VPNAVY VP-5 Mercury Capsule Recovery
http://www.vpnavy.org
VPNAVY Address

HistoryVP-4 HistoryHistory

Circa 1949

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: Naval Aviation News September 1949 "...100-Knot Wind Buffets VP-4 - Page - 11 - Naval Aviation News - September 1949..." WebSite: http://www.history.navy.mil/nan/backissues/1940s/1949/sep49 [12JUL2004]

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Circa 1948

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "01SEP48--VPB-144 was redisgnated VP-144 on 15 May 1946, VP-ML-4 on 15 November, and finally, VP-4 on 1 September 1948, the designation it carries today, now known as the "Skinny Dragons." Transitioning to Lockheed P2V-2 Neptunes in 1947, the squadron remained in the Pacific Fleet based at Naha, Okinawa (1956-1964) and at NAS Barbers Point, Hawaii while deploying throughout the Far East. VP-4 flew Market Time and Yankee Station missions during the Vietnam War. Flying Lockheed P-3C Orion's, VP-4, currently under Commander Patrick S. O'Brien, is scheduled to move to MCAF NAS Kaneohe Bay, Pearl Harbor, Hawaii by 1999...(Proceedings/April 1996 Lest We Forget-Bob Lawson)...George Winter...[SEE VP-144 for complete story and PV-1 Ventura Photo]" Contributed by George Winter pbycat@bellsouth.net

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...VPNAVY BookTitle: "Patrol Squadron Four Aerial Survey of Southeastern Alaska 1948 Cruise Book"..." CruiseBook mentions FASRON-112, VP-61, and VP-4. [10JAN2000]


Circa 1947

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: BooksTitle: "A Brief History of Patrol Squadron Four - The Neptune Years 1947 - 1966 by Richard M. Douglass. "This brief history is dedicated to all those men and women who have faithfully served their country as members of Patrol Squadron Four and to their spouses and families who supported them during their time of service." This booklet is 34 pages with pictures, history, and more! For further information contact: Richard M. Douglass rmdover2u@earthlink.net [01JUN99]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: UNIT: VP-4 PREVIOUS DES: VP-AM-4 NAME: Skinny Dragons TAIL CODE: SC/YD ACTIVATED: 1947 DEACTIVATED: TYPICAL LOCATION(S): NAS Whidbey Island, Washington
Books"Title: Lockheed P2V Neptune An Illustrated History by Wayne Mutza wmutza@wi.rr.com...A Schiffer Military History Book...ISBN: 0-7643-0151-9...286 pages full of pictures and history!


Circa 1945

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Dad, ENSIGN Rolland F. Geil, served with VPB-4 at MCBH Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii in 1945..." Contributed by Richard Geil rdgeil@aol.com [08MAR2016]

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HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...War Diary Patrol Bombing Squadron FOUR - 01FEB1945-28FEB1945..." Official U. S. Navy Records (National Archives and Records Administration) via Fold3 http://www.fold3.com/ [06OCT2013]

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HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...War Diary Patrol Bombing Squadron FOUR - 01MAR1945-28MAR1945..." Official U. S. Navy Records (National Archives and Records Administration) via Fold3 http://www.fold3.com/ [06OCT2013]

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HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...War Diary Patrol Bombing Squadron FOUR - 01MAY1945-31MAY1945..." Official U. S. Navy Records (National Archives and Records Administration) via Fold3 http://www.fold3.com/ [06OCT2013]

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HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...War Diary Patrol Bombing Squadron FOUR - 01JUN1945-30JUN1945..." Official U. S. Navy Records (National Archives and Records Administration) via Fold3 http://www.fold3.com/ [06OCT2013]

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HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...War Diary Patrol Bombing Squadron FOUR - 01JUL1945-31JUL1945..." Official U. S. Navy Records (National Archives and Records Administration) via Fold3 http://www.fold3.com/ [06OCT2013]

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HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...War Diary Patrol Bombing Squadron FOUR - 01AUG1945-31AUG1945..." Official U. S. Navy Records (National Archives and Records Administration) via Fold3 http://www.fold3.com/ [06OCT2013]

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HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...War Diary Patrol Bombing Squadron FOUR - 01SEP1945-30SEP1945..." Official U. S. Navy Records (National Archives and Records Administration) via Fold3 http://www.fold3.com/ [06OCT2013]

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HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...War Diary Patrol Bombing Squadron FOUR - 01OCT1945-30OCT1945..." Official U. S. Navy Records (National Archives and Records Administration) via Fold3 http://www.fold3.com/ [06OCT2013]

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HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: Naval Aviation News Magazine "...On A Famous Mission - Naval Aviation News - March 1945.." WebSite: http://www.history.navy.mil/nan/backissues/1940s/1945/15mar45.pdf [10NOV2004]

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HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Actually, VPB-4 was evidently not the progenitor of the later VP-4. VPB-4 was decommissioned in Oct. 1945, and I was sent to VR-4 at Moffett Field...VP-1 moved to San Diego in late February 1945 and was decommissioned. After leave, we were all reassigned, most of us to the newly formed VPB-4, operating with newly overhauled PB2Y-5 equipment out of San Diego. (The pilot of my crew was Lt. (jg) Joe Schoenfeld, a former enlisted pilot who had flight tested the PB2Y series, and could do things with that aircraft that would make your eyes bug out.) My crew's first flight with the new equipment and squadron was on May 2, 1945. The big barrel hangars by the seawall apron at the NAS were our home, and I suppose they are still standing. The squadron began deploying to Okinawa, piecemeal, in the latter part of June. The squadron was about half and half when the war ended, at which time further deployments were cancelled, and the deployed section was moved to Hong Kong. I spent VJ-Day night tied up to a buoy in San Diego bay doing buoy watch and listening to the various celebrations on the aircraft radio. We had landed with a depth charge stuck, partly released and dangling half out of the bomb bay in the right wing, and the ordnancemen didn't want to beach us or to try getting it out until the next day. The squadron was decommissioned in late October 1945...I got the details on that info out of my log book..." Contributed by William J. Bonville bonville@q.com WebSite: http://home.cdsnet.net/~bonville/


Circa 1944 - 1945

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: Naval Historical Center, Department Of The Navy, Washington, D. C http://www.history.navy.mil/branches/dictvol2.htm [28APR2001]
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Circa 1944

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...War Diary Patrol Bombing Squadron FOUR - 01OCT1944-30OCT1944..." Official U. S. Navy Records (National Archives and Records Administration) via Fold3 http://www.fold3.com/ [06OCT2013]

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HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...War Diary Patrol Bombing Squadron FOUR - NOVEMBER 1944..." Official U. S. Navy Records (National Archives and Records Administration) via Fold3 http://www.fold3.com/ [06OCT2013]

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HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...History of FAW-14 - History from 15OCT42-01DEC42 - Submitted December 22nd, 1944. Squadron's Assigned: VP-1, VP-2, VP-4, VP-11, VP-12, VP-13, VP-14, VP-15, VP-21, VP-23, VP-24, VP-33, VP-44, VP-53, VP-54, VP-71, VP-72, VP-81, VP-91, VP-101, VP-102, VP-103, VP-104, VP-106, VP-109, VP-111, VP-115, VP-117, VP-118, VP-119, VP-121, VP-122 and VP-202..." Official U. S. Navy Records (National Archives and Records Administration) via Fold3 http://www.fold3.com/ [06DEC2012]

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HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraFAW-2 VP Aircraft and Location "...FAW-2, VPB-4, VPB-13, VPB-19, VPB-25, VPB-26, VPB-28, VPB-71, VPB-100, VPB-111 and VPB-115 - FAW-2/A12-1 01 NOVEMBER to 30 NOVEMBER 1944..." Official U. S. Navy Records (National Archives and Records Administration) via Fold3 http://www.fold3.com/ [16OCT2012]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraFAW-2 VP Aircraft and Location "...FAW-2, VPB-4, VPB-11, VPB-13, VPB-16, VPB-26, VPB-27, VPB-28, VPB-34, VPB-52, VPB-100 and VPB-106 - FAW-2/A12-1-013 December to 31 December 1944..." Official U. S. Navy Records (National Archives and Records Administration) via Fold3 http://www.fold3.com/ [15OCT2012]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Full Text Citations For Award of The Navy Cross - To U.S. Navy Personnel - World War II - (2,889 Awards) - Navy Cross Citations U.S. Navy - World War II..." WebSite: Home of Heros http://www.homeofheroes.com/ valor/ 1_Citations/ 03_wwii-nc/ nc_06wwii_navyC.html [20NOV2007]

CHRISTOPHER, THOMAS A.

(First Award)
Citation:

The Navy Cross is presented to Thomas A. Christopher, Lieutenant Commander, U.S. Navy, for extraordinary heroism and distinguished service while serving as Commander of a Patrol Bomber in Patrol Squadron THIRTY-FOUR (VP-4) operating in the Bismarck Sea in the vicinity of strongly-defended Japanese bases on the nights of 31 December 1943 and 22 January 1944. On 31 December 1944 Lieutenant Commander Christopher attacked and damaged one enemy vessel during a night patrol. Again, on 22 January 1944 he attacked and damaged an enemy vessel at night, receiving damage from heavy AA fire resulting in injury to one crewmember. Lieutenant Commander Christopher pressed home his attacks despite adverse weather conditions, enemy aircraft and heavy antiaircraft fire which damaged his plane on both occasions. His leadership in seeking out the enemy and pressing home the attack under heavy fire, his outstanding courage and determined skill were at all times inspiring and in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
Bureau of Naval Personnel Information Bulletin No. 330 (September 1944)
Born: May 24, 1911 at Perth Amboy, New Jersey
Home Town: Perth Amboy, New Jersey
Other Award: Navy Cross w/Gold Star (WWII)

(Second Award)
Citation:
The Navy Cross (First Gold Star) is presented to Thomas A. Christopher, Lieutenant Commander, U.S. Navy, for extraordinary heroism and distinguished service while serving as Commander of a Patrol Bomber in Patrol Squadron THIRTY-FOUR (VP-4) operating in the Bismarck Sea in the vicinity of strongly-defended Japanese bases on 15 January 1944. Lieutenant Commander Christopher led a five-aircraft attack on a strongly escorted enemy convoy attempting to cross the straits. He made a masthead attack at extremely close range and personally accounted for one 6,800-ton merchantman, while the remainder of the flight destroyed two more. His leadership in seeking out the enemy and pressing home the attack under heavy fire, his outstanding courage and determined skill were at all times inspiring and in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
Born: May 24, 1911 at Perth Amboy, New Jersey
Home Town: Perth Amboy, New Jersey
Other Award: Navy Cross (WWII)


Circa 1943

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...I just found my father-in laws "Aviator's Flight Log Book" Vernard C. Nichols, ARM 1/c. His first flight with VBP-4 was on May 19, 1943, and his last flight was on October 24, 1945. He flew a total of 1,467.7 hours, in PB2Y-3, and PB2Y-5's. In his flight log book he had listed the Pilots, each Buno, hours of the flight, date, and the character of flight. Of his total flying time with VBP-4 he flew with 50 different pilots. The pilot that he spent the most time flying for was Lt. Kosick , 1174 hours. The first flight with Lt-jg Kosich was on June 24, 1943. The entry for October 19, 1943 has him listed as Lt. Kosich. The last flight with Lt. Kosich was on December 16 & 17, 1944 from Kaneohe Bay to San Diego. The only other pilot that he flew for alot, was a Lt. Jones. He flew 104.6 hours in his planes, from February 7, 1945 to July 28, 1945..." Contributed via Tim Morris (Son-In-Law) timlinda65@gmail.com [16AUG99]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "Re-commissioned in July 1943 as VP-144, after losing all but one aircraft in the Philippines Defense Campaign, VP-4 re-entered World War II with vastly improved fortunes. At the end of Pacific hostilities, the squadron emerged as Patrol Squadron FOUR and moved to a new home base in Whidbey Island, Washington. After transitioning to P2V Neptunes in 1947, VP-4 conducted an aerial photographic survey of Southeastern Alaska from Annette Island and began regular visits to Pacific deployment sites. Naha, Okinawa became the new homeport of VP-4 in 1956. From this base, the squadron flew reconnaissance and ASW coverage to counter the Communist Chinese threat to the islands of Matsu and Quemoy. In 1964 the squadron completed four years of unequaled operational excellence that resulted in three COMNAVAIRPAC Battle Efficiency "E" Awards, three CNO Safety Awards, and four Arnold J. Isbell Trophys. Having returned to their original home of Hawaii, VP-4 began transitioning from P-2V Neptune to the P-3A Orion in 1966. The "Skinny Dragons" went on to participate in the 1968 RIMPAC Exercise with representative squadrons from Australia, New Zealand, and Japan. During a subsequent deployment in 1972 to Cubi Point, Republic Of the Philippines, VP-4 was awarded the Meritorious Unit Commendation for its effort during operations "Market Time" and "Yankee Station". During the 1975 deployment to Cubi Point, VP-4 participated in the evacuation of South Vietnam and the "Mayaguez" recovery operations. 1976 saw detachment operations to NAS Agana, Guam during which the squadron participated in Australia's Kangaroo II fleet exercise. In July 1978, the "Skinny Dragons" assumed the NAS Agana, Guam Detachment and simultaneously conducted operations that stretched around the world from Cubi Point to Barbers Point, Moffett Field, Brunswick, and Sigonella. Patrol Squadron FOUR finished transitioning to the P-3B (MOD), or "SUPER BEE" in May 1979. The squadron then started a work up period for its next Cubi Point deployment which began in November 1979. In May 1980, VP-4 returned from a very productive six-month Cubi Point deployment with a detachment in Diego Garcia, British Indian Ocean Territory. In February 1984, Patrol Squadron FOUR commenced transitioning to P-3C aircraft and had the honor of becoming the first P-3C squadron at NAS Barbers Point, Hawaii. VP-4 became the first Barbers Point squadron to deploy to Diego Garcia in January 1985. The squadron concluded this remarkable deployment by flying over 100,000 flying of mishap free flying. In June 1986, the "Skinny Dragons" deployed to remote NAS Adak, Alaska; the first Barbers Point squadron to do so. In November 1987, the "Skinny Dragons" again deployed to Cubi Point. During 1987 VP-4 earned the Golden Anchor Award and the Battle "E" Award. 1988 saw the "Skinny Dragons" return to Hawaiian waters, where they participated in numerous exercises, including RIMPAC and READIEX. The highlight of the year was receiving their second consecutive Golden Orion and Golden Anchor Awards for retention, an unprecedented accomplishment for a deployable Pacific squadron. 1989 saw the "Skinny Dragons" complete a highly successful deployment to NAS Adak, Alaska. While in NAS Adak, Alaska, VP-4 conducted numerous ASW operations and participated in PACEX-89, the largest Naval exercise since World War II. Deploying to Diego Garcia in November 1990, the "Skinny Dragons" quickly established a detachment in Masirah, Omanto enforce the UN embargo against Iraq during Operation DESERT SHIELD. By early January 1991, 179 missions had challenged 3,669 merchant vessels. The embargo gave way to Battle Force Protection as war was declared on 17 January 1991. Flying 279 combat missions and 2,779 flight hours in the Arabian Gulf in support of Operations DESERT SHIELD and DESERT STORM, the "Skinny Dragons" provided detection and targeting, resulting in the total destruction of the Iraqi Navy. In the Fall of 1991 Patrol Squadron FOUR transitioned to the P-3C model, the Update III. In 1992, VP-4 once again deployed to Diego Garcia B.I.O.T. with permanent detachments in Masirah, Omanand NAF Kadena, Okinawa, Japan. Deployed from May-November 1992, VP-4 resumed missions in support of Operation DESERT STORM and successfully conducted numerous multinational exercises and independent operations. Upon returning home to Hawaii, Patrol Squadron FOUR learned that it had again received the Golden Anchor and the COMPATWINGSPAC Golden Orion for retention excellence. In November 1993, VP-4 deployed to NAF Misawa, Japan, and established a permanent detachment in NAF Kadena, Okinawa, Japan. While on deployment, Patrol Squadron FOUR received the 1993 Chief of Naval Operations Aviation Safety Award for a Pacific Fleet Maritime Patrol Squadron, the Commander Seventh Fleet Award and the Captain Amold Jay Isbell Trophy, both for Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW) excellence. After completing a challenging at home training cycle, Patrol Squadron FOUR again received the 1994 Chief of Naval Operations Aviation Safety Award. In November 1995, VP-4 conducted a split-site deployment to NAF Misawa, Japan and Kadenia, Okinawa, fully integrating into COMSEVENTHFLT operations. During this deployment squadron flew around the clock for seventeen straight days during PRC-Taiwan Crisis in support of both the NIMITZ and INDEPENDENCE Battlegroup. After a highly successful deployment, the "Skinny Dragons" continued down the path of excellence, immediately jumping into RIMPAC '96 and conducting flawless Harpoon shot. In early 1997, VP-4 again set the West Coast standard results on the Mining Readiness Certification Inspection, the Aviation Evaluation (AME), the Conventional Weapons Technical Proficiency Inspection (CTPI) and the Operational Readiness Evaluation (ORE). In addition, the squadron performed superbly during the first ever detachment operations from NAS Point Mugu, California while supporting the CONSTELLATION Battlegroup and BOXER ARG in JTFEX 97-1. In March 1997, the Skinny Dragons were recognized for their high level of achievement and were again awarded the Baffle Efficiency "E" Award. Now in their twenty-fifth year of mishap free flying, the "Skinny Dragons" of Patrol Squadron FOUR proudly look forward to many more years as the leader in U.S. Navy Maritime Patrol Aviation, emboldened by their motto of "Pride and Excellence" Contributed by LCDR Eric Isaminger EIsam@aol.com

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...USS Salisbury Sound (AV-13)...Squadrons Supported: VP-1, VP-2, VP-4, VPB-21, VP-22, VPB-26, VP-40, VP-42, VP-46, VP-47, VP-48, VP-50, FAW-1 ..." Contributed by Patrick Clancey Pat.Clancey@central.sun.com, WebMaster The HyperWar Project [30NOV2000]

USS Salisbury Sound (AV-13)
http://www.ibiblio.org/hyperwar/USN/ships/dafs/AV/av13-history.html


USS Salisbury Sound (AV-13), a Seaplane Tender, is named for Salisbury Sound, Alaska, a strategically located basin near Sitkawitch, which forms a natural harbor especially suited for seaplane base operations.

Salisbury Sound was built by the Los Angeles Shipbuilding and Drydock Company of San Pedro, California, which became Todds, San Pedro shipyard before her completion. Her keel was laid 10 April 1943 and she was launched 18 June 1944, under the sponsorship of Mrs. John D. Price, wife of Rear Admiral Price, Commander of Fleet Air Wing Two, Air Forces US Pacific Fleet. The Seaplane Tender was placed in commission on 26 November 1945, Captain Doyle G. Donaho, USN, in command.

Salisbury Sound is capable of supporting two (2) fifteen plane squadrons of the Mariner type, both in material upkeep and repair and personnel subsistence. Her facilities include engine repair, hydraulic repair, carburetor repair, metal, parachute, and photographic shop. In addition to her own officers and crew she is able to billet over 120 squadron officers and 200 crew members. Her most striking feature is her large after-deck where two huge seaplanes can be hoisted aboard and serviced at the same time. Two enormous cranes, one on her after-deck and one on her superstructure, can lift the planes with ease. Her hospital ward is fitted with 18 beds and a great number can be made available in event of emergency. high speed boats can be lowered over her sides by cranes and dispatched to refuel planes or boats at sea, and if necessary, tow them to safety. Supplies, trained mechanics, and medical rescue teams stand by ready to the blown over vast ocean reaches and parachuted to me immediate relief of planes or vessels in distress.

Salisbury Sound got underway from San Pedro on 27 December 1945 for training out of San Diego. She cleared port on 12 February 1946 and arrived at Pearl Harbor on the 20th. After final exercises in the Hawaiian area, she sailed on 1 March to load 6 fighter planes and a torpedo bomber at Guam (13-15 March), then reported for duty to Commander Air Wing One at Buckner Bay, Okinawa, 19 March 1946. After conducting familiarization flights and gunnery tracking drills for planes of Patrol Squadron Twenty-One, she got underway on 8 June for tender service of Patrol Bombing Squadron Twenty-Six at Shanghai (11 June-5 July); Tsingtao (6-17 July), returning to Buckner Bay on 10 July to resume duties at that base. She again sailed on 13 September to tend planes of Patrol Bombing Squadron Twenty-Six at Tsingtao, returning to 6 October 1946. Having repaired some 26 planes and directed several air-sea search and rescue missions which saved the life of a number of men, she put to sea on 4 November 1946 for return to the United States. Steaming by the way of the Philippines ports of Puerto Princessa, Manila and Guiuan, she arrived at San Diego on 23 December 1946. After upkeep and local training exercises, she cleared San Diego on 29 March 1947 again bound for Buckner Bay, Okinawa. She arrived at the latter base on 18 April 1947 to commence a second tour of duty as a mobile repair and seadrome control unit for the maintenance of patrol planes at that port, Tsingtao, China and Apra Harbor, Guam. She departed Buckner Bay on 27 July for another stay of service at Tsingtao until 30 August, then loaded planes and aviation cargo at Manila for delivery to Apra Harbor on 9 September 1947. She then set course for return to San Diego, 22 September 1947.

Salisbury Sound underwent overhaul in the Hunters Point Naval Shipyard 26 September 1947 to 16 February 1948, then shifted to her base at San Diego for refresher exercises in the area off San Clemente Island. She cleared San Diego on 12 March 1948 and steamed by the way of Pearl Harbor to deliver aviation cargo at Apra Harbor, Guam, and Manila, Philippine Islands, before arrival at Buckner Bay, Okinawa, 7 April 1948. After off-load of aviation cargo, she got underway the following day for similar deliveries at Tsingtao and Yokosuka. She returned to Buckner Bay on 30 April and got underway for tender services at Yokosuka (18 May-2 July); Tsingtao (5-21 July); and Shanghai (23-26 July). She resumed duty at Buckner Bay on 20 July 1948 and returned to Tsingtao on 14 August to tend patrol planes of Fleet Air Wing One. On 5 September 1948, at Tsingtao, she acted as conference ships for Rear Admiral R.P. McDonnell (Commander Fleet Air Wing One); Captain J.B. Taylor (Commander Destroyer Division (One); Vice Admiral Oscar C. Badger (Commander Naval Forces, Western Pacific); and Dr. Stuart (American Ambassador to China). Having embarked passengers, she got underway from Tsingtao on 22 September to load aviation cargo at Apra Harbor, Guam, then picked up an amphibious plane and passengers at Ponape in the Caroline Islands on 1 October 1948. She put to sea on the latter date and embarked more passengers at Pearl Harbor before arrival at San Diego on 15 October 1948. Upkeep at San Pedro (18 October 1948-10 January 1949), was followed by training in local areas out of San Diego.

Salisbury Sound cleared San Diego on 15 January and arrived at Port Hueneme, California, the following day to embark men of the Naval Schools Construction Battalion Center and their snow-removal equipment before her arrival at Seattle, 19 January 1949. She became the Flagship of Commander Fleet Air Wing Four, 27 January, and got underway for Takutat, Alaska. She arrived at the latter port on 30 January, debarking her student passengers and their equipment for special exercises ashore until 6 February, when the last of her student passengers and their equipment were again aboard. She put to sea the following day for Kokiak, where Commander Air Wing Four hauled down his flag on 15 February 1949. After touching at Seward, Alaska (17-21 February); and Seattle (25-26 February), she debarked her student passengers at Port Hueneme on 3 Mar, returned to her base at San Diego the following day. She became the Flagship of Vice Admiral G.F. Bogan (Commander First Task Fleet) on 25 March 1949. Training in local waters off San Diego and off San Clemente Island were conducted until 17 June, when Vice Admiral Bogan departed the ship. She entered the Hunters Point Shipyard for upkeep and repairs on 29 June and returned to San Diego on 10 September 1949 for a busy schedule of refresher training off Coronado Roads and San Clemente Island.

Salisbury Sound departed San Diego on 24 November 1949 and reached Pearl Harbor six days later. She got underway on 4 November and anchored two miles off Kussie Island, East Carolines, 13 Nov. She embarked a Congressional party of 10 persons and Rear Admiral L.S. Fiske, Deputy Commissioner of Trust Territories, along with his staff for an inspection tour of Kussie and Mokil Islands. She debarked the party at Ponape Island on 17 November 1949 and steamed by way of Guam and Manila to arrive at Hong Kong on 1 December 1949. She tended planes of Patrol Squadron Forty-Two at that port until 6 February 1940, then shifted to Subic Bay in the Philippine Islands. She resumed duty at Hong Kong on 12 April and cleared port on 11 May for exercises off Sangley Point, Luzon before loading aircraft at Guam (27-29 May 1950). She put to sea on the latter day and steamed by way of Pearl Harbor for return to San Diego on 13 June 1950. After voyage repair in the San Francisco Naval Shipyard, she embarked passengers, including men of Patrol Squadron Forty-Two, and sailed from San Diego on 26 July bound for the Far East. She debarked her passengers at Pearl Harbor on 1 August and to sea the next day, carrying some 700 passengers destined for the Patrol Squadron One, Patrol Squadron Two, and Patrol Squadron Four of Fleet Air Service Squadron and Army units in Japan. Four helicopters and an equal number of SNBS of the Fleet Air Service Squadron were loaded on her seaplane deck. She reached Yokosuka on 11 August 1950, debarking her passengers and their equipment, and took on new aviation cargo and passengers for transport to Apra Harbor, Guam. She arrived at the latter port on 20 August, debarked her passengers, then loaded patrol bomber spare parts and eight jet fighters for delivery to Naha Harbor, Okinawa, 25 August 1950. She reported to Commander Seventh Fleet for duty that day and shifted to Buckner Bay for operations under Commander Service Squadron Three (Commander Task Group 70.7). On 3 September she serviced seven Mariners of Patrol Squadron Forty-Six and two Sunderlands of the 88th Royal Air Force Squadron, which had sortied on typhoon evacuation from their base at Iwakuni, Japan.

On 6 September 1950, Salisbury Sound arrived at Iwakuni, Japan, and reported for duty to Commander Fleet Air Wing Six. She commenced service to Patrol Squadron Forty-Two and Forty-Seven, which had eleven Mariners present on that day plus three Sunderlands of the 88th Squadron of the Royal Air Force. These units comprised the seaplane and reconnaissance of Task Force Ninety-Six supporting the operations of Task Force Seventy-Seven and Task Group 96.5. Four additional Mariners had arrived on 9 September 1950 when Salisbury Sound became Flagship of Commander Fleet Wing Six. She now became the operating base for all seaplanes in the Patrol and Reconnaissance Force (*Task Force 99) tending eight Sunderlands of the 88th Squadron of the Royal Air Force, seven planes of Patrol Squadron Forty-Seven and nine planes of Patrol Squadron Forty-Two. On 16 September Commander Fleet Air Wing Six shifted his Flag, along with pilots and crew of Patrol Squadron Forty-Seven, to sea plane tender Curtis (AV-4), controlling all flights from that ship. Salisbury Sound continued seadrome control until 18 September, then took on aviation fuel at Kure, returning to Iwakuni on 21 September 1960. She reported for duty to Commander Air Wing One (task Group 70.6) on 23 September and shifted to base at Buckner Bay, Okinawa, on the 26th. She laid 18 buoys in the seaplane anchorage and on 2 October five Mariners of Patrol Squadron Forty-Six (Southern Search and Reconnaissance Force), arrived from the Pescadores Islands to escape the fury of a typhoon. These planes conducted nightly reconnaissance and patrol flights of the Formosa Straits from the Salisbury Sound until 10 October, when they again terminated their flights in the Pescadores. Meantime she had hoisted the flag of Commander Fleet Air Wing One on 5 October 1950. Winds and heavy seas again threatened the seadrome in the Pescadores on 19 October, and Mariners of Patrol Squadron Forty-Six there once again shifted gradually to base from Salisbury Sound. On 2 November 1950 she entered the harbor of Naha, transferring 30,000 gallons of gasoline to Y-53 for delivery to the Naval Base before return to Buckner Bay the same day. She continued direction and tending of the Mariners' search and reconnaissance flights until 27 November 1950 when Commander Fleet Wing One shifted his flag to Gardiners Bay (AVP-39).

Salisbury Sound arrived at Iwakuni, Japan 20 November 1950, and hoisted the flag of Commander Air Wing Six. She relived Curtis (AV-4) of seadrome control and began tending nine Mariners of Patrol Squadron Forty-Two and four Royal Air Force Sunderlands, operating from Iwakuni. On 1 December, seven Mariners of Patrol Squadron Forty-Seven arrived, and on the 21st, Commander Fleet Air Wing Six transferred his flag to Curtis. On 15 December 1950, Salisbury Sound returned to Buckner Bay and relieved Gardiners Bay (AVP-39) as flag ship of Commander Fleet Air Wing One. She now commenced service for the detachment of five Marines of Patrol Squadron Forty-Six, stationed at Buckner Bay, and three Mariners of the same squadron, stationed at Sangley point, Luzon, Philippine Islands. These units conducted search and reconnaissance flights out of Buckner Bay and completed courier flights between Sangley Point and Hong Kong. Commencing 6 January 1951, she supported Anti-Submarine Warfare Training Element 7016 comprising a Land Plane Air Search and Attack Unit (9 P2V4s of Patrol Squadron Twenty-Two); a Seaplane Air Search and Attack Unit (9 Mariners of Patrol Squadron Forty-Six); and Fleet Submarine Besugo (SS-321). This duty terminated on 16 January 1951 and Salisbury Sound resumed her daily direction of reconnaissance flight and tender services.

Commander Fleet Air Wing One departed Salisbury Sound on 30 day emergency leave on 2 March 1951, and her Commanding Officer assumed the flag duties until the 9th when she arrived at Sangley Point, Luzon, Philippine Islands. She got underway on 11 March for return to the west coast of United States, touching at Guam and Pearl Harbor before her arrival at San Diego, 31 March 1951. She conducted training exercises out of that port with visits to Monterey and San Francisco. On 24 May 1951 she broke the flag of Vice Admiral A.D. Struble, Commander First Fleet, who departed the ship on 3 June. Five days later she embarked men of Patrol Squadron Forty-Seven, then sailed for Whidbey Island, Washington, where operational readiness was completed on the 18th for the Mariners who took off for return to the Naval Air Station at Alameda. Salisbury Sound returned to San Diego where on 26 June she embarked the Chief of Staff of Fleet Air Wing Fourteen and stood out to sea for operational readiness inspection, terminated 28 June 1951. She completed a similar inspection on 23 July and cleared San Diego on 1 August 1951 for another tour of duty in the Far East. Steaming by way of Pearl Harbor, she arrived at Boko Ko, Pescadores Islands, 22 August 1951. That same day she relieved Pine Island as Flagship of Commander Fleet Air Wing One and became the base for Mariner planes of Patrol Squadron Forty-Seven. She departed Boko Ko 10 October 1051 and sailed by way of Hong Kong to base at Buckner Bay, Okinawa (18 October 1951-21 February 1952). On the latter date she was relieved as Flagship of Commander Air Wing One by Pine Island (AV-12).

Salisbury Sound served as flagship of Commander Fleet Air Wing Six at Iwakuni, Japan (24 February-31 March 1952), and hauled down his flag at Yokosuka on 2 April. She put to sea the same day for return to San Diego, 16 April 1952. She entered the Hunter's Point Shipyard on 29 April for overhaul until 16 July 1952, followed by refresher training out of San Diego. She sailed from Long Beach on 15 August 1952 and reached Yokosuka, Japan, on 2 September. Clearing that port on the 5th, she arrived at Buckner Bay on 7 September 1952. The next day she broke the flag of Rear Admiral T.B. Williamson, Commander Task Force Seventy-Two. The Mariner planes of Patrol Squadron Forty came to base aboard, temporarily, on 10 September for repairs and service, and Salisbury Sound arrived at Keelung, Formosa, 8 October 1952. While in that port on 11 October, Rear Admiral Williamson held conference on board with the Honorable Karl Ranking, United States Minister to China; and Major General Chase, Chief of the Military Assistance Advisory Group. After visits to Takao, Formosa (220-22 October) and Hong Kong (23-28 October), she commenced tending Mariners of Patrol Squadron Forty at Buckner Bay. She got underway from the latter port on 30 November to base at Subic Bay in the Philippine Islands (3-20 December), then touched at Kaohsiung, Formosa (22 December) before resuming operations at Buckner Bay on the 24th. On 28 February 1953 the Mariner planes of Patrol Squadron Forty were relieved by planes of Patrol Squadron Forty-Six. Commander Task Force Seventy-Two transferred his flag to Pine Island on 7 March and detachments of Patrol Squadron Forty-Two also left the Salisbury Sound for that Seaplane Tender. That same day Task Force Seventy-Two was established as the Formosa Patrol Force under Rear Admiral Williamson in Pine Island.

Relieved of her duties in the Far East, she sailed by way of Guam and Pearl Harbor to reach Alameda, California, 25 March 1953. She underwent overhaul in the Hunter's Point Shipyard (31 March-27 April 1953). She put into the harbor of Long Beach on 28 April, embarking Commander Mine Squadron Five, and got underway on the 30th with other ships of Task Unit 11.7 for landing assault exercises of Ayliso Beach, California. This duty terminated on 7 May and the ships underwent alternations in the Hunter's Point Shipyard (11 May-30 June), followed by gunnery exercises in local areas from the naval Air Station at Alameda. She cleared the latter port on 21 July and arrived at Boko Ko, Pescadores Islands, 12 August 1953. On that day she became the flagship of Rear Admiral Truman J. Hedding, Commander Formosa Patrol Force (Task Force Seventy-Two) and Commander Fleet Air Wing One. Tending the planes of Patrol Squadron Forty-Eight, she departed Boko Ko on 26 August to base at Buckner Bay until 12 September 1953. Thereafter, she based her operations at Boko Ko (14-19 September); Keelung, Formosa (20-25 September); Kaohsiung, Formosa (29-30 September); Keelung, Formosa (8-14 October); Buckner Bay (15-29 October); Hong Kong (1-7 November); Buckner Bay (11-28 November); Kaohsiung, Formosa (30 November); and Manila (1 December-6 January 1954). She arrived at Sangley Point on 13 January and Commander Task Force Seventy-Two (Formosa Patrol Force) shifted his flag to Pine Island on 18 February 1954. Salisbury Sound put to sea that day and steamed by way of Buckner Bay and Pearl Harbor to arrive at San Francisco, 11 March 1954. She shifted to the Naval Air Station, Alameda, the next day and entered the Mare Island Navy Yard on 8 April for overhaul until 28 June 1954.

Salisbury Sound conducted refresher training out of San Diego and cleared Alameda on 3 August 1954 for another tour of duty in the Far East. She arrived at Yokosuka on 23 August and became the flagship of Rear Admiral F.N. Kivette, Commander of the Formosa Patrol Force (Task Force Seventy-Two) at Boko Ko, Pescadores Islands, 31 August 1954. In the following months she made repeated calls at Formosa port of Kaohsiung and Keelung; Yokosuka, Japan; and spent much of her time in operations while based at Buckner Bay, Okinawa. She was relieved as flagship of the Formosa Patrol Force at the latter port on 28 February 1955 and put to sea for return to Alameda on 19 March 1955.

Salisbury Sound engaged in a rigorous schedule of training maneuvers off the California coast until 23 September 1955 when she cleared Alameda to arrive at Yokosuka, Japan, 13 October 1955. That same day she hoisted the flag of Rear Admiral G.W. Anderson, Jr., Commander of the Formosa Patrol Force and Fleet Air Wing One. She commenced duty at Buckner Bay, Okinawa on 20 October 1955, making frequent cruises to Manila Bay; Kaohsiung and Keelung, Formosa. The Formosa Patrol Force was redesignated Taiwan Patrol Force, effective 1 November 1955 and Salisbury Sound arrived at Manila on 9 February 1956 to participate in "Operation Firmlink" with Joint Task Force Nineteen. This operation was a joint maneuver of the SEATO (South East Asia Treaty Organization) forces to demonstrate their readiness to preserve the peace and ward off any aggressive action which might be taken against any of the member nations (Australia, France, New Zealand, Philippines, Thailand, United Kingdom, and United States). Units participating in this operation was USS Salisbury Sound, USS Princeton (CVS-37), USS McDermott (DD-667), HMS Newfoundland, HNS Comus, HMS Tobruk, and HMNZA Consort.

Salisbury Sound embarked 9 official observers, 40 officers and 526 troops of the First Battalion, 9th Infantry Regiment, Third Division of the Philippine Armed Services and cleared Manila with the Joint Task Force which conducted tactical maneuvers and battle exercises enroute to Bangkok, Thailand. She arrived at Bangkok on 15 February 1956 and her passengers-troops went ashore to take part in a demonstration of readiness which included parachute demonstrations, helicopter landings, and equipment displays. The demonstration was completed by 18 February and Salisbury Sound debarked the Philippine Army Forces at Manila on the 23rd. She resumed operations at Buckner Bay on 6 March 1956 and was relieved as flagship of the Taiwan Patrol Force at Yokosuka, 23 March 1956. She cleared port the next day and returned to Alameda on 12 April 1956.

Salisbury Sound remained at Alameda until 12 June 1956 when she steamed for visits to Astoria and Portland, Oregon. She entered the Mare Island Naval Shipyard on 14 June for overhaul until 29 August 1956. After refresher training she departed Alameda on 13 November 1956 for Yokosuka where she arrived 2 December 1956. The next day she became the flagship of Rear Admiral R.E. Dixon, Commander Taiwan Patrol Force. Mariners of Patrol Squadron Forty commenced operating from her seadrome at Buckner Bay on 12 December 1956 and rescued the crew of a United States Air Force seaplane from the sea on 5 January 1957. Intervening these operations were cruises for visits at Hong Kong; Manila, Kaohsiung and Keelung, Taiwan; and Apra Harbor, Guam. Mariners of Patrol Squadron Forty-Six commenced operations from her seadrome on 26 March 1957 and she conducted exercises in the area east of Tsugen Jima Island before clearing port of 17 April. She touched at Keelung (18-20 April), then visited Iwakuni, Japan before her arrival at Yokosuka on the 28th. Commander of the Taiwan Patrol Force hauled down his flag at Yokosuka on 6 May 1957 and Salisbury Sound sailed for return to Alameda on 23 May 1957. During the remainder of the year she participated in combined fleet maneuvers off the California coast, and engaged in refresher training exercises while operating from Alameda and San Diego.

Salisbury Sound sailed from Alameda on 8 January 1958 and reached the British Crown Colony of Hong Kong on 4 February to become flagship of Rear Admiral F.E. Stoop, Commander Taiwan Patrol Force. Rear Admiral Stoop was relieved of his command 10 February by Rear Admiral P. Blackburn, Jr., who retained his flag in Salisbury Sound. She commenced operations in the Philippines area on 26 February, alternating between Dingalan, Subic and Manila Bays, then shifted to Buckner Bay, Okinawa on 18 March with occasional cruises for visits to Kaohsiung, Taiwan; Boko Ko, Pescadores Islands, and Hong Kong. She cleared Buckner Bay on 5 June 1958 and was relieved as flagship of the Taiwan Patrol Force at Sasebo on 13 June by USS Pine Island. She put to sea the following day and returned to Alameda on 3 July 1958. Upkeep in the Bethlehem Steel Shipyard of San Francisco (8 August-2 September) was followed by final overhaul period in the Todd Shipyard at Alameda (2 September-4 November 1958). After refresher training, she cleared Alameda on 27 December 1958 and arrived at Yokosuka on 13 January 1959.

Salisbury Sound arrived at Buckner Bay on 25 January and the following day relieved Orca as flagship of Rear Admiral P.P. Blackburn, Jr., Commander Taiwan Patrol Force. Seadrome operations at that base were again intervened by visits to ports of the Philippines, Taiwan, and Japan. In addition to these ports, she visited Saigon, Viet Nam (1-4 June) and Jesselton Harbor, North Borneo (8-11 June). She departed Buckner Bay on 23 June and was relieved as flagship of the Taiwan Patrol Force at Yokosuka, 30 June 1959 by Pine Island. She sailed from Yokosuka on 2 July and reached Alameda, California on 14 July 1959.

Following a leave and upkeep period in Alameda, Salisbury Sound conducted periods of ISE at sea off San Francisco. During the period from 14 November to 29 November, she was in San Diego for special weapons exercises. In early December, seadrome operations were conducted in Drakes Bay just northwest of San Francisco.

Salisbury Sound got underway from Alameda on 11 January 1960 for her 15th deployment to the Western Pacific. arriving at Pearl Harbor on 18 January for a two-day stop over and then proceeding to Yokosuka, Japan. Following post-voyage repairs, she got underway for Kobe, where on 9 February 1960 the flag of Rear Admiral J.W. Cannon (Commander Taiwan Patrol Force) was shifted from the USS Frontier (AD-25). She then proceeded to Buckner Bay, Okinawa, where seadrome operations were conducted until 9 March. She arrived in Hong Kong on 12 March for a 5-day visit prior to departing for Kaohsiung, Taiwan where along with other Seventh Fleet units she participated in operation "Blue Star." After returning to Buckner Bay on 29 March, the Salisbury Sound was needed to assist a downed P5M Marlin at Fukuoka, Japan on 14 April. Almost a year to the day since an accidental emergency at Fukuoka necessitated transporting a disabled aircraft to Iwakuni, history repeated itself. The stricken aircraft was hoisted aboard and taken to Iwakuni via the Shimoniseki Straits. The ship returned to Buckner Bay on 23 April. Seaplane operations were conducted at Okinawa until 20 May when Salisbury Sound departed for refueling at Subic Bay then on to Sangley Point, R.P., arriving there on 23 May. She departed Sangley for Hong Kong on 26 May. After a brief visit to the British Crown Colony (28 May-2 June) she departed for Buckner Bay and seaplane operations. On 22 June she left Buckner for Yokosuka, arriving there on 25 June and after voyage repairs she headed for Alameda, California on 2 July 1960.

The ship remained in EastPac during the remainder of 1960 and early part of 1961. Operations consisted primarily of independent ships exercises and type training. She underwent extensive overhaul at U.S. Naval Shipyard San Francisco, California from the last of September until December of this year.

Salisbury Sound operated as a unit of the Seventh Fleet from 1 April 1961 until 17 July 1961. During this period, the ship performed her primary mission of providing an advanced base for seaplane squadrons and served as flagship for U.S. Taiwan Patrol Force. Most of the ship's operations were conducted in Buckner Bay, Okinawa where units of Patrol Squadron Forty and Fifty were supported for periods of short duration. In addition the ship visited the following ports while deployed: Hong Kong, Kaohsiung, Taiwan, Iwakuni, Kobe, Sasebo and Yokosuka, Japan. The ship departed WestPac on 17 July 1961 and arrived in San Francisco on the 31st of that month.

On 21 August, the ship's mid-cycle overhaul period began in Williamette Shipyard at Richmond, California and continued until 22 September. After the yard period, the ship was engaged in type training and independent ship exercises while operating out of the Naval Air Station, Alameda, California.

On 6 November 1961, Salisbury Sound established a seadrome at White Cove, Santa Catalina Island and operated with P5M aircraft from Patrol Squadron Forty-Two for three days. Other operational exercises of short duration were conducted with Patrol Squadron Forth-Eight. Type training and independent ship exercises were continued throughout the spring as the ship prepared for her next WestPac deployment. During the period the ship assisted in the Administrative Inspection of USS Currituck (AV-7), and was given an Operational Readiness Inspection.

Salisbury Sound deployed to WestPac on 28 May 1962. She served as flagship for Rear Admiral B.M. Stran, USN, Commander Patrol Force Seventh Fleet/Commander Taiwan Patrol Force. While in port at White Beach, Buckner Bay, Okinawa, she continually maintained an operational seadrome which operated on a 24-hour, all-weather basis. While deployed, Salisbury Sound operated in support of scheduled exercises with Patrol Squadron Forty from 13 to 17 August and Patrol Squadron Forty from 13 to 16 September.

The ship visited Yokosuka, Kagoshima, Iwakuni, Sasebo, and Kobe, Japan; plus Hong Kong, Kaohsiung, Taiwan, and Sangley Point, Philippine Islands. Significant contributions were made to the people-to-people program through blood, general visiting, and guided tours for special groups.

The ship was relieved by Currituck (AV-7) on 14 November 1962, and sailed for Alameda, California the next day. A gala welcome awaited her arrival on 29 November. The remainder of 1962 was devoted to a leave period while the ship remained in Alameda, California.

On 15 January 1963, Salisbury Sound entered Williamette Iron and Steel Company Shipyard at Richmond, California for her periodic major overhaul. In addition to routine overhaul and maintenance, the ship's wooden seaplane deck was renewed and several new radio antennas were installed. Included in the latter was a large "Decone Cage" antenna installed on the forecastle at frame 5. This added another feature to the silhouette. Dry-docking for cleaning and preserving the underside of the hull, was accomplished during the period 2 to 16 February.

On 1 March 1963, a change of Command ceremony was held at which Capt. Hugh M. Durham, USN, relieved Capt. James L. Holloway, III, USN, as commanding officer. The yard period over and sea trials complete on 16 April, Salisbury Sound rejoined the operating forces. After a short period in Alameda for refitting and replenishment, the ship sailed to San Diego and reported to Commander Fleet Training for operational control and refresher training. The period 13 to 24 May was spent conducting simulated battle problems, ship's drills, and damage control problems while underway. The was followed by a week of Air operations at San Diego Bay , working with aircraft from Patrol Squadron Forty-Eight.

After completion of underway training and a short period in Alameda, Salisbury Sound sailed to Oak Harbor, Washington and reported to Commander Fleet Air Wing Whidbey for operational control. From 17 to 26 June, day an night antisubmarine warfare seaplane operations were conducted with Patrol Squadron Forty-Seven embarked. This advanced training was conducted in Holmes Harbor, an elongated body of water near Saratoga Straits, a component of the Puget Sound complex.

The ships departed Whidbey Island on 28 June 1963 to return to Alameda. The operational schedule for the months of July and August included an Operational Readiness Inspection and an Administration Material Inspection. The ship sailed to San Diego and reported to Commander Fleet Air Wing San Diego on 24 July for the conduct of the Operational Readiness Inspection. Commander Fleet Air Wing Fourteen and Commander Fleet Air Training Group, San Diego, assisted in the inspection. Selected operational exercises involving seamanship, navigation, gunnery, and damage control problems were conducted in the San Diego ocean operation area. These were followed by a simulated battle problem to test the crew's ability to perform as an integrated fighting unit. The final portion of this inspection was conducted in White Cove, Santa Catalina Island, and included the conduct of air exercises and seaplane support exercises applicable to the type ship.

Upon return to Alameda on 2 August, the ship made final preparations for the Administration Inspection to be held by Commander Fleet Air Alameda on 6-7 August. The inspection of administrative organization and procedures was completed the first day, and was followed by a personnel inspection of the brew by Rear Admiral D.J. Welch, USN, on 7 August.

Salisbury Sound received the following Commendations and awards for the competitive year 1962-1963, which were presented to the ship after the close of fiscal year 1963:

A. Ney Award for the best General Mess in type.
B. ComNavAirPac Battle Efficiency Awards for Engineering and Communications.


It was during this period that the Chief of Naval Operations informed the ships that the homeport was to be changed from NAS Alameda, California to NAS Whidbey Island, Washington. The effective date for rthe change for administrative purposes was established as 29 June 1963. However, in view of the ship's forthcoming deployment, the physical shift would not occur until the return from WestPac in March of 1964.

On 26 August 1963, the ship departed Alameda for her scheduled deployment to the Western Pacific. On 7 September, Operational Control was changed to Commander Seventh Fleet. The ship was assigned to Task Force Seventy-Two and further designated Task Group Seventy-Two.

Upon arrival in Yokosuka, Japan on 10 September, action to shift the staff of Commander Patrol Force, Seventh Fleet, from USS Pine Island to USS Salisbury Sound was commenced immediately. The flag of Rear Admiral R.A. MacPherson, USN, was broken on 12 September, and Salisbury Sound officially relieved Pine Island as flagship.

The ship arrived in Buckner Bay on 19 September, and established a seadrome. Air operations with detachments from both Patrol Squadron Forty and Patrol Squadron Fifty were conducted during intervals in port Buckner Bay.

[During September and October, Salisbury Sound made operational visits to Yokosuka (10 Sep), Iwakuni (2 Oct), Beppu, Japan (5 Oct), and to Sangley Point, P.I. (28 Oct).]

At the conclusion of the port visit to the Philippines, the ship established a seadrome in the southern part of Subic Bay. From here, with Patrol Squadron Forty embarked, the command was to participate in a fleet exercise, Operation Yellow Bird. The operation was subsequently canceled; however, the ship, with twelve aircraft from Patrol Squadron Forty conducted operational and training operations from 5-9 November.

A port visit was made to Singapore in the Federation of Malaysia from 28-29 November. Salisbury Sound was the first US warship to visit this port after formation of the federation in October. People-to-People activities were scheduled which included a significant contribution of blood by crew members to the Singapore Blood Bank and a Christmas party for under privileged children. Upon departure from Singapore, the ship crossed the Equator into the Southern Hemisphere at longitude 105º37' E, at 0911 Zulu on 9 December, while on operations prior to return to Okinawa. [Because of the 30-day mourning period for President Kennedy's assination, the usual ceremonies were not performed.]

Arrival in Buckner Bay was on 18 December. The ship remained in port for the remainder of 1963, observing Christmas and New Year holiday period in Okinawa.

On 8 January 1964, Salisbury Sound departed for Keelung, Taiwan and Hong Kong. While in Keelung, Admiral Ni, CINC of the Republic of China Navy called on Rear Admiral MacPherson and Capt. Durham. The ship returned to Buckner Bay on 23 January.

Patrol Squadron Fifty flew in three aircraft to Buckner Bay on 27 January. Heavy winds and sea conditions damaged an engine and a prop on one aircraft necessitating an engine change. No sooner was this engine changed than a second engine failed. The second aircraft was hoisted aboard just prior to the ship getting underway for Sasebo, Japan on 3 February. This engine was changed enroute to and in Sasebo.

Salisbury Sound arrived at Sasebo on 5 February and departed for Buckner Bay on 8 February arriving there on 10 February.

On 16 February 1964, the ship shifted berths to Naha Port in order to shift the flag to USS Currituck. The shift was made on 18 February and immediately following, Salisbury Sound got underway for Oak Harbor, Washington, arriving there on 6 March 1964.

Capt. Merle M. Hershey relieved Capt. Hugh M. Durham on 10 March 1964.

On 28 March Salisbury Sound got underway on two hours notice for Kodiak, Alaska to assist in recovery operations following the tidal wave that hit Kodiak Island on the 27th [the "Good Friday" earthquake]. Arrival was on 31 March and parties were immediately organized to assist in the clean up.

During the 1963-64 competition cycle, Salisbury Sound received Battle Efficiency Awards for the Air and Engineering Departments.

During her operations in Alaska the Salisbury Sound provided electricity, hot water and working parties of up to 40 hands to assist the stricken station to clear debris. For her efforts, she was awarded the Navy Commendation Medal.

On April 10 the ship departed Kodiak and returned to her homeport at Whidbey Island. She arrived four days later and on 16 May held open house at Oak Harbor.

During June, provisions and fuel were taken aboard in preparations for a cold weather cruise. Aviation gasoline was pumped aboard from the ship's sister, the Pine Island, and the ship's fuel tanks were topped off readying her for her 15 June departure for Cold Bay, Alaska.

Once anchored in Cold Bay 20 June, seadrome operations with VP-47 seaplanes commenced. On securing these operations 30 June 1964 and heaving in the anchor, the ship cruised the coast of Alaska stopping at Haines, Juneau and Sitka. She was in Haines for the Fourth of July celebrations. On 11 July, the ship departed Alaska for her return voyage and arrived back at Oak Harbor 13 July.

She remained at anchor until 6 August and then sailed up Puget Sound to Seattle, where she remained at Pier 91 for four days. On the 10th, the Salisbury Sound returned to Oak Harbor by way of Bangor, Washington, where she loaded ammunition.

On 17 August, she pulled out of Oak Harbor and set sail for San Francisco. She was in San Francisco three days before cruising beneath the Golden Gate Bridge and heading north to Oak Harbor.

Salisbury Sound was anchored at Oak Harbor until 10 September when she moved to Astoria, Oregon and commenced seaplane operations for 10 days. She returned home 22 September and remained there until 8 October except for a one-day dependents' cruise on 3 October.

She sailed to San Diego, California for supplies 12 October and then went to Long Beach Naval Station for minor repairs.

On 19 October 1964, the Salisbury Sound anchored in White Cove, California off Catalina Island and commenced seaplane operations. She returned to Whidbey Island 26 October and remained there until departing for a Far East cruise.

On pulling into Yokosuka, Japan, the Salisbury Sound tied next to the Pine Island, her sister ship, and on 1 December the Commander Patrol Force Seventh Fleet shifted his command to the AV-13. Four days later the Salisbury Sound left for Buckner Bay, Okinawa.

The ship spent Christmas and New Year's in Buckner Bay and on 6 January 1965 lifted anchor for Keelung. She stood in Keelung two days on 8 January left for Kaohsiung and then on 14 January pulled into Naha, Okinawa.

She returned to her homeport overseas, Buckner Bay, 19 January and remained there until 5 February when she departed for Manila Bay.

She stood off Sangley Point in Manila Bay on four hours standby until the next day when she steamed for DaNang, South Viet Nam.

For five days from 12 February she operated a seadrome at DaNang. She returned to Sangley Point and then to Buckner Bay where she pulled in 23 February.

On 25 February, Captain Earnest R. Horrell relieved Captain Merle M. Hershey as Commanding Officer.

March 22 the Salisbury Sound left Buckner Bay for Hong Kong where she anchored for six days. The American Counsel General visited the ship 26 March.

March 31 the Salisbury Sound left the world's most populated city for Buckner Bay arriving there 3 April.

On 30 April the ship left Buckner Bay for Subic Bay, Philippines, arriving there 3 May. Five days later she left Subic Bay and steamed into Manila Bay and then to Poula Condore, South Viet Nam, arriving 11 May and setting up a seadrome the next day. On 20 May the Salisbury Sound secured seaplane operations and sailed for Bangkok, Thailand.

While in Bangkok the ship was visited by officials of the Thai Royal navy and British naval officers.

Culao Cham Island, South Viet Nam was the next port of call. Leaving Bangkok 27 May, the ship was refueled at sea while underway 29 May. She arrived at her destination 31 May and set up seadrome operations.

On 5 June she closed down her seaplane operations and sailed for Subic Bay, where she anchored for two days before returning to the United States. The trip across the Pacific took 18 days and the Salisbury Sound arrived at Oak Harbor 26 June.

On 5 August the Salisbury Sound reported to Seattle for the Sea Fair, the Navy's part in the World Fair being held in Seattle. She remained in Seattle for four days before returning to Oak Harbor.

At her next port of call, Juneau, Alaska, the Salisbury Sound once again set up a seadrome on arrival 10 September. Three days later she lifted anchor and sailed for Kodiak, Alaska where she was warmly greeted on 15 September as a visitor after her timely help following the earthquake of the year before. After a five day visit, she sailed for Anchorage, arriving 21 September. Two days later she heaved in the anchor and returned to Oak Harbor.

From 27 September until 5 February 1966 the Salisbury Sound remained on the West Coast, moving only to pick up supplies or undergo repairs prior to her final cruise.

After visits to San Diego for supplies, Bangor, Washington for ammunition and Bremerton shipyards for repairs, the Salisbury Sound departed the United States from San Diego 5 February for Yokosuka, Japan. The ship left Yokosuka 23 February and made quick stops in Kobe, Japan and Buckner Bay, Okinawa before getting back to the business of tending her seaplanes in Cam Ranh Bay, South Viet Nam. She arrived there on 4 March.

Capt. Clarence E. Mackey relieved Capt. Earnest R. Horrell as Commanding Officer of the Salisbury Sound 7 March. It was the first time a United States man-o-war changed Captains in Viet Nam.

On March 26 the ship secured her seadrome operations and pulled out of Cam Ranh Bay and set her charts for Subic Bay, P.I., arriving there two days later for a five day stay before steaming to Hong Kong.

It was a 24-hour journey from Buckner Bay to Keelung, Taiwan, and after three days in port there, the Salisbury Sound headed for Kaohsiung, Taiwan, arriving 9 May. Returning to Cam Ranh Bay, South Viet Nam on 15 May, the ship set up her seadrome and tendered her planes until 3 June, when she lifted anchor and steamed for Bangkok, Thailand, for a four-day goodwill visit. She went back to Subic Bay for provisions and rest for the crew before beginning nearly three months of seaplane operations: in Buckner Bay from 17 June to 6 July, in Cam Ranh Bay from 10 July to 6 August, and again in Buckner Bay from 12 to 29 August.

On the 29th, the ship headed for Sasebo, Japan for a goodwill visit and rest for the crew arriving 31 August. After a ship's party, the USS Salisbury Sound pulled out of Sasebo 9 September and headed to Buckner Bay for fueling and supplies. The ship departed Buckner Bay 27 September and headed for Subic Bay, where she moored alongside the Currituck, her sister ship, on 30 September, and transferred the Commander Patrol Force Seventh Fleet, Rear Adm. Roy M. Isaman to the Currituck before heading to Cam Ranh Bay on 5 October.

During her last operations in Cam Ranh Bay, from 7 to 27 October, the ship pumped her millionth gallon of aviation fuel to her attached seaplanes, setting a record for a Seaplane Tender for number of gallons pumped during one cruise. On 27 October, the Salisbury Sound hoisted a 540-foot homeward bound pennant and steamed from Cam Ranh Bay for the last time.

Another rarity, a double hoist, was accomplished for the trip from Cam Ranh Bay to Sangley Point in Manila Bay when a second Martin Marlin seaplane developed engine trouble just before departure time, forcing the Salisbury Sound to accommodate the second plane on her deck. After off-loading the giant planes in Manila Bay, the ship sailed for Subic Bay, arriving the same day, 29 October.

On 2 November the ship pulled out of Subic Bay and steamed for Buckner Bay for refueling before starting across the Pacific bound for the United States. The long-awaited trip back began 5 November. The Salisbury Sound pulled into Oak Harbor for the last time 21 November, in time for her crew to enjoy Thanksgiving, Christmas, and New Year's celebrations.

The ship bid farewell to her homeport 3 January 1967, and started her last voyage to Bremerton, Washington, where she docked at Pier Delta at the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard.

The ship's Executive Officer, Commander Austin V. Young relieved Capt. Clarence E. Mackey as Commanding Officer 13 January 1967.

On 31 March 1967, the USS Salisbury Sound was decommissioned and joined the Reserve Fleet, ending a 21-year career.

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