VPNAVY VP-5 Mercury Capsule Recovery
http://www.vpnavy.org
VPNAVY Address

HistoryVP-5 HistoryHistory

Circa 1999

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...P-3C (AIP) in Allied Force - Wings of Gold, Fall 1999 by Steiner, Ron, Potterfield, Gary..." WebSite: Wings Of Gold http://www.looksmartusa.com/p/articles/mi_qa3834/is_199910/ai_n8875930 [15OCT2005]

Operations Noble Anvil and Allied Force marked the combat debut of the P-3C Antisurface Warfare Improvement Program (AIP) aircraft. In the littoral warfare role it played in these combat operations, the endurance and responsiveness of the P-3C capable C2 suite, mission-oriented weapon loadouts and state of the art all-weather surveillance/reconnaissance sensors provided the warfare commander with a force multiplier previously not available. The Mediterranean-based Maritime Patrol Aircraft (MPA) force for these operations was comprised of 10 P-3Cs, five of the AIP variant. There were 14 crews from a combination of VP-10 (NAS Brunswick, Maine), VP-1 (NAS Whidbey Island, Washington), VP-4 (NAS Barbers Point, Hawaii) and VP-5 (NAS Jacksonville, Florida). Home base was NAS Sigonella, Sicily.

On March 22nd, two days before the start of hostilities, P-3C AIP Orions commenced around the clock flight operations with armed surveillance flights in the Adriatic Sea in direct support of Tomahawk Land Attack Missile (TLAM) capable ships. For the next 94 days the MPA provided 100% of the Surface Combat Air Patrols (SUCAP) for the USS Theodore Roosevelt Battlegroup and other allied ships operating in the area. This was the first time, during combat, that SUCAPs were performed exclusively by non-carrier organic aircraft.

In all, Navy MPA flew 391 combat support missions, logging 3,840 flight hours during the entire Kosovo Phased Air Operation. The battlegroup commander had an armed MPA on station for 99.2% of the total conflict. Armed with a combination of torpedoes, MK20 Rockeyes, AGM-65 Mavericks and/or AGM-84E SLAM missiles, depending on the threat, the P-3C AIP was the first line of defense for Coalition ships against the entire Federal Republic of Yugoslavia's Naval Order of Battle (FRY NOB). In a first, the AlPs fired 14 Standoff land Attack Missiles at Serb targets.

On six to eight hour SUCAP missions in the Adriatic, the P-3C AIP planes used day/night imaging capability to monitor not only possible commercial contraband carriers but also the FRY NOB in the Montenegrin ports of Tivat and Bar. The Task Force 67 Orions conducted this imagery surveillance hourly from a standoff position outside surface to air missile threat envelopes. Over 3,500 surface contacts were tracked and reported.

"I can not overstate AIP's operational impact," said RADM Steve Tomaszeski, TF-67 Commander. "The mixture of mission-oriented weapons loadouts and all-weather surveillance and strike capabilities gave the battlegroup a degree of flexibility never before attained."

RADM Winston Copeland, TF-60 Commander, remarked, "Having the P-3s there - providing us with protection from hostile ships and submarines around the clock - permitted us to use our carrier aircraft in strike and patrol missions elsewhere and really allowed us to maximize the options afforded by a carrier air wing!

By virtue of AIP's quantum leap in technology, MPA maintained a continuos surface picture and hourly imaging of the primary FRY ports. The AIP Orions further strengthen the tactical prowess of the carrier battlegroup's battlespace dominance in littoral warfare.

"GNGB"

At a recent reunion of Skyraider pilots from yesteryear in Virginia Beach, Virginia, the the featured banquet speaker was CAPT Jack Fellowes, USN (Ret.). CAPT Fellowes had flown the A-1 (a.k.a., AD, Spad) in VA-85. His squadron mates from early 1960s, many of whom hadn't seen each other in over 30 years, were happy to hear remarks from a genuine hero - one of their own. Jack had transitioned to A-6 Intruders after Skyraider duty and was subsequently shot down over North Vietnam. He was incarcerated for over seven years. With his fellow prisoners of war he endured untold torture, solitary confinement and the miseries only those who were confined with him can fully appreciate.

There was some light banter at the outset of his talk. He recalled some operational highlights and snafus that heightened the pleasure - and the laughter - that such gatherings inevitably produce. He gave a litany of milestones. For instance, Paul Engel, at 60, was the youngest member present. Stan Cobb came the farthest - from Hawaii. Joe Bingham had the most VA-85 A-1 hours; 1,800. Joe also had the most ditches in the A-1: two. Fellowes had the most night hours in VA-85 Spads: 300, and Jim Reid the most VA-85 A-1 traps: 344.

lt was also publicized that squadron pilots had collectivly gained over 1,000 pounds since way back when.

Then CAPT Fellowes got serious. He wanted to express what knowing those in the audience - the men who shared that first-squadron experience with him - had meant during those dark days in the Hanoi Hilton. During captivity he was bolstered by the knowledge he had a strong and loving wife and family pulling for him back home, an enormous plus.

"But," he said, I thought a lot about you guys. In fact, it was the memory of you, the ones I started out with, the ones who taught me what unity of purpose means, the ones who conveyed what it's like to be in a unique group of Naval Aviators, that helped me get by."

This declaration gives credence to the notion that a Naval Aviator's first squadron experience is, arguably, the most memorable, the one that has the most impact on how you do from then on, the one where friendships are solidified for the ages.

As Jack paused, a perfect silence fell over the 70 former squadron mates, wives and friends. With clenched fist and a practical cadence, he tapped his knuckles on the edge of the wooden podium for a moment.

He explained, "As you know, for much of the time we weren't allowed to talk to each other in the prison camp, So we communicated by tapping on the walls of our cells using a code we had created. Messages would be passed down the line through the tap code system. They kept us in touch with each other and lifted our spirits. At night, we had a special four-word message."

Jack tapped out a sequence again on the podium, enunciating, as he did so, the letters, "GNGB ... GNGB."

"It meant;" he went on, 'Good Night, God Bless...Good Night, God Bless ... Good Night, God Bless.' This simple phrase emblematic of a very serious unity of purpose, was a wonderful and needed inspiration. I can't tell you how much it helped get us through one more night so that we could face one more day"

He waited a moment then tapped the podium one more time, "Good night and God Bless."

Copyright Association of Naval Aviation Fall 1999

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...VP-5 'Mad Foxes' Celebrate Change Of Command by Bv Lt Will Bassett and Lt Mary Anne Casler...VP-5 Public Affairs...Jax Air News - June 24, 1999 Page 6..." [06JUN99]

Cmdr. Timothy S. Tibbits relieved Cmdr. Adreon Mark Ensor as commanding officer of Patrol Squadron (VP) 5 during a June 18 ceremony that both honored the past accomplishments of the squadron and looked forward to the challenges of the future.

During the year of Ensor's command, VP-5 conducted more than 7,000 mishap-free flight operations. Prior to deploying in August 1998, the squadron qualified eight crews to fly the new Anti-Surface Warfare Improvement Program (AIP) modified P-3C aircraft, while still meeting the highest standards in anti-submarine warfare (ASW) readiness.

While deployed to Sigonella, Sicily, the "Mad Foxes" flew more than 5,000 flight hours that included 458 operational sorties, with over 200 over Bosnia and Kosovo. VP-5 aircrews flew reconnaissance missions in support of Operation Deliberate Forge, ongoing NATO peacekeeping efforts in the region, and participated in Operation Eagle Eye, the expansion of surveillance flights into Kosovo in support of the NATO Verification Mission.

The "Mad Foxes' also participated in Operation Determined Forge, Operation Flexible Anvil, and provided Mediterranean support for units involved in Operation Desert Fox. While engaged in Operation Flexible Anvil, the contingency for Kosovo air strikes, VP-5 carried more than 200,000 pounds of ordnance while providing battle group force protection for the U.S. carrier battle group in the Adriatic Sea.

VP-5 was also the first U.S. unit to participate in joint operations with Algeria. Upon their return home, VP-5 was awarded the ComNavAirLant Battle "E" for 1998. With the increased tensions in the Balkans, the "Mad Foxes" were again called upon to provide their expertise, returning to Sigonella to augment forces already deployed in the Mediterranean with their experienced crews.

Rear Adm. Mike Holmes, with whom Ensor served in VP-30 Fleet Replacement Squadron from June 1996 to June 1997, was guest speaker for the ceremony. He was introduced by Capt. Alex S. Hill, commodore of Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing II. Hill characterized Ensor as a tremendous leader who has led the maritime patrol community into the future through his pioneering efforts in the AIP aircraft. He congratulated VP-5 on receiving the Wing II nomination for the Golden Wrench Award which recognizes the squadron's maintenance excellence, and for being the 1998 recipient of the ComNavAirLant Battle "E".

Holmes then credited Ensor for "carving out a new niche" for the community, making the P-3 the reconnaissance platform of choice for battle group force commanders. He cited the increased demand for the assets and the enthusiasm within the fleet for P-3 reconnaissance and battle group support in the Mediterranean arena. Holmes described Ensor as a "catalyst behind AlP's introduction." His efforts were fundamental in the deployment of the new assets, as commanding officer of the first East Coast squadron to deploy AIP. The squadron was also instrumental to the P-3 tactical employment of the Standoff Land Attack Missile (SLAM).

At the conclusion of his speech, Holmes presented Ensor with the Air Medal for missions in support of Operation Deliberate Forge and the Meritorious Service, Medal for his extraordinary leadership of VP-5. Upon taking the stage, Ensor reminded the "Mad Foxes" that their reputation for accomplishing missions with "Mad Fox style" could not exist without "Mad Fox skill," and expressed how much he had enjoyed his year of command. He closed his comments with his traditional benediction, "Thanks for coming to work."

Upon assuming command of VP-5 Tibbits praised Ensor for his exception al leadership, saying he would hav "tremendous shoes to fill." He credit ed the men and women of VP-5 for sac rificing their time to protect the free dom that most people take for grantee Tibbits closed with advice to "work hard, play hard and do the right thing."[06JUL99]


Circa 1996

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: 00APR96--"The Naval Air Reserve recently provided peacetime support to Joint Inter-Agency Task Force East Counter-Drug Operations in Panama using a Fleet Maritime Mobile Operations Control Center (MOCC) from Willow Grove, Pennsylvania. MOCC Willow Grove deployed to Howard Air Force Base, Panama, with its state-of-the-art Command, Control, Communications, Computers and Intelligence (C4I) system. Tasked with demonstrating C4I capabilities, MOCC watch teams provided brief and debrief, flight-following, safety-of-flight and complete mission planning services to active Navy Maritime Patrol Aircraft (MPA) crews from VP-5 and VP-92..." http://www.ncts.navy.mil/navresfor/nrn/past/apr96/page2b.html


Circa 1998

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...'Fox Fever' outbreak sweeps nation - 'Mad Fox' banner tours country"..." [11JAN2000]

"'Fox Fever' outbreak sweeps nation - 'Mad Fox' banner tours country"


JaxAirNew - July 23, 1998


In an epidemic that has left experts baffled, "Fox Fever" appears to be sweeping the nation. Outbreaks of "Fox Fever" have been reported in such disparate locations as Tinker Air Force Base in Oklahoma and the ski slopes of the Rockies.
jaxairnews
"Even the Air Force would appear to be susceptible to 'Fox Fever.'"


Experts were quoted as saying, "It was only a matter of time before the fever spread; we're only surprised it didn't happen sooner." Spread of the epidemic has been linked to the travels of a "Mad Fox" banner, currently touring the country in support of the "Mad Foxes'" impending Mediterranean deployment.

This "Mad Fox" publicity blitz reportedly comes courtesy of a local Sea Control Squadron, raising the prospect of a promising new banner-towing mission for the venerable S-3 viking "War Hoover," ensuring the community's survival well into the 21st Century. When asked about this exiting new mission, one ecstatic S-3 driver was quoted as saying, "We're not just for tanking any more!"

This "Fox Fever" epidemic is not only limited to the Continental U.S., with experts already prediciting outbreaks overseas in the coming months as the Med braces itself for the arrival of the "Fox Fever" season in August.
jaxairnews
"Flag Upadate - Feeling very homesick, VP-5's flag beds down for the night in a familiar reminder of home. 'There's no place like home.' The flag's captors are becoming increasingly thirsty."


Contributed by Beth Perry (E-Mail Removed By Request) NEWSLETTER: "VP-8 Alumni Association" [02AUG98]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...11SEP98 -- Fox fever sweeps Med: VP-5 takes on as Patrol Squadron by Lt.j.g. Will Bassett..." http://www.sicily.navy.mil/signature/issues/11SEPT98/05.htm [02MAY99]

The "Mad Foxes" of Patrol Squadron FIVE, recently began a six month deployment to NAS Sigonella, relieving the "Tridents" of Patrol Squadron TWENTY-SIX, as Patron Sigonella. While in the Mediterranean, the "Mad Foxes" will be engaged in reconnaissance flights over Bosnia-Herzegovina in support of Operation Deliberate Forge, ongoing peacekeeping efforts in the region. The Mad Foxes fly P-3Cs that are equipped with a sophisticated Electro-Optic system, a long-range, computer controlled, high resolution camera that can provide a real-time video images to the peacekeeping forces on the ground, giving them a critical aerial "big picture" of situations on the ground as they develop. Additionally, VP-5 will be fulfilling numerous other operational roles in the Med, including participation in cooperative exercises with countries including Great Britain, France, Spain, Tunisia, Israel, Turkey, Greece, Romania, Hungary, Egypt and Italy.

While VP-5 will be assuming the same operational role as previous patrol squadrons, they bring to the Med a brand new asset, P-3 Orion aircraft with the Anti-surface Warfare Improvement Program (AIP) modification on board. The AIP Orions bring with them enhanced capabilities that promise to provide VP squadrons with a new level of mission effectiveness in their ever-expanding roles. These AIP modifications will be especially useful in the Orion's role over Bosnia-Herzegovina in Support of the NATO SFOR.

The "Mad Foxes" spent the last twelve months in Jacksonville in intensive preparation for this deployment, which included familiarization with the sophisticated new systems on board the AIP aircraft. The hard work seems to have paid off, as the "Mad Foxes" were flying missions within hours of arriving in Sigonella. Cmdr. Andy Johnson, commanding officer of the "Tridents" described the transition as "seamless," and Cmdr. Mark Ensor, commanding officer of the "Mad Foxes" characterized the turnover as "One of the smoothest transitions Patron FIVE has ever experienced."

The "Mad Foxes" of Patrol Squadron FIVE return home to Jacksonville in February of '99.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...19SEP98 SUBJ/PUBLIC AFFAIRS -- NAVEUR NEWS SERVICE (33-98)// "...HEADLINE: "MAD FOXES" SHOW THEIR TEETH BY LTJG WILL BASSETT...NAVAL AIR STATION SIGONELLA, SICILY - THE MAD FOXES OF PATROL SQUADRON FIVE (VP-5) DEPLOYED TO NAS SIGONELLA, SICILY, RECENTLY HAD A CHANCE TO DEMONSTRATE THE OFFENSIVE "TEETH" OF THEIR P-3C ORION AIRCRAFT WHILE PARTICIPATING IN A LIVE MISSILE FIRE EXERCISE......VP-5 LAUNCHED A MAVERICK MISSILE AT A SMALL FLOATING TARGET OFF THE COAST OF GREECE. THE EXERCISE INVOLVED NOT ONLY INTENSIVE TACTICAL PLANNING, BUT EXTREMELY CLOSE COORDINATION BETWEEN TWO VP-5 AIRCRAFT THAT PARTICIPATED AND GREEK ARMED FORCES WHICH PROVIDED THE TARGET RANGE. AS THE MISSILE-ARMED ORION PREPARED TO LAUNCH THE MISSILE, A RANGE SAFETY AIRCRAFT CLEARED THE TARGET RANGE AND PROVIDED ACOUSTIC AND VISUAL BOMB DAMAGE ASSESSMENT IN THE AFTERMATH OF THE STRIKE, WHICH TOTALLY DESTROYED THE FLOATING TARGET......THIS MAVERICK MISSILE EXERCISE REFLECTS THE CHANGING MISSION OF THE VENERABLE P-3C ORION. ORIGINALLY DESIGNED PRIMARILY AS A SUBMARINE HUNTER, THE RANGE AND FLEXIBILITY OF THE ORION MEANS IT CAN BE UTILIZED FOR A VARIETY OF NEW MISSIONS. ORION CREWS NOW SPENDING THE MAJORITY OF THEIR TIME FLYING DRUG-INTERDICTION AND RECONNAISSANCE-ORIENTED MISSIONS, BUT RECENT UPDATES HAVE PROVIDED THE ORION WITH THE CAPABILITY OF LAUNCHING AN IMPRESSIVE ARRAY OF STANDOFF WEAPONS, INCLUDING HARPOON, SLAM, AND MAVERICK MISSILES......WITH ITS LONG RANGE, SOPHISTICATED ELECTRONICS AND LARGE CREW, THE ORION IS PROVING ITSELF TO BE AN EXTREMELY CAPABLE MARITIME STRIKE AIRCRAFT. FAR-RANGING ORIONS CAN BE ON TARGET WITHIN HOURS OF RECEIVING THE CALL, IMMEDIATELY PROVIDING CRITICAL RECONNAISSANCE AND STRIKE CAPABILITY ANYWHERE WITHIN THE THEATER WHERE THEY ARE DEPLOYED......THE MAD FOXES ARRIVED IN SIGONELLA FOR THEIR SIX-MONTH DEPLOYMENT IN AUGUST AND WILL RETURN TO THE STATES IN EARLY FEBRUARY...." http://www.spear.navy.mil/ships/lsd46/nns_33-89.htm [19FEB99]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...by JOC Tim Adams, CTF-67 Public Affairs NAF Naples, Italy (NWSA) -- Patrol Squadron (VP) FIVE at NAS Sigonella, Sicily, recently received the first P-3C Orion aircraft refitted with upgrades for day or night surveillance and Standoff Land Attack Missile (SLAM) capability. The package, called the Antisurface Warfare Improvement Program (AIP), also includes a whole new suite of sensor, communications and self-defense equipment. A new Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) enables the aircrew to can see through cloud cover or camouflage netting with startling clarity. For intelligence purposes, its camera quality imagery can be downlinked in real-time and be available instantly on any battlefield commander's desktop computer."Now we have an aircraft that's able to do the job during bad weather and at night, and when you have that ability, everybody wants to use you," said Cdr. Ken Deutsch, Commander, Task Force (CTF) 67 operations officer. "The P-3 has always been a true all weather ASW aircraft," said Capt. Lawrence Cotton, CTF-67 Chief of Staff, after viewing the new AIP model. "Now it's truly also an all weather surveillance platform. We did not compromise or lose any old abilities, we still have those plus more tools in the toolbox -- mines, torpedoes, harpoon cruise missiles, bombs, Maverick, depth charges, sonobuoys and now SLAM..." Contributed by navigator1@eastlink.ca [E-Mail Updated 01MAR2009]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: 18JUN98: JaxAirNews Page 3 "VP-5 'Mad Foxes' To Hold Change Of Command" Contributed by Beth Perry (E-Mail Removed By Request) [27JUN98]

"VP-5 'Mad Foxes' To Hold Change Of Command"
By Lt. j.g. Will Bassett VP-5 Public Affairs Officer

Cmdr. Adreon Mark Ensor will relieve Cmdr. Michael J. Szostak as commanding officer of Patrol Squadron 5 during a change of command ceremony scheduled for tomorrow at 10 a.m. in Hangar 1000. The ceremony marks the 48th change of command in the distinguished history of the "Mad Foxes."

Originally commissioned as Bombing Squadron 135 in 1942, the "Mad Foxes" were redesignated Patrol Squadron 5 in 1948, and were relocated to NAS Jacksonville, Florida (as their permanent home) a year later. Over its 50-year history VP-5 has achieved an outstanding record of accomplishments, including receiving the coveted Battle "E" six times, two Meritorious Unit Commendations, the Navy Expeditionary Medal, the "Hook Em" Award, the Amold Jay lsbell Trophy for ASW Excellence, the Commander Patrol Wing 11 Bronze Anchor Award, and the Commander Naval Air Forces U.S. Atlantic Fleet Silver Anchor, among others.

Raised in Rockville, Md., Ensor graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy in May 1979. He was designated a naval aviator in 1981 and participated in two Western Pacific deployments with Patrol Squadron 19. In March 1985, he reported as a FRS instructor pilot to Patrol Squadron 31. He attended Tactical Action Officer School in November of 1987 and served as flag ASW officer (VP) on the staff of Commander, Carrier Group I, participating in WestPac deployments and Pacific Exercise '89. Following attendance at Aviation Safety Officer School, he served as safety/NATOPS officer for Commander, Patrol Wing 2, and safety/NATOPS officer and maintenance officer for Patrol Squadron 22..

During his WestPac/IO deployment, Ensor served as Commander, Task Group 150.7 in support of the United States Naval Forces Central Command during Operation Desert Storm. In 1992, he reported to the Aviation Warfare Assignments Division of the Bureau of Naval Personnel, serving as the aircraft carrier placement officer and aviation placement branch head. In 1995, he reported to Patrol Squadron 30 as executive officer, and in 1997 reported to the Patrol Squadron 5 "Mad Foxes" as executive officer.

Ensor will assume the duties of commanding officer. Patrol Squadron 5 tomorrow. His personal awards include the Defense Meritorious Service Medal (two awards) and Navy Commendation Medal (two awards).

Szostak, a native of Elizabeth, N.J., received his commission from the U.S. Naval Academy in 1979, and received his naval flight officer wings in August 1980.

He then made three deployments with Patrol Squadron 24 and in 1984, reported to Patrol Squadron 30 as an instructor, and served with Royal Netherlands Navy 320 Squadron in Valkenburg, the Netherlands.

In October of 1986, Szostak reported as flag lieutenant to the Commander, Naval Forces Japan. In 1989, he enrolled in the Space Systems Engineering curriculum at Naval Postgraduate School, earning a master of science degree in astronautical engineering, and was nominated for the Capt. Michael J. Smith Award for academic excellence and leadership contributions. In 1991, he reported to Patrol Squadron 5 where he served as command services officer and operations officer, and was later assigned to Patrol Wing 11 as wing operations officer. In November 1993, Szostak was assigned to the White House Military Office as presidential emergency plans officer in the Contingency Plans Directorate.

He reported to VP-5 as executive officer in 1996, and served as commanding officer from June 6, 1997 to present Szostak leaves VP-5 for the Operational Support Office at the National Reconnaissance Office in Washington, D.C. His personal awards include the Defense Meritorious Service Medal, Navy Commendation Medal (3 awards) and the Navy Achievement Medal.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...SIGONELLA, SICILY MAY 63 - NOV 63..." Contributed by Jim Buckley jimbuckley12@msn.com

CREW 1
PPC-CDR. R P SMYTH
C/P-LT. D M AMIDON
3RD P-LTJG. W M McDONALD
NAV-LTJG. F A STANSBURY
TACCO-LTJG. R E WEBB
P/C-HASKINS, R A-ADR1(AC)
2ndM-CARNES, L W-ADR3
1st T-WOOTON, W R-AT2(AC)
2ndT-KROVIAK, E L-AXAN
3rd T-MILLER, H L-AE2
RADIO-MASON, D E-ATR3(AC)
ORD-STEPHENS, L J-AO1
CREW 2
PPC-LCDR. W J WRIGHT, JR
PPC-LTJG. L M MAYO
PP2F-LTJG. R C CAMPBELL
TACCO-LTJG. J D LATHAM
P/C-CRAYS, J E-ADR2
2ndM-ARMSTRONG, I R-ADR2
1stT-PIERCE, J M-AX1
2ndT-COLLIER, P I-AXAN
3rdT-MATTHEWS, R A-AE2
RADIO-PETTWAY, R T-ATN3(AC)
ORD-PRICE, E R-AO1
CREW 3
PPC- LCDR. K W BENNER, JR.
PPC-LT. R D WINTERS
PP2P-LTJG. M G COSTARAKIS
TACCO-LTJG. J C PHILLIPS
P/C-STRICKLAND, E E-ADR2
2ndM-BAKER, L J-ADJ2
1stT-BROWN, J(N)-AX2(AC)
2ndT-BARKSDALE, H-AT2
3rdT-MASENGALE, H D-AE2
RADIO-BOROFF, D R-ATR3
ORD-WELTON, S A-AO2
CREW 4
PPC-LT. C W BURCHETT
PT2P-LTJG. J L MULHALL
PP3P-LTJG. R A PERKINS
TACCO-LT. J D
P/C-WALL, L R-ADR1
2ndM-KEY, J F-ADR3
1stT-FREDERE, R L-AT2
2ndT-ANDERSON, G A-AT2(AC)
3rdT-RICHARDSON, L E-AE2(AC)
RADIO-MICELI, F J-ATN3(AC)
ORD-ROVIARO, R L-AO3(AC)
CREW 5
PPC-LCDR J E WALL
PPNP-LT R D AWBREY
PP2P-LTJG J F RUHSENBERGER
TACCO-LT A L
P/C-ROSE, R L-ADJ1
2ndM-CHILDRESS, V R-ADRAN
1stT-TINDER, J K-AT2(AC)
2ndT-RADLOFF, R C-ATN3
3rdT-DAVIS, S(n)-AE3
RADIO-BORIS, J S-AN
ORD-WALDROP, A-AO3
CREW 6
PPC-LT J J HIGGINS
PP2P-LTJG R P RICH
PP3P-LTJG J J LANGAN
TACCO-LTJG W R CASWELL
P/C-TYNES, O E-ADR2
2ndM-MILLER, C F-ADR3
1stT-SHELLY, R F-AX2(AC)
2ndT-TOWNSEND, W R-AX3(AC)
3rdT-WHITLEY, P K-AE2
RADIO-BUKOVEY, L M-ATN3(AC)
ORD-JOYCE, G R-
CREW 7
PPC-CDR J A PATE
PPC-LT J A KEILER
PP2D-LTJG M J HALL
TACCO-LTJG W L DANFORTH
P/C-VAUGHN, R K-ADR2(AC)
2ndM-O'HALLORAN, F E-ADJ3
1stT-BINET, E E-AT2
2ndT-WARNER, D L-AXAN
3rdT-McCORMACK, J L-AEAN
RADIO-St. PIERRE, L A-ATN3
ORD-COOK, H C-AO2(AC)
CREW 8
PPC-LCDR. A N FOWLER
PPC-LT. J M MAXWELL
PP2P-LTJG. W J BECK
TACCO-LTJG. W S MILES III
P/C-PAYNE, H L-ADR2(AC)
2ndM-GREEN, R F-ADR2
1stT-MARKOWSKI, J F-AX2
2ndT-KING, P L-AX3
3rdT-SWIFT, L(n)-AE3(AC)
RADIO-PAYNE, J E-AX3
ORD-WITCHEY, J G-
CREW 9
PPC-LT. D E BORCIK
PP2P-LT. P E OECHSLIN
PP2P- LTJG. W J HEINZ
TACCO- LTJG. J P OHLMAN
P/C-PATRICK, J R-ADR1
2ndM-RUSSELL, D E-ADR2
1stT-ROSZLER, JJ-ATR3
2ndT-GILMORE, T L-AXAN
3rdT-ADAMS, G E-AE2(AC)
RADIO-CUTSFORTH, R W-ATR3
ORD-BUMGARNER, J B-
CREW 10
PPC-LCDR. R J TOUCH
PPC-LTJG. G L COLE
PP3P-LTJG. R S CAMA
TACCO-LTJG. A S HILLMAN
P/C-GURLEY, J(n)-AMS2
2ndM-ROBERTS, G A-ADR3
1stT-JENKINS, J K-AT1
2ndT-CAMPBELL, D A-ATR3
3rdT-RISER, J D-AE1
RADIO-HALE, W G-AT2(AC)
ORD-FERNANDEZ, C E-
CREW 11
PPC-LT. W E BRIDGMAN
PP2P- LT. R V CLOUD, JR
PPNP-LTJG. L G HATHORN
TACCO-LTJG. J E SEANOR
P/C-KARPUS, J T-ADJ2(AC)
2ndM-WILLIAMSON, C R-ADJ3
1stT-ROBBINS, J(n)-AT2(AC)
2ndT-BROWN, A F Jr-AX3(AC)
3rdT-COWLEY, B D-AE3
RADIO-FANNING, I H Jr-ATN3(AC)
ORD-DOWLING, J J-AO2(AC
CREW 12
PPC-LT. G T McKENZIE
PPC-LT. A CASTRO, Jr
PP3P-LTJG. B W GORMAN
TACCO- LTJG. W L COWAN
P/C-WEIGANDT, S B-ADR2(AC)
2ndM-SMITH, E(n)-AN
1stT-COLEMAN, M A-ATLP2
2ndT-MOORE, R E-AE1(AC)
3rdT-DODRILL, E E-AE3
RADIO-HAGER, C A=AX3
ORD-CLAY, S E-AN
CREW 13
P/C-GARDTM W D-AECS
2ndM-SAIENNI, DJ-AMH1
1stT-BARNES, C G-ATCSP2
2ndT-PEAK, J F-ATC
3rdT-HOAGLIN, D W-AE1
RADIO-McWATERS, M J-ATC
ORD-ARENBURGH, M F-AOCA

CREW 15
P/C-PEEPLES, A D-ADR1
2ndM-WILLARD, D R-ADR1
1stT-AUTRY, G S-ATC
2ndT-DRUMRIGHT, K B-AX1
3rdT-HUNT, A H-AE1
RADIO-HALE, W C-AT2
ORD-HUNT, H(n)-AO1

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: Logo ThumbnailCameraVP-5 Patch Contributed by John Lucas JohnLucas@netzero.com [16MAR2004]


Circa 1995

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: Naval Aviation News Magazine "...Awards, Change-Of-Command, Etc. - Naval Aviation News - September - October 1995.." WebSite: http://www.history.navy.mil/nan/backissues/1990s/1995/so95.pdf [12NOV2004]

VP History ThumbnailCamera

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: Naval Aviation News Magazine "...Deployments, Change-Of-Command, Awards, Records, Etc. - Naval Aviation News - July - August 1995.." WebSite: http://www.history.navy.mil/nan/backissues/1990s/1995/ja95.pdf [12NOV2004]

VP History ThumbnailCamera

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: Naval Aviation News Magazine "...Awards - Naval Aviation News - May - June 1995.." WebSite: http://www.history.navy.mil/nan/backissues/1990s/1995/mj95.pdf [12NOV2004]

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Circa 1994

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: Naval Aviation News Magazine "...Records (Safe Flying) - Naval Aviation News - November - December 1994.." WebSite: http://www.history.navy.mil/nan/backissues/1990s/1994/nd94.pdf [12NOV2004]

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HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: Naval Aviation News Magazine "...Awards, Major Deployments, Etc. - Naval Aviation News - July - August 1994.." WebSite: http://www.history.navy.mil/nan/backissues/1990s/1994/ja94.pdf [12NOV2004]

VP History ThumbnailCamera

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: 14APR94--"KEFLAVIK, ICELAND (NENS) -- THE "MAD FOXES" OF PATROL SQUADRON FIVE (VP-5), HOME BASED IN JACKSONVILLE, FL AND CURRENTLY DEPLOYED TO ICELAND, ENTERED THE RECORD BOOKS TODAY WITH THEIR PARTICIPATION IN EXERCISE POMOR 94 OFF THE COAST OF NORWAY. IT MARKS THE FIRST TIME U.S. AIRCRAFT HAVE JOINED IN AN EXERCISE IN THIS PART OF THE WORLD. THE THREE-DAY MULTINATIONAL EXERCISE FEATURES BOTH SURFACE AND AIR MARITIME FORCES FROM THE UNITED STATES, UNITED KINGDOM, THE NETHERLANDS, GERMANY, NORWAY AND RUSSIA. VP-5 FLIES THE P3-C ORION, A LONG-RANGE ANTI-SUBMARINE WARFARE (ASW) PATROL AIRCRAFT USED TO DETECT, CLASSIFY, LOCALIZE, TRACK AND DESTROY ENEMY HIGH-PERFORMANCE SUBMARINES. IT IS ALSO USED FOR SURFACE SURVEILLANCE...." http://www.chinfo.navy.mil/navpalib/news/eurnews/eur94/eur94010.txt


Circa 1992

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: Naval Aviation News Magazine "...Safe Flying, Change-Of-Command, and Rescues - Naval Aviation News - November-December 1992.." WebSite: http://www.history.navy.mil/nan/backissues/1990s/1992/nd92.pdf [11NOV2004]

VP History ThumbnailCamera

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: Naval Aviation News Magazine "...Change-Of-Command, Safe Flying, etc. - Naval Aviation News - July-August 1992.." WebSite: http://www.history.navy.mil/nan/backissues/1990s/1992/ja92.pdf [11NOV2004]

VP History ThumbnailCamera

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: Naval Aviation News Magazine "...Squadron Deployments, Operations Desert Shield/Storm, Disestablishment, etc. - Naval Aviation News - July-August 1992.." WebSite: http://www.history.navy.mil/nan/backissues/1990s/1992/ja92.pdf [11NOV2004]

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Circa 1993

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: Naval Aviation News Magazine "...Change-Of-Command, Records, Etc. - Naval Aviation News - November - December 1993.." WebSite: http://www.history.navy.mil/nan/backissues/1990s/1993/nd93.pdf [12NOV2004]

VP History ThumbnailCamera

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: Naval Aviation News Magazine "...VP Deployments, Change-Of-Command, Etc. - Naval Aviation News - July - August 1993.." WebSite: http://www.history.navy.mil/nan/backissues/1990s/1993/ja93.pdf [12NOV2004]

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Circa 1991

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VP History ThumbnailCameraVP-5 Patch "...VP-5 Med Deployment 1991 - Operation Desert Storm - NS Rota, Spain, NAF Lajes, Azores, Portugal, NAS Sigonella, Sicily and Souda Bay..." Contributed by John Lucas JohnLucas@netzero.com [30MAY2005]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: Naval Aviation November-December 1991 "...History - Change-Of-Command - Naval Aviation News - November-December 1991..." WebSite: http://www.history.navy.mil/nan/backissues/1990s/1991/nd91.pdf [25OCT2004]

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HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: Naval Aviation September-October 1991 "...Desert Shield/Storm - Naval Aviation News - September-October 1991..." WebSite: http://www.history.navy.mil/nan/backissues/1990s/1991/so91.pdf [24OCT2004]

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HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: Naval Aviation July-August 1991 "...1990 Patrol Squadron Major Deployments - Page 19 - Naval Aviation News - July-August 1991..." WebSite: http://www.history.navy.mil/nan/backissues/1990s/1991/ja91.pdf [23OCT2004]

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HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Naval Aviation Units Involved in the Persian Gulf War (16 January–27 February 1991)...This Squadron Mentioned...Naval Historical Center ADOBE Download File: http://www.history.navy.mil/avh-1910/APP29.PDF [27MAY2003]
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Circa 1990

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: Naval Aviation March-April 1990 "...History - Change-Of-Command - Page 8, 28 and 30 - Naval Aviation News - March-April 1990..." WebSite: http://www.history.navy.mil/nan/backissues/1990s/1990/ma90.pdf [22OCT2004]

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