2007]

    Despite being separated from their families, the "Mad Foxes" of VP-5 made this Christmas memorable by donating $1,500 in toys and clothes to children of El Salvador.

    A week before Christmas, the squadron members raised $900 to purchase toys and clothes for the youngsters at Shalom Children's Home. A few days later, the aircrew and maintainers rallied once again, and raised another $600 to purchase gifts for the children of the Quality Hotel employees.

    The average worker earns $200 per month in El Salvador, a country still recovering from a 13-year civil war. VP-5 has 90 personnel stationed there to support regional efforts to prevent the flow of illicit drugs destined for United States and other partner nations.

    To make the holiday memorable for the children in El Salvador, VP-5 went to the children's home. Don and Rose Ann Benner founded the home in 1976, just as the civil war was breaking out. For 30 years, hundreds of children have been touched by their affection. The Santo Tomas location grew into 10 buildings, where children under their care receive shelter, clothing, food, medical care, and education in a Christian environment. Currently, they host 77 children ranging in ages from newborns to 18 years old.

    "Due to the high number of children under our care, it would have been financially difficult to get every child a gift. Without VP-5's help, each child was going to simply receive candy," said Rose Benner.

    After a tour of the spaces, VP-5 presented each of the 77 children individual gifts. Additionally, a tri-wall full of toys, clothes, and school supplies was donated by Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Sea Operations Detachment. To express their thanks, the children organized on stage and performed songs for the group.

    IS1 Kim Danner and PS1 Joy Cassie-Leach were instrumental in organizing this unforgettable event. "This experience left me speechless. I would not have traded this for anything in the world," said Cassie-Leach.

    But, VP-5's overwhelming generosity did not stop there. The squadron also gave to the families of the people who serve them everyday – the hotel staff. The "Mad Foxes" went back into their pockets, and collected another $600 for presents. During a special party for the hotel's children, squadron members served food and distributed gift bags to more than 80 children.

    "You do not know how much this means to our families," said Miriam Lopez, general manager of the hotel.

    One father also expressed his thanks stating, "Our people are deeply grateful for all your generosity."

    More than 15 squadron members were part of the tremendous team effort to raise donations, shop for presents, wrap gifts, and serve food.

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Front Office News - CO's Corner..." WebSite: VP-5 Official Site http://www.vp5.navy.mil/index.php?id=541&secid=20 [02JUL2007]

    Dear Mad Fox spouses,

    I would like to begin by telling you all how excited I am about the upcoming year. This past year has truly been an incredible experience and my challenge is to make this next one even better. I want this to be the best year for every Mad Fox family. How will we accomplish this? Well I think it begins with each and every one of you. In my COC speech I referred to what I feel is the key word to facilitate success. That word is RESPECT. If we respect each other and look beyond our own personal desires but look toward what is best for everyone, this will be a huge step in the right direction to give this squadron an even greater sense of family. Toward that end I want to hear from you. Communication back and forth will be the key to achieving that success. We must make sure that when we have activities the word gets out early and accurately.

    As I told your spouses, I want us to get the CORE of what being a Mad Fox is all about. That CORE is 1. COMMITMENT: I want you to know and feel that the squadron is committed to making you a priority. I want you to feel that this squadron cares about you and your family's happiness and that we listen to your needs and wants. 2. OPPORTUNITY: That you are afforded the opportunity to participate in squadron activities and that your ideas are given a chance to produce results. 3. RESPECT: That your time with your spouse and your desires are respected. That you feel that you are a part of the process not just at the mercy of it. 4. EFFORT: Your VP-5 team that starts with me, XO, CMC and the Ombudsman provide the type of effort that results in success. We aspire to make every event the best it can be.

    I have challenged the Ombudsman to solicit ideas and concepts from the spouses for activities that will make this squadron even stronger. I want to know what bothers you and what you think is needed to make this squadron strong. If it is a Spouse Support Group then let's do it. If it is family picnics every week then let's try it. Every idea will be considered. I want your participation. I want to take this time to form the relationships that will make our VP-5 family as strong as possible prior to the next deployment. I want you all to enjoy our social events to the point that you regret missing them and will change plans to be at them.

    I have challenged the squadron leadership to plan in as much detail as possible. I want your spouses to be able to commit to family activities without last minute cancellations due to poor planning on our part. I will be very demanding on this because I know that there is nothing worse than disappointing a child or spouse due to something that could have been avoided. br>
    My promise to you is that I will try. I will never stop putting forth the effort to make this a fun year for us all. There will be disappointments and there will be hard times, but my goal is for us to see those times through together as a family. Your happiness is very important to me and I am willing to do whatever it takes to make this a happy, successful year. I am committed and I am hoping that I can inspire the same level of commitment from each one of you.

    I would like to thank Skipper Klavon, CMC Dubiel and their families. We were all blessed by having them in the squadron and they will be missed.

    In closing I would like welcome XO Pregmon and his wife Kathy, CMC Alcott and his wife Vivian, Melissa DeBaecke our new Ombudsman, and Tiffany Oliver our new assistant Ombudsman. This group is committed to making this a great year. We want and need your help to make that happen. Please join us on what I anticipate being a fantastic, fun filled journey.

    Skipper Howard

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCamera070502-N-2491R-066 SIGONELLA, Sicily (May 2, 2007) "...The official party salutes the colors at the beginning of the change of command ceremony for VP-5. Cmdr. Reggie Howard relieved Cmdr. Brent R. Klavon as commanding officer while on deployment in Sigonella, Sicily, from Naval Air Station Jacksonville, Fla. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Harry J. Rucker III (RELEASED)..." WebSite: NavyNews http://www.news.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=45700 [11MAY2007]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCamera070502-N-2491R-089 SIGONELLA, Sicily (May 2, 2007) "...VP-5 Commanding Officer, Cmdr. Reggie Howard, bows his head during a prayer given at the end of his change of command ceremony. Howard relieved Cmdr. Brent R. Klavon while on deployment in Sigonella, Sicily, from Naval Air Station Jacksonville, Fla. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Harry J. Rucker III (RELEASED)..." WebSite: NavyNews http://www.news.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=45702 [11MAY2007]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCamera070502-N-2491R-049 SIGONELLA, Sicily (May 2, 2007) "...Patrol Squadron Five (VP) 5 Executive Officer, Cmdr. Reggie Howard, receives his command-at-sea pin pinned on by his wife. Howard relieved Cmdr. Brent R. Klavon as commanding officer while on deployment in Sigonella, Sicily, from Naval Air Station Jacksonville, Fla. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Harry J. Rucker III (RELEASED)..." WebSite: NavyNews http://www.news.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=45701 [11MAY2007]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCamera070429-N-2491R-007 SIGONELLA, Sicily (April 29, 2007) "...Aviation Warfare Systems Operator 1st Class Danny Scull, assigned to the "Mad Foxes" of VP-5 explains to a group of visiting Italians how a sonobuoy is part of the search stores aboard a P-3C Orion aircraft. VP-5 hosted the tour to help boost community relations (COMREL) for Naval Air Station Sigonella. VP-5 is deployed in support of Maritime Security Operations (MSO) and the global war on terrorism. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Harry J. Rucker III (RELEASED)..." WebSite: NavyNews http://www.news.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=45569 [11MAY2007]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraChange-of-Command "...VP-5 Hold Change-of-Command - Thursday, May 10th, 2007 Vol. 65 - No. 19..." WebSite: JaxAirNews http://www.jaxairnews.com/ [11MAY2007]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraSailor Of The Quarter "...Sailor Of The Quarter - Menitoned: VP-4, VP-16, VP-30, VP-45 and CPRW-11 - Thursday, May 3rd, 2007 Vol. 65 - No. 18..." WebSite: JaxAirNews http://www.jaxairnews.com/ [04MAY2007]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VP-8 Patch ThumbnailCameraOperation Enduring Freedom "...VP-5, VP-8, VP-10, VP-26, VP-40 and VP-45 - Deployment PATRON Al Udeid Air Base, Qatar Dec 2006 - Jun 2007..." Contributed by LT Donald W. Hartsell donald.hartsell@navy.mil [03MAY2007]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...VP-5 Command Structure..." WebSite: VP-5 http://www.vp5.navy.mil/ [01MAY2007]

    History ThumbnailCameraCO - CDR Reginald Howard Commander Brent Klavon was born and raised in Pittsburgh , Pennsylvania . He graduated from Pennsylvania State University with a Bachelors of Science degree in 1988, received his commission via NROTC and subsequently began flight training. In June 1989 he received his pilot wings.

    Upon completion of Fleet Replacement Squadron (FRS) training at VP-31, Commander Klavon reported to the Golden Eagles of VP-9 stationed at Moffett Field , California in January 1990. He completed a deployment to Misawa , Japan and detachments to Adak , Alaska and Panama . He conducted a home port duty station change with VP-9 leaving Moffett Field for Barbers Point , Hawaii in 1993. He served as the Pilot NATOPS Officer, Tactics Officer and qualified as Patrol Plane Commander, Functional Check Pilot, Mission Commander and Instructor Pilot.

    In March 1993, Commander Klavon reported to VP-30 in Jacksonville , Florida . He served as Pilot Training Officer, qualified as a Pilot Instructor Under Training (IUT) Instructor and Fleet NATOPS Pilot Evaluator.

    In July 1996, Commander Klavon reported aboard USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71) in Norfolk , Virginia as the Assistant Navigator. He qualified as Officer of the Deck (Underway) and Conning Alongside Officer and deployed to the Mediterranean Sea and Arabian Gulf .

    In June 1998, he reported to the Bureau of Naval Personnel, Millington , Tennessee as an Aviation Officer Detailer for the P-3 Community.

    In June 2000, he reported to the Pelicans of VP-45 located at Jacksonville , Florida for his Operational Department Head tour. He completed deployments to Sigonella , Sicily and Roosevelt Roads, Puerto Rico while serving as the Safety Officer and Maintenance Officer.

    In April 2002, he reported to the Chief of Naval Operations staff, Director, Naval Air Warfare, Washington D.C. as the Broad Area Maritime Surveillance Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Requirements Officer.

    In March 2004, he reported to VP-30 in Jacksonville , Florida as the Executive Officer prior to joining VP-5 in April 2005.

    His awards include Meritorious Service Medal, Air Medal, Navy Commendation Medal (three awards), Navy Achievement Medal and unit and campaign decorations.

    History ThumbnailCameraXO - CDR Brent Klavon Commander Reggie Howard was born and raised in Macon , Georgia . He graduated from the United States Naval Academy in 1989 with a Bachelors of Science degree in Engineering. He attended flight school in October of 1989 and was designated a Naval Flight Officer in April of 1991.

    He reported to the "Fighting Marlins" of VP-40 in Moffett Field, California in January of 1992 after Fleet Replacement Squadron(FRS) training in VP-31. While in VP-40 he served as the Human Resource Officer, AW Division Officer, ASW Tactics Officer, NFO Training Officer and NFO Natops Officer while completing deployments to the Western Pacific and the Caribbean . He also conducted a homeport duty station change with VP-40 leaving Moffett Field for Whidbey Island , Washington in 1993.

    In July 1995, Commander Howard reported to VP-30, the Fleet Replacement Squadron, where he served as MCS Coordinator, NFO Schedules Officer, Line Division Officer, Fleet Natops NFO Evaluator and Natops Division Officer.

    Commander Howard next reported to Commander, Carrier Group Six in August 1998 where he served as aide and flag secretary. While assigned, the staff deployed to the Mediterranean Sea and Arabian Gulf embarked in USS John F Kennedy (CV-67) during its Millennium cruise in support of Operation Southern Watch.

    In March 2001, he reported to VP-45 in Jacksonville, Florida for his Department Head tour where he completed a split-site deployment to Keflavik, Iceland and Roosevelt Roads, Puerto Rico. During this tour, he served as Operations Officer, Keflavik Officer-in-Charge, Training Officer and Tactics Officer.

    In April 2003, Commander Howard reported to the OPNAV staff at the Pentagon as the Deputy Executive Assistant to the Director, Air Warfare (N78).

    In August 2004, following his Pentagon tour, Commander Howard attended the National Defense University and received a Masters of Science in National Security Strategy from the National War College.

    Commander Howard's personal awards include the Meritorious Service Medal, three Navy Commendation Medals, Navy Achievement Medal along with various unit and campaign awards.

    Commander Howard is married to the former Jodie Marie Paul of Miami , Florida . They have three children: Olivia, Grant and India Rose.

    History ThumbnailCameraCMC - Mark Dubiel Master Chief (SW) Mark A. Dubiel entered the United States Navy in November 1980. Following completion of recruit training at RTC Great Lakes, he attended Electronic Warfare Technician Training at NTTC Corry Station Pensacola, FL.

    He reported as USS Mount Baker's (AE 34) first Electronic Warfare (EW) Technician and oversaw the installation of the AN/SLQ-32 and standup of the Ship's Electronic Warfare Workcenter. He attained the rank of First Class Petty Officer, earned his Enlisted Surface Warfare qualification, and deployed to the Mediterranean Sea and Indian Ocean .

    In May 1987, he reported to USS Doyle (FFG 39) as leading EW. He attained the rank of Chief Petty Officer and deployed to the Arabian Gulf . In October 1989, he transferred to Fleet Training Center , Mayport FL. He was designated as a Master Training Specialist and earned the Association of Old Crows Award for training.

    After transferring in October 1992, he reported to USS Philippine Sea (CG 58) as the Leading Chief Petty Officer of OT Division. He attained the rank of Senior Chief and deployed to the Mediterranean Sea and Adriatic Sea . In August 1995, he reported to Commander Carrier Group SIX as Assistant Electronic Warfare Officer and attained the rank of Master Chief. He deployed to the Northern Atlantic, Arabian Gulf, Mediterranean Sea and Adriatic Sea on board USS America (CV 66), USS Mount Whitney (LCC 20), and USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74).

    Master Chief Dubiel reported in January 1999 to the staff of the Chief of Naval Operations as the Requirements Officer for Surface Ship Electronic Warfare Systems. He was selected for the Command Master Chief Program and assumed duties aboard USS Hue City (CG 66) from June 2001 to June 2004 prior to reporting as VP-5 Command Master Chief.

    His personal awards include the Meritorious Service Medal, Navy Commendation Medal (three awards), Navy Achievement Medal (two awards), and Good Conduct Medal (five awards).

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCamera070416-N-3855M-001 SIGONELLA, Sicily (April 17, 2007) "...Aviation Electronics Technician 3rd Class Jose M. Cruz, assigned to Consolidated Maintenance Organization (CMO) in support of the "Mad Foxes" of VP-5, checks oil levels making sure RPMs are good before start of a low power maintenance turn on a P-3C Orion aircraft. VP-5, homeport Jacksonville, Fla., is forward deployed in support of maritime security operations and the global war on terrorism. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class G. Wade McKinnon (REALEASED)..." WebSite: Navy NewsStand http://www.news.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=45184 [18APR2007]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCamera070413-N-2491R-054 SIGONELLA, Sicily (April 13, 2007) "...VP-5 Executive Officer, Cmdr. Reggie Howard, performs the curl-up portion of the Navy's semi-annual Physical Fitness Assessment (PFA) held aboard NAS Sigonella, Sicily. VP-5, homeported in NAS Jacksonville, Florida, is forward deployed in support of Maritime Security Operations (MSO) and the global war on terrorism. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Harry J. Rucker III (RELEASED)..." WebSite: Navy NewsStand http://www.news.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=45073 [14APR2007]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Maritime exercise with North Africa under way - Stars and Stripes - European edition, Wednesday, April 11, 2007..." WebSite: Stars and Stripes http://www.estripes.com/article.asp?section=104&article=45015 [12APR2007]

    Phoenix Express, a two-week exercise to strengthen U.S. and European maritime partnerships with North Africa, began Tuesday.

    Eleven nations will train in the Mediterranean Sea and Atlantic Ocean in an agenda that includes maritime interdiction, search and rescue, division tactics and medical practices. Participating are armed forces from Algeria, France, Greece, Italy, Malta, Morocco, Portugal, Spain, Tunisia, Turkey and the United States, the Navy said in a news release.

    USS Nassau and USS Kauffman, both home ported in Norfolk, Va., will participate with Marines based in NS Rota, Spain, and VP-5 air assets based in NAS Sigonella, Sicily.

    The Military Sealift Command fleet oiler USNS Patuxent also will participate.

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Exercise Strengthens Maritime Partnerships With North Africa - By American Forces Press Service - Apr 10, 2007 - 5:29:19 PM..." WebSite: Blackanthem http://www.blackanthem.com/ News/ International_21/ Exercise_Strengthens_Maritime_Partnerships_With_North_Africa5675.shtml [11APR2007]

    Waiting for permission to post entire article.

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraPhoto by MC1(SW) G. Wade McKinnon "...P-3C Maintenance. Thursday, April 5, 2007 Vol. 65 - No. 14..." WebSite: JaxAirNews http://www.jaxairnews.com/ [06APR2007]

    AT2 Kenneth Wheeler of VP-5, installs intake covers on the P-3C Orion aircraft March 30. VP-5 is forward deployed to NAS Sigonella, Sicily in support of martime security operations and the global war on terrorism. ATAN Ashley Smith and AT3 Justin Thurman assigned to Consolidated Maintenance Organization in support of the "Mad Foxes" of VP-5, re-install an antenna on a P-3C Orion aircraft March 27.

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCamera070330-N-3855M-002 SIGONELLA, Sicily (March 30, 2007) "...Aviation Electronics Technician 2nd Class Kenneth R. Wheeler assigned to the "Mad Foxes" of VP-5 installs intake covers on the P-3C Orion aircraft. VP-5, homeport NAS Jacksonville, Florida is forward deployed in support of Maritime Security Operations (MSO) and the global war on terrorism. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class G. Wade McKinnon (RELEASED)..." WebSite: Navy NewsStand http://www.news.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=44552 [31MAR2007]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCamera070327-N-3855M-001 SIGONELLA, Sicily (March 27, 2007) "...Aviation Technician Airman Ashley R. Smith and Aviation Technician 3rd Class Justin L. Thurman, assigned to the "Mad Foxes" of VP-5, reinstall an antennae on a P-3C Orion aircraft. VP-5, homeported in NAS Jacksonville, Florida is forward deployed in support of Maritime Security Operations (MSO) and the global war on terrorism. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class G. Wade McKinnon (RELEASED)..." WebSite: Navy NewsStand http://www.news.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=44456 [31MAR2007]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCamera070303-N-2491R-186 SIGONELLA, Sicily (March 3, 2007) "...Aviation Maintenance Administrationman Felicia Ceasor, assigned to the "Mad Foxes" of VP-5, participates in a tricycle race during the "Over the Hump" party. The party, sponsored by Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) and the First Class Petty Officers Association, marks the midway point of VP-5s deployment. VP-5 is forward deployed in support of Maritime Security Operations (MSO) and the global war on terrorism. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Harry J. Rucker III (RELEASED)..." WebSite: Navy NewsStand http://www.news.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=43659 [20MAR2007]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraAZ2 Felicia Ceasor "...Over the hump - Photo by MCSN Harry Rucker III - Thursday, March 15, 2007..." WebSite: JaxAirNews http://adserver1.harvestadsdepot.com/jaxairnews/ss/jaxairnews/ [16MAR2007]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCamera070222-N-2491R-039 Sigonella, Sicily (Feb. 22, 2007) "...Aviation Electronics Technician 3rd Class Kevonte Daniels, assigned to the "Mad Foxes" of VP-5, cleans an engine part during a quarterly Isochronal Scheduled Inspection System (ISIS). During the ISIS, Sailors check every part of the engine to make sure they are free of discrepancies so the aircraft will function properly. VP-5, homeported in NAS Jacksonville, Florida is forward deployed in support of Maritime Security Operations (MSO) and the global war on terrorism. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Harry J. Rucker III (RELEASED)..." WebSite: Navy NewsStand http://www.news.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=43413 [04MAR2007]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCamera070222-N-2491R-038 Sigonella, Sicily (Feb. 22, 2007) "...Sailors assigned to the "Mad Foxes" of VP-5 conduct a quarterly Isochronal Scheduled Inspection System (ISIS) on an engine of a P-3C Orion. During the ISIS, Sailors check every part of the engine to make sure they are free of discrepancies so the aircraft will function properly. VP-5, homeported in NAS Jacksonville, Florida is forward deployed in support of Maritime Security Operations (MSO) and the global war on terrorism. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Harry J. Rucker III (RELEASED)..." WebSite: Navy NewsStand http://www.news.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=43412 [04MAR2007]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraAT3 Kevonte Daniels "...Inspecting Aircraft Parts..." WebSite: JaxAirNews http://www.jaxairnews.com/ [02MAR2007]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCamera070207-N-2491R-048 Sigonella, Sicily (Feb. 7, 2007) "...Aviation ordnanceman, assigned to the "Mad Foxes" of VP-5, load a AGM-65 Maverick captive air-launched training missile (CATM) to a pylon attached to the wing of a P-3C Orion aircraft. VP-5, homeported in NAS Jacksonville, Florida, is forward deployed in support of maritime patrol operations and the global war on terrorism. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Harry J. Rucker III (RELEASED)..." WebSite: Navy NewsStand http://www.news.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=42849 [10FEB2007]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCamera070207-N-2491R-041 Sigonella, Sicily (Feb. 7, 2007) "...Aviation ordnancemen, assigned to the "Mad Foxes" of VP-5, run a cable from the 196DE Hoist to help lift a AGM-65 Maverick captive air-launched training missile (CATM) to a pylon attached to the wing of a P-3C Orion aircraft. VP-5, homeported in NAS Jacksonville, Florida, is forward deployed in support of maritime patrol operations and the global war on terrorism. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Harry J. Rucker III (RELEASED)..." WebSite: Navy NewsStand http://www.news.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=42848 [10FEB2007]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCamera070111-N-2491R-060 Sigonella, Sicily (Jan. 11, 2007) "...Aviation Electronics Mate 3rd Class Kevonte Daniels, assigned to the "Mad Foxes" of Patrol Squadron Five (VP-5), repairs propeller balance cables that gauge the exhaust inlet temperature on a P-3C Orion aircraft. VP-5, homeported in NAS Jacksonville, Florida, is forward deployed in support of Maritime Security Operations (MSO) and the global war on terrorism. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Harry J. Rucker III (RELEASED)..." WebSite: Navy NewsStand http://www.news.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=42073 [10FEB2007]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraPhoto by MCSN Harry Rucker III "...VP-5 Participates in Run - February 8, 2007..." WebSite: JaxAirNews http://www.jaxairnews.com/ [09FEB2007]

    Photograph Caption: Sailors assigned to VP-5 participate in Moral, Welfare, and Recreation-sponsored "Base 2 Base Run" January 27. More than 140 service members and family participated in the annual seven-mile run that takes place between NAS Sigonella, Sicily I and NAS Sigonella, Sicily II. VP-5, homeported in NAS Jacksonville, Florida, is forward deployed in support of maritime security operations and the global war on terrorism.

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraPhoto by MCSN Harry Rucker III "...VP-5 Visits the Pecorino Institute - VP-5 Public Affairs - February 7, 2007..." WebSite: JaxAirNews http://www.jaxairnews.com/ [08FEB2007]

    Photograph Caption: Sailors assigned to VP-5 play with children at the Pecorino Institute, a Sicilian school for handicapped children Jan. 31. VP-5 provided the institution with supplies, games, and toys as part of a voluntary community relations project. VP-5, homeported in Jacksonville, is forward deployed in support of maritime security operations and the global war on terrorism.

    The "Mad Foxes" of VP-5, based out of NAS Jacksonville, Florida, paid a visit to the Percorino Institute, a Sicilian school for handicapped children, Jan. 31.

    Eleven Sailors participated in the community relations (COMREL) project that provided the institution with supplies, games and toys for the children who attend there. Erio Pappalardo, liaison and translator for the institution, says that deployed patrol squadrons have been volunteering there since 1962.

    "The school has benefited greatly from VP-5 and other squadrons over the years, not only with construction done to the building but also with time spent with the children," said Pappalardo. After an introduction to the staff and coffee, traditional Italian hospitality, the Sailors of VP-5 set out to greet the children with new toys and games.

    PR1 Barbara Strahl, who coordinated the COMREL project said, "It was a wonderful experience; I enjoyed the reaction of all the children when they received all their toys. I can't wait to go back." The Sailors spent over three hours with the children entertaining and being entertained.

    IS3 Joshua Predieri said, "I was speechless, just to see how excited these kids were to receive the toys we brought them."

    Sailors from VP-5 regularly spend their free time during deployment volunteering for various COMREL projects. VP-5 is forward deployed in support of maritime security operations and the global war on terrorism.

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...CO's Corner - Skipper's Message - Dear Mad Fox Families - January 2007..." WebSite: VP-5 http://www.vp5.navy.mil/ [03FEB2007]

    I hope your holidays were safe and enjoyable.

    The Mad Foxes are doing extremely well around the world. I'm very proud to be on the same team with your spouse or loved one. I'd like to take a moment and provide a deployment update.

    In El Salvador our crews have not missed a single mission as they continue to fight the war on drugs. We believe VP-5 has set an unofficial record for helping to capture over 7 metric tons of illicit drugs with an estimated street value of nearly 1 billion dollars! The El Sal team has been very busy helping the local community, donating Christmas toys to a nearby orphanage and hosting a children's party at the hotel they live in. From all accounts your Mad Foxes were just as blessed as the grateful children.

    In Djibouti operations are very busy. I visited Djibouti for Christmas and spent a week with the "Dessert Foxes", savoring the interesting quality of life in Eastern Africa ! The Desert Foxes have taken the whole concept of teamwork to a new level as they all pitch in and help each other, whether it's fixing aircraft or flying missions. The Desert Foxes continue to support the war on terror and have truly impressed leadership with their professionalism and "can do" spirit.

    In Sigonella the command has continued to meet every mission and enters January with a perfect record supporting its NATO requirements. The Mad Foxes are becoming wonderful ambassadors as they have donated food to a local food bank and have started mentoring school children in the NAS Sig DoDD school system. They are also busy planning for forthcoming detachments to Eastern Europe and Western Africa in the new year.

    In Jacksonville I stand in awe as you evoke super human skills to raise a family, or manage to get through the loneliness of holiday without your Mad Fox. We realize the challenges you all face back home and our hearts stay with you as do our prayers. You are as important to the team as anyone in VP-5. Thank you for your continued sacrifice as you cope with the daily challenges of your own back in the states. I encourage you to keep the lines of communication open with the various support networks, and consider the proverb "As iron sharpens iron, so one man sharpens another." While this proverb seems to work better with military audiences, it's still applicable. By building relationships we can make each other better, we can rely on each other. I suggest you sharpen someone today by sending an email of encouragement to a frazzled mother, or, a simple phone call to check on a newlywed spouse experiencing deployment for the first time. Together we can make it through this deployment and make 2007 the best year ever.

    On behalf of all Mad Foxes deployed, we appreciate you and you are always on our minds.

    Skipper Klavon

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...VP-5 Raises $1,500 In Gifts For Childred By LT(jg) Fared Raftery. Thursday, February 1, 2007 Vol. 65 - No. 5..." WebSite: JaxAirNews http://www.jaxairnews.com/ [02FEB2007]

    Despite being separated from their families, the "Mad Foxes" of VP-5 made this Christmas memorable by donating $1,500 in toys and clothes to children in El Salvador.

    A week before Christmas, squadron members raised $900 to purchase toys and clothes for the youngsters at Shalom Children's Home. A few days later, the aircrew and maintainers rallied once again, and raised another $600 to purchase gifts for the children of the Quality Hotel employees.

    The average worker earns $200 per month in El Salvador, a country still recovering from a 13-year civil war. VP-5 has 90 personnel stationed there to support regional efforts to prevent the flow of illicit drugs destined for United States and other partner nations.

    To make the holiday memorable for the children in El Salvador, VP-5 went to the children's home. Don and Rose Ann Benner founded the home in 1976, just as the civil war was breaking out. For 30 years, hundreds of children have been touched by their affection. The Santo Tomas location grew into 10 buildings, where children under their care receive shelter, clothing, food, medical care, and education in a Christian environment. Currently, they host 77 children ranging in ages from newborns to 18 years old.

    "Due to the high number of children under our care, it would have been financially difficult to get every child a gift. Without VP-5's help, each child was going to simply receive candy," said Rose Benner.

    After a tour of the spaces, VP-5 presented each of the 77 children individual gifts. Additionally, a tri-wall full of toys, clothes, and school supplies was donated by the Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Sea Operations Detachment. To express their thanks, the children organized on stage and performed songs for the group.

    ISI Kim Danner and PS1 Joy Cassie-Leach were instrumental in organizing this unforgettable event. "This experience left me speechless. I would not have traded this for anything in the world," said Cassie-Leach.

    But, VP-5's overwhelming generosity did not stop there. The squadron also gave to the families of the people who serve them everyday - the hotel staff. The "Mad Foxes" went back into their pockets, and collected another $600 for gifts. During a special party for the hotel's children, squadron members served food and distributed gift bags to more than 80 children.

    "You do not know how much this means to our families," said Miriam Lopez, general manager of the hotel.

    One father also expressed his thanks stating, "Our people are deeply grateful for all your generosity."

    More than 15 squadron members were part of the tremendous team effort to raise donations, shop for presents, wrap gifts and serve food.

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraLT Jason Mays "...Deputy director of security to retire tomorrow. Thursday, January 25th, 2007 - Vol 65 No 4..." WebSite: JaxAirNews http://www.jaxairnews.com/ [26JAN2007]

    Photograph Caption: LT Jason Mays of VP-5 explains the mission of a P-3C Orion aircraft to the Association of Elders from the town Tremestier, Siciliy, Italy January 13. VP-5 provided the association with a static display of a P-3 Orion aircraft while on their tour of NAS Sigonella, Sicily. VP-5, homeported in NAS Jacksonville, Florida, is forward-deployed in support of maritime security operations and the global war on terrorism.

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraPhoto by MCSN Harry Rucker III "...AO3 Jenny Dimanche of VP-5 signals to the crew of a P-3C Orion that the No. 3 propeller is turning Jan. 3. VP-5, homeported in NAS Jacksonville, Florida is forward deployed in support of maritime patrol operations and the global war on terrorism. Thursday, January 12th, 2007 - Vol 65 No 2..." WebSite: JaxAirNews http://www.jaxairnews.com/ [13JAN2007]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraPhoto by MCSN Harry Rucker III "...Aviation ordnancemen assigned to the "Mad Foxes" of VP-5 unload and stow sonobuoys from a P-3C Orion aircraft at NAS Sigonella, Sicily. Thursday, January 12th, 2007 - Vol 65 No 2..." WebSite: JaxAirNews http://www.jaxairnews.com/ [13JAN2007]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraCaptain Sean Buck, CO CPRW-11 "...Warfare Development: A New Paradigm. By Lt.j.g. Scott Greer - VP-45 PAO. Squadrons Mentioned: CPRW-11, VP-5 and VP-45. Thursday, January 4th, 2007..." WebSite: JaxAirNews http://www.jaxairnews.com/ [05JAN2007]

    Photograph Caption: Captain Sean Buck, Commanding Officer of CPRW-11 and Rear Admiral Brian Prindle, Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Group, cut the ribbon to the new Warfare Development Center

    On Oct. 1, the P-3 squadrons of Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing Eleven (CPRW-11) unified their maintenance departments into single a Consolidated Maintenance Organization (CMO). With a renewed focus on warfare primacy, professional development, and leadership excellence, the resulting squadrons were completely restructured.

    Central to the new construct was the creation of a transformational Warfare Development Department (WDD) charged with positional training along with tactical standardization and innovation.

    Three department heads supported by nine junior officer instructor pilots and tactical coordinators lead the new department. Tactics are developed or refined through close coordination with VP-30 and CPRW-11's Weapons Training Units, detailed postmission reconstruction/analysis, and feedback of lessons learned to aircrew.

    Training is managed through the creation of positional warfare development tracks.

    Enlisted aircrew remain in their respective training tracks until qualified whereas junior officers serve in either an intermediate or advanced training track. Intermediate training occurs during the first three months a junior officer is in a squadron. Advanced training is conducted after the first year culminating in a demanding oral review board and in-flight evaluation.

    On Sept. 22, Rear Adm. Brian Prindle, commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Group, Capt. Sean Buck, commanding officer (CO) of CPRW-11, Cmdr. Mark Turner, CO of VP-45 and Cmdr. Brent Klavon CO of VP-5 dedicated an innovative Warfare Development Center (WDC).

    The WDC is a state-of-the-art facility comprised of 75 computers, cutting edge software, and the latest presentation technologies. In 2007, the WDC will also allow worldwide video teleconferencing and SIPRNET access. The new facility was created to support the WDD Inter-Deployment Readiness Cycles charter by providing a central location where aircrew undergo a rigorous syllabus of computer-based training, systems/tactics lectures, development: a new snow lectures, and professional/leadership seminars. At the end of the training, participants are expected to be a consummate war-fighter and leader.

    Every detail, including the layout of the WDC, was planned in detail to reinforce the worldwide readiness of P-3 squadrons. Consisting of two classrooms, designated the Campaign and warrior rooms, aircrew can view the flags and campaign streamers for the locations and operations that patrol squadron have operated in since World War II. More poignantly, all of the Navy personnel lost on Sept. 11, 2001 and the global war on terrorism are memorialized.

    Prindle heralded the warfare development model as "the way of the future" and how the P-3 community will "make the step from the P-3 to multi-mission maritime aircraft without missing a step."

    A quote from Sir Winston Churchill is on the wall of the warrior room that reads, "History will be kind to me for I intend to write it." The officers and Sailors of CPRW-11, VP-45 and VP-5 are doing just that for the entire P-3 community.


    Circa 2006

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCamera061225-N-2491R-058 Sigonella, Sicily (Dec. 25, 2006) "...Patrol Squadron Five (VP-5) Executive Officer, Cmdr. Reggie Howard, serves Aviation Machinist's Mate Airman Robert Maxie dinner at Naval Air Station Sigonella's "Finest in the Mediterranean" galley during holiday festivities. VP-5, homeported in Jacksonville, Fla., is forward deployed in support of Maritime Security Operations and the global war on terrorism. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Harry J. Rucker III (RELEASED)..." WebSite: NavyNews http://www.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=41861 [02JAN2007]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "... VP-5 and CMO Det 5 "Mad Foxes" Shift Colors - Story Number: NNS061212-15 - Release Date: 12/12/2006 4:01:00 PM - By Mass Communications Specialist 1st Class (SW) G. Wade McKinnon, Patrol Squadron 5 Public Affairs..." WebSite: NavyNews http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=27006 [02JAN2007]

    JACKSONVILLE, Fla. (NNS) -- Patrol Squadron (VP) 5 and Consolidated Maintenance Organization (CMO) Detachment (Det) 5, both homeported in Jacksonville, Fla., successfully deployed hundreds Sailors Dec. 3 ready to serve six months in support of counter drug operations and flying combat missions in support of Operations Enduring and Iraqi Freedom.

    VP-5 aircrews and CMO Det 5 Sailors will support simultaneous tri-site operations in European Command (EUCOM), Central Command (CENTCOM) and Southern Command (SOUTHCOM).

    "Not an easy task," explained Command Master Chief Mark Dubiel on the logistics needed to complete the task. "Many hours of preparation and follow through on the plans we made for our personnel had to be successfully carried out and we did it. When the time arrived, we forward deployed 344 personnel and over 180,000 pounds of equipment in less than a week. I am very proud of the combined team of VP-5 and CMO Det 5. This team has already proven they have what it takes to complete our missions and I have no doubt it will be a successful six months for us."

    Lt. Mike Moody, tactics officer of VP-5, said he was looking forward to the deployment.

    "We are really excited and proud to be able to conduct maritime patrol and reconnaissance operations in three different areas of responsibility (AOR) around the world," said Moody. "The members of VP-5 are ready to support the war on terrorism, having worked hard to prepare for the six month deployment."

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraVP-5 P2V Neptune Display "...The P2V Neptune was placed in the park Aug. 18, 1993. This plane was used by the stations's patrol squadrons prior to the P-3 entering service. it was seen in the skies over NAS Jacksonville, Florida from December 1949 to 1971. This actual plane on display was assigned to VP-5 at NAS Jacksonville, Florida in the 1960s. It went to a private aircraft collector after the Navy retired it but was donated to NAS Jacksonville, Florida in 1992 and restored by station personnel. It stands as a tribute today to the many personnel who flew the P22V out of this station. Thursday, November 30th, 2006 - Vol 64 Number 47..." WebSite: JaxAirNews http://www.jaxairnews.com/ [02DEC2006]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraVP-5 History "...Motorcycle Safety - By MC1 Gary McKinnon - VP-5 Public Affairs - Thursday, September 28, 2006..." WebSite: JaxAirNews http://www.jaxairnews.com/ [30SEP2006]

    Photograph Caption: Motorcyclists from Commander, Patrol Reconnaissance Wing 11 gather together after an annual motorcycle safety stand-down to promote motorcycle safety.

    Motorcycle riders from Commander, Patrol Reconnaissance Wing 11 met at the NAS Jacksonville base theater recently for the annual motorcycle safety stand-down. Approximately 120 Sailors benefited from the valuable safety talks given by guest speakers from the Jacksonville Sheriffs Office (JSO).

    "The stand-down was an absolute success," said Lt. Robert Woodards, a VP-5 pilot and assistant motorcycle safety officer. There can never be enough emphasis on motorcycle safety. Last year, there were 21 Navy and 14 Marine fatalities resulting from motorcycle accidents. An effort was made at the safety stand-down to emphasize benefits of a safety barrier that included a helmet, gloves, long sleeves, pants, reflective vest and riding boots.

    "Motorcycle riding requires much more caution and defensive driving procedures than driving an automobile," stated ADAN Dustin Childress of the VP-5 Command Services Office, who is a big fan of motorcycles and learned helpful tips to increase his own safety. "I often ride in groups. The stand-down taught me there is more control of situations while riding in small groups."

    "They covered a lot of stuff that I did not know and I've been street riding for more than five years," said AE1 Henry Jones, VP-5 quality assurance representative who also attended the safety stand-down and appreciated the variety of information provided. "I liked that JSO explained the laws so everyone could easily understand them. I especially enjoyed the part about exhaust pipes and mufflers being considered good to have loud. The noise can make you m/ safer on the street. Other drivers may not always see you, but they are likely to hear you."

    After the safety briefing, the riders enjoyed a motorcycle ride to a local restaurant.

    "I thought it was great we got some good tips from the deputies about favorable riding conditions," said AZAN Charles Burdette of VP-5, "The stand-down was an immediate benefit for us."

    SK2(AW/SW) Daisy Coates of the Aviation Supply Department, also thought the guest speakers provided some much needed information. "I have only been riding about a year and this brief was very beneficial. "So many people are killed in motorcycle accidents because they don't wear their helmets. Sometimes I'm tempted not to wear my helmet but the temptation goes away when I think about the safety stand-down," she said.

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraVP-5 Lt. Jeff Roney "...VP-5 Officer Places In Rifle Competition - By MC1 Gary McKinnon - Thursday, September 28, 2006..." WebSite: JaxAirNews http://www.jaxairnews.com/ [30SEP2006]

    Hitting the bulls-eye," means success. To hit a bulls-eye 1,000 yards away requires a good rifle, steady hands, perfect vision and complete concentration. Lt. Jeff Roney of VP-5, recently proved he has what it takes to achieve this goal.

    Roney recently participated in the National Rifle Association Championship Matches for both military and civilian members competing at Camp Perry, Ohio.

    The Navy fielded two rifle teams, consisting of four members each at the national competition. "We placed second in the master class," Roney said.

    "The competition is fierce and to maintain the edge requires us, at our own expense, to upgrade our standard M16 rifle to a match grade rifle to compete with the civilians and other military members. It's a great honor to be able to compete for the Navy and it's something I enjoy very much."

    Roney has been the maintenance material control officer at VP-5 for the past three years. He recently competed in the East Coast Fleet Forces Command Rifle Matches at Dam Neck Annex, Va., and again at the same location, in the All-Navy Rifle Matches. The final competition, the National Rifle Association Championship Matches, took him to Ohio.

    A typical day at a match begins with a 6 a.m. muster and concludes 12 or more hours later. The competition was held every day on the firing line.

    Each day, competitors begin by firing at targets 200 and 300 yards away, then 600 yards, and finally from 1,000 yards. Each competitor is scored in different categories including marksman, sharpshooter, expert, master and high master.

    Members of Roney's four-man rifle team each earned enough award points in the master class to earn silver medals from the National Rifle Association.

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...VP-5 Participates In "Surge" Deployment - By MCSN Harry Rucker III - Thursday, September 28, 2006..." WebSite: JaxAirNews http://www.jaxairnews.com/ [30SEP2006]

    The "Mad Foxes" of VP-5, recently completed a successful three-month "surge deployment." Six combat aircrews (CAC) from VP-5, departed NAS Jacksonville and traveled across the Pacific to Misawa Air Force Base, Kadena Air Force Base in Japan and Clark Air Force Base in the Philippines.

    CACs Six, Eight and Eleven went first for two months, while CACs One, Two and Four completed their surge time after the other aircrews came home.

    The aircrews flew more than 350 hours in support of VP-46 and VP-9, who are currently forward deployed. While overseas, the "Mad Foxes" helped fight the war on terror by providing support for Operation Enduring Freedom (Philippines). During Operation Valiant Shield, the largest exercise in naval history, two VP-5 aircrews had the unique experience of flying missions from the island of Iwo Jima, where more than 6,000 U.S. troops and 20,000 Japanese troops lost their lives in a battle for the small island during World War II.

    Additionally, the squadron participated in Cooperation Afloat Readiness and Training, which involved a VP-5 crew flying support missions with the Indonesian Navy from Sur- abaya, Indonesia. Crews also visited a detachment sight in Utapao, Thailand.

    Once again the "Mad Foxes" lived up to their standard of excellence pertaining to mission accomplishment. "VP-5 did a fantastic job adjusting to an area of responsibility where they do not usually deploy and also in helping Commander Task Force 72 accomplish its mission," said Lt. j.g. Richard Parella. All aircrews involved believed that their time overseas provided valuable training and real-world experience. "Surge gave everyone the opportunity to put their training into action and I couldn't be happier with the results," added Lt. Brian Fichter.

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...ax Sailors Focus on Motorcycle Safety - Story Number: NNS060919-14 - Release Date: 9/19/2006 5:00:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class (SW) G. Wade McKinnon, Patrol Squadron 5 Public Affairs...." WebSite: Navy NewsStand http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=25650 [26SEP2006]

    JACKSONVILLE, Fla. (NNS) -- All Commander, Patrol Reconnaissance Wing 11 motorcycle riders met at the Naval Air Station Jacksonville base theater here Aug. 18 for an annual motorcycle safety stand-down.

    Approximately 120 Sailors benefited from the valuable safety talks given by guest speakers from the Jacksonville Sheriff's Department.

    "The stand-down was an absolute success," said Lt. Robert Woodards, Patrol Squadron (VP) 5 pilot and assistant motorcycle safety officer. "There can never be enough emphasis on motorcycle safety. Last year, there were 21 Navy and 14 Marine fatalities resulting from motorcycle accidents. An effort was made at the safety standdown to emphasize the safety barrier a helmet, gloves, long sleeves, pants, reflective vest and riding boots provide. Motorcycle riding requires much more caution and defensive driving procedures than driving an automobile."

    Aviation Machinist's Mate Airman Dustin S. Childress of the VP-5 Command Services office, is a big fan of motorcycles and learned helpful tips to increase his own safety.

    "Oftentimes, I ride in groups, and small groups are safer than large groups. The stand-down taught me there is more control of situations with small riding groups," explained Childress. "They covered a lot of stuff that I did not know, and I've been street riding for over five years."

    Aviation Electrician's Mate 1st Class Henry Jones, VP-5 quality assurance representative, also attended the safety stand-down and appreciated the variety of information provided.

    "I liked that the sheriffs explained the laws so everyone could easily understand," Jones said. "I especially enjoyed the part about 'the pipes' (exhaust pipes/mufflers) being considered good to have loud. The noise can sometimes make you safer on the street. They (other drivers) may not always see you, but they are likely to hear you."

    After the safety briefing, the riders enjoyed a motorcycle ride to the Outback Crab Shack.

    "I thought it was great we got some good tips from the deputies about favorable riding conditions," said Aviation Maintenance Administrationman Charles G. Burdette of VP-5 Maintenance Administration Department. "The stand-down was an immediate benefit for us."

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Patrol Squadron 5 Completes Surge - Story Number: NNS060919-15 - Release Date: 9/19/2006 5:02:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Harry J. Rucker III, Patrol Squadron 5 Public Affairs. Squadrons Mentioned: VP-5, VP-9 and VP-46...." WebSite: Navy NewsStand http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=25654 [26SEP2006]

    JACKSONVILLE, Fla. (NNS) -- The "Mad Foxes" of Patrol Squadron (VP-5), based out of NAS Jacksonville, Florida, finished a successful "surge" that lasted from June 1 to Aug. 30.

    Six combat air crews (CAC) from VP-5 departed NAS Jacksonville, Florida and traveled across the Pacific to NAF Misawa, Japan and NAF Kadena, Okinawa, Japan, as well as Clark Air Force Base in the Philippines. CACs 6, 8, and 11 went from June 1 to Aug. 4, while CACs 1, 2 and 4 where overseas from July 31 to Aug. 30.

    Combined, the air crews flew more than 350 hours in support of VP-46 and VP-9, who are currently forward deployed.

    While overseas, the Mad Foxes helped fight the war on terrorism by providing support for Operation Enduring Freedom in the Philippines.

    During Operation Valiant Shield, two VP-5 air crews had the unique experience of flying missions from the island of Iwo Jima, where more than 6,000 U.S. troops and more than 20,000 Japanese troops lost their lives in a battle for the small island during WWII. In addition, the Mad Foxes participated in Cooperation Afloat Readiness and Training (CARAT), which involved a VP-5 crew flying support missions with the Indonesian navy from Surabaya, Indonesia. Crews also visited a detachment sight in Utapao, Thailand.

    "VP-5 did a fantastic job adjusting to an area of responsibility where they do not usually deploy and (also) helping Commander Task Force 72 accomplish its mission," Lt. j.g. Richard Parella said.

    All air crews involved believed that their time overseas provided valuable training and real-world experience.

    "Surge gave everyone the opportunity to put their training into action," said Lt. Brian Fichter, "and I couldn't be happier with the results."

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraVP-5 AME1 Jason Corse "...Sport Challenge: Rain Can't Dampen Spirits Of Participants In First MWR-Sponsored Event - AME1 Jason Corse of VP-5 slams the ball during the softball tournament which was part of the Sport Day Challenge..." WebSite: JaxAirNews http://www.jaxairnews.com/ [01SEP2006]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraVP-5 AD3 Abrigo Gavin "...Sport Challenge: Rain Can't Dampen Spirits Of Participants In First MWR-Sponsored Event - AD3 Albrigo Gavin of VP-5, effortlessly takes the ball to the hoop as defenders try their best to stop him during the Sports Day Challenge 3-on-3 Basketball Tournament August 24..." WebSite: JaxAirNews http://www.jaxairnews.com/ [01SEP2006]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraVP-5 LTjg David Trenholm "...Sport Challenge: Rain Can't Dampen Spirits Of Participants In First MWR-Sponsored Event - LTjg David Trenholm of VP-5, adds two more points to the scoreboard during the Sports Day Challenge 3-on-3 Basketball Tournament..." WebSite: JaxAirNews http://www.jaxairnews.com/ [01SEP2006]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraVP-5 and VP-30 "...'The Roar' Visits NAS Jacksonville, Florida - Thursday, August 24, 2006 (Squadrons Mentioned: VP-5 and VP-30)..." WebSite: JaxAirNews http://www.jaxairnews.com/ [25AUG2006]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraPhoto By MCSN Jacqueline Hall "...MSSN Harry Rucker, assigned to the Mad Foxes of VP-5, photographs members of his squadron hard at work on the flight line of NAS Jacksonville, Florida Auguest 8. VP-5 is gearing up for a regularly scheduled deployment set for December..." WebSite: JaxAirNews http://www.jaxairnews.com/ [19AUG2006]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCamera060808-N-6205H-002 Jacksonville, Fla. (Aug. 8, 2006) "...Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Harry Rucker, assigned to the Mad Foxes of Patrol Squadron Five (VP-5), photographs fellow "Mad Foxes" hard at work on the flight line of NAS Jacksonville, Floridae. VP-5 is gearing up for a regularly scheduled deployment set for December. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Jacqueline J. Hall (RELEASED)..." WebSite: NavyNews http://www.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=37893 [12AUG2006]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VP History ThumbnailCameraVP-5 History "...Beating The Heat - By MC3 Mark A. Braden - Staff Writer - Thursday, August 3rd, 2006 - NAS Jacksonville, Florida..." WebSite: JaxAirNews http://www.jaxairnews.com/ [04AUG2006]

    Photograph Caption: AE3 Kevonte Daniels of VP-5 "Mad Foxes" brings water to the flight line so his fellow Shipmates don't dehydrate.

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VP History ThumbnailCameraVP-5 History "...Maintenance is Golden at VP-5 - Story Number: NNS060703-15 - Release Date: 7/3/2006 6:18:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class (SW) Gary Wade McKinnon, Patrol Squadron 5 Public Affairs - VP-5 Public Affairs..." WebSite: Navy News Stand http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=24427 [23JUL2006]

    Photograph Caption: Official U.S. Navy file photo of a P-3C Orion assigned to the Mad Foxes of Patrol Squadron (VP) 5 preparing for a mission while on deployment to NAS Sigonella, Sicily.

    JACKSONVILLE, Fla. (NNS) -- Patrol Squadron (VP) 5 "Mad Foxes," homeported at Naval Air Station Jacksonville, Fla., received the Golden Wrench Award here May 25 in recognition of excellence in aircraft maintenance.

    Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing (CPRW) 11, Capt. Sean S. Buck and James M. Parolise, customer support regional manager at Lockheed Martin, presented the award to VP-5 Commanding Officer, Cmdr. William D. Johns.

    "I would like to personally congratulate you and your Mad Fox team on winning the 2005 Golden Wrench Award," Buck said. "This award demonstrates the 'can-do' spirit, professionalism and dedication to quality maintenance, which is prevalent on the Mad Fox hangar deck. Your Sailors have made me, former Commodore Sinnett and the rest of my staff proud and thankful to have such an outstanding organization in CPRW-11."

    Mark W. Sulfridge, Master Chief Aircraft Maintenanceman (AW), the VP-5 maintenance master chief, credited the men and women throughout VP-5's maintenance department.

    "It is a very deserving award for hard working maintainers," he said. "The biggest part of success is due to good coordination. It says a lot about the command to go from a multi-site deployment, return home and pull it all back together without missing a beat."

    In fiscal year 2005, VP-5's accomplishments included a 99 percent mission completion rate (100 percent for U.S. Southern Command (SOUTHCOM) area of responsibility), 88 percent mission capable rate, 70 percent full mission capable rate, interdiction of 31.4 metric tons of illegal narcotics in SOUTHCOM, participation in eight highly successful multi-national exercises in U.S. European Command and performance in U.S. Central Command supporting ground forces engaged in hostile operations in Iraq and Afghanistan.

    Commissioned in 1948, VP-5 currently is in its "surge" phase with three crews in Japan with nine crews ready to deploy. At the end of this year, VP-5 will deploy for six months in support of the global war on terrorism and maritime security operations.

    The Golden Wrench Award was initiated in 1965 by the Chief of Naval Operations and sponsored by Lockheed Martin to acknowledge maintenance performance that goes above and beyond even the extraordinary effort that regular aircraft maintenance requires. It is presented annually to the Patrol Squadron in the Atlantic Fleet, Pacific Fleet and Reserve Force that demonstrates the greatest excellence in aircraft maintenance.

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VP History ThumbnailCameraPhoto by PH1 G. Wade McKinnon "...'Mad Fox' Team Earns Golden Wrench Award - By PH1 G. Wade McKinnon, VP-5 Public Affairs..." WebSite: JaxAirNews http://www.jaxairnews.com/ [30JUN2006]

    Commander, Patrol and Re-connaissance Wing Eleven (CPRW-11) Capt. Sean Buck, and Lockheed Martin Customer Support Regional Manager James Parolise presented the Golden Wrench Award to Cmdr. William Johns and a group of VP-5 maintainers May 25.

    "I would like to personally congratulate the 'Mad Fox' team on winning the 2005 Golden Wrench Award. This award demonstrates the 'can-do' spirit, professionalism and dedication to quality maintenance, which is prevalent on the VP-5 hangar deck," said Buck during the ceremony. "VP-5 has made the CPRW-11 staff extremely proud and thankful to have such an outstanding organization in our wing."

    "What a memorable year it's been for VP-5. Mad Fox 2005 accomplishments speak for themselves. A 99 percent mission completion rate (100 percent for Southern Command (SOUTHCOM) area of responsibility), 88 percent mission capable rate, 70 percent full mission capable rate, interdiction of 31.4 metric tons of illegal narcotics in SOUTHCOM, participation in eight highly successful multi-national exercises in European Command and flawless performance in Central Command supporting ground forces engaged in hostile operations in Iraq and Afghanistan," added Buck. "Bravo zulu and well done."

    VP-5's Maintenance Master Chief AFCM(AW) Mark Sulfridge credited the men and women throughout VP-5's maintenance department.

    "This is a very deserving award for hard working maintainers. The biggest part of success is due to good coordination. It says a lot about the command to go from a multi-site deployment, return home and pull it all back together without missing a beat," stated Sulfridge.

    The Lockheed Martin P-3A Orion became operational in the United States Navy in 1962. After subsequent airframe modifications, the P-3C, which VP-5 currently flies, emerged and deployed in August 1969.

    The award was initiated in 1965 by the Chief of Naval Operations and sponsored by Lockheed Martin to acknowledge maintenance performance that goes above and beyond even the extraordinary effort that regular aircraft maintenance requires.

    In 1977, it was officially called the AVCM Donald M. Neal Aircraft Maintenance Award. Today this award is fondly known as the "Golden Wrench." It is presented annually to the patrol squadron in the Atlantic Fleet, Pacific Fleet and reserve force that demonstrates the greatest excellence in aircraft maintenance.

    Commissioned in 1948, VP-5 currently is in its "surge" phase with three crews in Japan with nine crews ready to deploy. Later this year, VP-5 will deploy for six months in support of the global war on terrorism and maritime security operations.

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VP History ThumbnailCamera060421-N-3855M-001 Jacksonville, Fla. (April 21, 2006) "...Aviation Machinist Mate 3rd Class Mony R. En raises her right hand at the Naturalization Ceremony held at the U. S. District Court Middle Florida. En is assigned to Patrol Squadron Five (VP-5) homeported at Naval Air Station Jacksonville, Florida. U. S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 1st Class G. Wade McKinnon (RELEASED)..." WebSite: Navy Newsstand http://www.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=34368 [02MAY2006]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraCmdr. Brent Klavon and Cmdr. William Johns "...VP-5 change of command ceremony is tomorrow - By Lt. j.g. Rich Parella, VP-5 PAO - Thursday, May 25, 2006 - JaxAirNews Thursday May 25, 2006..." WebSite: JaxAirNews http://www.jaxairnews.com/stories/052506/mil_vp5coc001.shtml [26MAY2006]

    Cmdr. Brent Klavon will relieve Cmdr. William Johns as commanding officer of VP-5 during a change of command ceremony tomorrow. Klavon takes over as commanding officer just as the "Mad Foxes" begin their surge period as VP-5 air crew detach to sites around the world to support combatant commanders. In December 2006, the squadron will deploy overseas to conduct various missions in support of the global war on terror.

    Klavon was born and raised in Pittsburgh, Pa. He graduated from Pennsylvania State University with a bachelors of science degree in 1988, received his commission via NROTC, and subsequently began flight training. In June 1989, he received his pilot wings.

    Upon completion of fleet replacement squadron training at VP-31, Klavon reported to the Golden Eagles of VP-9 stationed at NAS Moffett Field, California in January 1990. While there, he completed a deployment to NAF Misawa, Japan and detachments to NAS Adak, Alaska and Panama. He also conducted a homeport duty station change with VP-9, leaving NAS Moffett Field, California for NAS Barbers Point, Hawaii in 1993.

    Cmdr. William Johns

    In March 1993, Klavon reported to VP-30 in NAS Jacksonville, Florida. Following his three-year tour in VP-30, Klavon reported aboard USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71) in Norfolk, Va. as assistant navigator.

    In June 1998, he reported to the Bureau of Naval Personnel, Millington, Tenn. as an aviation officer detailer for the P-3 community. Following his tour in Tennessee, Klavon reported to the "Pelicans" of VP-45 in NAS Jacksonville, Florida for his operational department head tour in June 2000. He completed deployments to NAS Sigonella, Sicily and NS Roosevelt Roads, PR.

    In April 2002, he served as the broad area maritime surveillance unmanned aerial vehicle requirements officer to the Chief of Naval Operations staff, Director, Naval Air Warfare, Washington D.C. In March 2004, he served as the executive officer of VP-30 in Jacksonville prior to joining VP-5 in April 2005.

    Throughout his tenure as commanding officer, Johns led VP-5 to unparalleled levels of success to include completing a worldwide deployment in support of the war on drugs, global war on terror and combat missions in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom.

    VP-5 achieved unprecedented levels of readiness, executed the first P-3 search, rescue, and survey missions in response to the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, won a sixth consecutive Retention Excellence Award, eclipsed 28 years and 167,000 mishap-free flight hours and earned the 2005 Golden Wrench Award under Johnsí command. His next assignment will be the National War College in Washington, DC.

    Cmdr. Reggie Howard will take over as the new VP-5 executive officer.

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...VP-5 Presented Humanitarian Service Award For Hurrican Efforts - By LT.jg. Rich Parella - VP-5 PAO - JaxAirNews Thursday May 25, 2006..." WebSite: JaxAirNews http://adserver1.harvestadsdepot.com/jaxairnews/ss/jaxairnews/ [26MAY2006]

    Fifty-five members of VP-5 were recently awarded the prestigious Humanitarian Service Award for their participation in relief efforts for the victims of Hurricane Katrina. Every squadron member who received the award flew missions over the devastated Gulf Coast region during the first few days after the storm.

    This award was last issued to those military members who aided the area affected by the 2004 tsunami in Asia. This time a natural disaster in our own country forced many of our nationís armed forces into action again.

    From Sept. 3-6, 2005, VP-5 flew five missions over ravaged New Orleans. With the ability to remain over the region for as long as seven hours, the P-3s helped vector rescue helicopters to survivors stranded by flood waters. Additionally, with the use of its high tech electro-optic camera, squadron crews were able to take pictures and video of the area affected by the hurricane.

    "We were in awe," stated AW1 Rick Boyle, a radar operator with VP-5. "We were tasked to video I-10 from Pensacola, Fla. to Houston and the hurricane had wiped out every bridge along the way.

    " The "Mad Foxes" were extremely willing to use whatever means available in order to help. As the ready alert squadron for Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing Eleven, VP-5 had the ability to launch aircraft within 12 hours of notification, which proved to be valuable for helping the relief efforts.

    Lt. Rob Wilkerson commanded the first P-3 flight over the area affected by Hurricane Katrina. "The destruction was just extraordinary," he said, "but it felt good to know that we could at least offer some help to those working on the ground.

    Even though not on deployment, VP-5 was called on to support its nation and to all of the Mad Foxes, their medals represent their ability and dedication to help their country in its time of need.

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraReunion Photographs "...VP-5 Hosts Guests For Annual Reunion - By PH1(SW) G.Wade McKinnon VP-5 - JaxAirNews Thursday May 18, 2006..." WebSite: JaxAirNews http://adserver1.harvestadsdepot.com/jaxairnews/ss/jaxairnews/ [19MAY2006]

    VP-5 held their annual reunion for approximately 80 former members of the command April 28. The event kicked off with a briefing by VP-5 Commanding Officer Cmdr.William Johns.

    "The P-3 community is standing on the shoulders of giants, and all of you here today have set that standard. Antisubmarine warfare is still our mission today. Only the U.S. Navy can do it and no one else can do it better than VP. It remains the most difficult mission, not just for VP, but for everyone" said Johns. He further explained changes to the community and the term "long dwell asset" of the P-3, meaning how the aircraft can maintain long patrol hours, a highly desired battle asset when the mission requires it.

    Johns spoke of the many upgrades to the aircraft, which are the reason, the aircraft is still flying. One such change is the over land mission capabilities that the P-3 is outfitted for in today's Navy.

    "There is always a new group of decision-makers in A Washington that question P-3 viability. Not only are we the platform of choice and necessity for antisubmarine warfare, the commandant of the Marine Corps has said 'the P-3 is saving thelives of his men,'" continued Johns.

    The group of former "Mad Foxes," asked many questions after the brief ranging from crew assignments to whether or not the squadron would decommission in the near future. The group was very happy to learn that VP-5 will remain an active squadron.

    5 Sailors after the brief. to say thanks

    After the brief, the reunion members were given a tour of the hangar spaces and climbed aboard a P-3C Orion.

    David Smoot, a retired firefighter from Cynthiana, Ky. flew in the P-3A from 1968-1971 as an airman radio operator.

    "The Cold War was big then. We tracked a sub all the way from the Mediterranean through the Straights of Gibralter to Cuba," he said. During the tour, he asked to visit the area where his avionics shop once existed. There he shared a few sea stories and laughs with VP-5 Sailors and thanked them for their time.

    Charles Kuehnel from St. Louis,Mo., retired as a lieutenant in 1966 during the transition from P2's to P-3's."The P-3 is a lot different, in the P2's you could not stand up straight. I also remember we had a lot of drills back then. During one drill organized as a rescue party to get prisoners of war, the Marineswere called in and no one informed the Marines it was a drill. I was captured nd the Marines were not very gentle!" Kuehnel said laughing. "I enjoy these reunions, this is my second one.

    Rob Veresi from Providence, R.I. was a member of the squadron from 1961 to 1964. He was an aviation machinist's mate reciprocating engine mechanic second lass petty officer. "I retired after 21 years and being at VP-5 were the best years of my Navy career. The camaraderie was just so great," said Veresi.

    All in all it was a rewarding day for both the former and current Mad Foxes.

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraPhotos by JO1 Mike England "...Education Fair Provides Sailors With Opportunities (VP-5 and VP-30 Mentioned) - Thursday, May 4th, 2006..." WebSite: JaxAirNews http://adserver1.harvestadsdepot.com/jaxairnews/ss/jaxairnews/ [06MAY2006]

    By JO1 Mike England
    Assistant Editor

    The NAS Jacksonville, Florida Navy College Office held an Education Fair April 25 at the NAS Jacksonville, Florida Officers' Club.

    The fair brought colleges and universities together at a central location and gave service members and their families a chance to learn more about the educational opportunities available at NAS Jacksonville, Florida. The educational institutions offered program information, accepted applications and conducted interviews.

    "This is a great opportunity to meet different schools and learn about a variety of programs in one forum," said Diane Argo, an education services specialist at the NAS Jacksonville, Florida Navy College Office.

    Argo also said that all of the schools located on NAS Jacksonville, Florida participated in the education fair.

    "People are getting the chance to learn about the Navy's rating relevant programs. It broadens their horizons as to what kinds of programs are out there," Argo stated.

    According to Joe Snowberger, a community relations coordinator for Columbia College, many service members don't realize what's out there or how much they stand to gain by getting their degree.

    "Too many veterans don't realize the value of college education," Snowberger said. "They need to realize that they are selling themselves short by not taking advantage of all of the opportunities afforded them."

    Many NAS Jacksonville, Florida Sailors and family members attended the education fair hoping to find ways to better themselves through education. VP-5 Sailor IS1(AW/SW) Kim Danner liked the fact that so many schools were in the same room. "It's great that Navy College is here to keep the troops informed of the educational opportunities they have while in the service," Danner said. "This education fair will make my school search a whole lot easier."

    NAS Jacksonville, Florida Supply Department Leading Chief Petty Officer SKCM(SW) Raffy Delacruz attended the fair so that he could keep his Sailors informed about what's out there. "This is a great opportunity for me to keep my Sailors up to date on what the Navy has to offer them," Delacruz stated. "I hope that this fair can give my Sailors an appreciation of what they can do on shore duty. Every Sailor should get their degree before they get out."

    For more information on education programs available at NAS Jacksonville, Florida, contact the Navy College Office at 542-2477.

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraVP-5 AD3 Mony En "...VP-5 Sailor takes the oath, becomes an American citizen - By PH1(SW) G. Wade McKinnon - Thursday, April 27, 2006..." WebSite: JaxAirNews http://adserver1.harvestadsdepot.com/jaxairnews/ss/jaxairnews/ [28APR2006]

    In a packed U.S. District Courtroom in downtown Jacksonville April 20, AD3 Mony En of VP-5 took an oath much different from her Navy oath of enlistment.

    En, a native of Thailand, along with 50 other immigrants from 28 different countries, stood proudly, raising her right hand to take the oath to become an American citizen.

    The oath of allegiance is a three-part oath. First, the soon-to-be new citizens must renounce their allegiance to their former country.

    Second, they agree to defend the United States and bear it true allegiance. And third, they agree to bear arms for the United States and non-combative services when required by law.

    After listening to the oath, the group proudly exclaimed, "I do!" allowing them to become United States citizens.

    The presiding judge, the Honorable Harvey Schlesinger then spoke to the group, "The beauty of this country is to be different, never forget that government exists for people and not people for the government." said Schlesinger.

    A video presentation from President George W. Bush followed the judge's speech. In it Bush stated he is pleased to welcome everyone as American citizens to live out the full purpose of American life.

    The principal speaker, Tri Vu, president and owner of TTV Architects, Inc., took the same oath over two decades ago when he left his country of Vietnam due to the war.

    "This is a memorable and honorable event of your life, you can participate in the government at the city, state, and federal level. In my old country of Vietnam, you could not do that. This is truly a land of opportunity, here you don't need a dream, just a

    Goal," Vu said.

    For En, who joined the Navy in August 2004, this is a dream come true.

    "Now that I'm a citizen, I feel different because I feel free to move on to other things. It's a step closer to my goal. I want to be a pilot one-day and I had to be a citizen to get there. It's always been a dream of mine to fly," said En, who takes flying lessons at the Jax Navy Flying Club on base in her spare time.

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraNAS Jacksonville, Florida History "...NAS Jacksonville, Florida Hold Unveiling To Open Dining Facility - By Miriam S. Gallet - Editor - Thursday, March 30, 2006 - NAS Jacksonville, Florida..." WebSite: JaxAirNews http://www.jaxairnews.com/ [01APR2006]

    A freshly painted sign, Mexican food and salsa music marked the grand opening of the NAS Jacksonville, Florida mess hall, previously known as the Galleon Galley. The new name was revealed during the unveiling of the sign March 22.

    NAS Jacksonville, Florida Commanding Officer Capt. Chip Dobson joined by culinary specialists dressed in their traditional garb, pulled the blue cloth that covered the newly-installed sign and signaled a new concept in dining aboard the base.

    "This is a great occasion," remarked a smiling Dobson. "A pleasing environment is very important to what you are doing and our new Flight Line Café is a reflection of it. This is an enjoyable and refreshing place for our Sailors to eat their meals."

    The mess hall, renamed the Flight Line Café, received major aesthetic changes during the last few months and held a "Name the Galley Contest" in order to keep up with the 21st century. VP-5 Sailors collectively won the name contest and will receive a pizza party from the café.

    Sailors and their families and Department of Defense civilians attended the grand opening and enjoyed an array of traditional Mexican and Spanish dishes and background salsa music. The celebratory meal served more than 300 attendees and included Spanish soup, beef fajitas, enchiladas, Mexican refried bean and corn, Spanish rice and a compliment of salads and desserts. Mexican sombreros, maracas and other ethnic art pieces adorned the tables and softened the look of the all-stainless steal food counters.

    Flight Line Café Food Services Officer CWO3 Kathy Wiseman said that the changes were necessary "because it's a whole new revolution in food service in today's Navy. Our new name is reflective of our attitude and who we serve."

    "Our value, convenience and quality can't be matched anywhere within the industry," she added. "This new makeover has been possible because I have an outstanding team of chiefs and enlisted Sailors who believe in what we do and in who we are. Each of us takes our profession seriously and our ultimate goal is to delight our patrons with every meal serve."

    The new Flight Line Café now offers light fare, low-calorie menus during every meal and desserts designed to satisfy even the most discriminating sweet tooth. Additionally, it also features large televisions showing news and current events throughout the day.

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraHabitat for Humanity "...VP-5 helps out the community - By Lt. j.g. Richard Parella VP-5 PAO - JaxAirNews Thursday March 23, 2006..." WebSite: JaxAirNews http://adserver1.harvestadsdepot.com/jaxairnews/ss/jaxairnews/ [26MAR2006]

    Several volunteers from VP-5 recently helped Habitat for Humanity complete a three-bedroom house for a family in Green Cove Springs, Fla. The project began July 2004, and after working countless hours of construction, it ended with a ribbon cutting ceremony in January.

    With the help of hundreds of volunteers putting in more than 1,000 hours of work, the house came to life. Habitat for Humanity volunteers worked tirelessly throughout the winter months with the assistance of construction team experts.

    VP-5 squadron members donated their time and energy to help people they had never met. In addition to organizing the contingent from NAS Jacksonville, Florida, the "Mad Foxes" aided in the construction effort each month.

    "Clay County Habitat could not function without the Navy volunteers and we remind them that they are an integral part to the construction effort," said Family Services Coordinator Gamble Wright.

    Even with their demanding work schedule, several squadron members found the time to help their surrounding neighborhoods. Lt. j.g. Matthew Martin, AWCS Patrick Dougher, ADCS Doane Spencer and HT1 Samantha Walker are just a few who returned month-after-month to help in this worthy cause. Walker was instrumental in organizing the support effort from VP-5, ensuring the Navy had a strong presence of volunteers with an astounding 50 individuals in all. To learn more about becoming involved in the Jacksonville Area Habitat for Humanity, contact Anita Hinkle at 282-7590.

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraSports and Standings "...Sports and Standings - JaxAirNews Thursday February 2, 2006. Squadrons Mentioned: VP-5, VP-16, VP-30, VP-45, VP-62, VS-22, and CPRW-11..." WebSite: JaxAirNews http://adserver1.harvestadsdepot.com/jaxairnews/ss/jaxairnews/ [09FEB2006]

    There will be several softball meetings Feb. 15 in the Building 850 conference room. The season will begin in March. The following are the times of the meetings:

    Greybeard – 11:30 a.m. – Open to active duty, selective reservists and command Department of Defense personnel age 30 and up.

    Intramural – noon - Open to active duty, selective reservists and command Department of Defense personnel.

    Women's league - 12:30 p.m. - Open to active duty, selective reservists, military dependents over 18 and Department of Defense employees.

    Commands having their athletic officer or designated representative attend the meeting will receive five captain's cup points. All interested personnel should attend the meeting to discuss rules and to get the required paperwork to join the league.

    Open softball meeting planned

    An open softball meeting will be held Feb. 16 at 3 p.m. at Mulligans. This league is open to NAVAIR and Department of Defense employees, active duty, military dependents over 18 and selective reservists. Rules as well as days of the week and times for the games will be discussed at the meeting.

    Racquetball tourney

    An open racquetball tournament will be held Feb. 28 through March 3 each night at 5 p.m. at the NAS Jax Gymnasium. The tournament is free and is open to all NAS Jax authorized men and women. There is a competitive division and a recreational division. Awards will be given to the winners of each division. Call 542-3239 to sign up by Feb. 22.

    Sports officials and scorekeepers needed

    The North Florida Military Officials Association is looking for individuals to officiate soccer, softball, football and volleyball at NAS Jax. Scorekeepers are also needed for basketball. Experience is not required. If interested, contact Jesse Beach at 771-1333.

    Navy Southeast Regional Running and Triathlon Team

    Attention competition runners. Represent U.S. Navy in 5K, 10K, marathons and/or triathlons? The U.S. Navy will showcase elite active duty men and women in regional races. Uniforms are provided as well as transportation, entry fees, and lodging costs. Interested runners must compete in a sanctioned (USA Track and Field, USA Triathlon Association, or Roadrunners Clubs of America) race and your time must be one of top 10 regional qualifying times.

    If you have run in a sanctioned race and your time meets the regional qualifying time, contact your base athletic director.

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VP History ThumbnailCamera060104-N-6205H-002 Jacksonville, Fla. (Jan. 4, 2006) "...Aircrew Survival Equipmentman 2nd Class Jason Corse, inspects an Oxygen Walk Around Bottle that belongs to a P-3C Orion. Corse is attached to "The Mad Foxes" of Patrol Squadron Five (VP-5) on board NAS Jacksonville, Florida. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate Airman Jacqueline Hall (RELEASED)..." WebSite: Navy Newsstand http://www.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=31003 [14JAN2006]


    Circa 2005

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraCPRW-11 History "...CPRW-11 program: Don't mix alcohol, driving - By LT Tony Walters - CPRW-11 PAO - Thursday, December 15, 2005 - VOL 63 - NO 49 - NAS Jacksonville, FLA...(Mentioned: VP-5)..." WebSite: JaxAirNews http://pub.jaxairnews.com/Sections.aspx?sec=16837 [16DEC2005]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCamera051129-N-6205H-003 Jacksonville, Fla. (Nov. 29, 2005) "...Aviation Machinist's Mate 1st Class Anthony Sims, assigned to the "Mad Foxes" of Patrol Squadron Five (VP-5), performs a quality assurance inspection on a P-3C Orion aircraft engine on board Naval Air Station Jacksonville, Fla. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate Airman Jacqueline Hall (RELEASED)..." WebSite: Navy News https://navcms.news.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=30243 [05DEC2005]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCamera051122-N-8544C-001 Jacksonville, Fla. (Nov. 22, 2005) "...Photographer's Mate Airman Jacqueline Hall picks up palm tree frowns on board Naval Air Station Jacksonville, during a command monthly base clean-up. Hall is assigned to the "Mad Foxes" of Patrol Squadron Five (VP-5). U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 2nd Class Susan Cornell (RELEASED)..." WebSite: Navy News https://navcms.news.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=30141 [05DEC2005]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCamera051121-N-6205H-004 Jacksonville, Fla. (Nov. 21, 2005) "...Aviation Machinist's Mate Airman Eric Brant guides a propeller as it is hoisted onto the engine of a P-3C Orion on board Naval Air Station Jacksonville. Brant is assigned to the "Mad Foxes" of Patrol Squadron Five (VP-5). U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate Airman Jacqueline Hall (RELEASED)..." WebSite: Navy News https://navcms.news.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=30138 [05DEC2005]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraVP-5K "...VP-5K holds fun run for charity - By LT(jg) Paul White - VP-5 PAO - Thursday, November 24, 2005 - (VP-5 and VP-16 mentioned)..." WebSite: JaxAirNews http://pub.jaxairnews.com/Sections.aspx?sec=16396 [29NOV2005]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...VP-5 Mad Fox Newsletter - Fifth Edition - November 2005 (PDF File 580KB)..." VP-5 Official WebSite: http://www.vp5.navy.mil/ [18NOV2005]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraVP-30 History "...CPRW-11 Continues Leadership Seminar Series - By LT Tony Walters - CPRW-11 PAO - Thursday, October 27, 2005..." WebSite: JaxAirNews http://pub.jaxairnews.com/Sections.aspx?sec=15815 [28OCT2005]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VP History ThumbnailVP-5 Video - 8/13/2005 "...Navy Marine Corps News - 8/13/2005 - VP-5 Applies Their Training To Real World Operations Video..." WebSite: Navy Newsstand http://wm.nmc.global.speedera.net/wm.nmc.global/nmcn_050813_08.wmv [21SEP2005]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...VP-5 Mad Fox Newsletter - Fourth Edition - August 2005 (PDF File 631KB)..." VP-5 Official WebSite: http://www.vp5.navy.mil/ [17SEP2005]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VP History ThumbnailCamera050810-N-8544C-008 Jacksonville, Fla. (Aug. 10, 2005) "...Aviation Structural Mechanic 1st Class Anthony Versage, right, and Aviation Structural Mechanic 2nd Class Ramon Diaz replace a main landing gear tire on one of their squadron's P-3C Orion aircraft. Versage and Diaz are assigned to the "Mad Foxes" of Patrol Squadron Five (VP-5). U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 2nd Class Susan Cornell (RELEASED)..." WebSite: Navy Newsstand http://www.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=27116 [20AUG2005]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...By Lt. j.g. Karensa Hinote VP-5 PAO..." WebSite: JaxAirNews http://pub.jaxairnews.com/Sections.aspx?sec=14493 [18AUG2005]

    Summer time is at its peak; with homecoming and postdeployment leave, VP-5 has inereascd its focus on off-duty safety. This time of year is full of fun recreational activitics; unfortunately, along with these celebrations come associated risks that include drinking and driving. To counter the dangers associated with making poor decisions when it comes to drinking, VP-5 has instituted a new program into the workplace called "Survive the Night".

    The program was established to improve the command's ability to help prevent alcohol related incidents and address today's cultural ideals regarding drinking and driving. There are already numerous programs that exist to fight the problem, however, VP-5 is taking a new perspective. The command has established peer group to discuss ways to avoid drinking and driving. This program, combined with the current programs such as ADAMS, Prevent, The Right Spirit, Club 2000, and Bottle to Grave, "provides Our sailors with options and alternatives", said one of the program coordinators, AMCS Luis Padilla.

    The main concern for the squadron isthc safety of their people as they go out and enjoy themselves. With this focus, VP-5 instituted a panel of sailors to meet every week and diseuss the difTerent aspects of "surviving the night". Each week there is a new topic to help raise a\cohol awareness. At the end of every Friday, the members of the group go out and talk with the individuals in their work centers about the specific discussion item for that week. Some of the topics include the cost associal€d with getting a our, career consequences, planning ahead, fun events in town, and even death of loved ones due to drinking and driving accidents.

    The command is concerned that their personnel may dl'ink and wait to come up with a viable option on how to get home until after their judgment is already impaired. Therefore, the focus of

    "Survive the Night" is to get the squadron members actively thinking and planning how they are going to get home before they even leave to go out. Lt. Doug Steil, a VP-5 navigator, sees the program as "putting a name to what already exists; thinking your way through the evening and looking out for your buddies." The command recognizes that the most effective way to build up alcohol awareness is to provide the sailors with ownership of the program. One of the current members of this peer group is YN3 Jacob Wayerski, who has a very strong opinion about the program. He stated; "This program is more beneficial to the reduction in alcohol related incidences for it is the first that has a heart at the lower class level. Every other program has been organized and run by a chief or an officer. Here we can reach everyone from all levels, reach it at the source, express ourselves from shipmate to Shipmate, instead of command to squadron,"

    Although the program has just recently been implemented, its positive efforts are already apparent, VP-5 continues to improve their standards and strives to take care of their personnel, while sareguarding the local community. With this new program in place, the command's aim is to see the number or driving incidents decrease, and make the roads a safer place.

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Navy Marine Corps News - 8/13/2005 - VP-5 Applies Their Training To Real World Operations...VIDEO..." WebSite: Navy News http://www.news.navy.mil/management/videodb/player/video.aspx?id=5349 [14AUG2005]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VP History ThumbnailCamera050607-N-1550W-002 Jacksonville, Fla. (June 7, 2005) "...Senior Chief Aviation Ordnanceman Andrew McDonald assigned to the "Mad Foxes" of Patrol Squadron Five (VP-5), disembarks the P-3C Orion aircraft after a six-month deployment in support of the global war on terrorism. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 2nd Class Elizabeth Williams (RELEASED)..." WebSite: Navy Newsstand http://www.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=25204 [13JUL2005]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VP History ThumbnailCamera050425-N-6205H-002 Sigonella, Sicily (April 5, 2005) "...Aviations Technician Airman Justin Kirschbaum uses hand signals to taxis a P-3C Orion from the taxiway. Kirschbaum is on deployment with the "Mad Foxes" of Patrol Squadron Five (VP-5) stationed at Naval Air Station Sigonella. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate Airman Jacqueline Hall (RELEASED)..." WebSite: Navy Newsstand http://www.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=23900 [13JUL2005]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VP History ThumbnailCamera050425-N-6205H-001 Sigonella, Sicily (April 5, 2005) "...Aviation Ordnanceman 3rd Class Michael Atkinson checks the pylon on a P-3C Orion after the aircraft returned from a routine flight. Atkinson is on deployment with the "Mad Foxes" of Patrol Squadron Five (VP-5) stationed at Naval Air Station Sigonella. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate Airman Jacqueline Hall (RELEASED)..." WebSite: Navy Newsstand http://www.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=23899 [13JUL2005]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...'Mad Foxes' finish deployment in a flurry - By Lt. j.g. Michael Moody, VP-5 PAO..." WebSite: JaxAirNews http://www.jaxairnews.com/stories/061605/mil_vp5001.shtml [16JUN2005]

    The NAS Jacksonville, Florida-based VP-5, the Navy's second oldest VP squadron, recently completed a deployment as families, friends and colleagues welcomed the last VP-5 P-3C aircraft back to NAS Jacksonville, Florida on June 8.

    VP-5 History ThumbnailCameraPhoto by PH3 Jessie Paquin A VP-5 P-3C taxis on the parking apron at NAS Sigonella, Sicily.

    Piloting the P-3C ''Orion'' on only her second flight as the squadron's newest patrol plane commander, Lt. Brooke O'Brien formally concluded the final chapter of a six-month deployment as she ''greased'' the landing after a transit home from NAS Sigonella, Sicily.

    Serving the cause of freedom over the last six months, VP-5 ''Mad Foxes'' executed 512 operational missions and 3,212 flight hours while stretching out over 12 time zones supporting missions in three theaters of operation, including South America, Africa and the Middle East.

    During the deployment, the bulk of the squadron was based out of NAS Sigonella, Sicily, supporting the United States European Command (EUCOM) where VP-5 executed intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (ISR) missions supporting Operations Active Endeavor, Deliberate Forge and Joint Guardian. AO3 Cheryl Grosso enjoyed most of her deployment in NAS Sigonella, Sicily, '' I really enjoyed loading live ammo on the P-3. It is a great feeling knowing you are doing your part in the fight against terrorism.''

    VP-5 History ThumbnailCameraPhoto courtesy of VP-5 Members of VP-5 Crew Four pose in front of the Kandahar International Airport in Afghanistan prior to departing for their next mission.

    The Mad Foxes were also able to hone their antisubmarine warfare (ASW) skills in numerous exercises, carrying out mock attacks on 18 different submarines from multiple countries.

    During the final days of deployment, the Mad Foxes took pride flying with Rear Adm. Stanley Bozin on his last operational P-3C flight prior to his transition back to the United States and duty in the operational Navy. The squadron also made history in May with a first-ever P-3C visit to Ghana, Africa accompanied by Capt. Bob Lally, commander, Task Force Six Seven. While in Ghana, the Mad Foxes met with U.S. Ambassador Mary Carlin Yates who received a P-3 tour and met with VP-5's Lt. Michael Mosi, who spent much of his life in Ghana.

    In the United States Central Command (CENTCOM), squad-ron members executed missions in direct support of Commander, Fifth Fleet and Operations Iraqi Freedom and Enduring Freedom. Additionally, the squadron's aircrews had the honor of supporting the historic free elections in Iraq.

    In United States Southern Command (SOUTHCOM), the forward operating location (FOL) team in El Salvador intercepted over 32 metric tons of illegal narcotics destined for North America. For AW1 Todd Barrett, who spent two months in El Salvador, ''The missions where lengthy at times, but it really paid off when you discover a go-fast (narcotic boat) and know that you are doing your part in stopping drugs from reaching our borders.''

    VP-5 History ThumbnailCameraPhoto by Miriam S. Gallet Five-year-old Logan and 4-year-old Carolyn shyly greet their dad, AT1(AW) Edward Hopper at the tarmac last Thursday afternoon. "I'm happy my dad is home, we can now go swimming and play with him," said Logan.

    Throughout the deployment, the FOL detachment team comprised crews and aircraft from VP-5, VP Reserve squadrons and Sea Operational Detachment (SEAOPDET) support personnel from NAS Jacksonville, Florida. VP-5 aircraft and maintenance personnel sustained a stunning 96 percent in-theater aircraft mission capable rate over six months. Cmdr. Bill Johns, VP-5 commanding officer, stated, ''I'm obviously biased, but VP-5 is blessed with simply the finest Maintenance Department on the planet.'' Combined with the on-station success from nine of 12 Mad Fox aircrews who spent time flying missions out of the FOL, the results spurred the ''best deployment ever'' accolades from Capt. Martin Smith, chief of staff, SOUTHCOM.

    Just days prior to the end of deployment, VP-5 executed a short-notice, four-day Hurricane (Adrian) evacuation and return plan, safely repositioning aircraft and personnel out of the path of nature's fury, then rapidly redeployed in time to continue theater operations without operational impact.

    VP-5 History ThumbnailCameraPhoto by Miriam S. Gallet VP-5 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Bill Johns praises and thanks the Sailors, family and friends upon arriving back from a six-month deployment.

    For many, this deployment marked professional and personal milestones as 61 squadron members earned their enlisted air warfare specialist pin, 23 first class petty officers earned board eligibility for chief, and 32 personnel earned advancement from the March exam cycle. For AOCS Andrew McDonald, this was his 17th and, most likely, his last deployment out of 26 dedicated years in the military. McDonald stated, ''I really enjoyed flying the missions, seeing the sights and working with all the tremendous talent in the squadron, not to mention the traditional camaraderie between the officers and chiefs.''

    VP-5 began deployment in December under the leadership of VP-5's 54th Commanding Officer Cmdr. Sean Cannon, witnessed a change of command in April, then ended deployment eclipsing 26 years of more than 148,000 mishap-free flight hours. ''It's always a team effort and we have a great team.'' stated Johns.

    ''The deployment success this squadron enjoys is due in large part to the steady leadership of the commanding officer who took VP-5 on deployment, Cmdr. Sean Cannon. ''Additionally, our families, friends and loved ones played a crucial role in weathering increased challenges at home due to our absence. Their unfailing support was a source of strength that allowed us to stay focused and execute missions. They deserve our gratitude, admiration and respect.''

    For the last six months, the Mad Foxes have honorably served our country from the leading edge of the global war on terror, furthering the cause of freedom, making a lasting difference and passing the deployment torch to the ''Red Lancers'' of VP-10.

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...What's in a name? For Navy squadrons, plenty - From Screwtops to snails, units treasure unique monikors - By Jason Chudy, Stars and Stripes - Scene, Sunday, June 5, 2005..." Stars and Stripes WebSite: http://www.estripes.com/article.asp?section=140&article=29529 [07JUN2005]

    Neither screwy, crazy — nor mad — are the Mad Foxes of Patrol Squadron 5, which is currently deployed to NAS Sigonella, Sicily.

    The name always draws questions, said Lt. j.g. Michael Moody, VP-5's public affairs officer.

    "[The name] refers to the MAD — a magnetic anomaly detector that's part of our [aircraft's] capabilities," he said about their P-3C Orion maritime surveillance and submarine hunting aircraft. The MAD can detect changes in the earth's magnetic field brought about by submarines.

    Squadron personnel wear unit patches that show a hammer- holding fox getting ready to hit a periscope.

    "It's a name of pride," Moody explained. "I think that it helps with the camaraderie of the squadron."

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Sigonella internships help students pick careers - Six months at the naval air station a plus for interns, mentors - By Jason Chudy, Stars and Stripes - European edition, Monday, May 16, 2005..." Stars and Stripes WebSite: http://www.estripes.com/article.asp?section=104&article=28332&archive=true [03JUN2005]

    VP-5 History Rita Anderson / Sigonella H.S. - Sigonella high school student Jade Garth listens as Petty Officer 1st Class Patrick Elmore explains job duties during Garth's internship at the base air traffic control facility. Garth spent about six months interning at the facility.

    It's not that unusual for students at NAS Sigonella, Sicily to tour its various military commands. What is unusual is having the students actually lead the tour.

    As part of the final few weeks of the Stephen F. Decatur High School's first-ever Career Practicum course, a dozen seniors gave their fellow students tours of the offices or commands they'd been working at as interns since early December.

    Explaining the operations of the base's fleet mail center wasn't too difficult for Jeff Shonk.

    "We trained him on everything that a postal clerk would do," said Chief Petty Officer Anthony Gambles. "He came every other day — this was his class."

    The 10 sailors working directly with Shonk appreciated having him around, Gambles said.

    "They felt good that a kid from the high school would want to learn about what they do," he said. "We teach the kid something, and we learn something from them."

    The students spent up to four hours every other day interning at various base organizations, ranging from the air traffic control planning section to the hospital's medical lab. The program was well received by both student and supervisor.

    "It's a great program," said Chief Petty Officer Joel Saikin, a flight engineer with the VP-5 squadron. "It gives high school kids the chance to see different aspects of the military. It gives them real-world experience."

    The students all chose a career field that they were interested in. Stephen Decatur's career coordinator Kathy Campbell then worked to get them internships in those fields.

    Senior Robert Martin said that next year he'll be majoring in aeronautical sciences or engineering at the University of West Florida, and possibly later at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University. His internship with VP-5 gave him an idea of what it's like to work in aviation.

    "It helped me out a lot," said Martin, who worked with Saikin in various squadron shops. "I think this internship gave me a lot of experience finding out what the job is like and what [Navy sailors assigned to a squadron] do."

    Campbell said that base commands were excited about the prospects of having high school interns. So much so, she said, that she's got a list of people wanting students for next year.

    "People wanted to have interns — they were asking for them," she said. "We had so many people...willing to train the students."

    Campbell said she hopes to have about two dozen student taking part in the internship program next year.

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...PAO Corner - MAD FOXES getting the job done..." VP-5 Official WebSite: http://www.nasjax.navy.mil/vp5/pao.htm [03JUN2005]

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    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...'Mad Foxes' to change leaders - By Lt. j.g. Brian Fichter, VP-5 - Thursday, April 14, 2005..." WebSite: JaxAirNews http://www.jaxairnews.com/stories/041405/mil_vp5001.shtml [18APR2005]

    The VP-5 ''Mad Foxes'' will celebrate their 54th change of command April 18 with distinguished guests, families and friends at NAS Sigonella, Sicily.

    The change of command ceremony will culminate a highly successful tour for outgoing Commanding Officer Cmdr. Sean Cannon who is being relieved by Cmdr. William Johns.

    VP-5 History ThumbnailCameraCmdr. William Johns Johns will continue to lead the Mad Foxes through the remainder of their deployment and then into the following inter-deployment readiness cycle (IDRC). Johns reported to the squadron in April 2004, assuming duties as executive officer.

    A graduate of the University of Nebraska, Johns received a Naval ROTC commission in 1987.

    After earning his naval flight officer's wings in May 1989, he reported to VP-30 for initial P-3 training in NAS Jacksonville, Florida. His very distinguished career includes an initial fleet tour in Brunswick, Maine with VP-44, which included a deployment to Keflavik, Iceland.

    After VP-44's decommissioning in 1991, he joined VP-10 and deployed to NAS Sigonella, Sicily. In 1993, he returned to VP-30 for instructor duty.

    Ordered to Commander, Carrier Group Six in 1996, Johns served as flag secretary and aide and qualified as staff tactical action officer deploying with USS John C. Stennis (CVN 64) Battle Group on its maiden deployment around the world and in support of Operation Southern Watch and United Nations sanctions against Iraq.

    In April 1999, he reported to VP-16 in NAS Jacksonville, Florida for his aviation department head tour, which included another deployment to NAS Sigonella, Sicily. In November 2000, Johns joined Com-mander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Group in Norfolk, Va. prior to reporting to VP-5.

    VP-5 History ThumbnailCameraCmdr. Sean Cannon Cannon's tenure began in April 2004, and he effectively transitioned the Mad Foxes through a challenging IDRC into a demanding worldwide deployment to Italy, El Salvador and NSA Bahrain. The squadron covered three areas of responsibility as well as several detachment sites to various countries.

    Under Cannon's guidance, VP-5 broke new ground by bringing the Navy's Fleet Response Plan (FRP) to maritime patrol aviation.

    While building 12 combat ready aircrews during the IDRC, six were detached within a three-month period to support European Command (EUCOM) and Southern Command (SOUTHCOM) requirements, executing 298 mishap-free hours and a 100 percent mission completion rate.

    In addition to providing FRP surge assistance, the squadron kept pace with readiness requirements while supporting carrier strike groups in numerous operations such as the joint task force exercise, and the composite training unit exercise.

    Cannon leaves the Mad Foxes in the middle of an already successful tri-site deployment. Under his charge, VP-5 has charted a new course for the operational employment of maritime patrol and reconnaissance aircraft, achieving a 98 percent mission completion rate during 3,600 flight hours.

    While supporting Fifth and Sixth Fleet operations in Central Command (CENTCOM) and EUCOM, the Mad Foxes have also conducted counter-drug operations throughout SOUTHCOM and CENTCOM in support of the Joint Inter-Agency Task Force South, aiding in the interdiction of narcotics worth 400 million dollars.

    VP-5 also completed numerous missions in support of Operations Iraqi Freedom and Enduring Freedom. His aircrews supported Operations Joint Guardian, Deliberate Forge and Active Endeavor, Strait of Gibraltar escort missions, as well as numerous NATO and multi-national exercises.

    Cannon's inspirational leadership led the command to unprecedented combat readiness, while surpassing 147,000 hours of mishap-free flight operations.

    He sparked advancement rates the last two cycles that exceeded wing, group, and Navy average, produced the highest chief petty officer selection rate of any VP squadron in the fleet, and received the 2004 Comman-der Atlantic Fleet Retention Excellence Award.

    Beginning this summer, Cannon will commence full time study under the Moreau Scholar Program at Johns Hopkins University.

    The Mad Foxes also welcome their new Executive Officer Cmdr. Brent Klavon. Klavon's last tour was as executive officer of VP-30.

    He is a 1988 graduate of Pennsylvania State University and received his commission via Naval ROTC and subsequently began flight training, earning his naval aviator wings in 1989.

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...VP-5 Mad Fox Newsletter - Second Edition (PDF File 528KB), April 2005..." VP-5 Official WebSite: http://www.nasjax.navy.mil/vp5/OMBUDSMAN2.doc [08JUL2005]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Approach March - April 2005 - CRM: What If? - By AEC(AW/NAC) Dan Schwertfager - AEC(AW/NAC) Schwertfager flies with VP-5..." Naval Safety Center WebSite: http://www.safetycenter.navy.mil/media/approach/issues/marapr05/CRM.htm [08JUN2005]

    Our crew had been operating for a month out of the Manta, Ecuador, forward operating location (FOL). Our missions were in support of Operations Dolphin Archer and Caper Focus.

    Our day began with a 0900 preflight for a five-hour reposition flight to NAS Roosevelt Roads, Puerto Rico. The P-3 we were to take back had arrived in the FOL two weeks earlier with a flap-asymmetry gripe, which was fixed with a flap re-rig, followed by a functional check flight. The plane then sat idle for two weeks.

    After takeoff, we leveled off at FL230 as the crew began to ponder what the next couple of weeks in Puerto Rico would be like. One hour into the flight, the flap-asymmetry light illuminated with the flaps in the up position. A quick visual inspection verified both flaps were in the full-up position and would not be available for landing. We broke out NATOPS, reviewed the procedures, and began a risk analysis of our situation.

    Flaps in the full-up position require higher speeds and AOA for approach and landing, and they create much longer landing distances. We evaluated our options and considered weather, runway numbers, and fuel remaining. Everything favored continuing to Puerto Rico.

    We try to keep all crew members "in the game" during every flight, and we routinely fire "what if" questions to each other. I thought it was time to toss a question to the crew. I looked out the starboard aft window and asked over the ICS, "What are everybody's thoughts on losing an engine during the rest of the flight?"

    During the conversation, the second flight engineer saw a slight reduction in the No. 1 hydraulic quantity from what had been noted during the preflight. I still was in the back of the plane, so I grabbed my cranial and goggles to take a look in the hydraulic service center (HSC). As expected, I saw a little fluid but no massive puddles or any sign of a leak. We once again evaluated our situation and decided to continue. Heck, it's not like the P-3 never leaks.

    At the four-hour mark of the flight, at FL230, the pilot thought he saw something flicker on the horizontal-annunciator-lights-panel assembly for the No. 3 engine; the flight station became abnormally quiet. I ran a lights check to see if any lights were burnt out, and I also checked to see if the "flicker" could have been the sun's reflection on the lights panel. As I scanned engine indications and the pilot finished checking the engine nacelle for any external indications, the No. 3 chips light came on for about 15 seconds, then went out. (The chips light means metal particles are on the power section or the reduction-gearbox magnetic plugs.)

    The No. 3 engine had no secondary indications of an engine or gearbox failure. NATOPS requires the engine to be shut down when a chips light comes on. If another emergency requiring power exists, the crew may elect to leave the engine running. This bad day was getting worse.

    Aircraft pressurization is provided by two engine-driven compressors (EDCs): one on the No. 2 engine and the other on the No. 3 engine. One EDC should be able to maintain pressurization; however, we also had an outstanding gripe in the book for a weak No. 2 EDC. This situation presented a dilemma because, as I mentioned, we were cruising at FL230.

    The pilot immediately contacted center and coordinated a descent to help the No. 2 EDC maintain cabin pressurization. Because of our altitude, we kept the No. 3 engine running to help maintain pressurization.

    Center initially cleared us to FL150, and we evaluated the remaining EDC's performance. The cabin pressure stabilized at 7,500 feet. The three-engine-at-15,000-feet range chart determined, with the fuel remaining, we would land 1,000 pounds above our on-top fuel requirement. Once everybody was comfortable with the situation, and no more questions existed, we shut down the No. 3 engine.

    In the Orion world, we routinely practice no-flap landings; we also practice three-engine landings. However, we do not routinely practice no-flap, three-engine landings.

    All the crew aft of the flight station, who weren't too concerned before, now were trying to find reasons to crowd into the flight station. This rush forward included our one passenger, the FOL maintenance-control chief who had released us "safe for flight."

    After what seemed to be an endless list of "what if" questions, and a good old-fashioned, round-table ORM discussion by the flight station (three pilots and both FEs), we decided to set up No. 3 engine for restart. With no secondary indications from the chips light, we agreed it would be beneficial to restart the engine before commencing the approach. We would do a four-engine, no-flap landing. If the No. 3 engine then developed secondary indications and degraded, we would shut it down for good.

    Before arriving at the initial approach fix, we reviewed the emergency-landing brief and the no-flap-landing procedures, completed our required checklists, and then restarted the No. 3 engine. All engine indications appeared normal, and we started our approach.

    Three miles from the landing threshold, the No. 1 hyd-press light illuminated (Do you recall our earlier slight loss of hydraulic fluid in the No. 1 system?). This light means the No. 1 hydraulic-pump pressure has dropped below the required limits. I secured the No. 1 hydraulic pump after talking with the pilot and verified the integrity of the No. 1 system. The No. 1A pump still worked and we saw no loss of fluid indicated.

    After announcing an "all good" to the flight station, we let the crew know everything was OK and flew a textbook, uneventful no-flap, four-engine landing.

    After landing rollout, we secured the No. 3 engine, and, during the taxi to our line, the second FE verified the HSC was clear and the integrity of the No. 1 hydraulic pump was intact. The main-power circuit breaker on the main load center had tripped; we reset it, and the pump ran fine. During postflight, the maintenance crew inspected the aircraft and found numerous gripes. The port flap brake was seized, the starboard flap brake had damaged pins, and the flap-asymmetry relay was shorted because of the flap gripe. The metal fuzz found on the No. 3 gearbox-mag plug was non-rejection criteria; a follow-on penalty run yielded no more fuzz. The HSC leak was within limits, and the No. 1 hydraulic-pump circuit breaker, when set, operated normally, and the discrepancies could be duplicated.

    Though we train for any of these malfunctions individually, when combined, this situation became an excellent ORM scenario. If we had added a few more malfunctions and a little runway work, we could have completed a fly flight for the junior pilots and my second engineer.

    I think this event made the biggest impression on our single passenger, the maintenance-control chief. So many times he signs "safe for flight," then the plane leaves, comes back, gripes are written, and gripes get fixed-the same old routine. But, when he actually got to experience the full effects of an in-flight malfunction, combined with a few problems, and to see the process we go through, he was impressed. After we had finished our postflight, he still was talking about how fluent and methodical it looked. He said we had made it look easy.

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VP-5 History ThumbnailCameraExercise Noble Marlin 2005 "...Exercise Noble Marlin 2005 - Photos by PO Klaus-Dietmar Gabbert GEN - Cleaning the windows of the cockpit is also part of getting an aircraft ready to take off. An enlisted member of the United States Fixed Wing Patrol Squadron Five brushes dust off the cockpit window of an US P3C. The US Maritime Patrol Aircraft gets ready to take off to search Ionian Sa for submarines. This is one of the many missions during the NATO Exercise NOBLE MARLIN 2005, an Anti-Submarine Warfare exercise in the Ionian Sea..." Allied Joint Force Command Naples http://www.afsouth.nato.int/JFCN_Images/2005/Noble_Marlin05/ExNM05_p3.htm [21MAR2005]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VP-5 History ThumbnailCameraExercise Noble Marlin 2005 "...Exercise Noble Marlin 2005 - Photos by PO Klaus-Dietmar Gabbert GEN - A pilot of the United States Navy checks the instruments of the cockpit of an US P3C prior to take off. The P3C of the United States Fixed Wing Patrol Squadron Five takes part in the NATO Exercise NOBLE MARLIN 2005. The exercise is NATO's Anti-Submarine Warfare exercise with a wide range of military objectives..." Allied Joint Force Command Naples http://www.afsouth.nato.int/JFCN_Images/2005/Noble_Marlin05/ExNM05_p3.htm [21MAR2005]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VP-5 History ThumbnailCameraExercise Noble Marlin 2005 "...Exercise Noble Marlin 2005 - Photos by PO Klaus-Dietmar Gabbert GEN - Stationed at the NAS Sigonella, Sicily P3C of the United States Fixed Wing Patrol Squadron Five is getting refueled. The Maritime Patrol Aircraft participates in the NATO Exercise NOBLE MARLIN 2005. The NATO exercise is an Anti-Submarine Warfare exercise, with the main aim to improve the ability of the ten participating nations to operate together..." Allied Joint Force Command Naples http://www.afsouth.nato.int/JFCN_Images/2005/Noble_Marlin05/ExNM05_p3.htm [21MAR2005]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VP-5 History ThumbnailCameraExercise Noble Marlin 2005 "...Exercise Noble Marlin 2005 - Photos by PO Klaus-Dietmar Gabbert GEN - A "wing walker" of the United States Fixed Wing Patrol Squadron Five escorts a P3C to its parking position. Wing-walkers are utilized for aircraft movements on the ground, to avoid accidents on the airfield. The P3C takes part in the NATO Exercise NOBLE MARLIN 2005, an Anti-Submarine Warfare exercise in the Ionian Sea..." Allied Joint Force Command Naples http://www.afsouth.nato.int/JFCN_Images/2005/Noble_Marlin05/ExNM05_p2.htm [21MAR2005]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VP-5 History ThumbnailCameraExercise Noble Marlin 2005 "...Exercise Noble Marlin 2005 - Photos by PO Klaus-Dietmar Gabbert GEN - An enlisted member of the United States Fixed Wing Patrol Squadron Five controls an US P3C from outside, before the aircraft gets reported as "ready for take off". The P3C of the US Fixed Wing Patrol Squadron Five participates in the NATO Exercise NOBLE MARLIN 2005. One of the main aims of the exercise is to amplify the existing inter-operability of the ten participating NATO nations..." Allied Joint Force Command Naples http://www.afsouth.nato.int/JFCN_Images/2005/Noble_Marlin05/ExNM05_p2.htm [21MAR2005]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VP-5 History ThumbnailCamera050301-N-1550W-003 Sigonella, Sicily (Mar. 1, 2005) "...Director, Naval Forces Europe, Plans and Operations/Commander, Submarine Group Eight, Rear Adm. Carl V. Mauney, speaks with Sailors assigned to Patrol Squadron Five (VP-5), in Sigonella, Sicily, during a site visit. VP-5 is currently deployed to Sigonella in support of Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF). U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 2nd Class Elizabeth Williams (RELEASED)..." Navy News Stand http://newshome.news.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=22421 [10MAR2005]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...NATO sub exercise set to kick off near Sicily - Stars and Stripes - European edition, Tuesday, March 1, 2005..." WebSite: Stars And Strips http://www.stripes.com/article.asp?section=104&article=26591&archive=true [21MAR2005]

    NAPLES, Italy — NATO's annual anti-submarine exercise Noble Marlin kicks off Thursday in the Ionian Sea southeast of Sicily.

    The exercise, known as Dogfish in previous years, will run through March 16.

    Six submarines, 10 maritime patrol aircraft and 16 surface ships will take part in Noble Marlin, which the alliance is billing as "the world's largest anti-submarine warfare exercise."

    The exercise will be run from Commander, Submarines Allied Naval Forces and Commander, Maritime Air, both based in Naples.

    U.S. forces include aircraft from the Sigonella, Sicily-based Patrol Squadron Five and staff assigned to the two Naples-based headquarters.

    Noble Marlin includes forces from 10 NATO nations, ranging from Turkey to Canada.

    According to an alliance press release, the exercise is designed to keep forces proficient in coordinated anti-submarine, anti-surface and coastal surveillance operations.

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...VP-5 Crew Joins SAR Mission Off Coast of Malta - Story Number: NNS050216-06 - Release Date: 2/16/2005 3:22:00 PM - By Journalist 1st Class Russell C. Tafuri, Armed Forces Network Sigonella..." Navy News Stand WebSite http://www.news.navy.mil/Search/display.asp?Story_id=17117

    NAS South Weymouth, Massachusetts (NNS) -- A Commander Task Force (CTF) 67 P-3 Orion crew from VP-5 assisted in a search and rescue mission of an exploded civilian cargo vessel off the coast of Malta Feb. 3.

    When the civilian cargo vessel Vigla exploded, Rescue Command Center Malta put out the SOS call. Britian's HMS Nottingham (D 91) was in the area and initiated the search-and-rescue effort, joined by an Italian military helicopter. The 11-member crew of VP-5, homeported in NAS Jacksonville, Florida, joined the effort looking for seven Dutch crew members of the Vigla, who were feared dead after the ship exploded 150 miles southeast of Malta, according to Capt. Robert Lally, commodore of CTF 67.

    The Navy's P-3 Orion lent unique support due to its ability to stay on mission for up to 10 hours, as well as provide the electronic equipment aboard suited to this type of mission, including radar systems and infra-red sensors, according to VP-5 Tactical Coordinator Lt. Tom Pickering.

    "We also had every available person onboard manning the windows as observers," said Pickering. "The whole time, we're treating this as if there are people in the water, waiting on us. We all stayed hopeful."

    But with the water temperatures between 55 and 57 degrees Fahrenheit, the mission ultimately became a search-and-recovery one.

    "If the people in the water were not in a life boat or without protective clothing, they could only last in the water up to two hours maximum," said Lally.

    The P-3 crew assisted with the recovery of four of the seven sailors' bodies from Vigla.

    "The take-away for me is genuine flexibility of the crews to respond so quickly to an emergent need like that," said Cmdr. Sean Cannon, VP-5 commanding officer. "It also validates the value of having a large-dwell platform like the P-3, because it is able to stay exactly where the action is longer than anything else."

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...050211-N-3195P-004/005/009 Sigonella, Sicily (Feb 11, 2005) - Sailors assigned to the "Mad Foxes" of Patrol Squadron Five (VP-5) perform a foreign object damage (FOD) walk down under the rising sun on the flight line of NAS Sigonella, Sicily. A FOD walkdown is done before, during, and after flight operations to ensure that no debris is on the flight line to cause any damage. The "Mad Foxes" are responsible for maintaining, flying, and performing missions with the P-3C Orion aircraft. VP-5 is on a regularly scheduled deployment in support of the Global War on Terrorism. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate Third Class Jesse L Paquin. (RELEASED)..." [10MAR2005]

    History - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge Thumbnail

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Tuesday, February 15, 2005 - Italy is latest stop for "Mad Foxes" on global anti-terror trek - By Sandra Jontz, Stars and Stripes - European edition, Tuesday, February 8, 2005..." WebSite: Stars And Strips http://www.estripes.com/article.asp?section=104&article=26169&archive=true [15FEB2005]

    VP-5 History Thumbnail "...Jesse L. Paquin / U.S. Navy - A P-3C Orion assigned to the "Mad Foxes" of Patrol Squadron Five makes its final approach to land at NAS Sigonella, Sicily, during routine flight operations.

    NAS Sigonella, Sicily — The "Mad Foxes" have traveled from El Salvador to NSA Bahrain to help fight the global war on terror.

    The 430 sailors of Patrol Squadron 5 — though based at NAS Jacksonville, Florida — are currently flying their four P-3 Orions out of NAS Sigonella, Sicily during a six-month routine deployment.

    The unit's sailors, such as Petty Officer 3rd Class Jeremy Fox, have been trekking around the world.

    Fox, 21, an aviation electrician's mate, spent about a month-and-a-half at the end of last year in El Salvador maintaining one of the squadron's aircraft that was aiding the U.S. Coast Guard and El Salvadoran military to track vessels possibly smuggling narcotics.

    And while he might not be on the front lines, Fox said, he's out there making a difference and seeing the world — two reasons why he joined the service more than three years ago.

    The squadron got its name in 1948 after being equipped with the first Lockheed P2V Magnetic Anomaly Detector, or MAD — a device that can detect a submerged submarine.

    The Sigonella deployment, which started in early December, has some sailors working outside their rates.

    Petty Officer 3rd Class David Bergeron, an aviation electronics technician by trade, has taken on the task as the "barracks super."

    "I'm the quality-of-life guy at the barracks, trying to keep everyone happy. If they're happy there, they're happy here," said the 22-year-old sailor during an recent interview at the squadron's hangar.

    No one VP squadron calls Sigonella home, at least not for long. A new one rotates in every six months, providing the surveillance and reconnaissance capabilities needed to meet requirements for the U.S. Sixth Fleet.

    The reason for the move is that it's cheaper for the Navy to deploy a squadron from its home base than to pay the permanent change-of-station costs to base sailors and their families at Sigonella, said Navy Capt. Robert Lally, commanding officer of Combined Task Force 67. The deployed squadrons fall under his command.

    Deploying to places such as Sigonella can be tough on the squadron's members, said Cmdr. Sean Cannon, the squadron's commanding officer.

    "Our biggest challenge is that this is not our hangar, and we have to get used to working in someone else's home," he said.

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...'Mad Foxes' are world travelers in the war on terror - By Sandra Jontz, Stars and Stripes - European edition, Wednesday, February 9, 2005..." WebSite: Stars And Strips http://www.estripes.com/article.asp?section=104&article=26188&archive=true [10MAR2005]

    NAS Sigonella, Sicily — The "Mad Foxes" have traveled from El Salvador to NSA Bahrain to help fight the global war on terror.

    The 430 sailors of Patrol Squadron 5 — though based at Naval Air Station, Jacksonville, Fla. — are currently flying their four P-3 Orions out of Sigonella during a six-month routine deployment.

    The unit's sailors, such as Petty Officer 3rd Class Jeremy Fox, have been trekking around the world.

    Fox, 21, an aviation electrician's mate, spent about a month-and-a-half at the end of last year in El Salvador maintaining one of the squadron's aircraft that was aiding the U.S. Coast Guard and El Salvadoran military to track vessels possibly smuggling narcotics.

    And while he might not be on the front lines, Fox said, he's out there making a difference and seeing the world — two reasons why he joined the service more than three years ago.

    The squadron got its name in 1948 after being equipped with the first Lockheed P2V Magnetic Anomaly Detector, or MAD — a device that can detect a submerged submarine.

    The Sigonella deployment, which started in early December, has some sailors working outside their rates.

    Petty Officer 3rd Class David Bergeron, an aviation electronics technician by trade, has taken on the task as the "barracks super."

    "I'm the quality-of-life guy at the barracks, trying to keep everyone happy. If they're happy there, they're happy here," said the 22-year-old sailor during an recent interview at the squadron's hangar.

    No one VP squadron calls Sigonella home, at least not for long. A new one rotates in every six months, providing the surveillance and reconnaissance capabilities needed to meet requirements for the U.S. Sixth Fleet.

    The reason for the move is that it's cheaper for the Navy to deploy a squadron from its home base than to pay the permanent change-of-station costs to base sailors and their families at Sigonella, said Navy Capt. Robert Lally, commanding officer of Combined Task Force 67. The deployed squadrons fall under his command.

    Deploying to places such as Sigonella can be tough on the squadron's members, said Cmdr. Sean Cannon, the squadron's commanding officer.

    "Our biggest challenge is that this is not our hangar, and we have to get used to working in someone else's home," he said.

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...VP-5 in Europe..." Contributed by Marco P.J. Borst p3orion@planet.nl P-3 Orion Research Group WebSite: http://home.planet.nl/~p3orion [14JAN2005]

    VP-5 in Europe
    By Lt. Michael Moody

    Now firmly established on one of the most challenging deployments in recent memory, the Mad Foxes of VP-5 have begun to make their presence known abroad.

    Various crews and aircraft have flown successful missions in the Central and Southern European Command theaters.

    Accompanying this grand scope of operations are the inherent challenges of communication, support and logistics. Meeting these challenges head-on, VP-5 has already enjoyed great success.

    While working closely with the Coast Guard and other agencies recently, the Mad Foxes were able to prevent more than 2.6 metric tons of illegal drugs from reaching U.S. soil.

    Rear Adm. Jeffrey J. Hathaway, director, US Coast Guard Joint Interagency Task Force South was so impressed with the performance that he sent a "Bravo Zulu" to the Mad Foxes from for their role in the operation.

    The squadron also had the unique opportunity to assist NAS Souda Bay`s Security Department with the medical evacuation of a canine. The department`s explosives-detecting dog, Maco, was suffering from a a leaky heart valve and needed immediate attention. The Ready Alert crew was notified and airborne within two hours and quickly delivered Maco to Army veterinarians in Germany to get the medical attention he needed. Maco is currently recovering, but will be retired from his military duties.

    The Mad Foxes continue a the Navy tradition of making a positive impact in the local community with a visit by members of the administration department to the local Suru Di Gesu Redntore orphanage, where they sponsored a Christmas party for the residents, in addition to tours of the P-3 aircraft for local Italian elementary schools.

    Fascinated by the plane, the children brought many questions and were able to learn about the many missions performed by the Orion aircraft and her crews.

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VP-5 History ThumbnailCamera050127-N-3195P-005/006/008 Sigonella, Sicily (Jan 27, 2005) "...A P-3C Orion assigned to the "Mad Foxes" of Patrol Squadron Five (VP-5) makes it final approach for landing at NAS Sigonella, Sicily during routine flight operations. The "Mad Foxes" are currently deployed in support of the Global War on Terrorism. U.S. Navy Photo by Photographer's Mate Third Class Jesse L Paquin. (RELEASED)..." WebSite: Port Orange Images http://www.portorangeimages.com/news%20from%20beyond.htm [10MAR2005]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VP-5 History ThumbnailCameraSigonella, Sicily (Jan 12, 2005) "...A P-3C Orion assigned to Patrol Squadron Five (VP-5), "Mad Foxes," sits on the flight line at Naval Air Station Sigonella while a maintenance crew changes the propeller on the number two engine. The Mad Foxes are on a regularly scheduled deployment in support of the Global War on Terrorism. U.S. Navy - photo by Photographer's Mate Third Class Jesse L Paquin. (RELEASED)..." [12FEB2005]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VP-5 History ThumbnailCamera050110-N-3195P-002 Sigonella, Sicily (Jan. 10, 2005) "...Aviation Ordnanceman 3rd Class Nick Carlson, right, stands ready to hand a sonobuoy to Aviation Ordnanceman 2nd Class Jason Skelton during the loading of sonobuoys in an P-3C Orion assigned to the "Mad Foxes" of Patrol Squadron Five (VP—5). Sonobuoys are devices that are used to detect acoustic waves produced by ships and submarines. VP-5 is on a regularly scheduled deployment in support of the Global War on Terrorism. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 3rd Class Jesse L. Paquin (RELEASED)..." Navy News Stand WebSite: http://www.news.navy.mil/search/photolist.asp [14JAN2005]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...VP-5 WebSite PAO Corner - The Mad Foxes New Den By LTJG Moody..." http://www.nasjax.navy.mil/vp5/pao.htm [18MAR2005]

    VP-5 History ThumbnailCamera

    Now firmly established on one of the most challenging deployments in recent memory, the Mad Foxes of Patrol Squadron FIVE have begun to make their presence known abroad. Various crews and aircraft have flown successful missions in the EUCOM, CENTCOM and SOUTHCOM theaters. Accompanying this grand scope of operations are the inherent challenges of communication, support and logistics. Meeting these challenges head-on, Patrol Squadron FIVE has already enjoyed great success. While working closely with the Coast Guard and other agencies recently, the Mad Foxes were able to prevent more than 2.6 metric tons of illegal drugs from reaching U.S. soil. A Bravo Zulu goes out to the Mad Foxes from RADM Hathaway of the USCG for their role in the operation. VP-5 also had the unique opportunity to assist NAS Souda Bay’s Security Department by conducting a canine MEDEVAC for their explosives-detecting dog, Maco. He was suffering from a leaky heart valve and needed immediate attention. The Ready Alert crew was notified and airborne within two hours, and quickly delivered Maco to veterinarians in Germany to get the medical attention he needed. Maco is currently recovering but will be retired from his military duties. Get well soon Maco.

    Representing the Navy, the Mad Foxes continue a tradition of making a positive impact in the local community. Some early activities that have already taken place include a visit by members of the Admin department to the local Suru Di Gesu Redntore orphanage where they sponsored a Christmas party for the residents, in addition to tours of the P-3 aircraft for local Italian elementary schools. Fascinated by the plane, the children brought many questions and were able to learn about the many missions performed by the Orion and her crews. VP-5 looks forward to more community involvement and interaction in the coming months.

    During the past Holiday season friends and families are missed the most. When asked about his family, AEAN Ramp of the CSO DEPT said, “Of course I wish I could be with them, but this is what I signed up for and things could always be worse.” AEAN Ramp has a wife and a son patiently waiting for him at home.. As the Mad Foxes dutifully fulfill our obligations far away from home, we would like to send our love and good cheer across the miles, back to all our loved ones. We appreciate your sacrifice, your love and your support.

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...VP-5 WebSite CO's Corner..." http://www.nasjax.navy.mil/vp5/cocorner.htm [18MAR2005]

    MAD FOX Families and Fans,

    Your MAD FOX team launched on deployment as smoothly as any squadron I have ever seen and since arriving at our deployment sites, has striven to make this our best deployment ever.

    Operationally, the MAD FOXES have charged out of the gate, already contributing to the nation's counter-drug effort by disrupting over $100 million worth of illegal drugs heretofore destined for your neighborhoods and schools. In the Med, MAD FOXES continue to underpin Commander Sixth Fleet's efforts to identify and track suspect shipping. And further east, elements of your team are supporting Central Command and Fifth Fleet priorities from sites in southwest Asia. With over 75 sorties already flown, the MAD FOXES continue to make a real difference in our Navy.

    On the deck, your heroes continue to grapple successfully with our beautiful but aged airplanes. They have kept our fleet flying and combat support folks have not missed a beat despite a whole new environment. We have underscored repeatedly the liberty and driving risks associated with our deployment sites and I could not be more pleased with how the MAD FOXES have embraced our collective efforts to keep each other safe on and off duty.

    We are working hard, but have also carved out time for over 100 MAD FOXES to enjoy sponsored tourist trips, including a couple of 4 wheel drive excursions up Mount Etna, the 10,000 foot volcanic peak 20 miles north of Sigonella, and an afternoon wine-tasting tour in nearby Sicilian towns. I could not be more proud of how well your team has been looking after one another and supporting each other.

    Over these next days, we will acutely feel the distance from home. We have a Christmas Breakfast planned at the Galley and will team up later in the day for some outdoor sports and finally, a Christmas movie and MAD FOX-cooked and served Christmas dinner. No bones about it - we will miss you. Thank you for supporting us with a mountain of letters and packages and with your diligent prayers. Nothing makes us happier than to know that you are basking in the freedoms that we have deployed to guarantee. As MAD FOX One, I wish you a Happy Christmas and enjoyable winter holiday.

    NO FOX LIKE A MAD FOX

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...VP-5 WebSite CMC's Corner..." http://www.nasjax.navy.mil/vp5/CMCcorner.htm [18MAR2005]

    Dear Family and Friends,

    Your Mad Fox Warriors are doing great things on deployment. Our over the hump party is March 6. Yes, halfway there. This month in the CMC's corner, I would like to highlight one of the many ways our community shows their appreciation. Below is a program by the City of Jacksonville to award grants to military members and their families.

    R/CMC


    Circa 2004

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Lightning and Fuel - by Lt. Bryan Schneider/P-3C - Lt. Schneider flies with VP-5..." Naval Safety Center WebSite: http://www.safetycenter.navy.mil/media/approach/vault/articles/2004/0802.htm [03JUN2005]

    So there I was, scheduled for an 8.5 hour mission out of NAS Jacksonville. The weather briefer forecasted numerous thunderstorms throughout Northern Florida and concluded that the weather at the field would deteriorate before the scheduled takeoff. We took off at 00:25 in VFR conditions; the field was in thunderstorm condition II, with numerous thunderstorms in the vicinity and a scattered to broken layer at 2500 Lightning and Fuelfeet. Takeoff weight was 130,000 pounds (our max recommended is 135,000). I occupied the left seat and briefed a max power takeoff, including the possibility of dumping fuel if we had to immediately return to the field. Passing through 650 feet the number three fire warning light illuminated. We shutdown the motor, noting no secondary indications of a fire.

    Canceling our IFR clearance, we proceeded to the 2000 foot delta pattern and stopped the transfer of fuel from tank 5 in order to achieve a lower gross weight after fuel dumping. Everything to this point had been almost "routine" in nature, practiced and discussed on many of our pilot training flights. However, I now found myself in an uncomfortable situation; dumping fuel in the vicinity of lightning, with the cloud layer at 2500 feet. After a thorough discussion I elected not to dump fuel and land the aircraft in its current configuration at a gross weight of 127,000 pounds with approach speeds of 162 and 145. We conducted an emergency-landing brief, and performed an uneventful 3-engine landing, touching down with 7000 feet remaining, on a dry 8000-foot runway.

    Maintenance personnel found no damage to the aircraft during the overweight landing inspection and returned it to service after resolving the engine fire discrepancy.

    Now, how did I come to the decision to land extremely overweight? While circling at 2000 feet, there were numerous cloud to cloud and cloud to ground lightning strikes observed in almost all directions from the field. The first item we discussed was fuel dumping. OPNAV 3710 states "whenever practicable, fuel shall not be jettisoned below an altitude of 6000 feet above the terrain". It also states "should weather or emergency conditions dictate jettisoning at a lower altitude, every effort shall be made to avoid populated areas". The possibility of dumping fuel at our current altitude gave way to discussing dumping fuel in proximity to lightning. We decided that the possibility of a lightning strike was poor due to the aircraft's relative position to the storms, but that a lightning strike while dumping could be catastrophic.

    After deciding to not dump fuel at the field, we discussed the possibility of landing the aircraft at its current gross weight or staying in the air to burn fuel. We were 127,000 pounds, operating with 3 engines. The max recommended landing weight for the P-3 is 114,000 pounds. Looking to NATOPs for further guidance, it states "landing in excess of 114,000 pounds should be conducted only in an emergency and requires an overweight landing inspection." The crew had recalled several emergencies where P-3s landed overweight, but knew little of the results or negative ramifications of doing so. Obviously, possible structural damage could result, but no one could recall this ever happening. Aircraft performance with the current environmental conditions allowed for safe yet relatively unfamiliar power settings for an approach and landing. Burning down fuel to 114,000 pounds would have meant another 2 and 1/2 hours circling above the field. With the field conditions forecasted to deteriorate, our engine shutdown for a fire, and the possibility of another malfunction, I decided that putting the aircraft on deck would be the prudent course of action.

    The following are only some of the insights I gained by discussing the flight amongst my peers, and are offered as possible topics of discussion for your benefit.

    Dumping in vicinity of lightning. While I have been unable to find any clear cut guidelines on safe separation from thunderstorms to dump fuel, it is widely accepted that lightning can and does strike aircraft up to 10 miles out. Commercial airliners document vastly more lightning strikes than we do, and only offer general guidance in some of their manuals stating that fuel should not be jettisoned in the vicinity of convective activity.

    Leaving the field to find non-convective area. At the time, I was not comfortable leaving the field with any hope of finding better conditions due to our forecast, however I did not use all my resources. A call to METRO might have told us of a possible clear area. However, leaving a known VMC field with only 3 operating engines to find a clear area is also worthy of ORM analysis.

    Landing above max recommended weight. Most aircraft are designed to land at max takeoff weight, requiring an overweight landing inspection because of the possibility of structural damage.

    3 engine performance. A high temperature, high humidity environment may have made 3 engine performance, or lack thereof, a major consideration in our decision to not dump fuel. Even with the conditions we had, a slow flight check or practiced approach and wave-off at altitude would have given us considerably more information.

    I hope that these topics will find their way into your wardroom as discussions. Another session of "So, there I was..." continues to be one of the best ways to learn from other's experience.

    Lt. Schneider flies with VP-5.

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY:  History ThumbnailCameraPhoto by Bill Bonser "...VP-5 wins intramural softball championship - By Bill Bonser - Sports Coordinator - Wednesday, June 30, 2004..." JaxAirNews http://www.jaxairnews.com/stories/070104/mil_softball001.shtml [07APR2005]

    Photo: Doug Gabel of the Aircraft Intermediate Maintenance Detachment, safely slides into second as Air Ops Second Baseman Keith Bernauer and an Air Ops outfielder converge on second base.

    With an impressive 20-1 record, the ''Mad Foxes'' of VP-5 placed first the NAS Jax 2004 Intramural Softball League. Taking second were the Aircraft Intermediate Maintenance Detachment (AIMD) ''Warriors'' followed by VP-45. Fourteen teams battled it out for a spot in the playoffs with VP-5 and AIMD earning the No. 1 and 2 seeds.

    There were no surprises in the opening round of the playoffs as VP-5 defeated VP-62, 23-15 and AIMD won by forfeit over the HS-3 ''Tridents.'' AIMD found themselves in a real battle in their second game of the playoffs against VP-16. AIMD was trailing 6-4 going into the bottom of the seventh inning, but AIMD responded under pressure scoring three runs to win the game, 7-6.

    VP-5 met their first big test in the winner's bracket semi-finals against CPRW-11. VP-5 was in control until the fifth inning when CPRW-11 scored three runs to take an 8-7 lead. The score was tied at 12 going into the seventh inning. CPRW-11 could not score in the top of the seventh and VP-5 got the one run they needed to win the game to advance to the winner's bracket final.

    AIMD walked right into the winner's bracket final when VP-30 did not have enough players to play the game. AIMD won their second game of the playoffs resulting in forfeitures from the other teams.

    The stage was set with the No. 1 and No. 2 seeds meeting in the winner's bracket finals. Both teams came out blazing scoring five runs each in the first inning. AIMD scored five more runs in the top of the second and VP-5 scored only twice. By the end of the third, AIMD had a 13-8 lead. VP-5 came back in the bottom of the fifth scoring six runs to take a 14-13 lead. AIMD scored three runs in the sixth and seventh innings to go up 19-14 with VP-5 having a chance to tie the game or win it in the bottom of the seventh. VP-5 was only able to score three runs and AIMD won the game 19-17 to make it to the championship.

    VP-5's first loss of the playoffs sent them to the loser's bracket to face Air Ops for the right to play AIMD for the championship. The two teams fought to a 14-14 tie at the end of seven complete innings to go into the first extra inning. Air Op's Cliff Williams hit a three-run home run in the first extra inning, igniting a six-run inning to break the game wide open. VP-5 could not recover as they went one, two, three in the bottom of the extra inning. Air Ops could not believe they knocked off the No. 1 seed and found themselves playing for the championship as the No. 4 seed.

    Air Ops started out with a big bang in the first inning of the championship game when Keith Bernauer hit a three-run homerun to give Air Ops a 3-0 lead. AIMD responded in the bottom of the first with a big bang of their own as Warren Dykes hit a three-run home run and AIMD scored another run to take a 4-3 lead.

    The game was rather quiet in the second inning with AIMD scoring one run to extend the lead to 5-3. AIMD made some more noise in the third inning when Dykes blasted his second home run of the game to give AIMD a 7-3 lead. Air Ops came alive in the top of the fourth with Justin Brown hitting a grand slam to give Air Ops an 8-7 lead.

    Air Op's lead was short lived as AIMD responded with four runs to take the lead again 11-8. Air Ops went one, two, three in the fifth and AIMD added one more run. Air Ops scored one run in the top of the sixth, but still trailed AIMD 12-9. Once again AIMD's Dykes came up big in the bottom of the sixth.

    With the bases loaded, Dykes hit a two-run double and AIMD scored four runs to take a 16-9 lead heading into the seventh inning. Air Ops got the ball rolling in the top of the seventh loading the bases with one out. Dave Tingler knocked in two runs with a base hit and Cliff Williams hit a single to bring in another run bringing the score to 16-12. With two outs, Air Ops loaded the bases again, but this time they were unsuccessful in bringing anyone in and AIMD won the championship 16-12.

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VP-5 History ThumbnailCamera041222-N-3195P-001 NAS Sigonella (DEC 22, 2004) "...Sailors assigned to the Mad Foxes of Patrol Squadron Five (VP-5) perform engine start procedures for a P-3C Orion in the morning sun on the flight line at Naval Air Station Sigonella. The Mad Foxes are on a regularly scheduled deployment in support of the Global War on Terrorism. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate Third Class Jesse L. Paquin (RELEASED)..." [12FEB2005]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Thursday, April 15, 2004 VP-5 honors past, looks to future - By Lt. j.g. Jeff Brownback - VP-5 PAO..." WebSite: Jax Air News http://www.jaxairnews.com/stories/041504/mil_vp5001.shtml [15FEB2005]

    VP-5 History ThumbnailCameraCmdr. Scott Dueker  Cmdr. Scott Dueker will turn over command of the VP-5 ''Mad Foxes'' to Cmdr. Sean Cannon in a change of command ceremony tomorrow in the VP-5 hangar spaces.

    VP-5 History ThumbnailCameraCmdr. Sean Cannon  Cannon is a 1986 graduate of the U.S. Naval Academy and was designated a naval aviator in 1988. He has completed tours with VP-24, VP-30, Commander, Cruiser-Destroyer Group Two embarked on board USS George Washington (CVN-71), and VPU-1. He is a Naval War College graduate and served on the Joint Staff.

    Cmdr. Scott Dueker will turn over command of the VP-5 ''Mad Foxes'' to Cmdr. Sean Cannon in a change of command ceremony tomorrow in the VP-5 hangar spaces.

    Cannon is a 1986 graduate of the U.S. Naval Academy and was designated a naval aviator in 1988. He has completed tours with VP-24, VP-30, Commander, Cruiser-Destroyer Group Two embarked on board USS George Washington (CVN-71), and VPU-1. He is a Naval War College graduate and served on the Joint Staff.

    During Dueker's tenure, VP-5 deployed in support of both Operation Iraqi Freedom and drug interdiction operations in South and Central America. Following their August 2003 redeployment, the Mad Foxes trained for the next deployment scheduled in December 2004.

    Dueker is a 1985 graduate of the United States Naval Academy and upon commissioning, entered flight training, earning a naval flight officer designation in June 1987. He completed Fleet Replacement Squadron training in the P-3C and reported to VP-49. He has also completed assignments with VP-30, USS America (CV-66), VP-9 and the office of the Secretary of Defense. He assumed command of VP-5 on May 9, 2003.

    Following a brief assignment with Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing Eleven, Dueker will report to the Industrial College of the Armed Forces at Fort McNair, Washington D.C.

    The new executive officer is Cmdr. William Johns. After earning a Reserve Officer's Training Corps Commission from the University of Nebraska, he was designated a naval flight officer and reported to VP-44. Upon VP-44's decommissioning, he reported to VP-10 and has had additional assignments with VP-30, Commander, Carrier Group Six, VP-16 and Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Force Atlantic.

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Stars and Stripes - European Edition, Thursday, December 16, 2004 - "The VP-5 "Max Foxes" sent aircraft and about 150 personnel to Sigonella. They are expected to be there for about six months..." Stars and Stripes http://www.estripes.com/article.asp?section=104&article=25153&archive=true [10MAR2005]

    A detachment of P-3C Orion aircraft and crews from Patrol Squadron Five recently replaced aircraft and personnel from Patrol Squadron 16 at Naval Air Station Sigonella, Sicily.

    Both squadrons are based out of Naval Air Station Jacksonville, Fla.

    The VP-5 "Max Foxes" sent aircraft and about 150 personnel to Sigonella. They are expected to be there for about six months.

    VP-16 spent five months flying missions from Sigonella. Squadron aircraft also deployed to Bahrain and Comalapa, El Salvador, and flew missions in support of U.S. forces in Afghanistan.


    Circa 2003

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY:  History ThumbnailCameraVP-5 History (Aug. 14, 2003) "...U.S. international forces conduct back-to-back exercises..." The Flagship http://www.flagshipnews.com/archives_2003/aug142003_6.shtml [09MAY2005]

    The destroyer Stump and guided-missile frigate McInerney recently completed two major exercises in support of commander, U.S. Southern Command's theater security strategy. Stump and McInerney participated first in Unitas 44-03 Pacific phase in the seas off of the Ecuadorian coast, followed immediately by their participation in PanaMax 2003, the first multinational, joint exercise designed as a response to potential seaborne threats to the Panama Canal.

    During Unitas, Stump served as flagship for Rear Adm. Vinson Smith, Commander Task Force 138, the multinational task force of the Americas. Task Force 138 included Navy and Coast Guard units from Chile, Ecuador, Panama, Peru and the United States as well as observers from Argentina, Bolivia and Mexico.

    Capt. James Martin, Commander Destroyer Squadron 6, also embarked in Stump, served as commander of the U.S. task group, which included the McInerney, and aircraft from Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron Light 42 and 48 Detachment 4, and from VP-5.

    A fast-paced exercise, Unitas is conducted throughout the year in a series of regional phases, which promote interoperability and coalition building.

    All warfare areas are stressed with exercise events designed to mirror the training of a combined training unit exercise; enabling U.S. units to maintain or improve war fighting readiness levels.

    "What I've learned from Unitas is that it is in our best interest to train with foreign navies. They're hard-working and fast-paced at the tasks at hand," said GM3 Caleb Smith, a Stump sailor. "Our allies might be people that we don't understand, so this training helps us to overcome communication's barriers."

    Serving as host of this year's Pacific phase, the Ecuadorian armada assembled an international planning staff and dedicated a year's effort toward building a challenging schedule of events culminating in an intensive final battle problem.

    "Tracking the Ecuadorian 209 submarine was the most challenging part of Unitas," said ST1(SW) Jason Adams, sonar supervisor aboard McInerney. "You can never get too much training; and when it comes to diesel submarines, this is one of a kind."

    As Unitas Pacific phase concluded, DesRon 6 staff, augmented with officers from Panama and Chile turned to the crisis-planning phase of PanaMax '03. The scenario-based exercise involved the detection, identification, monitoring and interdiction of a commercial vessel suspected of posing a threat to the Panama Canal.

    "It makes sense for our three countries to work together to protect the Canal: The United States is the first user of the canal and Chile is the premier South American user — fourth in the world — and Panama, well we are the owners," said the Jose Isaza, director general of Panama's National Maritime Service.

    McInerney, Stump, two Chilean ships and five patrol boats from Panama comprised the surface force working in conjunction with E-2C aircraft from Airborne Early Warning Squadron 77 and P-3C aircraft from VP-5 and Chilean patrol squadron 1.

    "The E-2C is the premier command and control aircraft. We can provide a surface picture out to a 200-mile radius," said Lt. Cmdr. Gerald Heyne, E-2C naval flight officer. "We pass the contact information to the P-3s and to the ships."

    Whether improving interoperability through Unitas or advancing hemispheric security cooperation through PanaMax, the naval forces deployed to the USNavSO area of responsibility are constantly working to support U.S. policy in the region. Stump and its embarked detachment from Helicopter Anti-submarine Squadron Light 42 departed their home ports of Norfolk and Mayport, Fla., June 2 for a routine six-month deployment to the U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command area of responsibility, which includes the Caribbean Sea, eastern Pacific and southern Atlantic. McInerney returned to its Mayport home port Aug. 1.

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY:  History ThumbnailCamera030708-N-0174W-501 Naval Air Station Jacksonville, Fla. (Jul. 8, 2003) "...Aviation Structural Mechanic 2nd Class Jeffrey A. Sims from New Jersey, N.J. removes working rivets from the wing of a P-3 Orion aircraft. Petty Officer Sims is assigned to the "Mad Foxes" of Patrol Squadron Five (VP-5). U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 3rd Class Richard W. Williams. (RELEASED)..." Navy News Stand http://newshome.news.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=8475 [05MAR2005]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Feb. 27, 2003 - Unitas forces commenced training in Caribbean..." The Flagship http://www.flagshipnews.com/archives_2003/feb272003_16.shtml [09MAY2005]

    PUERTO RICO — A multinational naval force from Colombia, Panama, Dominican Republic, the Netherlands, Peru and Venezuela assembled at Naval Station Roosevelt Roads, Puerto Rico, to commence Unitas 44-03 Caribbean Phase, the largest maritime exercise in the region.

    Hosted by Commander U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command, Rear Adm. Vinson E. Smith, approximately 3,000 sailors and Coast Guard personnel from seven countries will conduct a three-week training exercise that will develop and test the forces' ability to operate together in a variety of areas including surface, undersea and air warfare. Unitas 44-03 Caribbean Phase also focuses on maritime interdiction operations, counter drug operations and special warfare.

    "Unitas is the ideal venue for the navies of the Americas to demonstrate to the world our readiness and resolve to work together for mutual good and prosperity" said Smith. "At a time of world uncertainty, it is more imperative than ever that we be prepared to work together to ensure the security of our hemisphere."

    The U.S. task group participating in Unitas 44-03 Caribbean Phase is led by Commander Destroyer Squadron 14, Capt. Bernard Jackson, and it includes the flagship destroyer O'Bannon, the guided-missile frigate Boone and their embarked helicopter detachments, the Coast Guard cutter Spencer, the Military Sealift Command auxiliary ship Prevail and the attack submarine Springfield in addition to P-3C aircraft from VP-5.

    This opening, or Caribbean phase of Unitas 44-03, consists of a first phase comprised of in-port seminars, a work up phase and a scenario-driven free play.

    "The freeplay portion is like a final exam," said Lt. Cmdr. Hector Samario, CDS 14 air operations officer. "It is designed to present a complex, no-notice scenario to force mission analysis and prioritization while testing competencies in all areas."

    While the ship train at sea, a parallel special warfare exercise is taking place at NSRR. Navy SEALs from Naval Special Warfare Unit 4 will be training side by-side with their counterparts from the Dutch Antilles, Venezuela, Dominican Republic, Panama, Mexico and Peru.

    "Our training focus is operations in coastal environments," said Lt. Cmdr Cal Williams, NSWU-4 current operations officer. "Our training plan includes maritime and airborne operations as well as patrolling."

    Unitas presents an unequaled opportunity to improve the operational readiness and interoperability of U.S. and south and Central American naval forces while promoting hemispheric coalition, professionalism and mutual cooperation. It is the premier naval exercise in the region and consists primarily of three large regional multi-national phases: a Caribbean phase held in February, and Pacific and Atlantic phases held in July and October, respectively.

    In addition to a rigorous training schedule, U.S. Navy sailors and Coast Guard personnel will participate in community relations projects while in St. Lucia and St. Thomas.

    Now more than ever, Unitas plays a critical role in maintaining interoperability and coalition in the American hemisphere and presents an opportunity for U.S. Sailors and Coast Guard personnel to meet new people, visit interesting ports and experience rich new cultures.

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...P-3s Bid Farewell to Roosevelt Roads - Story Number: NNS030828-04 - Release Date: 8/28/2003 9:38:00 AM - By Lt. j.g. Nathan Rocklein, Naval Station Roosevelt Roads Puerto Rico Public Affairs..." WebSite: Navy News Stand http://www.news.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=8804 [12FEB2005]

    ROOSEVELT ROADS, Puerto Rico (NNS) -- As part of the restructuring of U.S. naval operations in the Caribbean following the closure of the Atlantic Fleet Weapons Training Facility, deploying P-3 Orion squadrons ceased scheduled flight operations at Roosevelt Roads, July 15, and shifted Maritime Patrol Aircraft operations to Forward Operation Locations in Curacao and El Salvador.

    The final squadron to deploy to Naval Station Roosevelt Roads was Patrol Squadron (VP) 5. The Mad Fox team has been deploying to Roosevelt Roads as far back as July 1947 when it still flew the P-2V Neptune aircraft.

    The Mad Foxes just completed a challenging, yet highly successful, six-month deployment that stretches from South America, through Northern Europe and into the Middle East.

    For the first time in the squadron's history, VP-5 performed missions from nine separate sites including Keflavik, Iceland; Andoya, Norway; Rota, Spain; Sigonella, Sicily; Souda Bay, Crete; Roosevelt Roads; Manta, Ecuador; Comalapa, El Salvador and Curacao in the Dutch Lesser Antilles. Additionally, exercises were flown from air bases in France, Germany, Scotland and England. At any given time, the Mad Foxes provided P-3 support for the fleet, covering over half the globe.

    Throughout its deployment, VP-5 performed a variety of missions. While flying the Northern Atlantic Ocean, VP-5 aircrews operating out of Keflavik and Andoya conducted successful anti-submarine warfare missions.

    While in Rota, Spain, the Mad Foxes teamed up with NATO partners to provide maritime surveillance and an armed escort of coalition vessels bound for Operation Iraqi Freedom.

    Aircrews working out of Souda Bay, Crete, and Sigonella, Sicily, conducted maritime surveillance and reconnaissance in the eastern Mediterranean and provided carrier battle group protection.

    Aircrews flew over Iraq in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom. Their mission was to be the "eyes in the sky" for coalition forces, providing real time intelligence to Coalition forces on the ground.

    In the Caribbean, VP-5 continued the nation's fight against illegal drug trafficking. Patrolling the waters of the Caribbean and eastern Pacific, crews were credited with the interdiction or disruption of more than $235 million worth of illegal narcotics headed to North America and Europe.

    Additionally, crews were instrumental in several search-and-rescue operations.

    The Mad Foxes enjoyed many successes throughout this deployment. From the Middle East to the Eastern Pacific, from the Arctic Circle to south of the Equator, the Mad Foxes flew more than 5,000 hours and enjoyed, by far, the most challenging deployment in many years.

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...August 28, 2003 - P-3s Bid Farewell to NS Roosevelt Roads, PR - Story Number: NNS030828-04 - Release Date: 8/28/2003 9:38:00 AM - By Lt. j.g. Nathan Rocklein, NS Roosevelt Roads, PR - Public Affairs..." http://www.news.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=8804 [26NOV2004]

    ROOSEVELT ROADS, Puerto Rico (NNS) -- As part of the restructuring of U.S. naval operations in the Caribbean following the closure of the Atlantic Fleet Weapons Training Facility, deploying P-3 Orion squadrons ceased scheduled flight operations at Roosevelt Roads, July 15, and shifted Maritime Patrol Aircraft operations to Forward Operation Locations in Curacao and El Salvador.

    The final squadron to deploy to NS Roosevelt Roads, PR was Patrol Squadron (VP) 5. The Mad Fox team has been deploying to Roosevelt Roads as far back as July 1947 when it still flew the P2V Neptune aircraft.

    The Mad Foxes just completed a challenging, yet highly successful, six-month deployment that stretches from South America, through Northern Europe and into the Middle East.

    For the first time in the squadron's history, VP-5 performed missions from nine separate sites including NAS Keflavik, Iceland; Andoya, Norway; NS Rota, Spain; NAS Sigonella, Sicily; Souda Bay, Crete; NS Roosevelt Roads, PR; Manta, Ecuador; Comalapa, El Salvador and Curacao in the Dutch Lesser Antilles. Additionally, exercises were flown from air bases in France, Germany, Scotland and England. At any given time, the Mad Foxes provided P-3 support for the fleet, covering over half the globe.

    Throughout its deployment, VP-5 performed a variety of missions. While flying the Northern Atlantic Ocean, VP-5 aircrews operating out of NAS Keflavik, Iceland and Andoya conducted successful anti-submarine warfare missions.

    While in NS Rota, Spain, the Mad Foxes teamed up with NATO partners to provide maritime surveillance and an armed escort of coalition vessels bound for Operation Iraqi Freedom.

    Aircrews working out of Souda Bay, Crete, and Sigonella, Sicily, conducted maritime surveillance and reconnaissance in the eastern Mediterranean and provided carrier battle group protection.

    Aircrews flew over Iraq in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom. Their mission was to be the "eyes in the sky" for coalition forces, providing real time intelligence to Coalition forces on the ground.

    In the Caribbean, VP-5 continued the nation's fight against illegal drug trafficking. Patrolling the waters of the Caribbean and eastern Pacific, crews were credited with the interdiction or disruption of more than $235 million worth of illegal narcotics headed to North America and Europe.

    Additionally, crews were instrumental in several search-and-rescue operations.

    The Mad Foxes enjoyed many successes throughout this deployment. From the Middle East to the Eastern Pacific, from the Arctic Circle to south of the Equator, the Mad Foxes flew more than 5,000 hours and enjoyed, by far, the most challenging deployment in many years.

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...August 7, 2003 - 'Mad Foxes' back home - By Lt. j.g. Nathan Rocklein - PAO VP-5 ..." http://www.jaxairnews.com/stories/080703/mil_madfoxes001.shtml [26NOV2004]

    History - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge Thumbnail
    Members of VP-5 disembark from an aircraft at NAS Jax after arriving home Monday from a six-month deployment.

    Photo by JO2(SCW) Eric Clay
    AM3 Daniel Jennings of VP-5 hugs his son, Trevor upon his arrival home from a six-month deployment to South America, Northern Europe and the Middle East.

    Photo by JO2(SCW) Eric Clay
    Lt. j.g. Tom Pickering greets his wife and son upon his arrival home.

    Photo by PH2 Kim Smith


    The VP-5 ''Mad Foxes'' returned home this week after a highly successful six-month deployment that stretched from South America, through Northern Europe and into the Middle East.

    Under the leadership of their skipper, Cmdr. Scott Dueker, the Mad Foxes completed another deployment, the scope of which has not been seen since the Mad Foxes fought the Japanese in World War II.

    For the first time in the history of VP-5, the Mad Fox team performed missions from nine separate detachment sites including NAS Keflavik, Iceland, Andoya, Norway, NS Rota, Spain, NAS Sigonella, Sicily, Italy, Souda Bay, Crete, NS Roosevelt Roads, PR, Manta, Ecuador, Comalapa, El Salvador, and finally Curacao in the Dutch Lesser Antilles. Additionally, exercises were flown from air bases in France, Germany, Scotland, Panama, and England. At any given time, the Mad Foxes provided P-3 support for the fleet, covering over half the globe.

    Throughout their deployment, VP-5 performed a variety missions. While flying the Northern Atlantic Ocean, VP-5 aircrews operating out of NAS Keflavik, Iceland and Andoya conducted successful anti-submarine warfare missions at a pace not seen since the end of the Cold War era. When the Mad Foxes first arrived in Keflavik, they were confronted with little daylight and extremely cold temperatures. Routinely operating above the Arctic Circle, crews were successful at their missions despite the challenging environment. NAS Keflavik, Iceland served as the Northern hub for VP-5's maintenance teams as they performed the lion's share of scheduled maintenance and required inspections for the squadron's nine aircraft.

    While NS Rota, Spain, the Mad Foxes teamed up with NATO partners to provide maritime surveillance and an armed escort of coalition vessels bound for Operation Iraqi Freedom. The mission was vital for ensuring the safety of the supply and logistics vessels, as well as battle groups transiting through the Strait of Gibraltar.

    Aircrews working out of Souda Bay, Crete, and NAS Sigonella, Sicily, Italy, conducted maritime surveillance and reconnaissance in the Eastern Mediterranean and provided carrier battle group protection. Aircrews flew over Iraq in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom. Their mission was to be the ''eyes in the sky'' for coalition forces on the ground, providing them with real time intelligence.

    In the Caribbean, VP-5 continued the nation's fight against illegal drug trafficking. Patrolling the waters of the Caribbean and Eastern Pacific, crews were credited with the interdiction or disruption of more than $235 million worth of illegal narcotics headed to North America and Europe. Additionally, one crew was credited with the rescue of 75 ailing people from a vessel that was dead in the water.

    On July 21, the Mad Foxes ended an era and permanently left Roosevelt Roads, Puerto Rico. As part of the restructuring of U.S naval operations in the Caribbean following the closure of the Atlantic Fleet Weapons Training Facility, the Mad Foxes ceased scheduled flight operation and shifted maritime patrol aircraft operations to forward operating locations in Curacao and Comalapa.

    VP-5 has been deploying to Roosevelt Roads since July 1947 when they still flew the P-2V Neptune.

    The Mad Foxes flew more than 5,000 hours and enjoyed by far the most challenging deployment in many years. They did it safely and effectively as maintenance teams performed brilliantly at keeping the aging P-3 Orion flying overhead providing essential maritime patrol coverage around the world.

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...July 11, 2003...VP-5 Takes Part In Multi-National Training - JaxAirNews July 11th, 2003..." http://www.nasjax.navy.mil/JAX%20AIR%20NEWS/11jul02.pdf [24DEC2003]

    By Lt.j.g. Brett Staples
    VP-5 PAO

    The "Mad Foxes" of VP-5 recently had the opportunity to participate in BALTOPS 2002.

    BALTOPS is the largest annual multi-national military training exercise held in all of Europe. Conducted in the Baltic Sea, international air, surface and subsurface naval assets work together to hone tactical procedures.

    Ten countries in all participated in this international exercise whose theme was "A Partnership for Peace." VP-5 and the other U.S. Navy units present had the unique opportunity to operate with naval forces from Denmark, Estonia, France, Germany, Great Britain, Holland, Poland, Russia, and Sweden.

    VP-5 sent two Combat Aircrews and a maintenance detachment to Nordholz, Germany for 11 days as representatives of the Navy's maritime patrol and reconnaissance force. Joining the "Mad Foxes" were aircrews from VP-45 and VP-10. Germany, France and Sweden also contributed their maritime patrol aircraft to the exercise.

    The aircrews were able to demonstrate the P-3C's wide range of capabilities as they flew numerous missions in support of Anti-Submarine Warfare, Anti-Surface Warfare and defensive mining operations. The "Mad Foxes" flew more than 77 flight hours during the course of seven different missions. On separate occasions, both VP-5 aircrews were able to successfully track the highly advanced Swedish AIP SSK submarine. The aircrews' acoustic operators attribute a great deal of their success to the training they have received during their current Inter-Deployment Training Cycle (IDTC).

    The true spirit of international relations was evident as one mission involved a "Mad Fox" aircraft conducting ASW operations with a Russian naval ship acting as its Air Coordinator. Working side-byside with such an unlikely partner was an exciting and interesting experience for all involved. There were many other challenging, yet rewarding experiences as the aircrews interacted with a number of foreign nations' naval assets.

    The success of the flights was due, in part, to the hard work of the dedicated "Mad Fox" maintenance team. They put in long hours to ensure the aircraft were ready to meet all operational requirements.

    While in Nordholz, the "Mad Foxes" were hosted by their German maritime patrol counterparts, Atlantique Squadron One, who provided them with maintenance facilities, as well as tactical and logistic support. Proving to be exceptional hosts, the German Squadron held a barbeque, which was attended by many of the participating nations. The occasion provided all with a well earned break from the rigors of the exercise, and more importantly an opportunity to interact with each other on a personal level. It was a great cultural exchange as stories and experiences were shared over authentic German food.

    BALTOPS 2002 was truly an international event. The success of the annual exercise proved how a multi-national force can combine its efforts and work to together in an effective "Partnership for Peace."

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...March 5, 2003 - In the Spotlight - Lt. Cmdr. Frank Naylor, VP-5 Squadron Commander..." http://www.nctskef.navy.mil/IDF/WF/Archives/2003/Mar/Mar.%205,%2003/spotlight.htm [04JUL2003]

    The Mad Foxes of Patrol Squadron FIVE are the most recent addition to the 'Team Kef" family of commands. Arriving in waves since the beginning of February, the Mad Foxes are settling into the Patrol Squadron Keflavik spaces in Hangar 831. The normally warm-blooded "Northern Foxes," have quickly adapted to the challenging environmental conditions and have assumed full operational tempo is support of their varied detachments. Patrol Squadron FIVE is here for a six-month deployment in support of our nation's interests here and throughout the European area of operations.

    Patrol Squadron FIVE is the Navy's second oldest VP squadron and was commissioned in 1937. During World War Two the squadron was one of the first to attack Japanese vessels and positions. Throughout the war they flew many sorties on the Japanese mainland and became known as the select group called the "Empire Express." They received their current name "Mad Foxes" in 1948 when they were flying the P2V Neptune that had a Magnetic Anomaly Detector (MAD) on it. The Mad Foxes in the years following were involved in many noteworthy events. They were instrumental in the recovery of Astronaut Alan Shepard and during the Cuban missile crisis they were the first U.S. assets to locate and track a Soviet vessel. During Vietnam, they provided radar coverage for the carriers and duties included anti-infiltration surveillance and open ocean reconnaissance flights. During Desert Storm, the Mad Foxes operating out of Souda Bay, Crete provided maritime support to naval vessels operating in the eastern Mediterranean. In the Kosovo and Bosnian crisis the "Mad Foxes" operated overland bringing to the theater the first all-weather day and night overland reconnaissance and true "sensor to shooter" platform against mobile targets.

    In the past, PATRON Keflavik was part of a split-site deployment in which the squadron was divided between anti-submarine operations in the North Atlantic and anti-drug operations in the Caribbean. Operation Enduring Freedom and the increased tensions with Iraq, has led to the deployment of Keflavik aircrews into the Mediterranean to perform reconnaissance operations and support maritime assets. As a result, Patrol Squadron FIVE now has a standing presence in Rota, Spain as well as detachments to Italy, Greece, and Scotland.

    To the south, VP-5's area of operational responsibility has also increased. In order to more effectively cover portions western Caribbean and eastern Pacific, a standing detachment was established in Manta, Ecuador. While the mission being executed out of Manta is the same as that of Roosevelt Roads, the addition of another forward operating location presents new opportunities for VP-5 to exercise it's characteristic flexibility and set new standards in patrol squadron performance. In short, the Mad Foxes are covering one-third of the earth's surface and encompassing eight time zones. The Mad Foxes are here and are already making their presence known. We are undertaking tremendous challenges across the globe in support of the Navy's and the nation's missions, and are confident that we will exceed expectations in all our endeavors.

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...COMUSNAVSO Hosts Multinational Naval Training - Story Number: NNS030218-02 - Release Date: 2/18/2003 8:02:00 PM - From U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command Public Affairs..." WebSite: Navy News Stand http://www.news.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=5871 [28FEB2005]

    PUERTO RICO (NNS) -- A multinational naval force from Colombia, Panama, the Dominican Republic, the Netherlands, Peru and Venezuela assembled at Naval Station Roosevelt Roads (NSRR), Puerto Rico, to commence UNITAS 44-03 Caribbean Phase, the largest maritime exercise in the region.

    Hosted by Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command Rear Adm. Vinson E. Smith, approximately 3,000 Sailors and Coast Guard personnel from seven countries will conduct a three-week training exercise that will develop and test the forces' ability to operate together in a variety of areas, including surface, undersea and air warfare.

    UNITAS 44-03 Caribbean Phase also focuses on maritime interdiction operations, counter drug operations and special warfare.

    "UNITAS is the ideal venue for the navies of the Americas to demonstrate to the world our readiness and resolve to work together for mutual good and prosperity" said Smith. "At a time of world uncertainty, it is more imperative than ever that we be prepared to work together to ensure the security of our hemisphere."

    The U.S. task group participating in UNITAS 44-03 Caribbean Phase is led by Commander, Destroyer Squadron (CDS) 14 Commodore Bernard Jackson. Jackson's force includes flagship USS O'Bannon (DD 987), guided-missile frigate USS Boone (FFG 28) and their embarked helicopter detachments, Coast Guard Cutter Spencer, auxiliary ship USNS Prevail (T-AGOS 8) and attack submarine USS Springfield (SSN 761), in addition to P-3C Orion aircraft from VP-5.

    The exercise consists of a first phase of inport seminars, a work-up phase and a scenario-driven free play.

    "The freeplay portion is like a final exam," said Lt. Cmdr. Hector Samario, CDS 14 air operations officer. "It is designed to present a complex, no-notice scenario to force mission analysis and prioritization while testing competencies in all areas."

    While the ships train at sea, a parallel special warfare exercise is taking place at NSRR. Navy SEALS from Naval Special Warfare Unit (NSWU) 4 will be training side-by-side with their counterparts from the Dutch Antilles, Venezuela, the Dominican Republic, Panama, Mexico and Peru.

    "Our training focus is operations in coastal environments," said Lt. Cmdr Cal Williams, NSWU-4 current operations officer. "Our training plan includes maritime and airborne operations as well as patrolling."

    UNITAS presents an unequaled opportunity to improve the operational readiness and interoperability of U.S. and South and Central American naval forces while promoting hemispheric coalition, professionalism and mutual cooperation. It is the premier naval exercise in the region and consists primarily of three large regional multinational phases: a Caribbean phase held in February, and Pacific and Atlantic phases held in July and October, respectively.

    In addition to a rigorous training schedule, U.S. Navy Sailors and Coast Guard personnel will participate in community relations projects while in St. Lucia and St. Thomas.

    Now more than ever, UNITAS plays a critical role in maintaining interoperability and coalition in the American hemisphere while presenting an opportunity for U.S. Sailors and Coast Guard personnel to meet new people, visit interesting ports and experience rich new cultures.

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...February 18, 2003...COMUSNAVSO Hosts Multinational Naval Training - Story Number: NNS030218-02 - Release Date: 2/18/2003 8:02:00 PM..." Navy News Stand http://www.news.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=5871 [24FEB2003]

    COMUSNAVSO Hosts Multinational Naval Training
    Story Number: NNS030218-02
    Release Date: 2/18/2003 8:02:00 PM
    From U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command Public Affairs

    PUERTO RICO (NNS) -- A multinational naval force from Colombia, Panama, the Dominican Republic, the Netherlands, Peru and Venezuela assembled at Naval Station Roosevelt Roads (NSRR), Puerto Rico, to commence UNITAS 44-03 Caribbean Phase, the largest maritime exercise in the region.

    Hosted by Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command Rear Adm. Vinson E. Smith, approximately 3,000 Sailors and Coast Guard personnel from seven countries will conduct a three-week training exercise that will develop and test the forces' ability to operate together in a variety of areas, including surface, undersea and air warfare.

    UNITAS 44-03 Caribbean Phase also focuses on maritime interdiction operations, counter drug operations and special warfare.

    "UNITAS is the ideal venue for the navies of the Americas to demonstrate to the world our readiness and resolve to work together for mutual good and prosperity" said Smith. "At a time of world uncertainty, it is more imperative than ever that we be prepared to work together to ensure the security of our hemisphere."

    The U.S. task group participating in UNITAS 44-03 Caribbean Phase is led by Commander, Destroyer Squadron (CDS) 14 Commodore Bernard Jackson. Jackson's force includes flagship USS O'Bannon (DD 987), guided-missile frigate USS Boone (FFG 28) and their embarked helicopter detachments, Coast Guard Cutter Spencer, auxiliary ship USNS Prevail (T-AGOS 8) and attack submarine USS Springfield (SSN 761), in addition to P-3C Orion aircraft from Patrol Squadron (VP) 5.

    The exercise consists of a first phase of inport seminars, a work-up phase and a scenario-driven free play.

    "The freeplay portion is like a final exam," said Lt. Cmdr. Hector Samario, CDS 14 air operations officer. "It is designed to present a complex, no-notice scenario to force mission analysis and prioritization while testing competencies in all areas."

    While the ships train at sea, a parallel special warfare exercise is taking place at NSRR. Navy SEALS from Naval Special Warfare Unit (NSWU) 4 will be training side-by-side with their counterparts from the Dutch Antilles, Venezuela, the Dominican Republic, Panama, Mexico and Peru.

    "Our training focus is operations in coastal environments," said Lt. Cmdr Cal Williams, NSWU-4 current operations officer. "Our training plan includes maritime and airborne operations as well as patrolling."

    UNITAS presents an unequaled opportunity to improve the operational readiness and interoperability of U.S. and South and Central American naval forces while promoting hemispheric coalition, professionalism and mutual cooperation. It is the premier naval exercise in the region and consists primarily of three large regional multinational phases: a Caribbean phase held in February, and Pacific and Atlantic phases held in July and October, respectively.

    In addition to a rigorous training schedule, U.S. Navy Sailors and Coast Guard personnel will participate in community relations projects while in St. Lucia and St. Thomas.

    Now more than ever, UNITAS plays a critical role in maintaining interoperability and coalition in the American hemisphere while presenting an opportunity for U.S. Sailors and Coast Guard personnel to meet new people, visit interesting ports and experience rich new cultures.

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...February 5, 2003 - VP-5 'Mad Foxes' Arrive For NASKEF Duty - Story by LTjg Nate Rocklein, VP-5 PAO..." http://www.nctskef.navy.mil/IDF/WF/Archives/2003/Feb/Feb.%205,%202003/current/whitefal.htm [04JUL2003]

    This past week, the Mad Foxes of Patrol Squadron FIVE (VP-5) arrived to take over the duties of PATRON NAS Keflavik, Iceland. Relieving the Tridents of Patrol Squadron TWENTY SIX (VP-26), the NAS Jacksonville, Florida-based Mad Foxes will operate aboard NAS Keflavik, Iceland for the next six months. The squadron will also be fighting America's war on drugs from NS Roosevelt Roads, PR conducting Counter Narcotic detection and monitoring flights throughout the Caribbean.

    Patrol Squadron FIVE, commanded by Cmdr. Pat Buckley, will be working under the tactical control of CTF 67.0, led by Rear Adm. Waickwicz. The Mad Foxes will be conducting a multitude of missions, including anti-submarine missions in the North Atlantic. Mad Fox detachments from NAS Keflavik, Iceland will also operate with forces conducting operations and training exercises throughout the European theater.

    In addition to their efforts in the European theater, Mad Fox aircrews will fly in the Caribbean, intercepting both surface and airborne drug smugglers to be turned over to law enforcement agencies. Whether north or south, combat ready aircrews and the squadron's top-notch maintenance teams will skillfully handle all operational commitments. During the squadron's inter-deployment training cycle, described by Cmdr. Buckley as "the most successful I've seen in my years of naval service," the Mad Foxes flew over 5,100 flight hours, including detachments to Germany for BALTOPS, Keflavík for KEFTACEX, and Puerto Rico for Joint Task Force exercises and earned the CNO's Safety Award.

    The split-site deployment will present the squadron with many unique challenges. When asked how the Mad Foxes will fill this large order, Executive Officer, Cmdr. Scott Dueker said, "We won't be able to do this without the complete dedication of each of our maintenance, aircrew and administrative folks. I know that our Sailors are ready and looking forward to the challenge this deployment will provide. I am very proud of them."

    In addition to all of the hard work that lies ahead, squadron members are looking forward to experiencing the wealth of cultural opportunities that Iceland has to offer. According to Lt. Cmdr. Frank Naylor, Officer-in-Charge of PATRONKEF. "We are really excited to be in Keflavík and look forward to continuing a positive relationship with the base and local communities."

    The squadron has worked hard in preparation for this deployment and is ready for the challenging operational environment of the Keflavík AOR.

    With a history of excellence and professionalism, the Mad Foxes surely will continue to meet the challenges posed by an ever-increasing hostile world with resolve and determination.

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...January 23rd, 2003 - VP-5 recognizes top performers - By Lt.j.g. Nathan Rocklein - VP-5 PAO - Photos by PH2 Kim Smith..." WebSite: http://www.jaxairnews.com/pub/012303/p3s1m.htm [18MAR2005]

    VP History

    PR1(AW) Steven Lucas, PN2(AW) Antonio Searcy and AO2 Chad Thomas were recently named VP-5 Sailor of the Year, Mad Fox of the Year and Junior Sailor of the Year, respectively.

    As Maintenance Control leading petty officer, Lucas managed assets to meet an extremely aggressive flight schedule. This assignment is normally handled by chief petty officers. His efforts led to the command’s impressive 92 percent mission completion rate. He also directed the maintenance efforts of more than 180 personnel on 10 P-3C aircraft.

    Moreover, Lucas was a key element in the qualification of six newly assigned maintenance control coordinators.

    I am very excited about receiving this award,” Lucas said.

    His dynamic leadership and astounding technical expertise earned him his selection as Sailor of the Year. He was selected from an elite group of 250 highly-qualified and talented personnel.

    Lucas is a very experienced maintenance professional who continuously displays sustained superior performance at his job,” said Maintenance Material Control officer Lt.j.g. Scott Bowen.

    Lucas grew up in Steubenville, Ohio and joined the Navy on Nov. 22, 1983. Upon completion of boot camp, he attended Parachute Rigger “A” School where he received orders to Naval Weapons Center, China Lake, Calif. While there, he was chosen Sailor of the Month in March 1985 and was advanced to petty officer third class in June 1986.

    In November 1987, Lucas transferred to VA-22 at NAS Lemoore, Calif., where he served as work center night check supervisor and was advanced to petty officer second class in 1989 under the Command Advancement Program.

    In June 1991, Lucas transferred to NRD Pittsburgh, Penn. for a recruiting tour where he earned many recruiting awards and was selected as district’s Recruiter of the Month for August 1991.

    In September 1995, he reported on board USS Enterprise and was assigned as 800 Division’s leading petty officer. In June 1997, he was recognized as the AIMD Sailor of the Month.

    During his next successful tour at VP-30, he served as Maintenance Control coordinator, and was awarded the Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal and advanced to petty officer first class in December 1998. He joined VP-5 in December 2000.

    Searcy was selected Mad Fox of the Year because of his outstanding performance taking care of squadron personnel.

    VP-5 History

    AO2 Chad Thomas, who flowlessly directed the maintenance efforts of seven people, performs a maintenance check on an aircraft at VP-5.

    Searcy ensured that all pay and personnel matters were meticulously taken care of ensuring squadron readiness. He diligently tracked all transactions and maintained close liaison with the Bureau of Naval Personnel and Defense Finance Accounting Office.

    It’s an honor to be selected for such a prestigious award. I had no idea I would be recognized for the award because I was only doing my job,”said Searcy.

    His superb customer service has set the standard in the Administrative Department.

    A native of Atlanta Ga., Searcy joined the Navy in May of 1993. After boot camp, his first assignment was with VF-154 in Atsugi, Japan where he was promoted to petty officer third class.

    After completing Personnelman“A” School in Meridian, Miss., Searcy transferred to the Bureau of Naval Personnel in Washington D.C. where he quickly established himself as a hard worker, earning a Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medal.

    In July 1998, Searcy reported to VP-5 where he flawlessly provided personnel and administrative support to more than 349 enlisted personnel. In 2002, he completed paperwork for more than 670 pay documents, 34 reenlistments, 45 gains, 24 transfers and 10 separations.

    Searcy is a dedicated professional and the in-house shop expert. If anyone has the answer concerning pay or a personnel issue, Searcy will. Without his expertise countless hours would be spent looking up the right answer. His talent and commitment draws everyone in the shop up to a higher level of excellence and this is the reason why he deserves Mad Fox of the Year,” said Lt.j.g. Scott Searles, personnel officer.

    VP-5 History

    PN2(AW) Antonio Searcy ensures squadron personnel records are updated and all necessary documentation is safeguarded at VP-5's Administration Department.

    During his off-duty time, Searcy volunteers for the Real Men Read program at Lake Forest Elementary, and assists with VP-5 fundraising events.

    Another award was presented to Thomas who was recognized as VP-5’s Junior Sailor of the Year.

    Thomas achieved superior performance while performing his duties as Work Center 230 shift supervisor. Thomas flawlessly directed the maintenance efforts of seven people throughout VP-5’s inter-deployment training cycle. Accounting for more than 64 maintenance qualifications, he spent numerous hours providing training to his personnel and increased the proficiency of his work center.

    The Ordnance Branch achieved outstanding results during the Conventional Weapons Technical Proficiency Inspection and the Aviation Maintenance Management visit. This was in large part due to Thomas’ strong work ethic and persistent dedication.

    Over the past year, his knowledge and skill resulted in the safe execution of 70 proficiency loads and 50 aircraft wire checks.

    Thomas also helped four aircrews achieve Standoff Land Attack Missile qualifications by making sure that the weapon employed had a 100 percent systems reliability rating.

    Circa 2002

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VP History ThumbnailCameraVP-5 gets safety 'S' "...VP-5 gets safety 'S' - By Lt.j.g. Brett Staples - VP-5 PAO ..." WebSite: JaxAirNews http://www.jaxairnews.com/stories/080802/mil_vp5001.shtml [26OCT2005]

    Photograph Caption: Commodore Mark Ensor, commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing Eleven (left) presents Cmdr. Pat Buckley, commanding officer of VP-5 with the CNO Aviation Safety Award for 2001during a ceremony on July 22. Photo courtesy of VP-5

    VP-5 was recently awarded the CNO Aviation Safety Award for 2001.

    Cmdr. Pat Buckley, commanding officer of VP-5, accepted the award on behalf of the ''Mad Foxes'' from Commodore Mark Ensor, commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing Eleven (CPRW-11), during a ceremony on July 22 in Hangar 1000.

    The Safety ''S'' recognizes a command's unwavering commitment to all aspects of the Aviation Safety and Operational Risk Management (ORM) programs.

    Due to the inherent risks associated with naval aviation, safety continues to be the number one priority of the aviation community. The most important measure of the ''Mad Fox'' safety program is its ability to minimize risks and preserve valuable assets, while safely operating at an unprecedented operational tempo.

    Throughout 2001, VP-5 exceeded every operational and training milestone while safely flying 7,952 flight hours and has now surpassed 132,000 mishap-free flight hours over 23 years.

    VP-5 spent the first half of 2001 successfully completing a dynamic Inter-deployment Training Cycle (IDTC) in preparation for their Mediterranean deployment.

    While deployed to NAS Sigonella, Sicily from August 2001 to February 2002, VP-5 executed an unprecedented 6,600 flight hours and 1,100 missions in support of Operations Joint Guardian, Deliberate Forge and Enduring Freedom.

    The ''Mad Fox'' maintenance team continues to demonstrate that safety begins on the ground as evidenced by zero ground mishaps throughout the entire IDTC and high-tempo deployment.

    The ''Mad Foxes'' have committed a great deal of time and hard work to ensuring the success of their safety program.

    The command has fostered a routine of ''talking safety'' on a daily basis, which directly contributes to the command's overall success.

    In addition to this ''informal'' training, the ''Mad Fox'' Safety Department coordinates a squadron wide safety stand-down every quarter.

    This provides the command an opportunity to discuss topics other than those relating to squadron operations such as home security, fire prevention and automobile safety.

    To ensure squadron wide awareness of the latest safety issues, Buckley utilizes all-hands quarters and his skipper's bulletin board to keep his Sailors informed on all messages pertaining to safety.

    The men and women of VP-5 are unequaled in their ability to operate and train safely, and are certainly deserving of the recognition afforded by the 2001 CNO Aviation Safety Award.

    The ''Mad Foxes'' believe safety is more than just a topic - it is a way of doing business.

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Thursday, October 17, 2002 - Last modified at 4:10 p.m. on Wednesday, October 16, 2002 - 'Leaders at Sea' visit the Fleet - By Lt.j.g. Brett Staples - VP-5 PAO..." WebSite: JaxAirNews http://www.jaxairnews.com/stories/101702/mil_leaders002.shtml [12FEB2005]

    VP History ThumbnailCameraVP-5 History Cmdr. Pat Buckley, VP-5 commanding officer, (left) discusses the daily operations of VP-5 with the "Leaders at Sea." Photo courtesy of VP-5.

    The ''Mad Foxes'' of VP-5, along with Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing Eleven, hosted the Jacksonville area ''Leaders at Sea'' recently.

    The ''Leaders at Sea,'' a group developed by the Navy League, consist of influential business leaders from the Jacksonville area who are interested in the operations of the P-3 Navy.

    Nine of these leaders who have committed to the program visited NAS Jacksonville for a more personal introduction into the world of maritime operations.

    The group consisted of Navy League escorts Louis DiGuisto III, and Matt Tuohy, a retired Navy captain and director of the Aviation Program, Jacksonville University.

    Joining them were Joe Key, vice president and general manager of Auto Nation; Doug Milne, chairman of The Milne Compa-ny; Hickory Fant, chairman of First Guarantee Corpor-ation; Hank Haynes, president of Haynes, Peters & Bond, Inc.; John Krol, videographer for White-hawk, Inc.; Percy Rosen-bloom III, president of SGI, Inc. and Bill Scheu, senior partner at Rogers, Towers Law Firm.

    The visit began with a brief from Commodore Mark Ensor, commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing Eleven.

    The ''Leaders at Sea'' then met with Cmdr. Pat Buckley, VP-5 commanding officer, who took them on an orientation flight aboard a P-3 aircraft that was equipped with the latest Anti-Surface Warfare Improvement Program (AIP) technology.

    The flight, which toured Northeastern Florida, had aircrew members on hand to provide information and answer questions about the aircraft and the mission of the Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Force.

    The flight proved to be an enjoyable and enlightening experience for everyone involved.

    After a brief question and answer period, the guests joined members of VP-5 for a luncheon in Hangar 1000.

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...October 2002...Combat aircrew (CAC) 11 - October 2002..." http://safetycenter.navy.mil/media/approach/issues/oct02/bz.htm [01JUL2003]

    Combat aircrew (CAC) 11, with the Mad Foxes of VP-5, assisted in rescuing of a small fishing vessel off the east coast of Florida. While conducting combat-readiness training, CAC 11 received a distress call from a 28-foot, sport-fishing vessel. The boat rapidly was taking on water, and its three crewmen were trying to call the Coast Guard.

    Lt. Zack Connelly, the patrol-plane commander, and LCdr. Matt Pregmon, the mission commander, responded to the call, talked with the skipper, and got their location. Lt. Connelly contacted the Coast Guard Station at Port Canaveral, told the dispatcher of the situation, and offered SAR assistance. With approval from Air Traffic Control, the crew headed 85 miles south at 300 knots to an area 25 miles east of St. Sebastian's Inlet.

    CAC 11 identified the troubled boat using their advanced-imaging, multi-spectral-system camera. The flight-station crew noticed a few small fishing craft within five miles of the boat. Ltjg. Kristen Richards, the pilot at the controls, descended to 300 feet and circled the boat several times, flashing landing lights to tell the skipper that help had arrived. After establishing communications and marking their coordinates, the crew did low-altitude flybys and flashed their lights to get the attention of nearby vessels.

    The skipper of another sport fisher contacted CAC 11 on maritime frequency channel 16 and offered to assist. The P-3 crew returned to the distressed boat, circled overhead, and vectored the supporting craft to the distressed boat's position. While orbiting the sinking boat and talking with the Coast Guard, the P-3 crew learned the skipper of the assisting boat was retired Navy and had served in VP-6.

    Several members of the assisting-boat crew boarded the sinking fisher and helped bail the rising water. Unable to find and contain the source of flooding, the skipper of the sinking boat moved his crew to the safety of the other boat. Ten minutes later, the boat capsized.

    CAC 11 remained on-top and directed a Coast Guard cutter to the scene. As the cutter crew took control of the situation, CAC 11 returned to NAS Jacksonville with a completed training mission and SAR under their belts. "Way to go Navy!" was the last radio call received from the skipper of the assisting sport fisher as the P-3C left the site.

    Members of Mad Fox Crew 11 included: Patrol Plane Commander LT Connelly, Patrol Plane Copilot LTJG Richards, Tactical Coordinator LCDR Pregmon, Navigator Communicator LTJG Compton, Flight Engineer AE1 Mills, Sensor 1 AW1 Hamilton, Sensor 2 AW2 Humphry, Sensor 3 AW2 Moore, In-flight Technician ATC Gambill, and Observer PH2 Smith.

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...August 8, 2002...'VP-5 Gets Safety 'S' - August 8th, 2002 - By LTjg Brett Staples - VP-5 PAO - Page 3 - Jacksonville News http://www.nasjax.navy.mil/JAX%20AIR%20NEWS/08aug02.pdf..." [01JUL2003]
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    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VP History ThumbnailCameraVP-5 Change-Of-Command "...Master Baker MS2 Eddie Brothers decorates a cake for VP-5's change of command ceremony on May 24..." WebSite: Jax Air News http://www.nasjax.navy.mil/JAX%20AIR%20NEWS/30may02galley.htm [15FEB2005]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Mishap-Free Milestones...Approach June 2002..." Naval Safety Center WebSite: http://www.safetycenter.navy.mil/media/approach/issues/jun02/mishapfree.htm [03JUN2005]

    VP-5 24 years (146,000 hours)

    VT-86 25 years (330,000 hours)

    VAQ-142 5 years (7,291 hours)

    VAQ-133 6 years (8,049 hours)

    VP-47 29 years (176,000 hours)

    HMT-302 14 years (80,000 hours)

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VP History ThumbnailCameraVP-5 Awarded Battle 'E' "...VP-5 'Mad Foxes' awarded Battle 'E' - By Lt.j.g. Kristen Richards - VP-5 PAO..." WebSite: Jax Air News http://www.jaxairnews.com/stories/042502/mil_VP5004.shtml [21FEB2005]

    (Picture: Rear Adm. Richard Brooks, commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Force, Atlantic presents the Battle ''E'' award to Cmdr. Paul Frost, commanding officer of VP-5. Photo courtesy of VP-5)

    Patrol Squadron (VP) Five was recently selected as a Commander Naval Air Force Atlantic (ComNavAirLant) 2001 Battle Efficiency award winner. In December 2001, the ''Mad Foxes'' of VP-5 were nominated to represent Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing (ComPatReconWing) Eleven in the ComNavAirLant selection process. One maritime patrol and reconnaissance squadron in the Atlantic Fleet is selected each year to receive the award. VP-5's plenitude of accomplishments made them the number one contender on the East Coast. The competition was incredibly keen for this prestigious award, but the Mad Foxes clearly distinguished themselves in every area of battle efficiency, combat readiness and tactical development.

    VP-5 successfully completed numerous inspections during their Inter-Deployment Training Cycle (IDTC), including Naval Air Training and Operating Procedures Standardization (NATOPS) Program evaluation, Conventional Weapons Technical Proficiency Inspection (CWTPI), Aviation Maintenance Management Team Inspection (AMMT), and Aircraft In Process Maintenance Performance Assessment (IMPA). Inspectors were very impressed with the pride and professionalism displayed by the men and women of VP-5 during the IDTC and labeled the squadron as ''first rate.''

    In addition to the inspections, the squadron's operations and training departments were evaluated on their ability to efficiently conduct deployed operations in addition to CONUS training events. In 2001, VP-5 safely flew a total of 7,952 hours and had an aircraft sortie completion rate in excess of 90 percent. While deployed to NAS Sigonella, Sicily from August 2001 to February 2002, VP-5 executed an unprecedented 6,600 flight hours and 1,100 missions in support of Operations Joint Guardian, Deliberate Forge and Enduring Freedom.

    The key to VP-5's success in the air is an outstanding maintenance department. Mad Fox maintenance was lauded by ComNavAirLant and ComPatReconWing Eleven inspectors as ''the best on the East Coast'' during several rigorous inspections throughout the calendar year. Safety is the first thought during every maintenance evolution as evidenced by zero ground mishaps throughout the dynamic IDTC and high-tempo deployment. The department's success can be directly attributed to the pride, professionalism and attention to detail each and every Sailor dedicates to their work, day in and day out.

    Additionally, Patrol Squadron Five's impeccable safety record led to their selection as CPRW-11's nominee for the Safety ''S'' which further supported their selection as the Battle ''E'' winner. With the squadron's 7,952 mishap-free flight hours in 2001, VP-5 has now surpassed 132,000 mishap-free flight hours over 23 years.

    The Mad Foxes have demonstrated once again that they continue to be leaders in the patrol and reconnaissance community with a unique spirit of teamwork, integrity, and dedication. The Mad Foxes are already off to a fast start in their current IDTC and look forward to the challenges the future holds.

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Thursday, April 25, 2002 - Last modified at 5:38 p.m. on Wednesday, April 24, 2002 - Earth Day 2002 - Thousands turn out to celebrate - By Kaylee LaRocque - Asst. Editor..." WebSite: JaxAirNews http://www.jaxairnews.com/stories/042502/mil_earth002.shtml [12FEB2005]

    VP History ThumbnailCameraVP-5 History Lt.j.g. Billy Walker of VP-5 helps Earth Day spectator try on some flight gear at the VP-5 booth at The Jacksonville Landing. Photo by Sherri Albertson.

    The Jacksonville Landing was quite the happening place last Saturday as approximately 10,000 people visited the numerous booths and exhibits set up to help celebrate Earth Day 2002. Young and old alike went from display to display, talking to educators, gathering information and free goodies, and creating unique artwork with recyclable items.

    The entertainment stage was busy throughout the day with a dance performance, children's theatrical performance, an awards ceremony and music by Navy Band Southeast's Top 40 band "Pride" and several other local groups.

    Several commands and departments from NAS Jacksonville participated in the event. Volunteers from Commander Navy Region Southeast (CNRSE) and NAS Jax's Environmental Department spent the day handing out brochures, posters and an assortment of other giveaways as they explained some of the programs the base has created to help the environment.

    "CNRSE Environmental is continuing to strive in keeping the general public informed of what our Region and the entire Navy is doing to be good stewards of the environment. We continue to look for ways to maintain the Navy's mission while protecting and conserving the surrounding environments along the East and Gulf Coast as well as, the waters in the Caribbean," said Ken Conley, natural resources specialist from CNRSE Environmental Office.

    VP History ThumbnailCameraVP-5 History Lt.j.g. William Moye and AW2(NAC) Matthew Taylor of VP-5 explain their squadron's mission and the procedures they use to help protect the environment as they hand out materials. Photo by Kaylee LaRocque

    CNRSE members passed out numerous posters on marine mammals and sea turtles that inhabit this region along with pamphlets and booklets on the Department of Defense's effort for implementing coral reef protection.

    Also representing the base were several VP-5 pilots and aircrew who brought along pilot gear for visitors to try on. Many of the children who stopped by the booth were thrilled to be able to try on a "real" Navy pilot's helmet, gloves and survival vest. The squadron members also handed out information on the squadron and gave out free wooden airplanes and Navy pens and pencils. "We're here to help people realize that the Navy is environmentally conscious. The Navy does extensive research on the ocean's environment to ensure the exercises we perform are done correctly," explained AW2(AW) Jesse Shotts, an aircrewman with VP-5.

    "Our job as part of the Patrol Squadron community is Anti-Submarine Warfare. When we conduct our exercises and missions, we drop sonobuoys into the water, which not only detect the sounds of submarines, but also make us aware of the presence of marine life in the area. We do all we can to minimize the amount of damage we do to the environment. This is all part of our mission to defend our country," he added.

    Several members from Naval Aviation Depot were also on hand to talk about the Depot's mission and what resources it uses to keep within environmental guidelines. They also passed out lots of literature regarding their role within the Department of Defense.

    Naval Station Mayport's Navy Environmental Leadership Program (NELP) also had representatives at The Landing to talk to the public about its mission of addressing Fleet environmental issues and promoting environmental awareness.

    NELP representatives handed out coloring books and manatee posters. Visitors to the booth also had the opportunity to learn more about NELP initiatives such as the Mobile Aircraft Firefighter Training Device and the implementation of innovative painting and de-painting technologies at NS Mayport.

    VP History ThumbnailCameraVP-5 History Lauren Jacobson of the NAS Jacksonville Public Works Center helps out the Navy Environmental Leadership Program booth by explaining to visitors what the program is all about. Photo by Kaylee LaRocque

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...February 12, 2002...VP-5 "Mad Foxes" Depart Sicily for Home..." Navy News Stand http://www.news.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=855 [28MAR2002]

    Story Number: NNS020212-04
    2/12/2002
    By Lt. j.g. Kristen Richards, Patrol Squadron 5 Public Affairs

    NAS Sigonella, Sicily (NNS) -- The last aircrew members of the "Mad Foxes" -- from Patrol Squadron (VP) 5 -- have departed NAS Sigonella, Sicily and returned to their homeport of NAS Jacksonville, Florida.

    During the past six months, the Mad Foxes successfully completed a split-site deployment to NAS Sigonella, Sicily, and Naval Support Activity (NSA) Souda Bay, Crete. While deployed to the Mediterranean, the squadron safely executed more than 1,100 missions encompassing 6,600 flight hours in support of the theater commander's objectives.

    Initally arriving in Sigonella on Aug. 28, 2001, the Mad Foxes quickly adapted to their new environment. They immediately began conducting intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (ISR) sorties in support of Operation Deliberate Forge over Bosnia-Herzegovina and Operation Joint Guardian over Kosovo. These operations were created to support ongoing NATO peacekeeping efforts in the former Republic of Yugoslavia.

    In response to the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, VP-5 broadened their focus to begin conducting missions in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. The squadron expeditiously relocated nearly 40 percent of its combat aircrews and P-3C Orions to NSA Souda Bay, to gain a geographic advantage for Eastern Mediterranean operations.

    In conjunction with ongoing operational tasking, the Mad Foxes participated in numerous exercises to remain proficient in the Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance (MPR) community's wide-ranging mission areas, including anti-submarine warfare (ASW) and anti-surface warfare (ASUW), and to strengthen ties with various Mediterranean allies.

    Since August 2001, the Mad Foxes supported 17 multi-national exercises, including Destined Glory with Spain; Bright Star with Egypt and Noble Dina with Israel. Furthermore, the squadron's commitment to training resulted in the qualification of five patrol plane commanders, three patrol plane tactical coordinators and 10 mission commanders, as well as numerous enlisted aircrew and ground personnel qualifications.

    VP-5 Sailors also received recognition for their numerous achievements. At the deployment's conclusion, squadron members received the NATO Medal (Kosovo Operations) and Sea Service Deployment Ribbon. Additionally, all aviators and aircrew were awarded the Kosovo Campaign Medal for conducting missions in support of Operation Joint Guardian.

    Additionally, the commander of Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing 11 has nominated VP-5 for the Naval Air Force Atlantic Fleet Battle Excellence Award (Battle E) in recognition of their numerous operational achievements.

    Despite flying nearly around-the-clock on deployment, VP-5 maintained an excellent safety record. In 2001, the squadron flew more than 7,000 mishap-free flight hours adding to their impressive 23-year, 132,000 mishap-free-flight-hour record, earning them the Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing 11 nomination for the CNO Safety Award.

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailCameraAE1(AW) Gerald Stephens "...February 6, 2002 - 'Mad Foxes' Depart Sicily, Return Home - By Lt.j.g. Kristen Richards - VP-5 PAO..." http://www.jaxairnews.com/stories/020702/mil_return001.shtml [26NOV2004]

    PICTURE: AE1(AW) Gerald Stephens says hello to his newborn daughter, Zoei, held in the arms of his wife Deana. Photos Photo by PH2 Kim Smith

    By Feb. 10, the last ''Mad Fox'' aircrew from Patrol Squadron (VP) 5 will have returned to NAS Jacksonville from NAS Sigonella, Italy. Over the last six months, the ''Mad Foxes'' successfully completed a split-site deployment to NAS Sigonella, Sicily and NSA Souda Bay, Crete.While deployed to the Mediterranean, the squadron safely executed more than 1,100 missions encompassing 6,600 flight hours in support of theater Commander objectives.

    First arriving in Sigonella on Aug. 28, the ''Mad Foxes'' quickly adapted to their new environment. They immediately began conducting intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (ISR) sorties in support of Operation Deliberate Forge over Bosnia-Herzegovina and Operation Joint Guardian over Kosovo. These operations were created to support ongoing NATO peacekeeping efforts in the Former Republic of Yugoslavia.

    In response to the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, VP-5 broadened their focus to begin conducting missions in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. The squadron expeditiously relocated nearly 40 percent of its combat aircrews and P-3C Orions to NSA Souda Bay, Crete, to gain a geographic advantage for Eastern Mediterranean operations.

    In conjunction with ongoing operational tasking, the ''Mad Foxes'' participated in numerous exercises to remain proficient in the Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance (MPR) community's wide-ranging mission areas, including Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW) and Anti-Surface Warfare (ASUW), and to strengthen our ties with various Mediterranean allies.

    Since August 2001, the ''Mad Foxes'' supported 17 multi-national exercises including Destined Glory with Spain, Bright Star with Egypt and Noble Dina with Israel. Furthermore, the squadron's commitment to training resulted in the qualification of five patrol plane commanders, three patrol plane tactical coordinators and ten mission commanders, as well as numerous enlisted aircrew and ground personnel qualifications.

    VP-5 Sailors have been recognized for their numerous achievements. At the deployment's conclusion, squadron members were eligible to receive the NATO Medal (Kosovo Operations) and Sea Service Deployment Ribbon. Additionally, all the aviators and aircrew were awarded the Kosovo Campaign Medal for conducting missions in support of Operation Joint Guardian.

    In recognition of their numerous operational achievements, VP-5 has been nominated by Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing Eleven for the Commander, Naval Air Forces U. S. Atlantic Fleet Battle Excellence ''E'' Award.

    Despite flying nearly around-the-clock on deployment, VP-5 has maintained an excellent safety record. In 2001, VP-5 flew more than 7,000 mishap-free flight hours adding to their impressive 23 year and 132,000 mishap-free flight hour record earning the ''Mad Foxes'' the Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing Eleven nomination for the CNO Safety ''S'' Award.

    The ''Mad Foxes'' are extremely excited to be back onboard Naval Air Station Jacksonville and look forward to long anticipated reunions with their family and friends.

    Following a well-earned post-deployment standdown, the squadron will aggressively begin a 12-month Inter-Deployment Training Cycle (IDTC) in preparation for their next opportunity to serve their country.

    VP-5 is very appreciative of the support they received from ''Home Plate'' during their challenging deployment and upon arrival at NAS Jacksonville.


    Circa 2001

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VP History ThumbnailCameraVP-5 Patch Contributed by John Lucas JohnLucas@netzero.com [20OCT2005]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Frost relieves Boothe as VP-5 Commanding Officer..." http://www.nasjax.navy.mil/JAX%20AIR%20NEWS/31may01vp5.htm [02MAR2003]

    From Jax Air News - May 31, 2001
    By Lt.j.g. Jerome C. Johnson
    VP-5 PAO

    Cmdr. Paul J. Frost will relieve Cmdr. Timothy E. Boothe as Commanding Officer of Patrol Squadron (VP) 5 in the squadron's fiftieth change-of-command ceremony at 10 a.m. tomorrow. Retired Navy Rear Adm. Anthony R. Maness, former Commander, Anti-Submarine Warfare Force, U.S. Pacific Fleet, is the guest speaker.

    Raised on Long Island, N.Y., Frost graduated from the University of Southern California and received his commission through the Naval Reserve Officer Training Corp (NROTC) scholarship program in May 1983. Commencing flight training in October 1983, he was designated a Naval Flight Officer in September 1984.

    Training Officer and Tactics/CNO Special Projects Officer. In January 1989, he reported to VP-30 "Pro's Nest" for instructor duty, where he also served as Communications Officer/CMS Custodian, CPWL NFO Fleet IUT Coordinator, and CNAL NAVCOMM and NFO NATOPS Evaluator.

    After completing Communications school in Newport, R.I. in April 1992, Frost reported onboard USS Constellation (CV 64) as the Communications Officer and subsequently qualified as Repair Party Officer. Upon completion of refresher training at VP-30 in November 1994, Frost reported to the VP-47 "Golden Swordsmen" and served as Safety/NATOPS Officer, Training Officer, Operations Officer and Officer in Charge Det Kadena. During this tour, he completed a quad-site deployment to B.I.O.T. Diego Garcia; Masirah, Oman; Jeddah, Saudi Arabia; Kadena, Okinawa and a split-site deployment to Misawa, Japan and Kadena, Okinawa.

    In October 1996 Frost reported to Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Force Atlantic serving as the Assistant Training /Plans Officer until May 1999 when he reported for assignment as the executive officer of the "Pro's Nest." Frost became executive officer of the "Mad Foxes" in June 2000.

    A native of Georgia, Cmdr. Tim Boothe graduated from the University of Georgia in 1982 and received his commission through Aviation Officer Candidate School, Pensacola, Fla., later that year. A graduate of the University of Georgia, Boothe received his commission in 1982 through Aviation Officer Candidate School.

    He received his "Wings of Gold" in 1983. Boothe joined VP-40, NAS Moffett Field, Calif., in 1983 where he was a Patrol Plane Commander, Instructor Pilot and Mission Commander.


    Circa 2000

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VP-5 History ThumbnailCameraVP-5 History "...VP-5 2000 (Millennium Patch)..." WebSite: NAS Jacksonville, FL http://www.nasjax.navy.mil/command%20information/patches/vp/vp_patches.htm [28OCT2005]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Destroyer Squadron TWO FOUR - December of 2000 - VP-5, VP-16 and VP-30..." WebSite: Destroyer Squadron TWO FOUR http://www.cnsl.spear.navy.mil/cds24/history.htm [26OCT2005]

    December of 2000 brought the first groupsail for the new Inter-Deployment Training Cycle. An SSBN provided services for COMDESRON TWO FOUR which allowed us to refresh our ASW skills. Additional ASW support was provided by VP-5, VP-16, VP-30, and HSL-48. ATG Mayport also assisted while we honed our SUW and AAW skills off the coast of Florida.

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VP-5 History ThumbnailCameraVP-5 History "...A P-3C Orion of the "Mad Foxes" of Patrol Squadron Five (VP-5) makes a low approach on a cargo ship during drug interdiction training. VP-5 is deployed to NS Roosevelt Roads, PR. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 1st Class Jim Hampshire. May 14, 2000..." [26NOV2004]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...VP-5 prepares to head home after six-month deployment..."The White FalcOnline" (Keflavik´s base newspaper)..." [28JUL2000]

    VP-5 PREPARES TO HEAD HOME AFTER SIX-MONTH DEPLOYMENT
    By JO1 Christopher E. Tucker


    VP-5, the Mad Foxes, are preparing to return to NAS Jacksonville, Florida after a six-month deployment to NAS Keflavik, Iceland. The detachment, made up of four P-3C Orion aircraft and approximately 140 personnel, has been operating from NAS Keflavik, Iceland filling the role as Iceland' s maritime patrol squadron.

    VP-5's deployment marked several firsts for the squadron and the base. It was the first squadron to move into refurbished Hangar 831. VP-5 was also the first squadron to incorporate the AIP (Anti-Surface Warfare Improvement Program) P-3C, an Orion with increased surveillance and warfare capabilities.

    VP-5 Public Affairs Officer Lt. Zack Connelly said the deployment was tough on the squadron during the first month. "There were some growing pains. Moving into the new hangar and getting parts for the AIP aircraft was tough at first, but I think the squadron and the people at CFK learned a lot," he said.

    VP-5 also performed more than 30 detachments from NAS Keflavik, Iceland to NATO countries such as Norway and Portugal for NATO exercises and real-world missions. The squadron also exchanged aircrews with its detachment in NS Roosevelt Roads, PR. "I would say that everyone in the squadron had a chance to visit two or three different countries during their deployment to NAS Keflavik, Iceland," Connelly said.

    "This deployment has been excellent," said Lt. Cmdr. Chris Ramsden, commander Task Group 84.1 operations officer. "We've provided forward presence for the region and exercised inter-operability between us and other NATO nations."VP-5 also integrated three Navy reserve squadrons into operations at NAS Keflavik, Iceland during its deployment. VP-69, VP-62 and VP-92 all participated in the maritime patrol activities of NAS Keflavík.

    "That was difficult to plan and coordinate, but the operations were seamless," said Lt. Cmdr. Todd W. Rader, officer in charge of Patrol Squadron Five Detachment Keflavík.Squadron personnel had the highest praise for the base's support during their deployment.

    "This is the best hangar I've ever been in," Rader said. "Also, the two departments that have really taken care of us are Aviation Supply and Aircraft Intermediate Maintenance Department. They helped keep our aircraft flying."

    "People in our squadron try to get NAS Keflavik, Iceland as a deployment site because of the MWR and other quality of life facilities," said Ramsden.Although most squadron personnel were pleased with the deployment, many of them were eager to get back to Jacksonville to see family and friends. "I'm looking forward to getting back. I have a 12-year-old son and I haven't seen him for six months," said MS1(AC) Lisa Hamilton. "We've kept in contact by email, and I call him occasionally, but its not the same as going home."

    VP-5 will be relieved by the Lancers, VP-10, from NAS Brunswick, Maine. VP-10's first crew is scheduled to arrive Aug. 2.

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