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HistoryVP-1 HistoryHistory

Circa 2009

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraPO2 Tyler Kaye "...VP-1 Nears Halfway Mark By YN3 Class Kurt Feil - Thursday, February 25, 2010..." WebSite: NorthWest Navigator http://www.northwestnavigator.com/ [26FEB2010]

Photograph Caption: Naval Air Crewman (Mechanical) 2nd Class Tyler Kaye of VP-1 does a preflight check looking at the MADBOOM on a P-3.

At the onset of the holiday season, the Screaming Eagles embarked on a tri-site deployment. Though they left their families and friends behind at the hardest time of the year, the Sailors of VP-1 didn't miss a beat in establishing themselves operationally.

Replacing the manpower of two squadrons, the challenges at the onset were tough, but the professionals in the air and on the ground were able to rise above them with no gap in mission accomplishment.

"Standing up functional maintenance and operations detachments at three major sites has been taxing at all levels of the chain of command, but every day I am blown away at the professionalism and dedication to the mission capability displayed by the members of this squadron," said Cmdr. Mark Rudesill, commanding officer.

Upon arrival to their area of responsibility, the squadron's parking ramp was being moved to a different location on the flight line, resulting in the Maintenance Department building brand new spaces and literally laying a new foundation from scratch. From hauling sandbags to building desks and tables, Sailors from all departments contributed. In what seemed like no time at all, a formidable aircraft maintenance complex had been established.

Commanders of Task Force 57/72, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing Central, and CPRW-10 applauded the combined Task Group composed of VP-1, VQ-1 and VQ-2 for their efforts in the air and on the ground. The Screaming Eagles are now approaching the midway point of the deployment and the focus is on avoiding fatigue related problems and complacency.

Addressing the Sailors at a recent command quarters, Rudesill said, "We are doing everything right; from the minute we hit the deck we have been full bore. It can be easy to fall into a lull of complacency on the heels of such success, but we must police each other, be there for each other and ensure that we continue to maintain safety requirements and do things right, while still keeping the pedal to the metal."

It has been a lot of hard work, but there have been fun times for the Sailors mixed in. The command held a successful Christmas party, attended the base's New Year's celebration and enjoyed several celebrity visits; most notably Kid Rock, who visited the base and toured the P-3C Orion.

With almost half of a long deployment in the rear view mirror, the Screaming Eagles are looking forward to their traditional "Over the Hump" party. After a brief period of rest and reflection, the journey continues and the squadron will lean forward into the second half of the deployment.

© 2010 Sound Publishing, Inc.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Screaming Eagles Begin Deployment By LT Nick Matcheck - Tuesday, November 24, 2009..." WebSite: NorthWest Navigator http://www.northwestnavigator.com/ [27NOV2009]

With the holiday season bearing down, the Screaming Eagles VP-1 of NAS Whidbey Island, Washington have began their deployment to sites in the Middle East in support of coalition forces.

For many of the younger VP-1 Sailors, their first military deployment brings a mix of excitement and anxiety. For the more experienced, the separation from loved ones is a familiar refrain.

No matter what their level of experience, everyone at VP-1 is proud of their opportunity to contribute and looks forward to executing operations after eighteen months of preparation.

VP-1 heads east with two distinct advantages: excellent training and family support.

Recently the squadron participated in pre-deployment training referred to as Operational Readiness Evaluation (ORE). This event tested the squadron's operational capability through a series of simulators and 32 back to back flights. VP-1 performed very well, completing 32 of 32 flights and maintaining continuous ASW coverage off the coast.

"ORE offered the squadron challenges both tactically and logistically," said Lt. Jared McCaleb. Based on our performance and resolve we, as a squadron, are excited for the opportunity to excel on our coming deployment."

At home, VP-1's Family Readiness Group continues to support VP-1 families by providing information through meetings and offering local activities.

"I'm proud of the way we prepared for deployment," said VP-1 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Mark Rudesill. "Everyone worked hard and stayed committed to the mission. Now we get the chance to conduct the nation's business of supporting our forces in the field."

VP-1's multi-site deployment will relieve fellow maritime patrol squadrons, VP-10 and VP-40.

© 2009 Sound Publishing, Inc.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCamera090731-N-9860Y-003 SEATTLE, Wash. (July 31, 2009) "...Personnel Specialist 1st Class Gladys Willis, assigned to VP-1, celebrates after being notified in a cell phone call by her executive officer, Cmdr. Troy Bauder, of her selection as a chief petty officer selectee during the Navy League of the United States, Seattle Council, Sailor of the Year luncheon. Nearly 200 Sailors, Coast Guardsmen, Marines, Navy League Council Members, Canadian Consulate members and prominent community and business members were in attendance to honor Senior and Junior Sailors of the Year, Blujackets of the Year, Marines of the Year, Coast Guardsmen of the Year and Recruiters of the Year. The annual event was held as part of Fleet Week for the 60th Seattle Seafair. (U.S. Navy Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Tucker M. Yates/Released)..." WebSite: NavyNews http://www.navy.mil/ [04AUG2009]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...VP-1 Welcomes Aircrewman from 1950s - By YN3 Kurt J. Feil - Courtesy VP-1 - Thursday, July 23, 2009..." WebSite: NorthWest Navigator http://www.northwestnavigator.com/ [24JUL2009]

Every so often in the Navy, a command is afforded the opportunity to connect with its history, to speak with someone from the past, to sift through a weathered cruise book, and to take time from a busy schedule to honor one of its own, a member of it's old guard.

The Screaming Eagles of VP-1 recently had one of those moments when former Aviation Electronics Technician 1st Class Tom Honer paid them a visit. Honer was a member of VP-1 from 1955-1958 and served as a chief naval aircrewman.

He and his wife Paula were on a vacation from Virginia when the opportunity arose to pay his old squadron a visit. After arriving at Naval Air Station Whidbey Island, he was greeted by VP-1 Commanding Officer, Cmdr. Mark Rudesill, and Executive Officer, Cmdr. Troy Bauder, and was given a guided tour of the flight line and squadron spaces.

Honer met with CPRW-10, Capt. Kenneth Seliga, attended a VP-1 command quarters and ceremony, fielded questions from VP-1 Sailors, and toured the avionics shop at the squadron.

Honer said the high point of his visit was meeting with the current members of Combat Aircrew 7 and touring the aircraft with members of the same crew he had been a part of over 50 years ago.

"It was a pleasure to have the opportunity to meet with someone who walked in our shoes, and contributed to setting the standard of Patrol and Reconnaissance excellence," said Lt. Cmdr. Jaime Hernandez, CAC-7 mission commander.

During his tour of duty with the Screaming Eagles, Honer deployed to the island of Kwajalein, is part of the Republic of the Marshall Islands, where he took part in missions during the testing of the hydrogen bomb. His squadron was assigned to provide surveillance support over the area, working shipping lanes to keep ships out during the tests. He also deployed to NAS Kodiak, Alaska and NAS Adak, Alaska.

For Honer, it was a wonderful chance to reconnect with a part of his past and to catch a glimpse of where the future has taken his old squadron.

"I couldn't have asked for a better experience. My four years in the Navy were unforgettable. I would like to send my praise and salutations to everyone here for this opportunity to come back, as this was one of the best days of my life," said Honer.

For one day, the Sailors of VP-1 were able to hear the voice and see the face of a man who had experienced some of the moments that will live on forever in history books.

© 2009 Sound Publishing, Inc.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Screaming Eagles Hone Missile Tactics By Lt.j.g. Joseph Dugan - Screaming Eagles hone missile tactics By Lt.j.g. - Joseph Dugan VP-1 Public Affairs - Thursday, June 11, 2009..." WebSite: NorthWest Navigator http://www.northwestnavigator.com/ [12JUN2009]

The VP-1 "Screaming Eagles" recently provided its Combat Aircrew 9 an opportunity to take part in live-fire exercise off the coast of Jacksonville, Fla.

The exercise was intended to hone the tactical skills of the aircrew. The event was hosted by Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing 11 and Destroyer Squadron 26 of the USS Harry S. Truman Strike Group and involved a coordinated strike of seven missiles on target.

Combat Aircrew 9 spent weeks preparing for the exercise, in which they fired an AGM-84D Harpoon missile demonstrating their crew motto, "On time, on target." Countless hours of practice allowed the 11-member crew to function flawlessly as a single unit, resulting in a perfect missile strike. The live fire exercise satisfied crew readiness requirements as they prepare for an upcoming deployment.

"This is an ominous reminder to wrong-doers on the high seas that the P-3C is as effective as ever at conducting combat operations against enemy vessels," said Lt. Josh Mattingly, squadron plane commander. "I'm very proud of the way our crew performed. I think we have really set the bar for firing the harpoon with our excellent precision, on time, and on target."

"Although this was an exercise, it really bolsters our confidence, and I am certain this crew would be able to provide results if called upon to take offensive action in the line of duty," he added.

The AGM-84D "Harpoon" is an anti-ship missile capable of operating in all weather conditions. The missile, developed by Boeing is radar guided and as such can be fired at a target located over the horizon. It was developed for the Navy in 1977 to serve as its basic anti-ship missile for fleet wide use and the P-3C Orion aircraft began using the missile in 1979.

"We are grateful for the opportunity to conduct our nation's work. We train to effectively employ these weapons on target, on time. Today, the men did just that," said Lt. Andrew Brown, tactical coordinator for CAC-9.

© 2009 Sound Publishing, Inc.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraVP-46 History "...Wing 10 Change of Command Season Wraps Up by LT(jg) Daniel MacCabe Wing 10 - Thursday, June 4, 2009 (Squadrons Mentioned: CPRW-10, VP-1, VP-40, VP-46, VQ-1 and VQ-2)..." WebSite: NorthWest Navigator http://www.northwestnavigator.com/ [05JUN2009]

Photograph Caption: Following VP-46's change of command ceremony May 22, four of the five new Patrol and Reconnaissance squadron commanding officers flank Capt. Ken Seliga, commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing 10. From left the new skippers are Cmdr. Brett Coffey, VQ-2; Cmdr. Mark Hamilton, VP-46; Cmdr. Michael Giannetti, VQ-1; and Cmdr. Mark Rudesill, VP-1. Not pictured is Cmdr. Michael McClintock, VP-40. Photograph by LT(jg) Daniel MacCabe

The Grey Knights of Patrol Squadron 46 celebrated their 73rd change of command May 22. After serving one year as commanding officer and guiding the squadron through a combat deployment in the 5th Fleet area of operations, Cmdr. Carlos Sardiello was relieved by Cmdr. Mark Hamilton.

For Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing 10, VP-46s change of command ended a very compressed turnover season that began May 1 with Patrol Squadron 40 "Fighting Marlins" changing hands as Cmdr. Michael McClintock relieved Christopher Saindon. VP-40 has since departed for a six-month deployment with 5th and 6th Fleets supporting Operation Iraqi Freedom, Operation Enduring Freedom and other European Command missions.

The following week, Fleet Air Reconnaissance Squadron 2 "Rangers" celebrated their leadership's turnover as Cmdr. Brett Coffey assumed command from Cmdr. Robert Pauley, May 7 and the Patrol Squadron 1 "Screaming Eagles" followed suit the next day with Cmdr. Mark Rudesill relieving Cmdr. Christopher Corgnati.

The season continued May 14 as the Fleet Air Reconnaissance Squadron 1 "World Watchers" held their change as Cmdr. Michael Giannetti took over for Cmdr. James Gibson.

"It is with a great sense of pride that we celebrate the end of each commanding officer's extraordinary level of commitment, sense of duty and superb leadership each brought to bear within the command during their tours," said Capt. Ken Seliga, Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing 10. "We look forward to the energy and leadership each new commanding officer will bring in the year ahead."

© 2009 Sound Publishing, Inc.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Command of VP-1 Changes - Thursday, May 21, 2009..." WebSite: NorthWest Navigator http://www.northwestnavigator.com/ [22MAY2009]

Cmdr. Christopher Corgnati was relieved as VP-1 commanding officer by Cmdr. Mark Rudesill in a ceremony held at NAS Whidbey Island, Washington, May 8.

During Corgnati's tenure, he fostered a strong sense of pride for the squadron, the Patrol and Reconnaissance Community, and the Navy. Stressing operational excellence, the squadron successfully completed a demanding tri-site deployment and many important exercises culminating in VP-1 being awarded the Arnold J. Isbell Fleet Anti-Submarine Warfare Excellence Award for 2008.

Furthermore, the squadron's emphasis on Sailors and their careers resulted in the reception of the Commander, Pacific Fleet Retention Excellence Award.

Corgnati and his family are moving to Washington D.C., where he will fulfill his orders to work for the Office of the Secretary of Defense.

Rudesill, the 66th commanding officer of the Screaming Eagles of VP-1, welcomes the challenge and opportunity.

"With this proud group of Sailors as a backbone, the squadron's focus is clear… to be a combat ready aircrew and aircraft ready to operate globally," said Rudesill.

Rudesill is a native of Knoxville, Tenn., and a graduate of the University of Tennessee. He and his wife Charla have two children, Bobby and Ashleigh.

Cmdr. Troy Bauder will assume the duties of VP-1 executive officer.

© 2009 Sound Publishing, Inc.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Wing 10 Honors best, Brightest By MC2 Elizabeth Acosta - NPASE Det. NW - Thursday, April 30, 2009 (Squadrons Mentioned: CPRW-10, VP-1, VP-40, VP-46, VP-69, VQ-1 and VQ-2)..." WebSite: NorthWest Navigator http://www.northwestnavigator.com/ [01MAY2009]

Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing (CPRW) 10 held its annual ceremony to recognize the contributions of their Sailors, April 23.

This is the 14th year CPRW-10 and the Oak Harbor community honored the significant accomplishments of Wing 10 Sailors.

"Each of you earned your command's nomination because of your selfless sacrifice and commitment. Your work has made us a better wing and I hope each of you finds pride in your many contributions," Capt. Ken Seliga, commodore of CPRW-10.

The CPRW Sea Sailor of the Year (SOY) was Personnel Specialist 1st Class (AW) Gladys Willis, of VP-1, who was also recognized as the Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Group (CPRG) Pacific Sea SOY in January, and Junior Sailor of the year was Naval Aircrewman Operator 2nd Class (AW/NAC) Mark Hill of VP-1. The Shore Sailor of the Year was Aviation Electronics Technician 1st Class (AW) Danyall Benavides, of CPRW-10, whose contributions also led to recognition by CPRG as their Pacific Shore SOY, and Junior Sailor of the Year was Information Systems Technician 3rd Class Blake Hausman, of CPRW-10. The Reserve Sailor of the year was Naval Aircrewman Operator 1st Class (AW/NAC) Stephen Daley, of VP-69.

"It's pretty big; It feels really good to get this award. It was a very honorable experience" said Benavides.

Gifts were presented by Jim Slowik, Mayor of Oak Harbor, Patrick Travenetti, director, Embry Riddle Aeronautical University, Marjean Knokey, Columbia College, Barbara Bockman, Chapman University, Mike Sevy, USAA Insurance Company, Kim Braylens and Robin King, of Navy Federal Credit Union, to further recognize the contributions these Sailors make.

The Battle Efficiency award was presented to VQ-2, the Commander Naval Air Pacific Isbell Trophy, VP-1, and the Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Aviation Safety award, VQ-1. Also honored at the ceremony was the Aviator of the Year, Lt. Ronald Rumfelt, of VP-40, and Flight crew of the Year, Combat Aircrew 2, of VP-46.

"As we congratulate the winners of each category this morning, I ask that you take a moment to appreciate the momentous commitment and sacrifices our Sailors made during the past year to ensure we were prepared for, and executed, each mission we were asked to complete. And may you especially recall the commitment to excellence of our award winners today- those who went above and beyond to earn the endorsement of their respective command," said Seliga.

© 2009 Sound Publishing, Inc.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraVP-1 History "...VP-1 Celebrates 66 Years of Service - By MC2 Tucker M. Yates - NPASE Det. NW - Thursday, February 19, 2009..." WebSite: Northwest Navigator http://www.northwestnavigator.com/ [20FEB2009]

Photograph Caption: Chief Yeoman (AW/SW) Jose Salgado, of VP-1, presents the VP-1 command guidon to Cmdr. Chris Corgnati, VP-1 commanding officer, on behalf of the Chief Petty Officers Mess at a ceremony to commemorate VP-1s 66th birthday, Feb. 13. The event chronicled the origins of VP-1 as Bombing Squadron 128 flying the PV-1 Ventura, to today flying the P-3C Orion. MC2 Tucker Yates

VP-1 hosted a ceremony commemorating the squadron's 66th birthday, Feb. 13.

At the event, Yeoman 2nd Class Kurt Feil chronicled the origins of VP-1 as Bombing Squadron 128 as well as their transitions to Navy Patrol Bombing Squadron 128, to Patrol Squadron 128, to Medium Patrol Squadron 1, and finally becoming VP-1.

Capt. Ken Seliga, commodore of Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing 10, was the guest speaker at the event.

"A unit is made up of people. In my opinion, people are its greatest and most precious commodity. Nothing gets done in a squadron without them. Squadrons are built around planes, but they function well because of their people," said Seliga.

"The truly great squadrons endure. It is very rare to see a squadron exist for 66 years, due to the dynamics of naval aviation. Ladies and gentlemen, I am here to attest that VP-1 has endured because of the men and women sitting in this room," added Seliga.

Over the course of their history, VP-1 personnel have flown the PV-1 Ventura, P2V Neptune, and the P-3 Orion. They participated in World War II, the Korean War, the Vietnam War, Gulf War, Operations Enduring and Iraqi Freedom, and the global war on terrorism.

"The best way to honor that legacy is to always live up to it and always be ready," said Cmdr. Chris Corgnati, VP-1 commanding officer. "You have heard me say this before: the only true measure of success is operational excellence. Part of knowing who you are comes from knowing those people and events that are a part of our heritage."

In conclusion to the event Corgnati was presented with the command guide on, which was embroidered with all the past and present squadron logos, by the Chief Petty Officers Mess and a remembrance plaque for lost shipmates by the Flight Engineers Mess.

"Always ready to face the challenges of changing times, a brief glance at the timeline of VP-1 reveals a unit that has demonstrated the ability time and time again to support the Navy's mission," said Feil. "Since its establishment in 1943, VP-1 has left its mark on the history of the U.S. Navy, in times of war and times of peace, successfully carrying out countless missions and maintaining worldwide presence with unparalleled search and rescue prowess and humanitarian efforts."

© 2009 Sound Publishing, Inc.


Circa 2008

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraAircrew Wings "...Wings Oof Gold Awarded To New Aircrew by LT Phillip Sautter - VP-30 Public Affairs Officer (VP-1, VP-4, VP-5, VP-8, VP-10, VP-16, VP-26, VP-30, VP-16, VP-40 and VP-46. ) - Thursday, October 9, 2008..." WebSite: JaxAirNews http://adserver1.harvestadsdepot.com/jaxairnews/ss/jaxairnews/ [09OCT2008]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...VP-1 Sailors Commemorate POW/MIA Day - Story Number: NNS080923-13 - Release Date: 9/23/2008 12:47:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Tucker M. Yates, Fleet Public Affairs Center, Det. Northwest. (Mentioned: VP-1 and VP-17)..." WebSite: United States Navy http://www.navy.mil/ [29SEP2008]

OAK HARBOR, Wash. (NNS) -- VP-1 hosted a ceremony to commemorate Prisoners of War/Missing in Action (POW/MIA) Recognition Day with former members of VP-17 in Hangar 6 on NAS Whidbey Island, Washington Sept. 19.

National POW/MIA Recognition Day honors the courage of those who were held as prisoners of war in foreign conflicts and to ensure those who remain missing in action are never forgotten.

"Today our nation pauses to commemorate our comrades who cannot be with us for they are prisoners of war or are declared missing in action," said Command Master Chief (AW/SW) James Reynolds, VP-1 "Screaming Eagles." "So, on this third Friday in September, let us remember well the sacrifices our brothers and sisters have made."

Eight former members of the VP-17 "White Lightnings," which was disestablished in 1995, attended the event as part of their base tour.

"It's a great opportunity to honor those who have gone before us in similar situations back in the 60s; it's fantastic, I appreciate you being here," said Cmdr. Chris Corgnati, VP-1 commanding officer.

"It's important to take the time out of the day to remember those that have gone before us who paid that price and it's a great opportunity to reflect on those in all past conflicts as well as what's going on right now. Everybody in this room knows somebody who's out on the front lines today, so keep them in your thoughts and prayers."

After the ceremony, the White Lightnings received a static display tour of a P-3C Orion. Some of the members have not been to NAS Whidbey Island, Washington in nearly 40 years.

"This is something more than I ever expected," said Jim Whitmus, a VP-17 Sailor in 1970. "It's great being here seeing the old base again. The last time I was here was in 1975 for Naval Reserve schooling. I haven't seen it all yet, but it looks like there's been a lot of changes; it's really neat."

"I've never been treated this great, I think all of us to the person would say this has really been an experience," added Sherman Tifft, a VP-17 Sailor in 1968.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraVP-1 History "...Screaming Eagles Returns to Whidbey Island by MC2 Tucker Yates, Fleet PACEN NW - Friday, June 13, 2008..." WebSite: Northwest Navigator http://www.northwestnavigator.com/ [14JUN2008]

Photograph Caption: Aviation Ordnanceman 2nd Class (AW) Jeremy Vollmer, VP-1, plays with his son, Jacob, during homecoming for the VP-1 Screaming Eagles on NAS Whidbey Island, Washington, June 5. VP-1 returned to NAS Whidbey Island, Washington after a six-month deployment to the eastern Pacific in support of Commander Seventh Fleet and Combined Task Force 72 antisubmarine warfare and intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance missions.

VP-1, the Screaming Eagles, returned home to NAS Whidbey Island, Washington after a six month deployment to the Eastern Pacific, May 18 through June 9.

The Screaming Eagles departed in November of last year to support Commander Seventh Fleet and Combined Task Force 72 antisubmarine warfare (ASW) and intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance (ISR) missions.

"We flew in excess of 2500 flight hours and that was with, instead of the normal complement of 10 aircraft, four aircraft at times," said Cmdr. Mark Rudesill, VP-1 Executive Officer. "We had a quite a few accomplishments in support of Operation Enduring Freedom and the Global War on Terror specifically in the Philippines."

Rudesill was proud of the effort put forth by his Sailors to ensure they could accomplish the missions set before them.

"We've done a remarkable job," said Rudesill. "The whole squadron from topside to bottom side all performed magnificently on station. I'm very proud of all of them, we're happy to be home and happy to be home safe."

VP-1 will be the last NAS Patrol Squadron to be integrated into the newly stood up CMO-10. VP-1 will transfer accountability for their aircraft and maintainers to the organization in an effort to produce more capable aircraft and maintenance crews while maintaining the most efficient and cost-effective methods.

"I was working with a few of the other squadrons before we left so I've already integrated a little into this. Overall I think it will be a little bit better as far as working hours and being set up on deployment rotation schedules," said Aviation Electrician's Mate 2nd Class Brandon Ruby, of VP-1 who will be working in CMO-10. "We don't know all the fine details until we get into it, but so far so good. It is going to be group of maintainers instead of an operations group that happens to run a group of maintainers so I think it will be centered on the people and provide an overall better working environment. "

© 2008 Sound Publishing, Inc.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraVP-1 History "...VP-1 Goes 'Over the Hump' - By LT(jg) Ryan Broderick - VP-1 - Friday, April 11, 2008..." WebSite: Northwest Navigator http://www.northwestnavigator.com/ [11APR2008]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: Wings of Gold Thumbnail "...Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Group - RADM Brian C. Prindle, USN. Wings of Gold - Spring 2008 - Page 6-8. (Squadrons/Wings Referenced: VP-62, VP-69, VQ-1, VQ-2, VPU-1, VPU-2, VP-1, VP-4, VP-5, VP-8, VP-9, VP-10, VP-16, VP-26, VP-30, VP-40, VP-45, VP-46, VP-47, CPRW-2, CPRW-5, CPRW-10 and CPRW-11..." WebSite: Association of Naval Aviation http://www.anahq.org/index.htm [23APR2008]
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Open VP History Adobe FileMaritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Group Article 166KB

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraVP-1 History "...VP-1 Goes 'Over the Hump' - By LT(jg) Ryan Broderick - VP-1 - Friday, April 11, 2008..." WebSite: Northwest Navigator http://www.northwestnavigator.com/ [11APR2008]

Photograph Caption: Navy Counselor 1st Class Cesar Portillo and Aviation Machinist Mate 2nd Class Ramil Espiritu look on hungrily as Culinary Specialist 3rd Class Sheromjohn Delacruz prepares food for the squadron's recent "Over the Hump" party.

The morning of March 30 brought heavy rains to Okinawa and seemingly washed away hopes for an "Over the Hump" party as VP-1 passed the half way point of their WESTPAC deployment.

With a few last minute changes and a fortunate break in the weather, the party served as a welcome break and an opportunity to eat and relax.

The party was originally planned for the beach at Torii Station, but was moved to the grill pit outside of the barracks on Kadena Air Base due to the weather. The change was made to save people from the rain and gusty winds at the beach. Culinary Specialist 1st Class Michael Farmer coordinated an excellent meal with hamburgers, hot dogs, and pulled pork sandwiches. Aviation Warfare Systems Operator 1st Class Terra McCartney provided potato salad for the entire command and received great reviews, while a consortium of junior officers baked cookies for dessert.

"We have to roll with the punches, the weather didn't want to cooperate early in the day, but I think my team put out a great meal," said Farmer.

Despite the excitement generated by prospects of a trip to the beach in the days before the party, the grill pit proved to be a great alternative. People were coming and going throughout the afternoon and the culinary specialists braved the wind to keep warm food available for all hands.

The over the hump party is a significant event for Sailors on deployment. Time away from friends and family grows more difficult as deployment wears on and the celebration is a great opportunity to pick up morale.

"It's a shame the weather played such a large factor, but the food and opportunity to take my mind off of work was fantastic," said Lt. David Van Kampen.

Over the Hump is important for family members back home as well and the VP-1 Family Readiness Group had a very well attended bowling party to mark the half way point at NAS Whidbey Island, Washington.

© 2008 Sound Publishing, Inc.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraVP-1 History "...Screaming Eagles Take Flight at Okinawa Marathon - Friday, March 14, 2008..." WebSite: Northwest Navigator http://www.northwestnavigator.com/ [15MAR2008]

Photograph Caption: Six Sailors from VP-1 participated in the 16th annual Okinawa Marathon. From left are Lt.j.g. Andrew Brown, Lt.j.g. Johnny O'Hara, Aviation Electronics Technician 2nd Class Jeremy McKay, Aviation Electronics Technician 2nd Class Kawika Scaff, Reynolds, Command Master Chief Jim Reynolds, and Lt. Robert Aho.

Six Sailors from VP-1 recently had the unique experience of competing in an international race, the 16th Annual Okinawa Marathon.

Lt. Robert Aho, Lt.j.g. Andrew Brown, Lt.j.g. Johnny O'Hara, Command Master Chief Jim Reynolds, Aviation Electronics Technician 2nd Class Jeremy McKay and Aviation Electronics Technician 2nd Class Kawika Scaff took to the streets of central Okinawa, running over 26 miles through nine different cities, towns and villages. They were among 9,335 other runners who competed in the event.

The course included seven major hills and a number of minor hills. In the middle of the course was a long climb that continuously ascended for over 11 km. Although the course was hilly and well within the "challenging" classification for the runners, the experience took on a life of its own. It came in the form of the support provided by the Okinawan people.

"Having never competed in an international race, I was doubtful of the support we would receive," said Brown.

"That skepticism quickly faded as the citizens of Okinawa came out in droves to hand out everything from Gatorade and sponges to homemade candy and chocolate."

"The hospitality and friendliness of the local community during the race left me with the greatest impression of the Okinawan people," added Aho.

"The town's people came out of their homes and businesses with fresh fruit, drink and drums," said Reynolds. "I have never felt so nourished, hydrated or motivated as had during this race. The hospitality was truly humbling."

Pushing yourself to your physical limits and achieving something that requires everything you've got is always rewarding. However, doing something this difficult for someone else is even more rewarding.

"I had the honor to run in remembrance of 1st Lt. Travis Manion, USMC, who made the ultimate sacrifice in the war on terror,"

O'Hara said solemnly. "Wearing the 'Team Travis' jersey gave me the determination to push through this difficult course."

© 2008 Sound Publishing, Inc.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Community Projects Lift Spirits of VP-1 - By LT(jg) Ryan Broderick - Friday, January 18, 2008..." WebSite: Northwest Navigator http://www.northwestnavigator.com/ [18JAN2008]

The "Screaming Eagles" of VP-1 has recently been involved in community activities in NAF Misawa, Japan and NAF Kadena, Okinawa, Japan, as well as while on detachment in the Republic of the Philippines.

The crew has provided food for those in need and brought cheer to children via candy, songs and dance.

The importance of community relations was stressed by Command Master Chief James Reynolds. "One of the great things about deploying is the opportunity to experience a foreign culture," he said. "We all know we have a signification and primary mission objective, but it was also our goal to extend ourselves to the community through community relations projects."

The Gonohe Art Festival in the Sannohe District of Amori, Japan drew the attention of 12 Screaming Eagles.

"I was nervous after being told we would be dancing on a stage, but once we got started I had a blast, and can't wait till the next time we have the opportunity to dance again," said Aviation Electronics Technician 2nd Class Taneka Marks.

The festival involved a private "washitsu" (Japanese-style room) where a wide array of traditional Japanese cuisine and performances from trough xylophone musicians to historical Japanese Odori dancers was on hand. This was followed by VP-s own exhilarating performance of the Macarena and the Cha-Cha Slide, which excited the crowd.

In Kadena, another group of 12 made time for a trip to the Sashiki Children's Center, essentially a boys and girls club. There were several performances that day and the children were very excited whenever the VP- group to took the stage.

"As our turn came the kids were banging on the door and chanting for us to start," said Aviation Maintenance Administrator 2nd Class Troney Murrell.

For those in the Philippines, the activity was more based on need. Chief Aviation Warfare System Operator Christopher Acker and a team of aircrew and maintenance personnel prepared bags of food for families.

"It was so easy for our small group to do something nice for so many people," said Lt.j.g. Malissa Blane.

More community activities are on the horizon for VP-. The dance troupe from Misawa has already been invited to another festival and the entire squadron is collecting school supplies for needy children.

© 2008 Sound Publishing, Inc.


Circa 2007

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...VP-1 Flies Search and Rescue Mission for Downed Seahawk Helicopter..." WebSite: VP-1 http://vp1.ahf.nmci.navy.mil/ [09AUG2008]

A MH-60 Sierra helicopter from the Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron 23 assigned to NAS North Island, San Diego, California was conducting a training mission off the USS Bonhomme Richard, an amphibious assault ship, when it crashed into the ocean Friday afternoon. The helicopter was conducting a mission off the coast of San Diego, CA about 50 miles from Camp Pendleton. Saturday, military officials released that there were four naval personnel aboard the aircraft.

Patrol Squadron One, the "Screaming Eagles" was conducting integrated anti-submarine warfare exercises off the coast of San Diego at the time of the accident. Their involvement in the battle group exercise placed the patrol aircraft in a prime location to be a critical player in the search for the missing "Seahawk" helicopter. Early Saturday morning VP-1 deployed to aid in the search and rescue (SAR) mission to recover the personnel aboard the helicopter. Two VP-1 P-3C Orion aircrafts, accompanied by two full tactical crews took part in the mission. The two VP-1 crews alongside one crew from VP-26 assigned to NAS Brunswick, Maine, rotated their assistance throughout the entire search. As a combined force, the two VP-1 crews flew over 14 hours in search of personnel from the downed helicopter. Working alongside many other naval assets, the crews used a combination of search methods. Including a visual search by each crewmember in addition to the P-3's various electronic search capabilities during the SAR mission.

The search for survivors was called off Saturday afternoon after rescuers determined it was unlikely they could have survived in the cold water. At this time the VP-1 crewmembers tasking changed to a debris collection mission. They were in search of anything in the water that would aid the Naval Investigation of the accident.

Military officials on Sunday released the identities of the four sailors that perished in the "Seahawk" helicopter crash. Three of the bodies have yet to be found, they were LT Adam A. Dyer, of Lafayette, LA; LTJG Laura J. Mankey of West Hills, CA; Petty Officer 1st Class Cory J. Helman, of New Richmond, WI. The fourth crewmember Petty Officer 2nd Class Christopher M. Will, of Warren, MI, was pulled from the water shortly after the crash but died from internal injures while being treated aboard the USS Bonhomme Richard.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraAT2 Class Jessica Dutton and AT3 Class Rebecca Nowlandr "...VP-1 deploys to Okinawa Friday, December 21, 2007..." WebSite: Northwest Navigator http://www.northwestnavigator.com/ index.php/ navigator/whidbey/ vp_1_deploys_to_okinawa/ [21DEC2007]

Photograph Caption: VP-1 Photo - Aviation Electronics Technician 2nd Class Jessica Dutton, left, and Aviation Electronics Technician 3rd Class Rebecca Nowland, VP-1, unpack boxes at Kadena Air Base, Okinawa, Japan during deployment.

This holiday season may bring family and good cheer to homes around the Northwest, but for VP-1 it will bring operational readiness. The squadron recently deployed to Kadena Air Base, Okinawa, Japan.

For many in VP-1, it is the first opportunity to experience places like Japan, Korea, Thailand, Australia, Guam and other Pacific islands.

The squadron began preparing its Sailors more than a year ago and for many it seemed like there could never be enough time.

Throughout the deployment VP-1 duties will be "expeditionary" in nature. The Squadron will be active in all operations throughout the 7th Fleet area of responsibility and remain ready to assist the 5th Fleet as well.

This will include participating in several joint exercises with many different nations. These types of exercises allow VP-1 to hone skills that they have practiced throughout their training cycle at NAS Whidbey Island. They will also provide personnel with an opportunity to travel to countries throughout the region and interact with foreign military personnel on a professional and personal level.

AW1 Ian McElwain is making his fifth deployment, the fourth with VP-1. He said he looks forward to his time in Japan and visiting various countries, but laments, "leaving home doesn't get any easier with time or experience."

He is a father of one and his son is a senior in high school.

While McElwain regrets missing Christmas with his family, he said he understands the need to "answer the call" and looks forward to a successful deployment with the Screaming Eagles of VP-1.

© 2007 Sound Publishing, Inc.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Screaming Eagles participate in Missile-Ex - By Lt j.g. Ryan Broderick - Screaming Eagles reporter - Friday, July 27, 2007..." WebSite: Northwest Navigator http://www.northwestnavigator.com/ index.php/ navigator/ whidbey/screaming_eagles_participate_in_missile_ex/ [27JUl2007]

VP-1s Combat Aircrew Ten (CAC-10) enjoyed a rather unique opportunity recently as they traveled to southern California to take part in a live-fire missile exercise. The event was professionally executed by the entire Screaming Eagle team.

Preparation began several weeks ago with extensive planning and training, including two dedicated Maverick simulators and two flights with the Maverick Captive Air Training Missile (CATM).

The Maverick missile is one of the main Anti-Surface Warfare (ASUW) weapons employed by the P-3C Orion. The AGM-65 is the most widely used precision-guided missile in production today.

First used in South East Asia almost 30 years ago, it is included in the inventories of more than over 30 countries and is incorporated on almost every friendly strike aircraft including the P-3C. It is capable of hitting a variety of mobile land and sea targets.

Mission Commander Lt. Rob Hines, Patrol Plane Commander Lt. Brian Steckroth, Acoustic Warfare Systems Operator 1st Class Kevin McGranahan, Non-Acoustic Warfare Operator 2nd Class Joseph Shrader and the rest of CAC-10 started their day with a 1 a.m. pre- flight. They were on station at 9 a.m. in the Southern California Offshore Range (SCORE) located 20 nautical miles west of San Diego.

After checking in with range control the crew conducted their own range clearance by beginning a radar sweep of the area to clear it of any non-exercise surface contacts. The environmental conditions were challenging for the AGM-65F's infrared seeker below the normal Southern California marine layer. As the cloud layer began to clear, the crew received a clear range and began their clearing runs on the target.

The mission commander was satisfied that the crew and the target were in position and commenced their live fire run. The target lock-up and weapon release were flawless.

The crew maneuvered to assess battle damage and confirmed a direct hit. After ensuring the area was again safe, they guided the range support boat in to recover debris and checked off with range control to transit back to Naval Air Station Whidbey Island.

This marked the first live AGM-65F Maverick shot by VP-1 in more than two years and satisfied Wing 10 readiness requirements for the Squadron.

© 2007 Sound Publishing, Inc.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraHM2 Donta Foster "...VP-1 Sailor is Big Brother volunteer of the year - By Lt.j.g. Karlee Scheimreif - Friday, July 13, 2007..." WebSite: Northwest Navigator http://www.northwestnavigator.com/ index.php/ navigator/ whidbey/ vp_1_sailor_is_big_brother_volunteer_of_the_year/ [13JUl2007]

Photograph Caption: Cathy St. Julien, administrative specialist with Big Brothers, Big Sisters of Island County presents its Big Brother volunteer of the year award to HM2 Donta Foster, VP-1, pictured here with his "little brother" Shaun.

On June 21, the Big Brothers Big Sisters of Island County chapter elected Hosptal Corpsman 2nd Class Donta Foster, VP-1 as its Big Brother volunteer of the year.

Foster has been assigned to VP-1 since September 2006 performing duties as a Navy corpsman. As a "big brother" he has sponsored his "little brother" Shaun since October 2006.

His sponsorship has included playing video games, working on home work together, going to Sonics games and playing basketball.

"I always enjoy sharing my time with someone in need," said Foster. "Shaun and I look forward to our time together."

The Big Brothers, Big Sisters nationwide mission is to provide positive adult role models to children with one-on-one friendship based relationships.

As a preventive program, Big Brother Big Sisters reinforces positive attributes in children. These relationships provide a strengthened sense of self-worth at home, in school and in their local community.

It is recognized that children who have an older special friend tend to be more even-tempered, less likely to be swayed by peer pressure, and perform better academically.

The Big Brothers, Big Sisters help children between the ages of 6-14 who lack consistent adult role models and would benefit from the positive influence of a warm, caring friendship.

In March, the Island County Big Brothers, Big Sisters celebrated their 200 match. They are always in need of adult volunteers. Anyone interested can contact Big Brothers Big Sisters at (360) 279-0644 or online at BBBS@Whidbey.net.

© 2007 Sound Publishing, Inc.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...VP-1 Command Structure..." WebSite: VP-1 http://www.naswi.navy.mil/vp-1/ [03MAY2007]

History ThumbnailCameraCO - CDR George J. Vassilakis Commander Vassilakis was born in Morgantown, West Virginia. He attended the United States Naval Academy and was commissioned in 1988. Completing flight training in October 1989, he was designated a Naval Flight Officer.

Upon completion of P-3 Fleet Replacement Squadron (FRS) training with Patrol Squadron THIRTY (VP-30), Commander Vassilakis joined VP-24 in March 1990. While assigned to the "Batmen" he qualified as a Patrol Plane Tactical Coordinator, Patrol Plane Mission Commander and as an Instructor TACCO, and completed deployments to Keflavik, Iceland and Sigonella, Sicily on a Beartrap crew. His ground assignments included PR/AME Branch Officer, Personnel Officer, Readiness Officer, CNO Special Projects Officer and Assistant Tactics Officer.

Commander Vassilakis reported to Commander, Patrol Wings Atlantic (CPWL) in December 1992, where he served as Flag Lieutenant. Following the disestablishment of CPWL he reported to Commander, Surveillance and Reconnaissance Forces, U.S. Sixth Fleet in Naples, Italy and served as Flag Lieutenant from July 1993 to March 1995.

In May 1995, Commander Vassilakis reported to USS KITTY HAWK (CV 63) as Assistant Navigator, completing a Western Pacific/Arabian Gulf deployment. During this tour, he qualified as Officer of the Deck (Underway), Command Duty Officer (Underway) and earned a Surface Warfare Officer designation.

Following this tour, he was assigned in February 1997 to the Bureau of Naval Personnel in Washington, DC where he served as VP Aviation Assignments Officer for shore and sea detailing. He coordinated the homeport shift of the Aviation Assignments Branch to Millington, Tennessee in June 1998.

Following P-3 refresher training, he reported to the "Mad Foxes" of VP-5 for department head duty in July 1999. During this tour he served as Command Services Officer, Administration Officer, Training Officer and Operations Officer deploying to Naval Station, Roosevelt Roads, Puerto Rico and Sigonella, Sicily.

In November 2001, Commander Vassilakis reported to Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing ELEVEN at NAS Jacksonville, Florida as the Operations Officer and later served as the Chief Staff Officer. He reported as Executive Officer to Patrol Squadron ONE in April 2005 and assumed command April 2006.

Commander Vassilakis' personal awards include Meritorious Service Medal, Joint Service Commendation Medal, Navy Commendation Medal (4), Navy Achievement Medal (2) and other service awards.

History ThumbnailCameraXO - CDR Scott Wesley Askins Commander Askins, a native of Charleston, South Carolina, earned his Bachelor of Sciences degree from Auburn University on March 17, 1989 and was commissioned through the Naval Reserve Officer Training Corps as an Ensign upon graduation. He earned his wings as a Naval Aviator in May 1990 while serving in VT-31, Corpus Christi, TX.

Upon earning his wings, he was assigned to Patrol Squadron FORTY FOUR, located at NAS Brunswick, Maine from November 1990 to April 1991. Upon squadron disestablishment, he transferred to Patrol Squadron EIGHT and was attached from April 1991 to November 1993. He attained qualifications as Patrol Plane Commander, Mission Commander, Instructor Pilot and Post Maintenance Check Flight Pilot. He participated in a deployment to Sigonella, Italy where he flew missions in support of Operation Desert Shield and Desert Storm. He also completed a deployment in the Caribbean theatre conducting counternarcotics operations in support of JTF-4 objectives as well as detachments to Sigonella, IT, Rota, SP, Thule, GR, Panama, and Soto Cano, HD. He was assigned as OINC of a detachment to Sigonella to aid Patrol Squadron FIVE during Operation Sharp Guard and Sharp Fence in support of the former Yugoslavia.

CDR Askins then reported to Patrol Squadron THIRTY, NAS Jacksonville, Florida from December 1993 to October 1996 and served as an FRS Instructor Pilot, Patrol Plane Commander, Mission Commander, Post Maintenance Check Flight Pilot and attained qualification as a Formation Instructor Pilot.

In November 1996, he reported to the USS John C. Stennis as a Catapult and Arresting Gear Officer. He participated in the maiden deployment from February 1998 to August 1998 completing an around the world cruise from Norfolk, VA to San Diego, CA. He participated in every facet of flight deck operations in support of Northern and Southern Watch in the Persian Gulf as they completed over 10,000 traps during that deployment.

Upon departing, CDR Askins served as Administrative Officer for Commander Patrol and Reconnaissance Forces Atlantic from September 1998 to March 1999. He was then selected to attend the United States Naval War College in Newport, RI where upon graduation in March 2000 he obtained his Master of Arts degree in National Security and Strategic Studies.

Commander Askins returned to Maritime Patrol Aviation in September 2000 for his Department Head tour and joined the Tridents of Patrol Squadron TWENTY SIX in Brunswick, Maine. He completed a successful deployment to Sigonella, Italy where he flew numerous hours in support of Operations Deliberate Forge, Joint Guardian and Determined Forge.

In August of 2002, CDR Askins where he served as the Training Officer and Operations Officer for Commander Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing TEN located at Naval Air Station Whidbey Island, WA where he supported the training and operational control of three P-3C Maritime Patrol Squadrons and one EP-3E Fleet Air Reconnaissance Squadron deployed worldwide in support of the Global War on Terrorism conducting missions in Operation Enduring Freedom and Operation Iraqi Freedom.

After completing JPME Phase II at the Joint Forces Staff College in June of 2004 CDR Askins joined the Deployable Training Team at the USJFCOM Joint Warfighting Center in Suffolk, VA. He served as a Joint Operations Observer/Trainer where he participated in nearly every Joint Exercise conducted worldwide. He forward deployed to Iraq, Afghanistan and Horn of Africa as a Joint Task Force Knowledge/Information Management consultant. He also facilitated plenary and small group discussions for the Joint Staff's PINNACLE, CAPSTONE and KEYSTONE courses and served as the resident expert on the Information Revolution and Globalization trends.

Commander Askins' decorations include the Joint Meritorious Service Medal, Meritorious Service Medal, Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal (three awards), the Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medal and various other campaign, service and unit awards.

History ThumbnailCameraCMDCM(SW) - Eric M. Schmidt Master Chief Schmidt was born in Appleton, Wisconsin. He enlisted in September of 1985 and attended recruit training at RTC Great Lakes, Illinois. Following recruit training, he attended Electronics Technician "A" School at NTC Great Lakes, Illinois.

After completion of ET "A" School in 1986, Master Chief Schmidt was assigned to Navy Submarine Support Facility (NSSF) Groton, Connecticut. While assigned to NSSF, he served in the R4 Division, Submarine Periscope Installation and Removal work center. After completion of this tour of duty he was honorable discharged from active naval service in September of 1988.

In February of 1990, Master Chief Schmidt returned to active duty and was assigned to the Navy Computer and Telecommunications Station, High Frequency (HF) Site in Cutler, Maine. During this tour he qualified as the High Frequency (HF) Site Supervisor and was advanced to Second Class Petty Officer.

In December of 1992, he reported to USS JOSEPHUS DANIELS (CG-27) where he served in the Combat Systems Department, as the Communication Electronics (CE01) division Work Center Supervisor. During this tour he completed a Mediterranean deployment in support of operations SHARP GUARD, PROVIDE PROMISE, and DENY FLIGHT.

After the de-commissioning of USS JOSEPHUS DANIELS (CG-27), Master Chief Schmidt reported in July of 1994 to the pre-commissioning detachment for USS CHIEF (MCM-14). During this tour he qualified as Combat Information Center Watch Officer and earned his Enlisted Surface Warfare designation and was advanced to First Class Petty Officer.

In September of 1996, he reported to Mine Warfare Training Center in Ingleside, Texas. He served as an Instructor and Course Curriculum Model Manager for the AN/SSN-2 (V) 4 Precise Integrated Navigation System and the AN/SSQ-94 Combat Systems Integrated Training System. During this tour, Master Chief Schmidt earned his Master Training Specialist qualification and was advanced to Chief Petty Officer.

In November of 1999, Master Chief Schmidt reported to the USS FORD (FFG-54) where he served as Combat Systems and Operations Department Leading Chief Petty Officer. He completed two WESTPAC deployments in support of Maritime Interdiction Operations in the Northern Arabian Gulf, Straits of Malacca Escort, and Sea and Air Defense of Diego Garcia. During this tour, he qualified as a Command Duty Officer, Officer of the Deck Underway, and Tactical Action Officer and was advanced to Senior Chief Petty Officer.

He then reported to Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing Ten Tactical Support Center to serve as Automated Data Processing and Electronics Maintenance Divisions Leading Chief Petty Officer and later served as Tactical Support Center Senior Enlisted Advisor and COMPATRECONWING TEN Operations Department Leading Chief Petty Officer. During this tour, he was advanced to Master Chief Petty Officer.

Master Chief Schmidt is a graduate of the U.S. Navy Senior Enlisted Academy and his personal awards include the Navy Commendation Medal, Navy Achievement Medal (7) and other service awards.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraPhoto by MC2 Elizabeth Acosta "...Wing 10 recognizes its best - By Lt.j.g. Evan Larsen - Wing 10 reporter - Friday, March 30, 2007 - Squadrons Mentioned: , VP-1, VP-46, VP-69, VQ-1 and VQ-2..." WebSite: Northwest Navigator http://www.northwestnavigator.com/ index.php/navigator/whidbey/ wing_10_recognizes_its_best/ [31MAR2007]

Photograph Caption: Award-winning CPRW-10 squadrons and individual personnel take the spotlight for their impressive work over the past year.

CPRW-10 honored its top squadrons, flight crews and personnel March 23. Capt. David Taylor, Commander, CPRW-10, hosted the ceremony alongside distinguished visitors to present the awards to the awardees.

VP-46 and VQ-1 won the Pacific Fleet Battle Efficiency (E) award for 2006. The Battle 'E' focuses on a naval unitís overall readiness to complete assigned warfare missions.

The Grey Knights of VP-46 returned from a Western Pacific Deployment last December, during which they demonstrated superior readiness and combat operations in support of Operation Enduring Freedom-Philippines and Exercise Valiant Shield.

Throughout 2006, VP-46 maintained sustained their commitment to professionalism and aviation safety reflected with more than 292,000 mishap-free flight hours spanning 43 years of service.

The World Watchers of VQ-1 maintained a continuous 365-day presence in the Fifth and Seventh Fleet Areas of Responsibility, contributing vital intelligence the respective Regional Combatant Commanders.

In 2006, VQ-1 flew over 4,000 mission hours spread among over 500 sorties, demonstrating unit efficiency and flexibility with limited assigned aircraft.

Other mentionable unit awards included VP-1 receiving the Arleigh Burke trophy, as well as VQ-2s nomination for the Chief of Naval Operations Safety Award.

The Flight Crew of the year honor went to VP-1s Crew 10, while the Electronic Warfare Crew of the Year honors went to VQ-2s Crew 26. Also recognized was VP-46s Crew 4 as the Order of Daedalianís Crew of the Year.

For individual awards, Lt. Jamie Delcore of VQ-1 was recognized as aviator of the year. Additionally, his nomination as Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Groupís Naval Flight Officer of the Year was recognized during the ceremony.

Likewise from VQ-1, Aviation Electronics Technician 1st Class Joseph Medina was recognized as CPRW-10 and Patrol and Reconnaissance Groupís Aircrewman of the Year.

Among the maintenance awards, VP-69s Aviation Structural Mechanic 1st Class Gerald Campbell was recognized as CPRW-10s Maintenance Professional of the Year for his leadership while on a Search and Rescue detachment to Guam.

Taylor emphasized the importance this yearís ceremony placed in recognition of CPRW-10s many 2006 accomplishments, but he stressed the need to remember those Sailors unable to attend who are forward deployed in harmís way.

© 2007 Sound Publishing, Inc.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraVP-1 Photo "...VP-1 names Junior Sailor of the Year - By Lt.j.g. Kari Imperatore - Screaming Eagles reporter - Friday, March 9, 2007..." WebSite: Northwest Navigator http://www.northwestnavigator.com/index.php/navigator/whidbey/vp_1_names_junior_sailor_of_the_year/ [09MAR2007]

Photograph Caption: AT2 Michael Headings, pictured with VP-1 Executive Officer, Cmdr. Scott Askins, left, and VP-1 Commanding Officer, Cmdr. George Vassilakis.

VP-1 recently named Aviation Electronic Technician 2nd Class Michael Headings the Junior Sailor of the Year for his professionalism, hard work and determination.

Headings has portrayed many of the traits necessary to be successful in the command. He is a well rounded Sailor that has shown exceptional technical skills and steadfast responsibility.

He was previously Junior Sailor of the Fourth Quarter at VP-40 prior to transferring to VP-1 and then selected as the Junior Sailor of First Quarter for VP-1.

Headings has been in the navy for nine years and has served in three aviation squadrons. His career began in the helicopter community in HSL-41 based in San Diego. He made the transition to fixed wing aircraft when he was assigned to VP-40.

His contributions are numerous, serving as the Electro Static Discharge program manager and as an indispensable part of the command retention team. He was instrumental in starting the VP-1 Second Class Petty Officer Association in October 2006 and was elected president of the association by his peers.

Headings is currently serving as the leading petty officer for the avionics shop, a position that is usually occupied by a first class petty officer.

Headings' family is of the utmost importance to him. His father Mike has been a significant driving force in his life. He said his father always displayed an unwavering work ethic and as a result, he feels he should make decisions as though his father was watching him. He emulates the man and works to his full potential.

Headings recently celebrated his first wedding anniversary with his wife Jeni and their boxer, Sampson.

Headings works well with others. "He inspires subordinates to perform at higher levels by being the example to follow," noted

"This well-rounded Sailor has shown exceptional mentorship at his level," said Command Master Chief Eric Schmidt said. "He is effective at being a strong role model for both his peers and subordinates."

Ultimately, Headings said his career goal is to earn the opportunity to lead a squadron as a command master chief.

© 2007 Sound Publishing, Inc.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...VP-1 takes part in search for survivors - By Lt.j.g. Kari Imperatore - Screaming Eagles reporter - Friday, February 9, 2007..." WebSite: Northwest Navigator http://www.northwestnavigator.com/ index.php/navigator/whidbey/ vp_1_takes_part_in_search_for_survivors/ [09FEB2007]

A local patrol squadron joined search and rescue efforts to locate survivors of a Navy MH-60S helicopter that crashed at sea off the coast of San Diego, Calif., Jan. 26.

VP-1 Screaming Eagles were conducting integrated anti-submarine warfare exercises in support of the USS Bonhomme Richard (LHD 6) Expeditionary Strike Group at the time of the accident, placing the patrol aircraft in a prime location to be a critical player in the search for the missing helicopter and aircrew.

Early on the morning of Jan. 27, VP-1 shifted gears from anti-submarine warfare maneuvers and launched the ready alert aircraft to aid in search and rescue. The two VP-1 crews, alongside one crew from VP-26, rotated assistance throughout the entire search period.

Working together with other Navy assets and using a combination of human and electronic search methods common to P-3 technology, they searched more than 14 hours trying to locate the missing crew.

The Knighthawk helicopter with four crew members on board was assigned to Sea Combat Squadron 23 and was conducting routine training off the amphibious assault ship, USS Bonhomme Richard, at the time of the mishap. Cause of the accident is under investigation.

The search for survivors was called off Saturday afternoon after rescuers determined it was unlikely the crew members could have survived exposure to the cold water temperatures.

Petty Officer 2nd Class Christopher M. Will of Warren, Mich., was pulled from the water shortly after the crash, but died from internal injuries while being treated aboard USS Bonhomme Richard.

Military officials released the names of the Sailors who perished: Lt. Adam A. Dyer of Lafayette, La.; Lt.j.g. Laura J. Mankey of West Hills, Calif.; and Petty Officer 1st Class Cory J. Helman of New Richmond, Wis.

© 2007 Sound Publishing, Inc.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraAW1 (AW/NAC) Matthew Robinson "...Wing 10 selects year's top Sailors - By Lt.j.g. Evan Larsen - CPRW-10 reporter - Friday, January 26, 2007. (CPRW-10, VP-1, VP-40, VP-46, VP-69, VQ-1 and VQ-2 menioned)..." WebSite: Northwest Navigator http://www.northwestnavigator.com/ index.php/navigator/whidbey/ wing_10_selects_years_top_sailors/ [01FEB2007]

Photograph Caption: AW1 (AW/NAC) Matthew Robinson is seen on patrol in Iraq during Individual Augmentation duty.

Aviation Warfare Systems Operator 1st Class (AW/NAC) Matthew Robinson was recognized, Jan. 19, by Commodore David Taylor as the 2006 CPRW-10, Shore Sailor of the Year.

His selection came as a result of his tremendous professionalism and steadfast sacrifice exerted during a 300-day Individual Augmentation while supporting the U.S. Army's 13th Sustainment Command in Iraq. As a member of the Joint Crew Composite Squadron One, and aligned with ground combat troops, he utilized his electronic warfare expertise to develop training and maintenance programs for ground forces which mitigated the radio-controlled improvised electronic device threat.

While conducting a routine ground combat patrol, he demonstrated uncommon valor during an attack on his patrol by stabilizing the wounded and preparing a landing zone for a medical evacuation helicopter.

Additionally, he showed the initiative to continue the patrol and search for secondary IEDs, resulting in a Meritorious Service Medal awarded from the Brigade's Commanding General.

Aviation Ordnanceman 1st Class (AW/NAC) Robert Parish of Patrol Squadron 69 (VP-69) received top honors as CPRW-10 Senior Sea Sailor of the Year for 2006.

A consummate expert and extraordinary leader, his enthusiasm, professionalism and dedication to his shipmates' career advancement and education resulted in his selection as the Sea Sailor of the Year.

One of only five full system Quality Assurance Representatives, he proved invaluable during a number of engine changes and the quality inspection of countless work center repairs which directly contributed to the high level of operational success achieved by the six operational squadrons assigned to CPRW-10.

The award for CPRW-10 Shore Junior Sailor of the Year went to Aviation Warfare Specialist 2nd Class (NAC) Carey Langley of CPRW-10.

Her expertise proved crucial in supporting 36 forward-deployed aircrews, as a result of her keen analysis from over 260 missions. As a leader in her field, Langley's attention-to-detail led to critical enhancements in our national security.

CPRW-10 Junior Sea Sailor of the Year honors went to Avionics Electrician Mate 2nd Class (AW) Justin Leetham, currently serving in VP-46. Leetham recently returned from deployment with VP-46 in which he proved to be an exceptional leader.

He demonstrated honesty, integrity and an absolute dedication to duty. While at VP-46, his actions increased aircraft availability that executed 220 combat sorties and over 2,000 mishap-free flight hours in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom.

Oak Harbor Mayor Pro-Tem Danny Paggao, along with several local business and educational organizations, took time to pay homage at all the Sailors of CPRW-10.

As in the past, they provided gifts to recognize the winners and participate in recognition of the finest examples the Navy has to offer.

Every command in CPRW-10 had their senior and junior Sailors of the Year present for the presentation ceremony. These included;

-- VP-1 Senior Sailor of the Year, PS1(AW) Jared Zdrojowy; Junior Sailor of the Year, AW2(AW) Michael Headings;

-- VP-40 Senior Sailor of the Year, AM1(AW) David Anderson; Junior Sailor of the Year, AM2(AW) Matthew Vitello;

-- VP-46 Senior Sailor of the Year, AW1(AW) Gamorro Cameron; Junior Sailor of the Year, AE2(AW) Justin Leetham;

-- VP-69 Senior Sailor of the Year, AO1 (AW/NAC) Robert Parish; Junior Sailor of the Year, AT2(AW/NAC) David A. Smith; Selected Reserve PR1 (AW) Mark Wilde;

-- VQ-1 Senior Sailor of the Year, AM1 (AW) Luigi Giugliano; Junior Sailor of the Year, YN2(AW) Nicholas Hulse;

-- VQ-2 Senior Sailor of the Year, AM1(AW) John Bouquio; Junior Sailor of the Year, AT2 (AW/NAC) Peter Benninger;

-- Mobile Operations Command and Control Center Golf Senior Sailor of the Year, ET1(SW) William Lewis, Junior Sailor of the Year, ET2 Colleen Colver; and

-- CPRW-10 Shore Sailor of the Year, AW1 (AW/NAC) Matthew Robinson; Junior Sailor of the Year AW2 (NAC) Carey Langley.

© 2007 Sound Publishing, Inc.


Circa 2006

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraAviation Ordnance 2nd Class Daniel Rush "...VP-1 hosts Huskies - By MC3(NAC) Jason Beckjord - Screaming Eagles reporter - Friday, October 6, 2006..." WebSite: Northwest Navigator http://www.northwestnavigator.com/index.php/navigator/whidbey/vp_1_hosts_huskies/ [06OCT2006]

Photograph Caption: Photo by MC3(NAS) Jason Beckjord - Aviation Ordnance 2nd Class Daniel Rush discusses ordnance with Midshipmen from the University of Washington.

Patrol Squadron One (VP-1) had the honor of hosting the Naval Reserve Officer Training Corp (NROTC) from the University of Washington.

As part of their Freshman Battalion Orientation, 35 Midshipmen were welcomed by the Sailors of VP-1. With their customary pride and professionalism, the Screaming Eagles provided Midshipmen with a thorough tour of the hangar spaces, work centers and a P-3C Orion aircraft.

Starting in the wardroom, Midshipmen were welcomed by the officers of VP-1 and given an opportunity to discuss career paths and professional development for becoming a naval aviator. They were then presented with a brief overview of the history, missions and capabilities of the P-3 aircraft.

Next came the parachute riggers shop where safety, survivability training and crew preparedness were discussed. Midshipmen were allowed to put on survival vests and helmets.

The group was led over to the aviation ordnance shop where various ordnance and armament utilized by the P-3 were on display.

Finally, they ended their tour with a walk-through of the P-3C aircraft. One of VP-1s combat aircrews stood by to present their station's equipment and demonstrate system operations and discuss further the various missions of the P-3C.

Having the NROTC group witness first-hand how our Sailors function day-to-day, working with million dollar aircraft and equipment is exciting to say the least.

Said one Midshipman, "Trying to get commission is a lot different from my previous life; there's a lot to absorb."

The Midshipmen and the NROTC Commanding Officer, Capt. Stephen Keith all voiced their appreciation for the opportunity as well as commenting on the obvious pride the VP-1s Sailors took in discussing their roles in the squadron.

© 2006 Sound Publishing, Inc.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...VP-1 completes RIMPAC - By Lt.j.g. Chris Smith - Screaming Eagles Reporter - Friday, August 18, 2006..." WebSite: Northwest Navigator http://www.northwestnavigator.com/index.php/navigator/whidbey/vp_1_completes_rimpac/ [19AUG2006]

Palm trees, beaches and beautiful weather were the perfect combination to hold the annual Rim of the Pacific 2006 exercise. VP-1s Combat Air Crews (CAC) 6 and 9 travelled to Hawaii at the beginning of July and participate in the multinational exercise, more commonly referred to as RIMPAC 2006. Over 40 ships, six submarines, 160 aircraft and almost 19,000 Sailors, Airmen, Marines, Soldiers and Coast Guardsmen take part in this training operation every year.

RIMPAC is a major, month-long maritime exercise conducted in the waters off Hawaii and is intended to enhance the tactical proficiency of participating units in a wide array of combined operations at sea. By enhancing interoperability, RIMPAC helps to promote stability in the Pacific Rim region to the benefit of all participating nations.

At the same time, this exercise brings together land, air and naval military units from other countries, such as Australia, Canada, Chile, Peru, Japan, the Republic of Korea and the United Kingdom.

All participants conducted safe and successful maritime patrol and reconnaissance missions. Specifically, 28 aircraft flew 260 sorties and over 1,500 hundred hours, meeting 1,102 of 1,107 on-station hours.

CAC 6 and 9 operated out of Kaneohe Bay (Marine Corps Base Hawaii) from July 3-28 in support of RIMPAC, participating in over 15 tactical events with a 95 percent success rate. RIMPAC gave crew members high tempo coordinated operations that few exercises can match, resulting in countless quality training evolutions.

Off-duty time was spent visiting historical sites around Hawaii such as the USS Missouri and the USS Arizona memorials. RIMPAC proved to not only enrich the Screaming Eagles tactically and professionally, but personally as well.

© 2006 Sound Publishing, Inc.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...VP-1 Screaming Eagles Return To The Nest - By Lt.j.g. Chris Smith - Screaming Eagles Reporter - Friday, June 23, 2006..." WebSite: Northwest Navigator http://www.northwestnavigator.com/index.php/navigator/whidbey/screaming_eagles_return_to_the_nest/ [24JUN2006]

Early last December, the Screaming Eagles of Patrol Squadron One (VP-1) left NAS Whidbey Island for a deployment to the Western Pacific in support of 7th Fleet objectives.

This week, some six months later, they returned and were greeted by spouses, children, family and friends to a well-deserved, patriotic homecoming. With their American flags proudly waving from above the cockpits, four P-3Cs simultaneously rolled into their parking spots, completing a dramatic return to the nest.

The nearly 400 personnel that make up the squadron supported multi-mission operations out of Misawa, Japan and Kadena, Okinawa, by utilizing 11 variously equipped P-3C aircraft and 12 fully qualified combat aircrews.

As part of the Seventh Fleet Commander's objective to strengthen cooperative relationships with partnering nations, the squadron completed 18 operational detachments to nine different countries including South Korea, Australia, Thailand, Guam and Republic of the Philippines.

Throughout the various detachments, crews were able to highlight the Anti-Submarine Warfare, Anti-Surface Warfare, Search and Rescue, and Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance capabilities that the P-3C possesses to our Western Pacific allies ultimately proving that the United States Navy stands ready to "take care of business" if called upon.

Additionally, the squadron flew 119 sorties executing more than 1,100 flight hours in direct support of the global war on terrorism.

Supporting up to six simultaneous detachment sites at one time would challenge any Maintenance department. Screaming Eagles Maintenance professionals met the heavy demand and kept aircraft flying. Aside from their routine maintenance, they were able to complete nine comprehensive aircraft inspections, 17 prop control changes, 12 valve housing changes and 10 propeller changes. The entire squadron team worked together to amass more than 4,700 mishap and incident-free flights hours for the deployment, adding to an already impressive safety record.

As deployment came to a close, the squadron turned over the 7th Fleet watch to their sister squadron, the Grey Knights of VP-46, wishing them a safe and successful deployment.

© 2006 Sound Publishing, Inc.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraCmdr. George Vassilakis "...VP-1 changes command - By Lt.j.g. Gavin DeFreitas - Screaming Eagles reporter - Friday, April 7, 2006..." WebSite: Northwest Navigator http://www.northwestnavigator.com/index.php/navigator/whidbey/patrol_squadron_one_changes_command/ [11APR2006]

Cmdr. George Vassilakis relieved Cmdr. Frederick Nielsen III yesterday as commanding officer of VP-1. Rear Adm. Arthur J. Johnson, Commander Patrol and Reconnaissance Forces Seventh and Fifth Fleet, as well as Commander Fleet Air, Western Pacific, was guest speaker.

VP-1 reports to Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing 10 on NAS Whidbey Island and is currently deployed to Seventh Fleet in the Western Pacific.

Nielsen served as commanding officer since April 2005, guided VP-1 through an intensive inter-deployment readiness cycle in preparation for the Seventh Fleet deployment.

A native of Ann Arbor, Mich., he graduated from the University of Michigan with a bachelor's degree in political science in December 1987. He was commissioned an Ensign through the NROTC program and earned his naval flight officer wings in August 1989.

Following training, he joined VP-19, qualifying as instructor TACCO and patrol plane mission commander before next serving as flag aide to Commander Patrol and Anti-Submarine Warfare Forces, U.S. Pacific Fleet. Nielsen then joined VP-1 for his department head tour before serving as deputy executive assistant to the Director, Air Warfare (N78) on the Chief of Naval Operations Staff located in the Pentagon before attending the National War College in Washington D.C., where he received his masters of science degree in national security strategy.

Nielsen reported to VP-1 in 2004 and served as executive officer until 2005, when he assumed command. Nielsen will be reporting to Bureau of Naval Personnel as Commander Assignments VP / VQ.

Vassilakis is the 63rd commanding officer in the distinguished history of VP-1. A native of Morgantown, W. Va., he is married to the former Missy Smith of Jacksonville, Fla., and they have a daughter, Meagan.

Vassilakis attended the United States Naval Academy and was commissioned in 1988 and designated a Naval Flight Officer in 1989. He served in VP-24 as an instructor tactical coordinator and patrol plane mission commander before reporting to Commander Patrol Wings Atlantic and subsequently Commander Surveillance and Reconnaissance Forces, U.S. Sixth Fleet to serve as flag lieutenant.

He also served as assistant navigator onboard USS Kitty Hawk and VP aviation assignments officer for shore and sea detailing at the Bureau of Naval Personnel before reporting to the Mad Foxes of Patrol Squadron Five for his department head tour.

Following his tour in VP-5, he served as operations officer and chief staff officer for Commander Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing 11 before reporting in April 2005 to VP-1 as executive officer.

Cmdr. Askins has reported to VP-1 to serve as executive officer. A graduate of Auburn University, he completed flight training and was designated a naval flight officer in 1990.

Askins subsequently completed tours with VP-44, VP-8 and VP-30. After serving aboard USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74) as catapult and arresting gear officer, he reported to Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Forces Atlantic, where he served as administrative officer before attending the U.S. Naval War College where he obtained his master of arts degree in national security and strategic studies.

He joined VP-26 for his department head tour before being assigned to Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing 10 as training officer and operations officer.

He joined the deployable training team at the USJFCOM Joint Warfighting Center before reporting to VP-1.

VP-1 is currently deployed to the Western Pacific, with detachments in NAF Misawa, Japan and NAF Kadena, Okinawa, Japan; U-Tapao Royal Thailand Air Force Base, Thailand; Anderson AB, Guam; Clark AB, Philippines; and Pohang, South Korea.

The Screaming Eagles have flown over 750 hours in direct support of Operation Enduring Freedom-Philippines fighting the global war on terrorism. The squadron will continue to provide critical intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance of the region in support of the U.S. Naval presence in the Western Pacific before returning to NAS Whidbey Island, Washington later this summer.

© 2006 Sound Publishing, Inc.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraWing 10 Photo "...Heroes declared this President's Day - Friday, February 24, 2006 - Squadrons Mention: CPRW-10, VP-1, VP-40, VP-46, VQ-1 and VQ-2..." WebSite: Northwest Navigator http://www.northwestnavigator.com/index.php/navigator/whidbey/heroes_declared_this_presidents_day/ [27FEB2006]

Photograph Caption: Lt. Cmdr. Steven Richards and Aviation Structural Mechanic (Safety Equipment) 2nd Class (Air Warfare/Naval Aircrewman) Kyle Musto, VP-46, just two of the Wing 10 aviation professionals recognized at the recent annual awards ceremony, stand ready by the P-3 Orion.

Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing Ten (CPRW-10) held its annual awards quarters Wednesday. The heroes we recognized on President's Day, like our forefathers, exemplify what it means to be a patriot; giving of themselves to make this a better country, one shipmate at a time.

"There are few duties more rewarding than the opportunity to thank these tremendous performers who are flying and maintaining our combat aircraft," said Capt. John Dziminowicz, Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing 10. "I treasure these opportunities to acknowledge the excellent men and women who make our Force a capable, formidable tool for war fighting commanders across the globe."

Command Support Professional

Awarded to Hospital Corpsman 3rd Class(AW) Maurice Brown, of Fleet Air Reconnaissance Squadron Two (VQ-2). Brown ensured squadron medical readiness in the midst of a complex homeport move from Rota, Spain to NAS Whidbey and with consistent attention to detail, enabled the smooth and on-time deployment of 22 detachments,

Maintenance Professional

Awarded to Aviation Ordnanceman 1st Class (AW) Donald Weatherby of VP-1 (VP-1). Weatherby achieved numerous qualifications including Safe for Flight (releasing aircraft for flight), a position not normally achieved by a first class petty officer. His leadership in Maintenance Control was instrumental in executing over 40 percent of VP-1's flight hours, and resulted in zero discrepancies for the ordnance shop during the most recent Aviation Maintenance Inspection.

Aircrewman

Aviation Electronics Technician 1st Class (AW/NA) Joseph Medina of VQ-1 was recognized for his leadership as president of VQ-1s 1st Class Petty Officer Association, leading 77 first class petty officers in numerous volunteer efforts. He authored and taught 15 avionics presentations, trained 29 aircrew, significantly increasing the squadron's operational readiness. As Aircrew Detachment leading petty officer he trained and led eight aircrewmen in the repair of 40 in-flight discrepancies, resulting in a 100 percent sortie completion rate.

Enlisted Instructor

Aviation Structural Mechanic (Safety Equipment) 2nd Class (AW/NA) Kyle Musto, VP-46s top Flight Engineer, played an integral part in training 18 flight engineers, instructor pilots, and observers. As an instructor and handpicked as primary Flight Engineer Evaluator, he administered check rides and proctored positional exams, while racking up over 390 aircraft hours and 200 simulator hours as an instructor.

Officer Instructor

Lt. Edward Kribs, also of VP-46, recognized as the officer instructor of the year, attained every qualification available to a first tour pilot, with 450 hours as an aircraft commander and over 200 as an instructor. Leading the VP-46 training department, often under challenging conditions, he directly contributed to the qualification of 15 plane commanders and pilots and sat on 28 qualification boards.

Aviator

Lt. Jeffery Walker of VQ-1 is a fully qualified Senior Evaluator and Mission Commander and has been an outstanding performer during unit evaluations, achieving his warfare qualification 10 months ahead of the Wing 10 goal. While accumulating over 900 flight hours, including 263 combat hours, he remains committed to mentoring other junior officers. His guidance as NFO training officer significantly reduced training time for NFO "upgraders."

Electronic Warfare Crew

VQ-2s Combat Reconnaissance Crew 24 has flown 233 mishap-free combat hours in Operation Iraqi Freedom and for the Coalition Forces Maritime Component Commander in the Arabian Gulf. They spent 71 days in the Central Command Area of Responsibility, during which time they were the sole provider of threat intelligence that saved American lives during an OIF combat mission. As the first to arrive in response to troops under fire, they increased the situational awareness and security of ground forces under attack.

Flight Crew

VP-40s Combat Aircrew 6 flew over 170 combat flight hours in support of Operation Enduring Freedom-Philippines, providing real-time imagery and data collection for forces on the ground. Due to their professionalism and dedication to performance, they maintained 100 percent readiness throughout the home cycle and qualified three designated aircrew instructors.

Junior Officer Leader Excellence

Lt. Michael Haymon of VP-40 is a combat-tested veteran, who flew over 107 flight hours in support of OEF-P, and is directly responsible for his crew's unprecedented success in providing crucial information to ground forces. As the senior naval flight officer instructor he ensured compliance and currency of all 26 NFO's, leading them through the last Seventh Fleet deployment.

Peer Leadership

The Navy and Marine Association recognized the following individuals based on votes by their peers.

E-7 to E-9 category, Senior Chief Aviation Machinist Mate (AW/NA) Glenn Grimmer, VP-1

Junior Officer (O-1 to O-3) category, Lt. Dennis Jensen, VP-40

Department Head (O-4) category, Lt. Cmdr. Steven Richards, VP-46

Command (O-6) category, Cmdr. Raymond Keledei, VP-46

Dziminowicz closed the ceremony with thanks to all the men and women of Wing 10 who faced and mastered the numerous challenges in 2005, both here at home and around the world.

© 2006 Sound Publishing, Inc.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY:  History ThumbnailCameraPhoto by PH2 Chris Perkins "...Screaming Eagles receive warm welcome - By Lt.j.g. Gavin Defreitas - Screaming Eagles' reporter - Friday, January 6, 2006..." WebSite: Northwest Navigator http://www.northwestnavigator.com/index.php/navigator/whidbey/screaming_eagles_receive_warm_welcome/ [06JAN2005]

Photograph Caption: VP-1's Commanding Officer Cmdr. F.J. Nielsen III exchanges gifts with JMSDF Patrol Squadron Four's Commanding Officer Capt. Fusahiko Yamasaku.

The Screaming Eagles of VP-1 (VP-1) recently arrived at Misawa Air Base to conduct a six-month deployment in support of Commander Task Force 72.

As the squadron settles into their new surroundings in beautiful Northern Japan they were graciously welcomed by the Japanese Maritime Self Defense Force (JMSDF) Patrol Squadron Four "Blacky's." While on deployment, the Blacky's will be the Screaming Eagle's sister squadron.

The two squadrons will host social functions to promote friendship and build bonds that will increase the operational effectiveness of both nations during multi-lateral operations.

Based in Hachinohe, Japan, the VP-4 Blacky's are led by Capt. Fusahiko Yamasaku. A graduate of the National Defense Academy with an Electrical Engineering degree, he started his career in 1983 with VP-2 also based in Hachinohe. After being promoted to captain on July 1, 2002, he then took over as commanding officer of the Air Systems Programming Center in Atsugi. At the end of that tour he entered into his current position as commanding officer of the VP-4 Blacky's.

The Exchange of Memories Ceremony took place in Hangar 970. During the ceremony, Commanding Officer Fredrick J. Nielsen III, introduced Yamasaku to his wardroom initiating the festivities.

"It is my pleasure to be hosting VP-1," said Yamasaku, adding, "We look forward to flying with your squadron."

After this introduction, the two leaders exchanged mementos and posed for photographs.

In the months to follow, the Screaming Eagles will host the Blacky's wardroom, conducting tactical discussions as well as other events. The JMSDF VP-4 squadron will host their own Anti-Submarine Warfare conference involving aircrew from both countries.

Both squadrons will be attempting bilateral training at the end of the winter season in an effort to keep improving on their ASW prowess.

Keeping good relations with our host country provides great opportunities for aircrew from both respective forces to interact with each other while continuing to hone precision ASW skills. Nielsen and Yamasaku's exchange ceremony initiated a warm rapport with the MSDF's finest, VP-4.

© 2006 Sound Publishing, Inc.


Circa 2005

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCamera050308-N-8770A-006 Whidbey Island, Wash. (Mar. 8, 2005) "...Culinary Specialist Seaman Desiree Thomas of Roanoke Rapids, N.C., left, and Culinary Specialist 3rd Class Mary Wright of Fayetteville, N.C., prepare a food display to be used at the Admiral Nimitz Dining Hall on board Naval Air Station Whidbey Island, Wash. Petty Officer Thomas is assigned to Patrol Squadron Six Nine (VP-69) and Petty Officer Wright is assigned to Patrol Squadron One (VP-1). U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 3rd Class Elizabeth Acosta (RELEASED) ..." WebSite: NavyNews http://www.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=22623 [12AUG2006]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Screaming Eagles prepare to deploy - By Lt.j.g. Gavin DeFreitas - Screaming Eagles' reporter - Friday, December 16, 2005..." WebSite: Northwest Navigator http://www.northwestnavigator.com/ [16DEC2005]

Waiting for permission to post article.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...VP-1 maintenance scores high on inspection - By Lt. Chris Peyton - VP-1 reporter - Friday, October 28, 2005..." WebSite: Northwest Navigator http://www.northwestnavigator.com/ [28OCT2005]

Waiting for permission to post article.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VP History ThumbnailCamera050809-N-3622P-001 Whidbey Island, Wash. (Aug. 9, 2005) "...Aviation Machinist's Mate 3rd Class Geovanny Tremino, assigned to Patrol Squadron One (VP-1), changes a fuel filter on a P-3C Orion airplane. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 2nd Class Chris Perkins (RELEASED)..." WebSite: Navy Newsstand http://www.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=27041 [20AUG2005]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...VP-46, VP-69 join forces - By JO2(SW) Alicia Boatwright - Naval Air Reserve - Friday, August 12, 2005..." WebSite: Northwest Navigator http://www.northwestnavigator.com/ [14AUG2005]

Waiting for permission to post article.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Screaming Eagles take part in Hawaii SinkEx - By Lt.j.g Christopher Kenney Screaming Eagles' reporter - Friday, July 1, 2005..." WebSite: Northwest Navigator http://www.northwestnavigator.com/ [03JUL2005]

Waiting for permission to post article.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...AOs pass test with flying colors - By Lt.j.g. Chris Kenney - Screaming Eagles' reporter - Friday, April 29, 2005..." WebSite: Northwest Navigator http://www.northwestnavigator.com/index.php/navigator/ [08MAY2005]

Waiting for permission to post article.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Nielsen takes command of VP-1 - By Lt.j.g. Chris Kenney - Screaming Eagles' reporter - Friday, April 15, 2005..." WebSite: Northwest Navigator http://www.northwestnavigator.com/ [18APR2005]

Waiting for permission to post article.


Circa 2004

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY:  History ThumbnailCameraPhoto by PH2 Scott Taylor "...Ashes, ashes, all fall down - By JO1(SW) Daniel Sanford - Staff Writer - Thursday, October 7, 2004..." WebSite: Northwest Naviagor http://www.northwestnavigator.com/index.php/navigator/news/ashes_ashes_all_fall_down/ [08DEC2005]

Photograph Description: Mount St. Helens emits a plume of steam and ash recently from an area of new crevasses in the crater glacier south of the 1980-86 lava dome. The event lasted approximately 25 minutes and created a pale-gray cloud that reached an altitude of almost 10,000 feet. The image was taken at an altitude of 27,000 feet aboard a U.S. Navy P-3C Orion aircraft assigned to the "Screaming Eagles" of Patrol Squadron One (VP-1) stationed at NAS Whidbey Island, Washington.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY:  History ThumbnailCameraVP-1 History "...VP-1 Screaming Eagles take part in Vinson COMPTUEX - By Screaming Eagles' reporter - Friday, November 5, 2004..." WebSite: Northwest Naviagor http://www.northwestnavigator.com/index.php/navigator/whidbey/vp_1_screaming_eagles_take_part_in_vinson_comptuex/ [07MAR2005]

Recently, Combat Air Crew 6 (CAC-6) of Patrol Squadron One participated in the Composite Training Unit Exercise, or COMPTUEX, for the USS Carl Vinson Aircraft Carrier Strike Group. The exercise involved multiple ships such as destroyers, frigates, guided-missile cruisers and the USS Carl Vinson. The setting was sunny Southern California and the waters off the coast.

The P-3C brings a host of capabilities to the fight and to be a fully qualified combat aircrew, part of the training process involves real-world scenarios such as flying and working with ships, other aircraft and submarines.

COMPTUEX provided an ideal environment as well as an opportunity to complete the remainder of CAC-6's qualification process. VP-1 continues to send aircrews to Southern California to participate in these exercises so that they may receive quality training and to become fully integrated into the Carrier Strike Groups and Expeditionary Strike Groups prior to their deployment.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY:  History ThumbnailCamera040215-N-9500T-001 Naval Air Facility, Okinawa, Japan (Feb. 15, 2004) "...Aviation Ordnanceman 3rd Class Rommel Pineda, left, of San Diego, Calif., and Aviation Ordnanceman 1st Class Donald Weatherby, right, of Jacksonville, Fla., inspect a MK 65 Quick-Strike airborne mine after loading it onto a P-3C Orion patrol aircraft assigned to the "Screaming Eagles" of Patrol Squadron One (VP-1). The MK-65 is a 2000-pound weapon used against submarine and surface ship targets. VP-1 is stationed at Naval Air Station Whidbey Island, Wash. and are currently on a schedule six-month deployment. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 2nd Class Scott Taylor. (RELEASED)..." Navy News Stand http://newshome.news.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=11936 [05MAR2005]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY:  History ThumbnailCamera040415-N-3770P-001 Kadena Air Base, Okinawa, Japan (Apr. 15, 2004) "...Aviation Structural Mechanic 3rd Class Bryan Brinkley, of Atlanta, Ga., repairs a nose radome on a P-3 Orion aircraft assigned to the "Screaming Eagles" of Patrol Squadron One (VP-1). U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate Airman Jesse Praino. (RELEASED)..." Navy News Stand http://newshome.news.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=13417 [04MAR2005]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY:  History ThumbnailCamera040506-N-3770P-004 Kadena Air Base, Okinawa, Japan (May 6, 2004) "...Aviation Ordnanceman Airman Noe Jiminez assigned to the "Screaming Eagles" of Patrol Squadron One (VP-1), performs a proficiency load of an inert Mark 62 Quick Strike Mine for a P-3C Orion aircraft. U.S. Navy photo By Photographer's Mate Airman Jesse Praino. (RELEASED)..." Navy News Stand http://newshome.news.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=13896 [04MAR2005]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY:  History ThumbnailCamera040524-N-3770P-003 Japan (May 24, 2004) "...Aviation Machinist's Mate Airman Alvin Toves, from Guam, installs an "O" ring on the prop housing for a P-3 Orion aircraft assigned to the "Screaming Eagles" of Patrol Squadron One (VP-1). VP-1 is currently deployed to Japan, and is based out of Naval Air Station Whidbey Island. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 3rd Class Jesse Praino (RELEASED)..." Navy News Stand http://newshome.news.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=14295 [03MAR2005]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY:  History ThumbnailCamera040604-N-2976H-004 Naval Air Station Whidbey Island, Wash. (Jun. 4, 2004) "...Airmen Chris Bregel of Patrol Squadron One (VP-1) directs a P-3 Orion carrying squadron crew members returning home to Naval Air Station (NAS) Whidbey Island after a six-month deployment to Japan. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 1st Class John D. Hamill (RELEASED)..." Navy News Stand http://newshome.news.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=14750 [03MAR2005]


Circa 2003

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Naval forces begin return home as war in Iraq subsides - Sea Power, May 2003 by BURGESS, Richard R. rburgess@navyleague.org..." http://www.findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_qa3738/is_200305/ai_n9206235 [27MAR2005]

One S-3B Viking assigned to Sea Control Squadron 38 launched-for the first time in the aircraft's combat history-an AGM-85E Maverick missile against an Iraqi naval vessel that was targeted by a laser from an F/A18. AIP (Aircraft Improvement Program) versions of P-3C Orions assigned to VP-46-augmented by VP-1, VP-40, and VP-47-employed their long-range optical surveillance systems to provide targeting for coalition forces, including Air Force AC-130 gunships. Saddam Hussein's personal yacht was destroyed by Navy F/A-18 Hornets.

One surprising participant in the war was Air Test & Evaluation Squadron 30, which dispatched its sole DC-130A drone-launch aircraft to the war zone. The ancient aircraft was used to launch Vietnam-era Firebee drones over Baghdad to drop radar-jamming chaff and, until they ran out of fuel, to circle the city as decoys to draw anti-aircraft fire away from coalition strike aircraft.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY:  History ThumbnailCamera030319-N-5640H-004 Kanoya, Japan (Mar 19, 2003) "...Cmdr. Daniel Rieke, Executive Officer of VP-9 presents Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force (JMSDF) Rear Adm. Matsuoka, assigned to 1st Flight Group / 1st Flight Squadron (VP-1), Kanoya AB with a "Golden Eagles" hat and a photo of a U.S. Navy P-3C Orion flying near Japan's Mt. Fuji. The Japanese naval aviators hosted VP-9 in an event called "The Bonds of Friendship," where both American and Japanese Sailors interacted in various activities. The two squadrons fly the P-3C Orion anti-submarine aircraft. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 1st Class Evelyn P. Haywood. (RELEASED)..." Navy News Stand http://newshome.news.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=6151 [07MAR2005]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY:  History ThumbnailCamera030902-N-3770P-001 Naval Air Station Whidbey Island, Wash. (Sep. 2, 2003) "...Airman Gabriel Thorne, assigned to the "Screaming Eagles" of Patrol Squadron One (VP-1), takes fuel samples from a P-3 Orion in preparation for flight. Gabriel is in training for his aircraft surveillance qualification. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate Airman Jesse Praino. (RELEASED)..." Navy News Stand http://newshome.news.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=9364 [05MAR2005]


Circa 2002

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VP-1 History Orion ThumbnailCamera021101-N-4374S-052 Central Command Area of Operation (Nov. 1, 2002) "...Aviation Electrician's Mate 2nd Class Steve Rapp, a flight engineer assigned to the "Screaming Eagles" of Patrol Squadron One (VP-1), performs a post flight inspection on the number two engine aboard a P-3C "Orion" after completing a routine flight mission. The P-3C "Orion" is a land-based, long-range, anti-submarine warfare (ASW) and reconnaissance patrol aircraft. VP-1 is homeported at Whidbey Island, Wash., and is on a regularly scheduled six-month deployment, conducting missions in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 2nd Class Michael Sandberg. (RELEASED)..." WebSite: Navy NewsStand http://www.news.navy.mil/ [22FEB2003]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VP-1 History Orion ThumbnailCamera021101-N-4374S-030 Central Command Area of Operation (Nov. 1, 2002) "...Lt. Cmdr. Gilbert Hageman, a pilot assigned to the "Screaming Eagles" of Patrol Squadron One (VP-1), monitors the gauges aboard a P-3C "Orion" during a routine mission. The "Orion" is a land-based, long-range, anti-submarine warfare (ASW) and reconnaissance patrol aircraft. VP-1 is homeported at Whidbey Island, Wash., and is on a regularly scheduled six-month deployment, conducting missions in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 2nd Class Michael Sandberg. (RELEASED)..." WebSite: Navy NewsStand http://www.news.navy.mil/ [22FEB2003]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VP-1 History Orion ThumbnailCamera021024-N-4374S-030 Central Command Area of Operation (Oct. 24, 2002) "...Sailors assigned to the "Screaming Eagles" of Patrol Squadron One (VP-1) make an adjustment to a water hose while they wash a P-3C "Orion" on the flight line. VP-1 is based in Whidbey Island, Wash., and is on a regularly scheduled six-month deployment to the Middle East conducting missions in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 2nd Class Michael Sandberg. (RELEASED)..." WebSite: Navy NewsStand http://newshome.news.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=3084 [08MAR2005]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VP-1 History Orion ThumbnailCamera021022-N-4374S-029 Central Command Area of Operation (Oct. 22, 2002) "...A crewmember assigned to the "Screaming Eagles" of Patrol Squadron One (VP-1) walks up the boarding ladder of a P-3C "Orion" as they prepare to depart on a reconnaissance mission over the Arabian Gulf. The P-3C is a land-based, long-range, anti-submarine warfare (ASW) and reconnaissance patrol aircraft. VP-1 is based in Whidbey Island, Wash., and is on a regularly scheduled six-month deployment to the Middle East, conducting missions in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 2nd Class Michael Sandberg. (RELEASED)..." WebSite: Navy NewsStand http://newshome.news.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=3062 [09MAR2005]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VP-1 History Orion ThumbnailCamera021022-N-4374S-037 Central Command Area of Operation (Oct. 22, 2002) "...Aviation Electrician's Mate 2nd Class Jesse Olmstead, a flight engineer assigned to the "Screaming Eagles" of Patrol Squadron One (VP-1), calculates the fuel duration planning for a P-3C "Orion" for an upcoming flight mission to conduct reconnaissance over the Arabian Gulf. The P-3C is a land-based, long-range, anti-submarine warfare (ASW) and reconnaissance patrol aircraft. VP-1 is based in Whidbey Island, Wash., and is on a regularly scheduled six-month deployment to the Middle East, conducting missions in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 2nd Class Michael Sandberg. (RELEASED)..." WebSite: Navy NewsStand http://newshome.news.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=3063 [09MAR2005]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VP-1 History Orion ThumbnailCamera021022-N-4374S-042 Central Command Area of Operation (Oct. 22, 2002) "...Aviation Anti-Submarine Warfare Operator 2nd Class Brian Walker assigned to the "Screaming Eagles" of Patrol Squadron One (VP-1), conducts safety observer duties during start up procedures on the number three and number four engines aboard a P-3C "Orion." Aircrew personnel were preparing for departure on a reconnaissance mission over the Arabian Gulf. The P-3C is a land-based, long-range, anti-submarine warfare (ASW) and reconnaissance patrol aircraft. VP-1 is based in Whidbey Island, Wash., and is on a regularly scheduled six-month deployment to the Middle East, conducting missions in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 2nd Class Michael Sandberg. (RELEASED)..." WebSite: Navy NewsStand http://newshome.news.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=3065 [09MAR2005]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VP-1 History Orion ThumbnailCamera021022-N-4374S-060 Central Command Area of Operation (Oct. 22, 2002) "...Members assigned to the "Screaming Eagles" of Patrol Squadron One (VP-1) share some laughter on a short break during a reconnaissance mission over the Arabian Gulf aboard a P-3C "Orion." Missions of this type last for several hours. Breaks help keep aircrew personnel fresh at their workstations. The P-3C is a land-based, long-range, anti-submarine warfare (ASW) and reconnaissance patrol aircraft. VP-1 is based in Whidbey Island, Wash., and is on a regularly scheduled six-month deployment to the Middle East, conducting missions in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 2nd Class Michael Sandberg. (RELEASED)..." WebSite: Navy NewsStand http://newshome.news.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=3066 [09MAR2005]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VP-1 History Orion ThumbnailCamera021022-N-4374S-062 Central Command Area of Operation (Oct. 22, 2002) "...Aviation Anti-Submarine Warfare Operator 1st Class John Clark, an electronic warfare operator assigned to the "Screaming Eagles" of Patrol Squadron One (VP-1), monitors contacts on the screen with an Airborne Integrated Mapping System (AIMS) digital camera aboard a P-3C "Orion" while conducting a reconnaissance mission over the Arabian Gulf. The P-3C is a land-based, long-range, anti-submarine warfare (ASW) and reconnaissance patrol aircraft. VP-1 is based in Whidbey Island, Wash., and is on a regularly scheduled six-month deployment to the Middle East, conducting missions in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 2nd Class Michael Sandberg. (RELEASED)..." WebSite: Navy NewsStand http://newshome.news.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=3067 [09MAR2005]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VP-1 History Orion ThumbnailCamera021022-N-4374S-069 Central Command Area of Operation (Oct. 22, 2002) "...Aviation Machinist's Mate 2nd Class Steve Rodriguez, flight engineer assigned to the "Screaming Eagles" of Patrol Squadron One (VP-1), displays a patch on his flight suite in remembrance of the tragic events of September 11, 2001, while conducting a reconnaissance mission over the Arabian Gulf on board a P-3C "Orion." The P-3C is a land-based, long-range, anti-submarine warfare (ASW) and reconnaissance patrol aircraft. VP-1 is based in Whidbey Island, Wash., and is on a regularly scheduled six-month deployment to the Middle East, conducting missions in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 2nd Class Michael Sandberg. (RELEASED)..." WebSite: Navy NewsStand http://newshome.news.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=3069 [08MAR2005]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VP-1 History Orion ThumbnailCamera021022-N-4374S-015 Central Command Area of Operation (Oct. 22, 2002) "...Lt. Dan Johnson, a U.S. Navy P-3 pilot assigned to the "Screaming Eagles" of Patrol Squadron One (VP-1), rides a mini-van with other crewmembers while being transported to their aircraft. The P-3C is a land-based, long-range, anti-submarine warfare (ASW) and reconnaissance patrol aircraft. VP-1 is based in Whidbey Island, Wash., and is on a regularly scheduled six-month deployment to the Middle East, conducting missions in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 2nd Class Michael Sandberg. (RELEASED)..." WebSite: Navy NewsStand http://www.news.navy.mil/ [22FEB2003]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VP-1 History Orion ThumbnailCamera021022-N-4374S-081 Central Command Area of Operation (Oct. 22, 2002) "...Lt. j.g. Joy Zelinski, an Aviation Intelligence Officer assigned to the "Screaming Eagles" of Patrol Squadron One (VP-1), conducts an intelligence brief to crewmembers preparing for a flight mission. VP-1 is based in Whidbey Island, Wash., and is on a regularly scheduled six-month deployment to the Middle East, conducting missions in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 2nd Class Michael Sandberg. (RELEASED)..." WebSite: Navy NewsStand http://www.news.navy.mil/ [22FEB2003]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VP-1 History Orion ThumbnailCamera021022-N-4374S-181 Central Command Area of Operation (Oct. 22, 2002) "...Lt. j.g. Dave Snyder, a pilot assigned to the "Screaming Eagles" of Patrol Squadron One (VP-1) steps down from the boarding ladder of a P-3C "Orion" after the completion of a reconnaissance mission over the Arabian Gulf. The P-3C "Orion" is a land-based, long-range, anti-submarine warfare (ASW) and reconnaissance patrol aircraft. VP-1 is homeported at Whidbey Island, Wash., and is on a regularly scheduled six-month deployment, conducting missions in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 2nd Class Michael Sandberg. (RELEASED)..." WebSite: Navy NewsStand http://www.news.navy.mil/ [22FEB2003]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VP-1 History Orion ThumbnailCamera021022-N-4374S-079 Central Command Area of Operation (Oct. 22, 2002) "...The pilot and flight engineer assigned to the "Screaming Eagles" of Patrol Squadron One (VP-1), work together as they prepare to land a P-3C "Orion" upon return from a reconnaissance mission over the Arabian Gulf. VP-1 is based in Whidbey Island, Wash., and is on a regularly scheduled six-month deployment to the Middle East, conducting missions in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 2nd Class Michael Sandberg. (RELEASED)..." WebSite: Navy NewsStand http://www.news.navy.mil/ [22FEB2003]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VP-1 History Orion ThumbnailCamera021022-N-4374S-066 Central Command Area of Operation (Oct. 22, 2002) "...Aviation Antisubmarine Warfare Operator 1st Class Richard Smith, assigned to the "Screaming Eagles" of Patrol Squadron One (VP-1), studies a Naval Air Training and Operating Procedures Standardization (NATOPS) aviation flight manual, while conducting a reconnaissance mission over the Arabian Gulf in a P-3C "Orion." The P-3C is a land-based, long-range, anti-submarine warfare (ASW) and reconnaissance patrol aircraft. VP-1 is based in Whidbey Island, Wash., and is on a regularly scheduled six-month deployment to the Middle East, conducting missions in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 2nd Class Michael Sandberg. (RELEASED)..." WebSite: Navy NewsStand http://www.news.navy.mil/ [22FEB2003]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VP-1 History Orion ThumbnailCamera021022-N-4374S-040 Central Command Area of Operation (Oct. 22, 2002) "...Aviation Anti-Submarine Warfare Operator 2nd Class Brian Walker assigned to the "Screaming Eagles" of Patrol Squadron One (VP-1) hooks the leg strap on his SV-2 Survival Vest aboard a P-3C "Orion" during preparations for an upcoming reconnaissance mission over the Arabian Gulf. The P-3C is a land-based, long-range, anti-submarine warfare (ASW) and reconnaissance patrol aircraft. VP-1 is based in Whidbey Island, Wash., and is on a regularly scheduled six-month deployment to the Middle East, conducting missions in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 2nd Class Michael Sandberg. (RELEASED)..." WebSite: Navy NewsStand http://www.news.navy.mil/ [22FEB2003]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VP-1 History Orion ThumbnailCamera021022-N-4374S-025 Central Command Area of Operation (Oct. 22, 2002) "...Aviation Machinist's Mate 2nd Class Steve Rodriguez, a flight engineer assigned to the "Screaming Eagles" of Patrol Squadron One (VP-1) carefully monitors the refueling evolution on a P-3C "Orion" during preparations for an upcoming flight mission. The P-3C is a land-based, long-range, anti-submarine warfare (ASW) and reconnaissance patrol aircraft. VP-1 is based in Whidbey Island, Wash., and is on a regularly scheduled six-month deployment to the Middle East, conducting missions in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 2nd Class Michael Sandberg. (RELEASED)..." WebSite: Navy NewsStand http://www.news.navy.mil/ [22FEB2003]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VP-1 History Orion ThumbnailCamera021022-N-4374S-017 Central Command Area of Operation (Oct. 22, 2002) "...Crewmembers assigned to the "Screaming Eagles" of Patrol Squadron One (VP-1) approach a P-3C "Orion" patrol aircraft to conduct a reconnaissance mission over the Arabian Gulf. The P-3C is a land-based, long-range, anti-submarine warfare (ASW) and reconnaissance patrol aircraft. VP-1 is based in Whidbey Island, Wash., and is on a regularly scheduled six-month deployment to the Middle East, conducting missions in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 2nd Class Michael Sandberg. (RELEASED)..." WebSite: Navy NewsStand http://www.news.navy.mil/ [22FEB2003]


Circa 2001

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Patrol Squadron 1 Locates Missing Vessel Near Guam - Lt. Cmdr. Steve Deal, Patrol Squadron 1 Public Affairs - Posted: 04/12/01..." WebSite: United States Navy http://www.c7f.navy.mil/news/2001/04/14.htm [28AUG2006]

WESTERN PACIFIC – Less than one month after saving six stranded mariners south of Guam, two Patrol Squadron 1 (VP-1) aircrews deployed to Kadena Air Base, Japan, teamed on a 20-hour mission April 11 to rescue three Micronesian mariners lost at sea in an 18-foot fiberglass.

Combat Air Crew 2, led by Lt. Kevin Queen, mission commander, and Lt. Chris Rush, patrol plane commander, were dispatched April 10 to Guam as a ready alert launch to begin the search.

The lost craft, containing three men 30 to 52 years old, departed Pulusuk Island, 420 NM southeast of Guam March 9 at 5 a.m. local time. The vessel never returned to port.

On April 10, the United States Coast Guard (USCG) Marianas Section (MARSEC) requested airborne search and rescue assistance from Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Commander, Task Force 72, which immediately dispatched the VP-1 P-3C from Okinawa to Andersen Air Force Base, Guam.

"This is the second time in a month that this squadron has spotted someone for us," said USCG Quartermaster 2nd Class Andrea Martynowski, watch officer at MARSEC during the rescue event. "There have been a lot of Chuuk Island cases which go on for 11 or 12 days or more, and sometimes the vessels are never found.

"To have an aircrew spot them this quickly is great. This is the best turnaround I've ever seen," she said.

"The crew is pumped," said Queen immediately after the rescue. "This is exciting stuff. To get out on station and find them on the first day was a rush."

While searching for the lost vessel, the VP-1 crew used a marine VHF radio to contact inhabitants of local islands, querying for information regarding the vessel's whereabouts. During this search, the vessel in distress heard the crew's calls, and responded.

Utilizing radio reception quality to rule out sectors of the area, the crew homed in on the ever-strengthening voice of the lost mariners. Thirteen minutes after initial radio contact, the lost vessel spotted the flashing strobe lights of the P-3C and vectored the aircrew via radio to locate its position.

A few minutes later, the crew dropped a search and rescue (SAR) kit, consisting of emergency provisions, equipment and rafts, alongside the fiberglass craft. After assuring the lost mariners had recovered the kit, the crew searched for nearby island inhabitants and surface vessel traffic to provide further assistance.

Getting low on fuel, the crew dropped a sonobuoy marking the boat's position, and Rescue Coordination Center Guam vectored a Federated States of Micronesia (FSS) patrol craft to the rescue scene. The FSS would arrive on scene nine hours later. Meanwhile, VP-1's Combat Aircrew 3, manning a second VP-1 aircraft in Guam, was on its way to relieve the aircraft on scene.

After an in-flight turnover, Crew 3, led by Lt. Kingsley Greene, mission commander, and Lt. Brian T. Le, plane commander, located the lost boat and remained on station for more than eight hours until the FSS patrol craft completed the final rescue.

"Saving lives on a SAR mission is something we all think of," said Le after the mission. "To be part of a combined squadron effort so shortly after the first save was amazing. We were just glad to help."

VP-1, homeported at NAS Whidbey Island, Washington, is completing a six-month deployment to Kadena and Misawa, Japan.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Bravo Zulu - ADAN Keith Hasby VP-1 - Mech January-March 2001..." WebSite: Naval Safety Center http://www.safetycenter.navy.mil/MEDIA/mech/issues/janmar01/JanMar01BZs.htm [30JUN2006]

While doing a final walkaround inspection before launching a P-3 for an operational-readiness-evaluation flight at NAS Whidbey Island, Wash., ADAN Hasby noticed the access panel for the heat-exchanger fan on the port side had 12 screws missing. He immediately notified maintenance and had the launch postponed until someone could account for the screws.

The aircraft had just emerged from phase inspection the day before ADAN Hasby discovered the discrepancy. This panel is next to the APU, which operates at 130db and is an awkward location between the No. 2 prop and the fuselage. Despite these factors, ADAN Hasby's keen attention to detail and decisive actions prevented the aircraft from taking off with a potentially deadly FOD hazard.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Squadrons bring memorable deployment to a close at Misawa - By Wayne Specht, Misawa bureau chief - Pacific edition, Saturday, June 9, 2001 - Stars and Strips..." http://www.stripes.osd.mil/article.asp?section=104&article=2459&archive=true [07APR2003]

Squadrons bring memorable deployment to a close at Misawa
By Wayne Specht, Misawa bureau chief
Pacific edition, Saturday, June 9, 2001

MISAWA AIR BASE, Japan — Navy patrol squadrons preparing to leave after a six-month deployment took part in a number of important training exercises and one high-profile international incident.

The "Grey Knights" of VP-46 are swapping deployments as the VP-1 "Screaming Eagles" return to their home base of Whidbey Island Naval Air Station, Wash. Every six months, Navy patrol squadrons rotate P-3 Orion sub-hunter aircraft and crews.

For VP-1 flyers, the deployment to the Western Pacific had its share of drama after an EP-3E Aries II reconnaissance plane made emergency landing April 1 on China's Hainan island.

As diplomatic negotiations between the United States and China began, VP-1 crews at Misawa were busy preparing a P-3 aircraft to retrieve the 24 crewmembers, of which nine are from Misawa and one from Kadena.

Equipment was removed from the Misawa P-3 so it was light enough to fly as many of the crewmembers out of China as possible.

"VP-1's response was immediate due to the then-time-critical element of getting the plane and crew out of there as soon as possible," said Lt. Alan Vaughn, VP-1's public affairs officer.

That airplane also was designated to fly spare parts to Hainan island so the EP-3 could return to Kadena, where it began the ill-fated mission.

"Moments after the plane landed in China, we were placed on a heightened state of alert," Vaughn said.

"We worked closely with VQ-1 to determine the parts needed to be taken to China, which initially was all based on speculation since (at that time) the precise damage to the EP-3 was still unknown," he said.

VQ-1, a reconnaissance squadron from Whidbey where the EP-3 is assigned, has a detachment at Misawa.

All of this was happening, Vaughn said, hours before the world press got the news about the incident.

Within 12 hours of the EP-3's emergency landing, all parts were flown to Okinawa ready to be loaded aboard an Air Force C-17 cargo aircraft.

"Of course, when it became clear China wasn't about to let us fly in and fly the EP-3 out, our logistical support of VQ-1 took a back seat," Vaughn said.

During their deployment to Misawa, the Screaming Eagles flew more than 5,100 flight hours operating out of Japan, Korea, Hong Kong, Malaysia, Indonesia, Singapore, the Philippines, Thailand, Australia and Guam.

Vaughn said deployment tasks during the six-month deployment included tracking submarines, monitoring international shipping, drug interdictions and successful search-and-rescue operations.

Crews also flew joint anti-submarine warfare operations with the Singapore navy, and took part in Operation Tandem Thrust in Australia and Operation Cobra Gold in Thailand.

They trained with South Korea's 6th Cavalry Apache Unit, the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, and worked with the USS Kitty Hawk Battle group and the ESSEX Amphibious Readiness Group.

"We had high expectations for VP-1 this deployment," said Lt. Cmdr. Steve Haddad, VP-1's operations officer. "Crews performed remarkably while on station tackling every challenge with enthusiasm."


Circa 2000

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Kitty Hawk battle group led rescue work after collision - By Wayne Specht, Misawa bureau chief - Pacific edition, Saturday, November 18, 2000 - Stars and Strips..." http://www.stripes.osd.mil/article.asp?section=104&article=5180&archive=true [07APR2003]

Kitty Hawk battle group led rescue work after collision
By Wayne Specht, Misawa bureau chief
Pacific edition, Saturday, November 18, 2000

MISAWA AIR BASE, Japan — The Yokusuka-based USS Kitty Hawk battle group coordinated rescue efforts following Monday's midair collision between two Misawa F-16 fighters.

Capt. Warren Sneed, assigned to Misawa's 14th Fighter Squadron, died following a collision with pilot Col. Michael Lepper, 35th Operations Group commander. Sneed is still missing and is presumed dead; Lepper survived the accident.

First on the crash scene near Hokkaido were S-3B Viking anti-submarine warfare aircraft from the Kitty Hawk battle group.

The F-16s were taking part in Operation Keen Sword, a bilateral exercise involving American and Japanese military units.

Searchers scoured more than 6,000 square miles of ocean for more than 48 hours before calling off the search for Sneed.

The S-3B aviators with sea control squadron VS-21, assigned to Carrier Air Wing-5 aboard the carrier, took control of the search effort until they were relieved by other Navy aircraft, said Lt. Christopher Roby, a spokesman with Helicopter Squadron-14 aboard the USS Kitty Hawk.

Roby said a E-2C Hawkeye with airborne early warning squadron VAW-115 assumed control of the search and rescue effort, directing helicopters operating from the carrier, which sailed within 30 miles of the crash site.

Helicopters from the USS Kitty Hawk flew 24 sorties, totaling nearly 83 hours.

Roby said additional fixed-wing aircraft assisted with the search for Sneed over the next 48 hours.

"This search was difficult, and often frustrating, because our efforts went without rewards," Roby said. "The loss of a fellow aviator is a great loss to the military."

An EP-3 Aries aircraft from Misawa's VP-1, and a P-3C anti-submarine warfare aircraft with VP-4, on deployment to Misawa from Hawaii, also searched for Sneed.

Over the next two days, six sorties flown by VP-4 aircraft from Misawa flew a total of 43 hours searching for Sneed, said Capt. Richard High, commanding officer of Misawa's Naval Air Facility.

First Lt. Katsuhiro Yanaguida, a 3rd Air Wing spokesman at Misawa, said Japanese Air Self-Defense Forces, and Maritime Self-Defense Force ships taking part in the exercise, also joined in the search.

JASDF helicopters from Chitose Air Base on Hokkaido and from Akita Air Base on Honshu also lent a hand.


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