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HistoryVP-16 HistoryHistory

Circa 2009

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCamera091217-N-2425L-001 AUGUSTINE, Fla. (Dec. 17, 2009) "...Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. Gary Roughead, right, discusses the Ride 2 Recovery Florida Challenge that raises awareness about wounded warriors with Team Navy Jacksonville members Lt. John McLarnan, left, assigned to the War Eagles of VP-16, Ernie Mattison, assigned to Fleet Readiness Center Southeast and Capt. Bruce Gillingham, commanding officer of Naval Hospital Jacksonville, at the World Golf Village. (U.S. Navy photo by Kaylee LaRocque/Released)..." WebSite: NavyNews http://www.navy.mil/ [19DEC2009]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraVP-16 History "...VP-16 Safety Training Goes Interactive by LT(jg) Zach Goldstein - VP-16 PAO - Thursday, December 17, 2009..." WebSite: JaxAirNews http://adserver1.harvestadsdepot.com/jaxairnews/ss/jaxairnews/ [28DEC2009]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraVP-16 History "...VP-16 Forms Family Readiness Group By LT(jg) Zach Goldstein - VP-16 Public Affairs Officer - Thursday October 12, 2009..." WebSite: JaxAirNews http://www.jaxairnews.com/ [13NOV2009]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraVP-16 History "...Commander Congratulates "War Eagles" - Jax Air News, NAS Jacksonville, Florida - Thursday October 29, 2009 - Page 5..." WebSite: JaxAirNews http://www.jaxairnews.com/ [31OCT2009]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Commander U.S. 2nd Fleet Visits VP-16 By MC2 Charles White - Thursday, October 1, 2009..." WebSite: JaxAirNews http://www.jaxairnews.com/ [02OCT2009]

Commander, U.S. Second Fleet Vice Adm. Mel Williams Jr. visited the VP-16 "War Eagles" onboard NAS Jacksonville, Florida Sept. 17 to meet with the men and women who comprise the squadron and recognize them for their support to Second Fleet's mission.

Williams spoke about the importance of maritime patrol and reconnaissance services that the P-3C Orion squadron provides, specifically in the area of anti-submarine warfare (ASW).

"The Navy's P-3s are vital to Second Fleet in the execution of our mission to ensure maritime domain awareness in support of homeland defense," said Williams.

In addition to praising the VP community as a whole, Williams also recognized the VP-16 Maintenance Control, Operations and Intelligence divisions for their individual contributions to mission effectiveness.

During his visit, Williams also toured the recently completed Hangar 511, which is the newest and most modern hangar in the VP community. The structure was designed specifically to support the P-8 Poseidon aircraft which will replace the aging fleet of P-3C Orion aircraft beginning in 2013. It is also the largest and one of few "green" hangars in the U.S. Navy.

VP-16 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Anthony Corapi was appreciative of Williams' visit and recognition of his Sailors. "It means a lot when our senior leadership takes time from their busy schedules to thank the Sailors who make our Navy the best in the world," he said.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCamera090714-N-2491R-045 JACKSONVILLE, Fla. (July 14, 2009) "...Rear Adm. Bill Moran, commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Group, holds an all hands Admiral's call attended by VP-5, VP-8, VP-16, and VPU-1 stationed atNAS Jacksonville, Florida. Moran stressed the importance of the patrol and reconnaissance communities' role in the anti submarine warfare mission and also discussed the upcoming platform transition to the P8 Poseidon from the P-3C Orion aircraft. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Charles E. White/Released)..." WebSite: NavyNews http://www.navy.mil/ [22JUL2009]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCamera090714-N-3013W-035 JACKSONVILLE, Fla. (July, 14 2009) "...Rear Adm. Bill Moran, commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Group, holds an all hands Admiral's call attended by VP-5, VP-8, VP-16, and VPU-1 stationed atNAS Jacksonville, Florida. Moran stressed the importance of the patrol and reconnaissance communities' role in the anti submarine warfare mission and also discussed the upcoming platform transition to the P8 Poseidon from the P-3C Orion aircraft. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Charles E. White/Released)..." WebSite: NavyNews http://www.navy.mil/ [22JUL2009]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCamera090629-N-3013W-041 JACKSONVILLE, Fla. (June 29, 2009) "...Cmdr. Anthony Corapi, commanding officer of VP-16, left, and Cmdr. James R. Debold, assigned to Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing 11, give Admiral Jonathan W. Greenert, commander U.S. Fleet Forces Command, a tour of Naval Air Station Jacksonville's newly finished Hangar 511. The $127 million, 277,000 square-foot building is the largest hangar of its kind in the Navy. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Charles E. White/Released)..." WebSite: NavyNews http://www.navy.mil/ [03JUL2009]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraVP-16 History "...Corapi relieves Creasey as VP-16 commanding officer on Friday - By Lt. j.g. Kevin Harrington - VP-16 Public Affairs Officer - Thursday, May 14, 2009..." WebSite: JaxAirNews http://www.jaxairnews.com/ [20MAY2009]

Cmdr. Anthony Corapi will relieve Cmdr. Mark Creasey as commanding officer of the VP-16 "War Eagles" during a change of command ceremony at NAS Jax tomorrow.

Corapi, a native of Brooklyn, N.Y., is a 1992 graduate of The Citadel. He received his Naval Flight Officer (NFO) "Wings of Gold" in December 1994. His first operational tour was with the VP-10 "Red Lancers" in Brunswick, Maine, where he made deployments to Sigonella, Italy, Puerto Rico and Panama and Keflavik, Iceland. While assigned to VP-10, he served as public affairs officer, ordnance branch officer and NFO NATOPS officer.

In November 1997, he reported to the Fleet Replacement Squadron (VP-30) for assignment as a P-3C NFO instructor. He served in a variety of instructor billets during his tour to include senior NFO Fleet NATOPS evaluator. Corapi was next assigned on board USS Carl Vinson (CVN 70) in January 2001, as the assistant navigator also qualifying as an officer of the deck underway.

During his tour, the carrier launched the first air strikes in support of Operation Enduring Freedom in response to the terrorist attacks on the United States on Sept. 11, 2001. In September 2003, he began his department head tour with the VP- 1 "Screaming Eagles" at Whidbey Island, Wash. He served as the tactics officer, training officer and maintenance officer and deployed to Misawa and Kadena, Japan from December 2003 to June 2004. Corapi reported to the Operations Directorate J3, The Joint Chiefs of Staff, Washington DC. In January 2003. During his tenure, he personally garnered Secretary of Defense and Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff approval for employment of special access program capabilities during highly successful joint exercises in support of United States combatant commands. In May 2008, he reported to VP-16 as executive officer as the War Eagles were headed out for their six-month deployment to the Fourth, Sixth and Seventh Fleets.

"I cannot be more fortunate to be taking command of the finest squadron in the maritime patrol and reconnaissance community. I have never seen a more dedicated, professional group of warriors in my career. We will do great things because everyone in this organization believes in the mission and each other," said Corapi. "I am humbled and honored to be taking the helm from a man who has led us over the past year. Cmdr. Mark Creasey has left me huge shoes to fill. His leadership of this command and friendship to me has been second to none."

Creasey will transfer to Joint Chiefs of Staff, Arlington, Va.

"The past year has been the highlight of my professional career. This team came together in true War Eagle fashion and executed our responsibilities on a very demanding worldwide deployment," stated Creasey. "We did it safely and professionally and we continue to set the standard for our maritime patrol community. I want to thank the Sailors, chiefs' mess and wardroom for their dedication and focus. Diane and I will miss the War Eagles, and we wish all the best to Jill and Anthony Corapi as they take the reins at VP- 16."

Cmdr. Mark Melson joins VP-16 as the executive officer following his tenure as the naval aide to the Vice President of the United States, Washington, D.C.

The War Eagles continue their busy inter-deployment readiness cycle in preparation for their 2010 deployment.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraVP-16 History "...Congressional Staffers Visit Station By Miriam S. Gallet, NAS Jacksonville, Florida Public Affairs Officer ..." WebSite: JaxAirNews http://www.jaxairnews.com/ [27MAR2009]

Photograph Caption: From left, Lt. j.g. Kevin Harrington of VP-16, Elizabeth Drummond, House Armed Services Committee staff assistant, Cmdr. Mark Creasy, VP-16 commanding officer, Ryan Crumpler, military legislative assistant to Rep. "Buck" McKeon (R-CA), NAS Jacksonville, Florida Commanding Officer Capt. Jack Scorby Jr., Lt. David Colberg, Navy Office of Legislative Affairs, Nina Andrews, executive assistant to Rep. Ted Poe (R-TX), Michael Weems, legislative assistant to Rep. Joe Barton (R-TX), Alicia Haley, Ben Glerem, Andrew Tabler, and Zach Steacy, staff assistants, House Armed Services Committee, Lt. Bill Wellman, Navy Office of Legislative Affairs and Cmdr. Anthony Corapi, VP-16 executive officer. (Photos by MC2 Charles White)

NAS Jacksonville, Florida Commanding Officer Capt. Jack Scorby Jr. and other tenant command leadership met with congressional staffers March 14 as they toured various commands and facilities aboard the station.

Ten staffers representing Rep. "Buck" McKeon (R-CA), Rep. Ted Poe (R-TX), Rep. Joe Barton (R-TX) and the House Armed Services Committee, participated in the visit to NAS Jacksonville, Florida to increase their awareness of military activities and projects at the base. They learned about the world-class support NAS Jacksonville, Florida Sailors provide to the nation's and allied forces warfighters. The staffers also learned about the quality of life, facilities and infrastructure here.

The congressional staffers were welcomed by Scorby during a luncheon at Mulligan's Restaurant, where they learned firsthand the important role the station serves within the Departments of the Navy and Defense. Immediately following lunch, the entourage proceeded to Hangar 1000, where CPRW-11 Chief of Staff Cmdr. James DeBold greeted the staffers on behalf of the P-3 community and explained the move of P-3 squadrons from NAS Brunswick, Maine to NAS Jacksonville, Florida. He also discussed the future arrival of the P-8 Multi-Mission Aircraft in 2012. VP-16 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Mark Creasy followed Debold with a brief about the "War Eagles," which included the most recent deployment in support of the war on terror and drug interdiction missions in South America.

According to Lt. David Colberg of the Navy Office of Legislative Affairs House of Representatives, the trip was an educational experience for the staffers. "This is a terrific opportunity for staffers to learn about the Navy. I want to thank Capt. Scorby and the entire NAS Jax team for taking time out of their Saturday schedule to support our staff delegation," Colberg said.

While at Hangar 1000, staffers toured a P-3 parked on the apron and viewed some of the weapons the aircraft is capable of delivering, including MK-46 and MK-50 torpedoes, Harpoon and Maverick missiles, the Standoff Land Attack Missile, Rockeyes, and Mark 80 series bombs.

History ThumbnailCameraVP-16 History AO2 Crystal Toles of VP-16, explains a MK-20 Rockeye bomb to congressional staffers of the Armed Services Committee. The staffers were given a brief about the mission and capabilities of the P-3C Orion which carries the MK-20 as a part of its arsenal.

"This is wonderful. I am glad to be part of the familiarization visit. I have never toured a P-3 before," remarked Elizabeth Drummond, staff assistant on the House Armed Services Committee. The staffers also toured the Rescue Swimmer School (RSS) and Air Survival Training Center (ASTC). Cmdr. Susan Jay, director of ASTC Jacksonville, explained the aviation survival and safety training conducted at the facility while Sailors demonstrated some of the training in various simulators. Lt. Thomas Doane, officer in charge of RSS, gave the staffers a tour of the pool and explained the rigorous training students undergo while at RSS and the significant contribution that it makes to readiness.

According to Colberg, the visit was an "enormously successful trip and a great opportunity for these staffers to be exposed to the great things our Sailors are doing out in the fleet."

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCamera090319-N-3013W-009 JACKSONVILLE, Fla. (March 19, 2009) "...Naval Aircrewman 2nd Class Clinton Keyte assists in the maintenance on engine number one of a P-3C Orion assigned to the "War Eagles" of VP-16. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Charles White/Released)..." WebSite: Navy NewsStand http://www.navy.mil/ [25MAR2009]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCamera090317-N-3013W-015 JACKSONVILLE, Fla. (March 17, 2009) "...Deputy Wade Chapman of the Jacksonville Sheriffís Office takes questions from the Sailors assigned to the "War Eagles" of VP-16 about Florida state traffic violations. Chapman is volunteering as a presenter during a VP-16 safety stand down. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Charles White/Released)..." WebSite: Navy NewsStand http://www.navy.mil/ [25MAR2009]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCamera090317-N-3013W-066 JACKSONVILLE, Fla. (March 17, 2009) "...Lt. j.g. Jayne Wilson, assigned to VP-16, attempts to touch her nose during a simulated field sobriety test administered by a deputy from the Jacksonville Sheriff's Office. The test was part of a demonstration in which sailors of different sex and size consumed four standard sized drinks over an hour. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Charles White/Released)..." WebSite: Navy NewsStand http://www.navy.mil/ [25MAR2009]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCamera090314-N-3013W-068 JACKSONVILLE, Fla. (March 14, 2009) "...Aviation Ordnanceman 2nd Class Crystal Toles, from Greenville, Ala., explains the bomb bay of a P-3C Orion aircraft assigned to VP-16 to staff members of the U.S. House of Representatives House Armed Services Committee. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Charles White/Released)..." WebSite: Navy NewsStand http://www.navy.mil/ [25MAR2009]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCamera090314-N-3013W-045 JACKSONVILLE, Fla. (March 6, 2009) "...Naval Air Crewman 1st Class Adam Herzog explains the acoustic equipment of a P-3C Orion aircraft assigned to VP-16 to staff members of the U.S. House of Representatives House Armed Services Committee. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Charles White/Released)..." WebSite: Navy NewsStand http://www.navy.mil/ [25MAR2009]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCamera090220-N-3013W-093 JACKSONVILLE, Fla. (February 20, 2009) "...Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy (MCPON) Rick West is assisted by Aviation Structural Mechanic 3rd Class Tifani Vesey, from Seagoville, Texas, in delivering a Navy "hooyah" to the Sailors of VP-16. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Charles White/Released)..." WebSite: Navy NewsStand http://www.navy.mil/ [01MAR2009]


Circa 2008

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraVP-16 History "...VP-16 Around The Clock by LT Kevin Johnston COM-11 PAO - Thursday, December 11, 2008..." WebSite: JaxAirNews http://adserver1.harvestadsdepot.com/jaxairnews/ss/jaxairnews/ [12DEC2008]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...'War Eagles,' 'Black Tips' Homecoming - HOMECOMING: VP-16 Returns from Six-month Deployment by LT(jg) Kevin Harrington, VP-16 PAO - Thursday, December 11, 2008..." WebSite: JaxAirNews http://adserver1.harvestadsdepot.com/jaxairnews/ss/jaxairnews/ [12DEC2008]

The first combat aircrews of VP-16 "War Eagles" and maintainers of COM-11 "Black Tips" Maintenance Detachment Team B (MDT-B) returned Dec. 1 to an emotional Reunion with family and friends at NAS Jacksonville, Florida.

History ThumbnailCameraVP-16 History PHoto by Kaylee LaRocque VP-16 Operations Officer Lt. Cmdr. David McMullen. gets sprayed down by his co-workers after returning home and flying his last flight with the squadron Dec. 4.

During deployment, VP-16 was tasked with covering an area of responsibility (AOR) that encompassed nearly half of the globe. "I have never seen a squadron spread over such a large area and accomplish everything as well as we have. The total dedication to each other and the mission was humbling to watch. To be a part of this superb group of warriors is the highlight of my Navy career," remarked VP-16 Executive Officer Cmdr. Anthony Corapi.

History ThumbnailCameraVP-16 History Glad-to-be-home Lt. Cmdr. Shannon Clark said he had a lot of catching up to do with his wife, Sheila, and daughters Avree (5) and Makenna (2).

In June, VP-16 assumed command as Commander, Task Group 72.2/72.4 at Kadena Air Base, Okinawa, Japan while simultaneously deploying four combat aircrews (CAC), maintenance personnel and a command element to NAS Sigonella, Sicily in support of Commander, Task Force 67.

History ThumbnailCameraVP-16 History A member of the CMO-11's Detachment B Black Tip team washes down one of the VP-16 aircraft while on deployment.

From Japan, VP-16 launched a forward detachment of one aircraft, one combat aircrew and maintenance personnel to execute global war on terror missions at Clark Air Base, Philippines. In October, VP-16 assumed command as Commander, Task Group 67.1 in Sigonella and dispatched two combat aircrews to the Fourth Fleet AOR to carry out counter-drug operations from Comalapa Forward Operating Location, El Salvador.

History ThumbnailCameraVP-16 History CS3 Nick Lohnes of VP-16 is introduced to his 1-month-old daughter, Wendy, by his wife, Sarah, and son, Jackson.

This extraordinary deployment for VP-16 demonstrated the global reach of the War Eagles and showcased exceptional mission accomplishments. Operating simultaneously from three AORs, VP-16 executed more than 600 sorties and flew over 2,900 flight hours with better than a 92 percent mission completion rate. VP-16 Operations Officer Lt. Cmdr. Aaron Dimmock noted, "This high operational tempo is a true testament to each individual Sailor's dedication to the team and mission."

History ThumbnailCameraVP-16 History AO1 Justin McCray, of Naval Munitions Command Jax, celebrates the homecoming of his wife, AM2 Anna McCray of VP-16. "We're looking forward to being a couple for at least the next eight months. Even with deployments, the Navy has been good for us."

Historic achievements include the first-ever airborne acoustic intelligence and imagery collection against a foreign diesel submarine on an out-of-area patrol in the Pacific Command (PACOM) AOR.

In October, VP-16 carried out unprecedented simultaneous anti-submarine warfare (ASW) prosecutions within European Command and PACOM, achieving 39 hours of on-top time and over 54 hours of total deployment contact time on foreign submarine forces. This led the War Eagles to record the first "sector kill" in the North Atlantic in over nine years. Shortly after arriving in El Salvador, VP-16 combat aircrews located a suspected drug runner during a high-visibility maritime interdiction mission, resulting in the seizure of more than 1.2 million metric tons of illegal drugs. VP-16 executed 25 detachments across the globe to include most of Southeast Asia, Australia, Africa, South and Central America and Europe. These detachments were vital in supporting over 35 theater security cooperation engagements, humanitarian missions, allied exercises, real-world ASW operations and fleet support missions with over 28 different countries.

History ThumbnailCameraVP-16 History After waiting over two hours at Hangar 117, Jolene Carlton and her children got what they came for -- daddy! (Also known as AE2 Christopher Carlton)

VP-16's successful six-month deployment to support the commanders of Fourth, Sixth, and Seventh Fleets made 2008 one of the most extraordinary years in VP-16's maritime patrol and reconnaissance history. The performance of every member of the War Eagle and Black Tip team made this deployment one for the record books.

"This was a total team effort. My hat is off to the maintainers from CMO-11 Det Team B. I've never seen such a quality maintenance effort. They allowed us to excel on station and support the theater commanders," stated VP-16 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Mark Creasey.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Squadron Comes Home to NAS Jax - Posted By: Dave Wax Created: 12/9/2008 2:59:11 PM - Updated: 12/9/2008 4:19:02 PM..." WebSite: FirstCoastNews http://www.firstcoastnews.com/ [10DEC2008]

Waiting for permission to post entire article.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraLT(jg) Radford, AM1 Echeverry and LCDR Clark "...VP-16 Aviator 'Pronunciators' Help - Thursday, October 23, 2008..." WebSite: JaxAirNews http://adserver1.harvestadsdepot.com/jaxairnews/ss/jaxairnews/ [24OCT2008]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraVP-16/CMO-11 History "...Flexibility Gets VP-16 Over The Hump By LT(jg) Kevin Harrington - VP-16 Public Affairs Officer - Thursday, October 2, 2008..." WebSite: JaxAirNews http://adserver1.harvestadsdepot.com/jaxairnews/ss/jaxairnews/ [03OCT2008]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraVP-16 Combat Air Crew Six (CAC-6) "...VP-16 Joins American-Japanese ASW Exercise Near Okinawa - By Lt. Jonathan Whelan, PAO - Thursday, September 11, 2008..." WebSite: JaxAirNews http://adserver1.harvestadsdepot.com/jaxairnews/ss/jaxairnews/ [11SEP2008]

Photograph Caption: VP-16 Combat Air Crew Six (CAC-6) and Japanese Maritime Self Defense Force P-3 crew performed an interoperability exercise from Kadena Air Base Okinawa in early August. CAC-6 personnel pictured are: (from left, kneeling) AW1 Carman, Lt. Ford, Lt.j.g. Johnson, Lt. Montgomery; (from left, standing) AW2 Martin, AW1 Henson, Lt. Doran, Lt. McCullough, AW2 Beidelman and AT2 Blasingame.

The VP-16 "War Eagles" recently participated in an anti-submarine warfare (ASW) exercise with Japanese Maritime Self Defense Force (JMSDF) P-3 squadron VP-5. The interoperability exercise began on Kadena Air Base in Okinawa with a formal welcoming of JMSDF VP-5, based at nearby Naha, Okinawa.

After showing the Japanese guests around the hangar and tactical support center, War Eagles Combat Air Crew SIX (CAC-6) provided a briefing where they discussed safety of flight and tactical procedures for the combined ASW training.

After the briefing, some VP-16 crew flew on the Japanese P-3, and likewise, some Japanese VP-5 crew flew with CAC-6 aircraft.

Once on station, the two crews conducted four hours of coordinated ASW training using an Expendable Mobile ASW Training Target (EMATT). There were only minor complications with communication due to the language barrier. The extensive use of multiple communication aids, such as Link-11 Data Link, in addition to previously established code words or phrases, resolved any set backs.

The capstone of the training was simulated torpedo attacks on the target by both aircraft. After the flight, the crews met at the Japanese squadron's hangar in Naha to debrief and discuss details of the flight in order to improve future combined exercises.

When discussing the exercise, aircrew from both countries agreed that the training flight was a success, and valuable to both forces' endeavors for increased interoperability

The tactical coordinator for CAC-6, Lt. Dan Montgomery commented, "Bringing together maritime patrol forces from two navies to successfully complete a coordinated ASW mission is a difficult task. The extra pleasure was working with professionals at Japanese Maritime Self Defense Force made it a very meaningful exercise."

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Anti-submarine warfare skills are tested in Northern Eagle - Release Date: Jul 25, 2008 - Navy Mass Communication Specialist Second Class Christopher Henry - Fleet Public Affairs Center Detachment Europe..." WebSite: United States European Command http://www.eucom.mil/ [26JUL2008]

USS ELROD, Norwegian Sea — Russian anti-submarine ship Severomorsk, USS Elrod (FFG 55) and Norwegian Coast Guard Cutter Senja (W321) worked together to simulate tracking and destroying a decoy submarine July 23, as part of Exercise Northern Eagle 2008.

Northern Eagle is a 12-day trilateral exercise including the U.S., Russia and Norway that began July 17. The exercise, held in the Norwegian and Barents seas, focuses on maritime interdiction operations, search and rescue and tactical interoperability to improve maritime safety and security in Northern Europe.

"The exercise tested all of our crews abilities to work together in a coordinated environment, using our anti-submarine warfare skills, to achieve a common goal," said Navy Lt. j.g Kevin Shannon, Elrod's Assistant Operations Officer.

The scenario involved all three ships searching for a decoy submarine that sent out acoustic signals as an actual submarine could. A Norwegian P-3C aircraft dropped a decoy submarine into the water along with sonobuoys, small sonar systems which track underwater contacts.

The sonobuoys sent data back to the P-3, relaying information to the ships, allowing it to track and locate the decoy submarine. As the ships searched for the decoy, a U.S. P-3C from VP-16 relieved the Norwegian plane.

"Three different types of ships, from different counties and navies worked together communicating with the P-3's to successfully locate and destroy an undersea contact," said Commander Task Force 69, Navy Capt. Jeff Trussler. "Working with our partner nations, we can leverage each other's strength's and abilities, to improve maritime safety and security anywhere in the world."

The P-3 aircraft communicated data to the ships which were able to locate the decoy submarines position within a few hours.

Northern Eagle 2008 marks the third time the Russian Federation Navy has hosted the exercise, and the first time the U.S. and Russian navies have invited Norway to participate.

Elrod, a 453-foot Oliver Hazard Perry Class guided missile frigate, is home ported in Norfolk, Va. The ship departed for a regularly scheduled deployment to the European theater June 2.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraVP-16 History "...VP-16 responds quickly to typhoon By LT Jonathan Whelan, VP-16 PAO - Thursday, July 17, 2008 ..." WebSite: JaxAirNews http://adserver1.harvestadsdepot.com/jaxairnews/ss/jaxairnews/ [17JUL2008]

Photograph Caption: A P-3 aircraft of VP-16 sits on the ramp at Clark Air Force Base in the Philippines near Mount Pinatubo. Photo courtesy of VP-16

While deployed to support Seventh Fleet operations from Kadena Air Base in Okinawa, Japan, the "War Eagles" of VP-16 were called in to lead in the search and rescue efforts and recovery of casualties after a ferry boat capsized during Typhoon Fengshen in the Republic of the Philippines June 21-23.

Tragically, caught in the brunt of Fengshen's path was the super ferry Princess of the Stars.

Traveling from Manila to several islands in the Sibuyan Sea, the ferry ran aground and capsized off Sibuyan Island, 200 miles south of Manila. Believed to be carrying approximately 850 passengers on board, a quick response for search and rescue was initiated.

First on the scene, were combat aircrews 3 and 4 who provided low level searches of an 18,000 square mile area surrounding the capsized ferry.

The two crews, detached to Clark Air Base (located on Luzon Island 40 miles Northwest of Metro Manila), shared time on station in six to seven hour shifts, combing over all island coastland and surrounding waters from sunrise to sunset.

Using a combined asset approach, coordinates of all possible survivors spotted from the air were immediately relayed to the surface ship USNS Stockham for recovery.

Upon completion of the search phase, the two War Eagle aircrews were then tasked to coordinate with the USS Ronald Reagan Carrier Battle Group for further aid and relief to the islands lacking sanitary water and medical supplies.

Due to the P-3's extended endurance, VP-16 was able to image and assess local Philippine airfield conditions in order to provide supplies via C-130 cargo aircraft.

The War Eagles will return to Jacksonville in December 2008.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCamera080629-N-3013W-047 OKINAWA, Japan (June 29, 2008) "...Aviation Airman 1st Class (A1C) Gilbert Hardy, assigned to the Air Force 18th Civil Engineer Squadron, uses a vacuum to remove a swarm of Japanese honey bees from a VP-16 P-3C Orion. It is speculated that the bees sheltered on the aircraft from the heat and wind while in transit to a new hive site. VP-16 and Consolidated Maintenance Organization (CMO) 11 Det. BRAVO are deployed in support of Commander, U.S Navy 7th Fleet. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Charles White (Released)..." WebSite: NavyNews http://www.navy.mil/ [03JUL2008]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraCDR Creasey and CDR Pekari "...Creasey Relieves Pekari as VP-16 Commanding Officer - Thursday, May 15, 2008..." WebSite: JaxAirNews http://adserver1.harvestadsdepot.com/jaxairnews/ss/jaxairnews/ [16MAY2008]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: Wings of Gold Thumbnail "...Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Group - RADM Brian C. Prindle, USN. Wings of Gold - Spring 2008 - Page 6-8. (Squadrons/Wings Referenced: VP-62, VP-69, VQ-1, VQ-2, VPU-1, VPU-2, VP-1, VP-4, VP-5, VP-8, VP-9, VP-10, VP-16, VP-26, VP-30, VP-40, VP-45, VP-46, VP-47, CPRW-2, CPRW-5, CPRW-10 and CPRW-11..." WebSite: Association of Naval Aviation http://www.anahq.org/index.htm [23APR2008]
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HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraCS3 Rodney Johnson "...VP-16 Sailor Back After Seven-Month IA In Iraq..." WebSite: JaxAirNews http://adserver1.harvestadsdepot.com/jaxairnews/ss/jaxairnews/ [28MAR2008]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraAW2(AW/NAC) Todd Knutson "...In Memoriam - Thursday, January 10, 2008..." WebSite: JaxAirNews http://adserver1.harvestadsdepot.com/jaxairnews/ss/jaxairnews/ [12JAN2008]

AW2(AW/NAC) Todd Knutson, 38, a member of VP-16, passed away Dec. 23.

Services were held Jan. 3 at the Peterson Mortuary in Glenwood, Iowa. Burial with full military honors followed at Waubonsie Cemetery. Local services will be held tomorrow at 9 a.m. at the NAS Jacksonville, Florida All Saints Chapel. VP-16 will be in attendance and all other members are welcome.

Knutson was born in 1969 to Robert Knutson and Jackie Kucera Wilson. He graduated from Glenwood High School in 1988. After graduating boot camp in August 1991, Knutson reported to NAS Pensacola, Florida to begin his nearly 18 years of faithful and loyal naval service as a naval aircrewman. During his career, he flew more than 2,200 hours in missions over Kosovo, participated in Operations Enduring Freedom and Iraqi Freedom and received 33 awards and citations His personal awards include three Air Medals, two Navy and Marine Corp Commendation Medals and three Navy and Marine Corp Achievement Medals.

He is survived by his son, Ryan Knutson of Jacksonville; daughter, Haley Knutson of Hawaii; father, Bob Knutson of Omaha, Neb.; parents, Jackie and Bruce Wilson of Glenwood, Iowa; brother, Thomas Knutson of Omaha, Neb.; sisters, Michelle Schnepel of Lincoln, Neb.; Cindy Knutson of Omaha, Neb.; step-brothers, Sid Mitzlaff and Troy Mitzlaff all of Omaha, Neb.; stepsisters, Maria Wilson of Hemett, Calif.; Therese Wade of Alvarado, Texas; grandmother, Pauline Wilson of Glenwood, Iowa and many nieces, nephews and friends.


Circa 2007

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Mids Look To Bounce Back From Loss To Wake Forest..." WebSite: Military.com http://www.dcmilitary.com/stories/102507/trident_28065.shtml [21MAR2008]

Coming off a tough 44 - 24 loss at the hands of defending ACC champion Wake Forest, Navy (4 - 3) will play host to one of the best teams in the Football Championship Subdivision (formerly I-AA), the 14th-ranked Delaware Blue Hens, on Oct. 27 at Navy-Marine Corps Memorial Stadium. Kickoff is scheduled for 1 p.m. and the game sponsor is Hardee's. Standing room-only tickets are available for Saturday's contest and can be purchased at the Navy ticket booth on game day, which is located in the North end zone. Saturday's game will be televised nationally by CSTV with Pete Medhurst and Scott Zolak calling the action.

The fly-over features the Lockheed P-3-C Orion from the "War Eagles" of VP-16. Piloting the aircraft is Cmdr. Mark ''Slick'' Creasey, Class of 1990; Lt. Cmdr. Richard ''Ficus'' Kreh, Class of 1994 and a former Navy football player; Lt. Cmdr. Christopher ''RAGS'' Reaghard, Class of 1995 and a former Navy football play; and Lt. Aaron ''Magu'' McGowan, Class 1998. Serving as the Naval Flight Officers are Lt. Joel Starzmann and Lt. Daniel Montgomery, both from Class of 2003. The War Eagles are currently preparing for a Surveillance and Reconnaissance deployment to the Persian Gulf.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraVP-16 LT Minervini and AO1 Stewart "...VP-16 Members Home From Iraq - Thursday, November 15th, 2007..." WebSite: JaxAirNews http://adserver1.harvestadsdepot.com/jaxairnews/ss/jaxairnews/ [16NOV2007]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: MemorialHistory ThumbnailCameraAWCS(AW/NAC) Todd Ethington "...In Memoriam of AWCS(AW/NAC) Todd Ethington - From VP-16..." WebSite: JaxAirNews http://www.jaxairnews.com/ stories/ 102507/ mil_ethington_001.xml.shtml [26OCT2007]

AWCS(AW/NAC) Todd Ethington, 38, of the VP-16 "War Eagles" passed away Oct. 10 at St. Luke's Hospital in Jacksonville.

A service celebrating Ethington's life will be held today at 9 a.m. at the NAS Jacksonville All Saints Chapel. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Todd Ethington Memorial Fund, c/o VyStar Credit Union, P.O. Box 45085, Jacksonville, FL, 32232-5085.

Ethington was born Oct. 12, 1968, in Kansas City, Mo., growing up in Independence, Mo. and graduated from William Chrisman High School in 1987, where he excelled in basketball. He enlisted in the United States Navy Nov. 21, 1988 and attended Basic Military Training at Recruit Training Center, Orlando. During his 19 years of faithful and loyal service, he accumulated more than 5,924 mishap-free flight hours and attended more than 100 naval and civilian courses. Ethington served as an aviation warfare systems operator on board Navy P-3 Orion aircraft flying missions in support of the Cold War, Operations Desert Shield, Desert Storm, Kosovo, Enduring Freedom and Iraqi Freedom.

He is survived by his parents, Harold and Joan Ethington of Independence, Mo.; sister, Nikki Neely, her daughter, Raelee and her twins to be born later this year; sister, Kelly Ethington and her daughter, Morgan Headquist of Blue Springs, Mo. and many loving aunts, uncles, cousins, and other extended family members too numerous to mention. Online condolences may be expressed at www.speakerchapel.com.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCamera070813-N-2491R-018 JACKSONVILLE, Florida (Aug. 13, 2007) "...Sailors assigned to Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing CPRW-11 inspect the flight line of Naval Air Station NAS Jacksonville, Florida for foreign object debris (FOD). CPRW-11 is comprised of three operational squadrons, VP-5, VP-16, and VP-45, with 38 maritime patrol aircraft deployable worldwide. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Harry J. Rucker III (RELEASED)..." WebSite: NavyNews http://www.news.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=49510 [15AUG2007]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraSailors Of The Quarter "...Sailors Of The Quarter - CPRW-11, VP-5, VP-16 and VP-30 - Thursday, August 9th, 2007..." WebSite: JaxAirNews http://adserver1.harvestadsdepot.com/jaxairnews/ss/jaxairnews/ [10AUG2007]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraVP-16 History "...VP-16's Air Warfare Shop Sponsors Special Class - Thursday, July 26th, 2007 Vol. 65 - No. 19..." WebSite: JaxAirNews http://www.jaxairnews.com/ [27JUL2007]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraMC2(AW) Chris Brown "...Military Couple Going Dual IA - Thursday, May 10th, 2007 Vol. 65 - No. 19..." WebSite: JaxAirNews http://www.jaxairnews.com/ [11MAY2007]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraChange-of-Command "...Pekari To Relieve Hitt As VP-16 Commanding Officer - Thursday, May 3rd, 2007 Vol. 65 - No. 18..." WebSite: JaxAirNews http://www.jaxairnews.com/ [04MAY2007]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraSailor Of The Quarter "...Sailor Of The Quarter - Menitoned: VP-4, VP-16, VP-30, VP-45 and CPRW-11 - Thursday, May 3rd, 2007 Vol. 65 - No. 18..." WebSite: JaxAirNews http://www.jaxairnews.com/ [04MAY2007]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraVP-16 History "...VP-16 Hold Safety Stand Down - Thursday, May 3rd, 2007 Vol. 65 - No. 18..." WebSite: JaxAirNews http://www.jaxairnews.com/ [04MAY2007]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...VP-16 Command Structure..." WebSite: VP-16 http://www.vp16.navy.mil/ [01MAY2007]

History ThumbnailCameraCO - CDR James P. Hitt While attending Santa Clara University (BS in Computer Science - Math) CDR Hitt attended NROTC functions at the UC Berkeley unit earning his commission in June 1987. Upon commissioning, he began primary flight training at VT-6, NAS Whiting Field in Milton, FL.

CDR Hitt was on the Commodore's List at his winging from VP-31 at NAS Corpus Christi, TX in April 1989. He reported to VP-31 at NAS Moffett Field for initial maritime patrol training. Upon graduation from the "Black Lightning" camp in September 1989, he joined VP-48 where he participated in a split site deployment to Cubi Point, R.P. and Kadena AB, Japan. After VP-48's decommissioning, CDR Hitt transferred to VP-40, joining the "Fighting Marlins" early in their 1991 Misawa, Japan deployment. During his first tour he acted as Power Plants Branch Officer, Readiness Officer, Special Projects Officer (EWO), Schedules Officer, Assistant Operations Officer, and Pilot NATOPS Officer as well as Instructor Pilot.

Upon completion of his first sea tour in October 1992, he joined VP-30 at NAS Jacksonville, FL, the Atlantic Fleet's Fleet Replacement Squadron (FRS) completing detachments to Mildenhall, Rio de Janeiro, Rota, Brunswick and Whidbey Island. Through FRS consolidation, CDR Hitt was assigned the duties of Aviation Electrical/ Instruments and Ordnance Branch Officer, Fleet Projects Officer, and CNAL Alternate Pilot Evaluator. CDR Hitt departed VP-30 in October 1995 and reported aboard USS CONSTELLATION (CV-64) at NAS North Island, San Diego as a Catapult and Arresting Gear Officer ("Shooter"). During this tour he also sailed with USS KITTY HAWK in support of their flight operations. While onboard CONSTELLATION, he served as Aviation Fuels Division (V-4) Officer and Catapult and Arresting Gear Division (V-2) Officer, and qualified as Officer of the Deck (Inport) and Assistant Command Duty Officer. He deployed with CONNIE to WESTPAC and the Arabian Gulf in April 1997.

CDR Hitt detached from CONSTELLATION in April 1998 and reported to VP-30 for refresher training before arriving at VP-1 for his department head tour. While at VP-1, he deployed to Diego Garcia, B.I.O.T, and Bahrain. He served as the Screaming Eagles' Safety/NATOPS Officer, Assistant Maintenance Officer, Operations Officer and Maintenance Officer.

In November 2000, he was assigned to Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing TEN as Training Officer, Operations Officer and Chief Staff Officer. CDR Hitt reported to VP-16 as the XO in March of 2005 and assumed the position of Commanding Officer in March of 2006.

History ThumbnailCameraXO - CDR BGregory S. Pekari Greg Pekari is a 1989 graduate from the United States Naval Academy with a Bachelor of Science degree in Oceanography. After earning his Naval Flight Officer (NFO) wings in Pensacola, FL in January 1991, CDR Pekari was assigned to Fleet Replacement Squadron (FRS) TWENTY SEVEN (VS-27) for training and qualification in the S-3B Viking. After completing FRS training, CDR Pekari checked into Sea Control Squadron THIRTY ONE (VS-31) in June 1992. During his tour with the "Topcats", the squadron deployed aboard the USS GEORGE WASHINGTON (CVN 73) on her maiden voyage in May 1994. While in VS-31, CDR Pekari served as Legal Officer and NFO NATOPS Officer.

Upon completion of his first sea tour in August 1995, CDR Pekari reported to Commander Sea Control Wing Atlantic (CSCWL) where he served as CSCWL's NFO NATOPS Evaluator, S-3B Weapons and Tactics Officer, and S-3B Curriculum Officer. In April 1997, CDR Pekari's next assignment was with Commander Second Fleet (C2F) aboard the USS Mount Whitney (LCC-20). While with C2F, CDR Pekari served in the J33 Surface Warfare department as the Future Operations Officer. His duties included working Carrier Battle Group scheduling issues as well as Global Naval Force Presence Policy issues.

In September 1999, CDR Pekari checked in as a Department Head with the "Maulers" of Sea Control Squadron THIRTY TWO (VS-32) and immediately deployed aboard USS JOHN F. KENNEDY (CV-67) to the Arabian Gulf for Operation Southern Watch. He deployed again with VS-32 aboard USS THEODORE ROOSEVELT (CVN-71) in September 2001 to the Indian Ocean for Operation Enduring Freedom. While attached to VS-32, CDR Pekari served as Administrative Officer and Maintenance Officer.

In January 2002, CDR Pekari attended the Naval Post Graduate School in Monterey, CA where he earned a Masters of Business Administration degree in Financial Management. After graduating in June 2003, CDR Pekari was assigned to the Navy's Office of Budget (FMB) and Fiscal Management Division (N82) at the Pentagon. During his time there, he was the lead budget analyst for Naval Aviation Procurement and Research and Development programs.

In October 2005, CDR Pekari checked into VP-30 for transition and training in the P-3C Orion. CDR Pekari reported to the "War Eagles" of VP-16 as the Executive Officer in April 2006.

His personal decorations include the Meritorious Service Medal, Air Medal (Strike/Flight), Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal (3 awards), and various campaign and unit awards.

History ThumbnailCameraCMC - John L. Hatfield Command Master Chief John L. Hatfield was born December 2, 1959 in Kidlington, Oxford England. He graduated from Gosford Hill High School and enlisted in the Navy on February 7, 1983. After completing Recruit Training at RTC Great Lakes, Illinois, he attended AW A1 School at NATTC Memphis, Tennessee. Upon completion of A1 School, Master Chief Hatfield completed Naval Aircrew Candidate School, Pensacola FL, and Search and Rescue School in Jacksonville, FLorida.

In January 1984, he reported to HSL-30 Fleet Replacement Training Squadron as a student and remained onboard as a SH-2F Non-Tactical Instructor. In September 1986, he reported as an AW2 to the "Greencheckers" of HSL-34, deploying on the USS COMTE De GRASSE and USS YORKTOWN. While at HSL-34 he was selected as Aircrewman of the Year for three consecutive years and was the 1990 Sea Sailor of the Year. He transferred as an AW1 in February 1992 and attended Instructor Basic Training at NOB Norfolk, Virginia.

Master Chief Hatfield reported to HSL-30 in February 1992 serving as the Training Department Leading Petty Officer and Aircrew Curriculum Development Coordinator. While assigned to HSL-30 he was advanced to Chief Petty Officer.

His next assignment in January 1994 was HS-1 Fleet Replacement Training Squadron Jacksonville, Florida where he qualified as a SH-3 First Crewman. In July 1994, he reported to the "Dusty Dogs" of HS-7 deploying onboard the USS DWIGHT D. EISENHOWER (CVN-69) and the USS THEODORE ROOSEVELT (CVN-71) in support of Operations Southern Watch and Deny Flight. He was advanced to Senior Chief in 1997 and assigned to the Staff of Helicopter Sea Control Wing Atlantic. He served as the Operations Leading Chief, responsible for the Training and Readiness for five East Coast HS squadrons, and was chosen to represent the HS community in the development of the new Enlisted Aviation Warfare Specialist Personnel Qualification Standards. In May 2000, he was again assigned to the "Dusty Dogs" of HS-7, making two deployments onboard USS HARRY S. TRUMAN (CVN-75) in support of Operation Southern Watch and Operation Iraqi Freedom. In October 2003, after completion of the Senior Enlisted Academy, Master Chief Hatfield reported to the Enlisted Placement Management Center (EPMAC) in New Orleans and served as the Rating Specialist Division Officer for all aviation ratings. During this tour he was advanced to Master Chief Petty Officer. In February 2006, he reported to the "War Eagles" of Patrol Squadron SIXTEEN as the Command Master Chief.

Master Chief Hatfield is designated Enlisted Aviation Warfare Specialist, Enlisted Surface Warfare Specialist and Naval Aircrewman. His personal awards include the Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal (8 awards), Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medal (2 awards), and various other service, campaign and unit awards.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraPhotos by MC3 Charles White "...VP-16 takes part in Aviation Awareness Day in Savannah - By LT(jg) Tom Doran VP-16 PAO Thursday, April 19, 2007 Vol. 65 - No. 16..." WebSite: JaxAirNews http://www.jaxairnews.com/ [20APR2007]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCamera070329-N-5060B-052 JACKSONVILLE, Fla. (March 29, 2007) "...Lt. Cmdr. Charles Dittbinner II escapes the smoky fuselage of a P-3C Orion, assigned to VP-16, while conducting emergency landing and egress training during a Safety Stand Down at NAS Jacksonville, Florida. VP-16 is completing workups for upcoming deployments. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Christopher Brown (RELEASED)..." WebSite: Navy NewsStand http://www.news.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=44606 [13APR2007]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraBy LT(jg) Tom Doran - VP-16 PAO "...VP-16 Announces Honorees Of The Year. LT Christian Sloan, LT Patrick O'Reilly, AD1(AW) Clayton Demedeiros, AT1(AW/NAC) Gregory Wood and CS1(AW/SW) Timothy Hardin - Thursday, March 22, 2007 Vol. 65 - No. 12..." WebSite: JaxAirNews http://www.jaxairnews.com/ [22MAR2007]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraBy LT(jg) Tom Doran - VP-16 PAO "...VP-16 Officer Visits Ridgeview High School - By Thursday, March 22, 2007 Vol. 65 - No. 12..." WebSite: JaxAirNews http://www.jaxairnews.com/ [22MAR2007]

Photograph Caption: LT(jg) Onege Bateagborsangaya of VP-16, speaks at Ridgeview High School in Middleburg, Fla. about her experiences in the Navy.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraPhoto by Kaylee LaRocque "...Program Offers Unique Experience by MC2(AW/SW) Leah Stitles - Special Contributor. Thursday, February 1, 2007 Vol. 65 - No. 5 - Squadrons Mentioned: VP-16 and VS-22..." WebSite: JaxAirNews http://www.jaxairnews.com/ [02FEB2007]

Photograph Caption: AE3 Casey Myers of VP-16 takes the wheel of the Save A Life simulator as Tour Associate Patrick Ralston of The National Save A Life Tour critiques her driving techniques.

The "Save a Life Tour" made a stop at NAS Jacksonville, Florida Jan. 24-25. The program travels across the nation to educate young adults about the dangers of drunk driving.

Sailors were able to participate in a non-traditional opportunity to experience a state-of-the-art, interactive driving experience that simulates driving under the influence of alcohol.

"If you can't do this while you are sober, you definitely can't do this when you have been drinking," said Brian Beldyga, co-founder of the "Save a Life Tour. "We're here to show people new angles on drinking and driving and how alcohol affects reaction times, motor skills, how you can develop tunnel vision. We show all the hidden dangers. We act as the drunk friend in the front seat to give drivers the full effect. Everything is like driving a real car, so after giving them all this information, they can't say the machine is making them make errors."

This virtual reality machine simulates what it would be like in the front seat of a Ford Taurus after drinking. Since people metabolize alcohol at a different rate, the simulator has 57 individual sensors in the seating area that determine the user's height and weight to provide accurate effects. The interactive environment gives a 485-degree field of vision and is programmed to maneuver like a driver under the influence would, with increasing levels of impairment as the experience goes on. The user experiences unique challenges such as random traffic patterns, varying weather conditions and changes in route.

After participating in the simulation, AM3 Joshua Stiefel of VS-22 said, "It was certainly an eye-opening experience and showed me what not to do while driving down the road. It was a lot harder than I thought it would be. It seemed like I was going in slow motion and had to wait for things to happen and things just didn't go the way I wanted them to."

"I thought the simulator was pretty educational. You don't realize what you are doing when you go through it. You think you can just drive like you do normally do and you just have to watch out for other vehicles, but I couldn't even watch for obstacles because I was so focused on how I was driving so I didn't see anything," added AE3 Casey Myers of VP-16. "It was pretty stressful. The instructor was yelling and I was so confused.

This activity forces Sailors to recognize the disastrous effects of drinking and driving. As a grim reminder of the potential fate of not only drunk drivers, but those who have been victims, there was an open casket on display as well as somber posters next to the simulator.

"No matter what, no matter how many lines you hear, be a friend, take the keys," stated Beldyga.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraLCDR Steve Maier and LT Hunter Stolldorf "...Disaster drill helps emergency crews stay prepared. Thursday, January 25th, 2007 - Vol 65 No 4..." WebSite: JaxAirNews http://www.jaxairnews.com/ [26JAN2007]

Photograph Caption: LCDR Steve Maier, a flight surgeon with VP-30 and LT Hunter Stolldorf, a flight surgeon with VP-16, take a victim's vital signs to determine his condition during the drill


Circa 2006

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraPhoto by MC3(NAC) Charles White "...'War Eagles' Back From Successful Deployment By LT(jg) Kevin Buszta, VP-16 Public Affairs Officer - JaxAirNews Vol 64 - No. 49 - Thursday, December 14, 2006..." WebSite: JaxAirNews http://www.jaxairnews.com/ [15DEC2006]

After six months operating overseas, the "War Eagles" of VP - 16 are home. While deployed, the Sailors of VP - 16 successfully operated in three different areas of responsibility (AOR), fighting the global war on terrorism and conducting joint exercises with allies around the world.

Aircrews and maintainers deployed to the Central Command AOR in support of Operations Iraqi and Enduring Freedom. VP - 16 assets provided daily round-the-clock intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance support for ground combatant commanders as well as maritime security patrols throughout the Arabian Gulf and adjacent waters. In the Horn of Africa region, VP - 16 crews supported coalition efforts to eliminate piracy and intercept terrorists and illegal arms movements.

Flying in the Southern Command AOR, VP - 16 Sailors and aircrew made a substantial impact against narcotics smuggling operations. In cooperation with Customs Border Patrol, U.S. Coast Guard and other Navy assets, as well as regional nation forces, the War Eagles participated in intercepts of suspect vessels and aircraft. By keeping a watchful eye on the eastern Pacific Ocean and the Caribbean, 46.2 metric tons of cocaine worth an estimated 1.8 billion dollars were confiscated or disrupted.

With its main base of operations in Sigonella, Italy, the War Eagles coordinated detachments throughout Europe and for the first time, West Africa. Flying in support of NATO's Operation Active Endeavor, aircrews monitored shipping traffic throughout the Mediterranean Sea. Additionally, when the armed conflict broke out between Israel and Hezbollah in southern Lebanon, VP-16 was on station to assist in the evacuation of American citizens.

Other detachments included trips to Estonia, Iceland, Norway, Germany, Romania, Bulgaria, France, Cape Verde, and Ghana supporting NATO exercises and partnership for peace initiatives.

In all, more than 3,300 hours were flown, taking the squadron past the 41 year and 265,000 hour class "A" mishap-free milestone. All the members of VP-16 are proud to have finished a successful deployment and excited to be home for a restful holiday season with their families and loved ones.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraPhoto by MC3(NAC) Charles White "...AEC Jason Simmons of VP-16 inspects the starboard wing of a P-3C Orion for bare metal and corrosion November 16 at NAS Sigonella, Sicily. The corrosion of bare metal will degrade the structural stability of the wing and must be cleaned and painted prior to flying. VP-16 is forward deployment in support of martime patrol operations and the global war on terrorism. Thursday, November 30th, 2006 - Vol 64 Number 47..." WebSite: JaxAirNews http://www.jaxairnews.com/ [02DEC2006]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraPhoto by MC3(NAC) Charles White "...AECS Patrick Shekleton of VP-16 rips a piece of masking tape from the roll in order to cover sensitives areas of the starboard wing of a P-3C Orion before it gets a new coat of paint November 16. VP-16, home-ported at NAS Jacksonville, Florida is forward deployment of NAS Sigonella, Sicily in support of maritime patrol operations and the global war on terrorism. Thursday, November 30th, 2006 - Vol 64 Number 47..." WebSite: JaxAirNews http://www.jaxairnews.com/ [02DEC2006]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCamera061113-N-0068G-085 Sigonella, Sicily (Nov. 13, 2006) "...Aviation Warfare Systems Operator 2nd Class Trevor Godwin, of Tampa, Fla., demonstrates the crew coordination system on a P3-C Orion to professional baseball players Nick Swisher and Joe Blanton of the Oakland Athletics. Due to high noise levels and distance between crewmembers this system is the most efficient way to communicate. Patrol Squadron Sixteen (VP-16), homeported in Jacksonville, Fla., is forward deployed in support of maritime patrol operations and the global war on terrorism. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Mark Anthony Geil (RELEASED)..." WebSite: Navy News Stand http://www.news.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=40981 [29NOV2006]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCamera061113-N-0068G-081 Sigonella, Sicily (Nov. 13, 2006) "...Aviation Warfare Systems Operator 2nd Class Trevor Godwin, of Tampa, Fla., speaks to professional baseball players Nick Swisher and Joe Blanton of the Oakland Athletics about the acoustics station on board a P3-C Orion. Acoustics station operators listen to, identify and tracks underwater sounds given off by submarines. Patrol Squadron Sixteen (VP-16), homeported in Jacksonville, Fla., is forward deployed in support of maritime patrol operations and the global war on terrorism. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Mark Anthony Geil (RELEASED)..." WebSite: Navy News Stand http://www.news.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=40979 [29NOV2006]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCamera061114-N-0068G-059 Sigonella, Sicily (Nov. 14, 2006) "...Chief Aviation Electrician's Mate Nathan Canche, of Los Angeles, practices proper lung inflation during Cardio Pulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) class by watching the chest raise and fall. CPR is part of the Basic Life Support (BLS) system that is taught to all service members to insure no body is far from medical help. Patrol Squadron Sixteen (VP-16), homeported in Jacksonville, Fla., is forward deployed in support of maritime patrol operations and the global war on terrorism. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Mark Anthony Geil (RELEASED)..." WebSite: Navy News Stand http://www.news.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=40980 [29NOV2006]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCamera061108-N-3013W-039 Keflavik, Iceland (Nov. 8, 2006) "...An Icelandic de-icing crew working for Keflavik International Airport sprays down the surface of a P3-C Orion before a flight. Patron Sixteen (VP-16) is in Iceland to continue a partnership between the U.S. Navy and the Icelandic Coast Guard and government. VP-16 home ported in Jacksonville, Fla., is forward deployed in support of maritime patrol operations and the global war on terrorism. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Charles E. White (RELEASED)..." WebSite: Navy News Stand http://www.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=40784 [16NOV2006]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraVP-16 New Chiefs "...VP-16 recognizes new chiefs - Thursday, November 9, 2006..." WebSite: JaxAirNews http://www.jaxairnews.com/ [10OCT2006]

Photograph Caption: Seven members from VP-16 were recently frocked to chief petty officer while on deployment to NAS Sigonella, Sicily. From left, PSC(AW/SW) Iris Velez, AEC(AW) Nathan Canche, ATC(AW) Jason SImmons, ATC(AW/NAC) Charles Randall, AWC(AW/NAC) Daniel Buerger, NCC(SW) Jose Fiallos and ADC(AW) Eric Flemming.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraADCS Bruce Boyle and AD1 Steven Neitz "...SMARTWebMove adds personally procured moves - Thursday, November 9, 2006..." WebSite: JaxAirNews http://www.jaxairnews.com/ [10OCT2006]

Photograph Caption: ADCS Bruce Boyle and AD1 Steven Neitz, of VP-16, reference a technical manual for proper installation of an auxiliary power unit (APU) to a cradle before installing the part into a P-3C Orion Oct. 30. APUs provide electrical and air power to help start the engines and power electrical equipment on the plane until engines are started. VP-16 is forward deployment to NAS Sigonella, Sicily in support of maritime patrol operations and the global war on terrorism.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...VP-16 'War Eagle' success continues in war against drugs - Thursday, November 9, 2006..." WebSite: JaxAirNews http://www.jaxairnews.com/ [10OCT2006]

By Lt. j.g. Kevin Buszta

VP-16 PAO

In recent weeks, the "War Eagles" of VP-16 continue to participate in drug busts in the Eastern Pacific. In two separate cases, P-3s flown by War Eagle aircrews have located and provided aerial coverage during interception and confiscation of drugs smuggled in the Southern Command area of responsibility.

In the first case, a VP-16 crew launched in search of a high-speed boat known to be transiting the area. When detected, the smugglers immediately went dead in the water, hoping to disappear into the rolling waves of the ocean's surface (without their telltale wake). Despite their efforts, the squadron maintained contact until relieved by a U.S. Custom's Service aircraft who stayed on station until surface units could arrive on scene. As is common practice for the smugglers, the crew abandoned the vessel and set it ablaze once a U.S. Navy ship was spotted on the horizon. The extensive fire damage to the vessel meant only part of the cocaine shipment could be recovered before it became unsafe for the boarding crew to remain on board. A total of 2.6 metric tons of cocaine with a street value of 296 million dollars were seized.

Days later, another VP-16 crew launched and found two high-speed boats traveling together off the Central American coast. Once discovered, the boat crews stopped and rigged tarps to disguise their actions from the War Eagles watching from above. With the P-3 orbiting overhead, the crews are believed to have scuttled their cargo. The two boats then raced apart from each other, trying to break contact with the P-3 but to no avail. The aircrew watched as the two vessels rendezvoused a short time later. The crews of the two vessels boarded one boat and set the second ablaze. They raced out of the area, hoping to evade capture. Squadron members continued to monitor the suspect vessel until intercepted by Mexican authorities. Combined with previous drug busts, the War Eagles have helped intercept more than 28 metric tons of cocaine worth an estimated 3.5 billion dollars since deploying in June.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCamera061106-N-0068G-008 Sigonella, Sicily (Nov. 6, 2006) "...Aviation Warfare Systems Operator 2nd Class Trevor Godwin, of Tampa, Fla., facilitates an Alcohol and Drug Abuse Management Supervisors (ADAMS) class. ADAMS is a Navy wide program given to all supervisors and senior enlisted Sailors, E-5 to 0-4, to teach awareness of drugs and alcohol and how to recognize their signs in troubled Sailors. Patrol Squadron Sixteen (VP-16), home ported in NAS Jacksonville, Florida, is currently forward-deployed in support of maritime patrol operations and the global war on terrorism. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Mark Anthony Geil (RELEASED)..." WebSite: Navy News Stand http://www.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=40603 [09NOV2006]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCamera061030-N-0068G-035 Sigonella, Sicily (Oct. 30, 2006) "...Senior Chief Aviation Machinist's Mate Bruce Boyle, of Waterloo, N.Y., and Aviation Machinist's Mate 1st Class Steven Neitz, of Yuma, Ariz., reference a tech manual for proper installation of an auxiliary power unit (APU) to a cradle, before installing the part into a P-3C Orion. APUs provide electrical and air power to help start the engines and power electrical equipment on the plane until engines are started. Patrol Squadron Sixteen (VP-16), home ported in NAS Jacksonville, Florida, is forward deployed in support of maritime patrol operations and the global war on terrorism. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Mark Anthony Geil (RELEASED)..." WebSite: Navy News Stand http://www.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=40537 [05NOV2006]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCamera061027-N-2858G-094 Praia, Cape Verde (Oct. 27, 2006) "...Lt. Patrick O'Reilly, pilot and mission commander, and Chief Aviation Warfare Systems Operator Mike Fiordiliso man their posts in the cockpit of a P-3 Orion assigned to Patrol Squadron Sixteen (VP-16). VP-16 was in Cape Verde to demonstrate maritime surveillance systems. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Gunnar C. Gorder (RELEASED)..." WebSite: Navy News Stand http://www.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=40377 [05NOV2006]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCamera061027-N-2858G-080 Praia, Cape Verde (Oct. 27, 2006) "...Lt. Tony Cowart, a tactical co-coordinator assigned to the Patrol Squadron Sixteen (VP-16) "War Eagles," demonstrates the capabilities of a maritime surveillance system to Cristine Fontes Lima, the Cape Verde minister of defense, and Roger D. Pierce, the United States ambassador to Cape Verde, while Lt. Cmdr. Thomas Karney, assigned to Commander Task Force 67 (CTF-67), looks on. VP-16 is in Cape Verde to demonstrate the capabilities of their maritime surveillance systems and help improve the Cape Verdian security posture. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Gunnar C. Gorder (RELEASED)..." WebSite: Navy News Stand http://www.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=40376 [05NOV2006]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCamera061025-N-2858G-061 Praia, Cape Verde (Oct. 25, 2006) "...Commodore of Commander Task Force Six Five (CTF-65) Capt. John Nowell, takes a turn at the controls of a P-3 Orion aircraft assigned to the "War Eagles" of Patrol Squadron Sixteen (VP-16). The War Eagles are on a detachment to Cape Verde to demonstrate the capabilities of their maritime surveillance systems and help improve the Cape Verdian security posture. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Gunnar C. Gorder (RELEASED)..." WebSite: Navy News Stand http://www.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=40327 [05NOV2006]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCamera061023-N-3013W-030 Sigonella, Sicily (Oct. 23, 2006) "...The Command Master Chief of Patron Sixteen (VP-16), Les Hatfield, inspects the squadron required reading log for currency and accuracy. The inspection is in preparation for a visit from VP-16's relieving squadron. VP-16 is forward deployed in support of maritime patrol operations and the global war on terrorism. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Third Class Charles E. White (RELEASED)..." WebSite: Navy News Stand http://www.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=40218 [05NOV2006]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCamera061012-N-3013W-055 Sigonella, Sicily (Oct. 12, 2006) "...Lt. Chris Sloan of St. Cloud, Fla. gives a presentation to Patron Squadron Sixteen (VP-16) aircrew members on Crew Resource Management (CRM) and Emergency Destruct Plan (EDP). CRM training is designed to improve the overall safety of flight and EDP training is employed to insure the protection of classified government assets. VP-16 is home ported in NAS Jacksonville, Florida, is forward deployed in support of maritime patrol operations and the global war on terrorism. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Charles E. White (RELEASED)..." WebSite: Navy News Stand http://www.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=39941 [22OCT2006]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCamera061012-N-0068G-029 Sigonella, Sicily (Oct. 12, 2006) "...Aviation Electronics Technician 3rd Class Tabitha Spalin, of Lafayette, N.Y., takes notes for registration with Embry-Riddle College. Spalin is looking at the advantages of going to Embry-Riddle College to that of other colleges. Patron Squadron Sixteen (VP-16) is home ported in NAS Jacksonville, Florida, is forward deployed in support of maritime patrol operations and the global war on terrorism. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Mark Anthony Geil (RELEASED)..." WebSite: Navy News Stand http://www.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=39940 [22OCT2006]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCamera061010-N-0068G-044 Sigonella, Sicily (Oct. 10, 2006) "...Yeoman Seaman Shawn Ralston, of Philadelphia, Pa., files incoming mail for Patrol Squadron Sixteen (VP-16). While forward deployed in support of maritime patrol operations, mail continues to come in on a daily basis and is forwarded to personnel through out the command. VP-16 is home ported in NAS Jacksonville, Florida. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Mark Anthony Geil (RELEASED)..." WebSite: Navy News Stand http://www.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=39940 [22OCT2006]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCamera061009-N-3013W-021 Sigonella, Sicily (Oct. 9, 2006) "...Aviation Machinist's Mate Airman Mark Ruddy of Cedar Park, Texas, watches as his Shipmate signals the pilot of a Patrol Squadron Sixteen (VP-16) P-3C Orion prior to takeoff. Ruddy is assigned to VP-16, homeported in NAS Jacksonville, Florida, and is training for the signaling duty. VP-16 is forward deployed in support of maritime patrol operations and the Global War on Terrorism. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communications Specialist Third Class Charles E. White (RELEASED)..." WebSite: Navy News Stand http://www.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=39856 [22OCT2006]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCamera061009-N-0068G-014 Sigonella, Sicily (Oct. 9, 2006) "...Yeoman 3rd Class Samantha Aurand, of Eastlake, Ohio, instructs Yeoman Seaman Shawn Ralston, of Philadelphia, Pa., on how to properly document an award in a service record. Without proper documentation, a service member could miss out on promotion or consideration for special programs. Patrol Squadron Sixteen VP-16), homeported in NAS Jacksonville, Florida, is forward deployed in support of maritime patrol operations and the Global War on Terrorism. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Mark Anthony Geil (RELEASED)..." WebSite: Navy News Stand http://www.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=39855 [22OCT2006]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCamera061009-N-0068G-007 Sigonella, Sicily (Oct. 9, 2006) "...Chief Personnel Specialist Iris Velez, of Brooklyn, N.Y., counsels a service member about his upcoming retirement. At retirement there are many benefits available to a service member, and without proper documentation and timing certain benefits may be forfeited. Patrol Squadron Sixteen (VP-16), homeported in NAS Jacksonville, Florida, is forward deployed in support of maritime patrol operations and the Global War on Terrorism. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Mark Anthony Geil (RELEASED)..." WebSite: Navy News Stand http://www.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=39854 [22OCT2006]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCamera060919-N-3013W-002 Sigonella, Sicily (Sept. 02, 2006) "...Aviation Warfare Systems Operator 2nd Class Michael Sereno of Mazon, Ill., gets a pass off under pressure during a flag football game between VP-16, in yellow, and Aircraft Intermediate Maintenance Department (AIMD). The game was played as part of the NAS Sigonella, Sicily Fall Flag Football League. VP-16 is currently forward deployed in support of maritime patrol operations and the global war on terrorism. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Charles E. White (RELEASED)..." WebSite: NavyNews http://www.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=39355 [09OCT2006]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCamera060831-N-3013W-039 Sigonella, Sicily (Aug. 31, 2006) "...Aviation Machinist Mate Airman Marc Ruddy of Cedar Park, Texas, reconnects a swirl vane straightner clamp after completing scheduled inspection and maintenance on one of four engines belonging to a P-3C Orion assigned to VP-16. VP-16 is homeported in NAS Jacksonville, Florida currently forward deployed in support of maritime patrol operations and the global war on terrorism. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Charles E. White (RELEASED)..." WebSite: NavyNews http://www.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=38819 [09OCT2006]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraAW2 Michael Sereno "...AW2 Michael Sereno of gets a pass off under pressure during a flag football game between VP-16 and Aircraft Intermediate Maintenance Department. The game was played as part of the NAS Sigonella, Sicily Fall Flag Football League September 2. VP-16 is currently forward deployed in support of maritime patrol operations and the global war on terrorism..." WebSite: JaxAirNews http://www.jaxairnews.com/ [06OCT2006]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraAM3 Joshua Graham "...AM3 Joshua Graham of Atlanta, assigned to the "War Eagles" of VP-16, aligns the text lettering on the Kwik-print press Aug. 31. When completed, the leather surface will have the service member's name, rank and warfare insignia, including a Velcro backing for an individuals aircrew flight suit. VP-16, homeported at NAS Jacksonville, Florida, is forward deployed in support of maritime patrol operations and the global war on terrorism..." WebSite: JaxAirNews http://www.jaxairnews.com/ [16SEP2006]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCamera060823-N-3013W-011 Sigonella, Sicily (Aug. 23, 2006) "...Aviation Ordnanceman 3rd Class Giancarlo Rosasarias of Los Angeles, Calif., waits to direct a P-3C Orion into a designated parking area. The Orion assigned to Patrol Squadron One Six (VP-16), recently returned from a training flight. VP-16 home ported in NAS Jacksonville, Florida, is forward deployed in support of maritime patrol operations and the global war on terrorism. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Third Class Charles E. White (RELEASED)..." WebSite: NavyNews http://www.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=38556 [01SEP2006]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCamera060823-N-3013W-022 Sigonella, Sicily (Aug. 23, 2006) "...Aviation Ordnanceman 3rd Class Giancarlo Rosasarias of Los Angeles, directs a P-3C Orion into a designated parking area. The Orion assigned to Patrol Squadron One Six (VP-16), recently returned from a training flight. Patrol Squadron One Six, home ported in NAS Jacksonville, Florida, is forward deployed in support of maritime patrol operations and the global war on terrorism. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Third Class Charles E. White (RELEASED)..." WebSite: NavyNews http://www.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=38557 [01SEP2006]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCamera060823-N-3013W-003 Sigonella, Sicily (Aug. 23, 2006) "...Aviation Ordnanceman 3rd Class Giancarlo Rosasarias of Los Angeles, Calif., directs the taxi pilot to straighten his direction of movement in order to properly park a P-3C Orion, after returning from a training flight. Patrol Squadron One Six (VP-16) home ported in NAS Jacksonville, Florida, is forward deployed in support of maritime patrol operations and the global war on terrorism. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Charles E. White (RELEASED)..." WebSite: NavyNews http://www.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=38555 [01SEP2006]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCamera060818-N-3013W-031 Sigonella, Sicily (Aug. 18, 2006) "...Aviation Ordnanceman 3rd Class Giancarlo Rosasarias of Los Angeles carries sonobuoys prior to them being loaded into a P-3C Orion assigned to Patrol Squadron Sixteen (VP-16). VP-16 homeported in NAS Jacksonville, Florida, is forward deployed in support of maritime patrol operations and the global war on terrorism. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Charles E. White (RELEASED)..." WebSite: NavyNews http://www.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=38324 [27AUG2006]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCamera060814-N-3013W-011 Sigonella, Sicily (August 14, 2006) "...Aviation Machinist's Mate 3rd Class David Dew holds a flashlight as he and Aviation Machinist's Mate 3rd Class Jason Stanley inspect a newly installed exhaust basket on a P-3C Orion assigned to Patrol Squadron Sixteen (VP-16). VP-16 is forward deployed in support of maritime patrol operations and the global war on terrorism. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communications Specialist 3rd Class Charles E. White (RELEASED)..." WebSite: NavyNews http://www.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=38147 [27AUG2006]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...'War Eagles' Make First Drug Bust - By LT(jg) Kevin Buszta - VP-16 PAO - Thursday, July 20, 2006 - NAS Jacksonville, Florida..." WebSite: JaxAirNews http://www.jaxairnews.com/ [22JUL2006]

While fighting the war on drugs, one of the VP-16 "War Eagle" aircrews forward deployed to El Salvador participated in the interception and confiscation of 4.93 metric tons of cocaine in July.

After receiving word to launch and search for a suspect fishing vessel, the ready aircrew successfully located the vessel and reported its location to a nearby U.S. Navy ship that was patrolling in the area.

After giving the ship vectors to intercept the fishing vessel, the aircrew remained in the area to maintain contact with the suspect vessel and provide reconnaissance to the ship's crew as they maneuvered to board and search the boat.

As the fishing vessel's crew noticed the approaching warship, they set the boat ablaze and boarded a life raft. The Navy ship closed in on the burning vessel, taking the crew into custody and extinguishing the flames. Once the boat had cooled, a boarding party searched the charred remains and discovered the stash of cocaine below decks.

A total of 167 bales of cocaine were confiscated with an estimated street value of $562 million.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraATCS(AW/NAC) Mark Haskins "...Former NFL Quarterback Meets With 'War Eagles' - By LT(jg) Joel Starzmann - VP-16 Assistant Public Affairs Officer - By LT(jg) Kevin Buszta - VP-16 Public Affairs Officer - Thursday, July 20, 2006 - NAS Jacksonville, Florida..." WebSite: JaxAirNews http://www.jaxairnews.com/ [22JUL2006]

Photograph Caption: ATCS(AW/NAC) Mark Haskins gets an autograph from Hall of Fame quarterback Dan Marino. Photograph by MC1 Mark Ceil

NFL Hall of Fame quarterback Dan Marino passed through NAS Sigonella, Sicily, while on vacation with his family and met with the "War Eagles" of VP-16. After meeting military personnel from the various commands aboard the base and signing autographs for waiting fans, Marino joined Sailors for lunch in the base galley.

With his appetite satisfied, he then took time to tour the flight line and personally meet with Combat Aircrew (CAC) 12 as they preflighted their aircraft.

Crewmembers then escorted Marino and his family through the mighty P-3C Orion. The group received hands-on training from CAC-12, including explanations of each tactical position on the versatile aircraft. From maritime patrol to overland surveillance to surface and undersea warfare, the many mission capabilities of the P-3 were explained to the Marino family.

He compared Lt. Trent Tanski's job as mission commander and tactical coordinator to that of a quarterback, always reading the field of play and adjusting plans to become master of the situation.

Before departing the plane, Marino shared a few words with the crew.

"I want to take this opportunity to thank all of you for what you do and all the great things you've done," Marino said. "I want to let you know that you are appreciated. I know that it's tough at times, but for all of us back home, especially in the football community, we thank you for everything you've done."

Marino will go down in history as being one of the greatest signal-callers to ever play the game. Having been quarterback for the Miami Dolphins from 1983-1999, Marino tops the NFL record books in 24 regular-season records and is tied for three others. He ranks first in all-time career passing yardage and sixth in all-time passing efficiency.

The impressive numbers Marino posted during his exceptional football career led to a nomination into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 2005, his first year eligible for the honor. His number 13 is one of only two numbers to be officially retired from the Miami Dolphins organization.

Currently, Marino provides analysis for CBS's The NFL Today every Sunday during football season. He is also a co-host for HBO's Inside the NFL.

Off the field, Marino established the Dan Marino Foundation, an organization that benefits children's charities in South Florida. Additionally, Marino is a spokesman for the United Way.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraVP-16 P-3 Orion "...VP-16 Completes Steadfast Jaguar Exercise - By LT(jg) Kevin Buszta - VP-16 Public Affairs Officer - Thursday, July 20, 2006 - NAS Jacksonville, Florida..." WebSite: JaxAirNews http://www.jaxairnews.com/ [22JUL2006]

Photograph Caption: A VP-16 P-3C Orion sits amid the arid landscape at Sal International Airport

VP-16 detached Combat Aircrew Nine (CAC-9) to the island nation of Cape Verde in June to participate in a NATO exercise called Steadfast Jaguar. The small country, consisting of 11 islands off the western coast of Africa, played host to the joint forces of numerous nations as they tested their ability to operate out of a remote location.

The exercise was designed to test the NATO Response Force (NRF), which deploys air, land and sea assets quickly wherever needed. From humanitarian relief to land engagements to antisubmarine patrols, many different missions were performed under adverse environmental and logistical conditions.

Sal International Airport was the main base of operations for the many NATO air assets participating in the exercise. Ramp space was tight as the field was accustomed to mostly civilian airliners passing through one or two at a time. German, Greek, Belgian, Italian, French and American aircraft were located around the airfield, and operations were conducted from a tent city nearby called Camp Miracle.

CAC-9 performed expertly, demonstrating the flexibility of the P-3 Orion and the many capabilities of their aircraft. The versatility of the P-3 was fully exploited in varied missions, such as screening incoming relief supply shipments from submarine forces. Surveillance missions were flown to monitor the movements of enemy combatants and support friendly forces as they engaged enemy ground units. The final flights of the exercise were in reaction to the simulated eruption of Mt. Fogo, where CAC-9 evaluated simulated damage to the island's roadways, harbors and airfields as well as locating refugee camps.

The squadron left a lasting impression on all participating nations as they exceeded expectations in the air and actively participated in the ground planning of their missions. They effectively displayed the invaluable capabilities the P-3 can provide to the varied NRF missions. Many friendships were also made with our NATO allies, and an understanding of each other's specialties was gained, which will prove invaluable if an emergency arises.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraVP-16 History "...'War Eagles' Tackle Tri-Site Deployment - LT(jg) Kevin Buszta - VP-16 Public Affairs Officer - JaxAirNews Thursday, July 13, 2006 - NAS Jacksonville, Florida..." WebSite: JaxAirNews http://www.jaxairnews.com/ [15JUL2006]

The "War Eagles" of VP-16 departed Jacksonville in late May for Sicily, Italy, Qatar, and El Salvador, Central America as part of their regularly scheduled deployment cycle in support of the global war on terrorism.

In the Central Command theater, the War Eagles are patrolling the Persian Gulf to ensure freedom of commerce for merchant shipping and are flying over Iraq supporting coalition forces on the ground.

Operations are being conducted with U.S. Navy and other allied vessels to fight the growing piracy threat interfering with free trade off the Horn of Africa.

Working in conjunction with the U.S. Coast Guard, U.S. Navy ships and naval forces from other Central and South American countries, VP-16 crews are also fighting the war on drugs. By monitoring local shipping lanes and air traffic, VP-16 is playing a significant part in the counternarcotics mission.

Crews assigned to NAS Sigonella, Italy, are participating in exercises with NATO allies and other European and North African nations to promote cooperation on the global scale.

While showing the flag throughout the Mediterranean Sea, our aircrews are building friendships with foreign governments crucial to the continuing international fight against terrorists. Local officials visit the squadron spaces to learn the capabilities of maritime patrol aircraft.

Additionally, aircrews from other squadrons on their way to and from their own deployment sites are able to enjoy VP-16 hospitality as they pass through the European Theater.

One of the first orders of business once settled in Sigonella was the recognition of all enlisted personnel who made rate as the squadron deployed. VP-16 advanced 34 enlisted Sailors. The frocking ceremony was held on the hangar deck in front of all assembled personnel. VP-16 Commanding Officer Cmdr. James Hitt also extended special recognition to AFCM Joseph Tierney on making master chief petty officer and ADCS Bruce Boyle and AECS Pedro Torres on making senior chief petty officer.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraCDR Hit and CDR Palmer "...Hitt takes helm of VP-16 'War Eagles' - LT(jg) Kevin Buszta - VP-16 Public Affairs Officer - JaxAirNews Thursday, April 6, 2006 - NAS Jacksonville, Florida..." WebSite: JaxAirNews http://www.jaxairnews.com/ [11APR2006]

On March 31, Cmdr. James Hitt relieved Cmdr. Tad Palmer when he assumed command of the VP-16 "War Eagles." This time-honored ceremony was held aboard NAS Jacksonville, Florida at the Jay Beasley Memorial Hangar.

While attending Santa Clara University where he earned a Bachelor of Science degree in computer science, Hitt attended NROTC at the University of California at Berkeley unit, earning his commission in June 1987.

After earning his commission, Hitt began primary flight training at VT-6, NAS Whiting Field, Milton, Florida. He then reported to VP-31 at NAS Moffett Field, California for initial maritime patrol training.

In September 1989, he joined VP-48 where he participated in a split site deployment to NAS Cubi Point, Philippines and Kadena AFB, Japan. After VP-48's decommissioning, Hitt transferred to VP-40, joining the "Fighting Marlins" early in their 1991 NAF Misawa, Japan deployment.

During his first tour he acted as power plants branch officer, readiness officer, special projects officer, schedules officer, assistant operations officer and pilot NATOPS officer as well as instructor pilot.

Upon completion of his first sea tour in October 1992, he joined VP-30 at NAS Jacksonville, Florida, the Atlantic Fleet's Fleet Replacement Squadron (FRS), completing detachments to Mildenhall, England; Rio de Janeiro, Brazil; NS Rota, Spain; NAS Brunswick, Maine; and NAS Whidbey Island, Washington.

Through FRS consolidation, Hitt was assigned the duties of aviation electrical/ instruments and ordnance branch officer, fleet projects officer and a Commander, Naval Air Forces Atlantic alternate pilot evaluator. Hitt departed VP-30 in October 1995 and reported aboard USS Constellation (CV 64) at NAS North Island, San Diego as a catapult and arresting gear officer. During this tour he also sailed with USS Kitty Hawk in support of their flight operations.

While on board Constellation, he served as aviation fuels division officer and catapult and arresting gear division officer and qualified as officer of the deck and assistant command duty officer and deployed on a Western Pacific cruise and to the Arabian Gulf in April 1997.

Hitt detached from USS Constellation in April 1998 and reported to VP-30 for refresher training before arriving at VP-1 for his department head tour. While at VP-1, he deployed to NSF Diego Garcia and NSA Bahrain. He served as VP-1's safety/NATOPS officer, assistant maintenance officer, operations officer and maintenance officer.

In November 2000, he was assigned to Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing Ten as training officer, operations officer and chief staff officer. In March 2005, Hitt assumed duties as executive officer for VP-16.

Palmer is transferring to Arlington, Va., to work in the Office of the Secretary of Defense.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraSports and Standings "...Sports and Standings - JaxAirNews Thursday February 2, 2006. Squadrons Mentioned: VP-5, VP-16, VP-30, VP-45, VP-62, VS-22, and CPRW-11..." WebSite: JaxAirNews http://adserver1.harvestadsdepot.com/jaxairnews/ss/jaxairnews/ [09FEB2006]

There will be several softball meetings Feb. 15 in the Building 850 conference room. The season will begin in March. The following are the times of the meetings:

Greybeard - 11:30 a.m. - Open to active duty, selective reservists and command Department of Defense personnel age 30 and up.

Intramural - noon - Open to active duty, selective reservists and command Department of Defense personnel.

Women's league - 12:30 p.m. - Open to active duty, selective reservists, military dependents over 18 and Department of Defense employees.

Commands having their athletic officer or designated representative attend the meeting will receive five captain's cup points. All interested personnel should attend the meeting to discuss rules and to get the required paperwork to join the league.

Open softball meeting planned

An open softball meeting will be held Feb. 16 at 3 p.m. at Mulligans. This league is open to NAVAIR and Department of Defense employees, active duty, military dependents over 18 and selective reservists. Rules as well as days of the week and times for the games will be discussed at the meeting.

Racquetball tourney

An open racquetball tournament will be held Feb. 28 through March 3 each night at 5 p.m. at the NAS Jax Gymnasium. The tournament is free and is open to all NAS Jax authorized men and women. There is a competitive division and a recreational division. Awards will be given to the winners of each division. Call 542-3239 to sign up by Feb. 22.

Sports officials and scorekeepers needed

The North Florida Military Officials Association is looking for individuals to officiate soccer, softball, football and volleyball at NAS Jax. Scorekeepers are also needed for basketball. Experience is not required. If interested, contact Jesse Beach at 771-1333.

Navy Southeast Regional Running and Triathlon Team

Attention competition runners. Represent U.S. Navy in 5K, 10K, marathons and/or triathlons? The U.S. Navy will showcase elite active duty men and women in regional races. Uniforms are provided as well as transportation, entry fees, and lodging costs. Interested runners must compete in a sanctioned (USA Track and Field, USA Triathlon Association, or Roadrunners Clubs of America) race and your time must be one of top 10 regional qualifying times.

If you have run in a sanctioned race and your time meets the regional qualifying time, contact your base athletic director.


Circa 2005

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...The Drill—We Lost an Aircraft - By Lt. Chris McKone - Approach July - August 2005..." WebSite: Navy Safety Center http://www.safetycenter.navy.mil/MEDIA/approach/issues/julaug05/Drill.htm [27JUN2006]

"I have just learned that we lost an aircraft."

This was the statement presented to the members of Patrol Squadron Sixteen by the new commanding officer during quarters. The squadron duty officer just had rushed into the room after receiving a phone call saying that a squadron P-3 had ditched on a training mission.

Courage and proper training are essential to successfully navigate through a crisis. Although courage is the more illustrious of the two traits, it is difficult to instill and even harder to evaluate. We all hope to possess courage, but we never can be sure we have it until the need arises. Training is the one variable in a crisis situation that can be controlled, and, therefore, its value never can be overestimated. Courage may be the soul of the American military, but training is its backbone.

The VP-16 personnel in the room that morning did not know it yet, but the safety department had devised a way to test each and every one of them with regard to courage and training.

My crew, combat aircrew (CAC) five, was scheduled for an antisubmarine-warfare (ASW) training flight, beginning early in the morning. Nothing seemed out of the ordinary as we prepared to fly. The preflight had gone a little long because of minor equipment problems, but we still tried to meet our briefed takeoff time. With this in mind, I was a little annoyed to see our aviation-safety officer making his way up the ladder as we prepared to strap in. Anything he had to pass surely could wait until we returned.

Unfortunately, he said our flight was canceled, and we were part of an elaborate drill that would benefit the crew and the squadron far more than the flight could have. We were told to man our respective positions, make an "off deck" call to base, and then egress the aircraft. After sliding down the flaps in our survival vests and helmets, we were transported to the base water-survival facility, which, to our dismay, recently had reopened after a complete renovation. We were not to have any contact with our squadronmates in an effort to ensure the illusion of our airborne status. Our new skipper's first quarters was kicking off.

Once at the pool complex, we were brought up-to-speed on the intent of the exercise. My 11-man crew and I were to conduct a drill on water survival, while the squadron ran a commandwide mishap drill. To best simulate an actual ditch, we were asked to perform all the tasks involved in the water-survival course. These tasks included dunker egress (my personal favorite), full flight-gear swim, raft boarding, and a helo-hoist recovery.

Our water-survival drill was conducted with no classroom briefs, so my crew would be evaluated in a real-time scenario. We were armed only with the knowledge we had retained from previous refresher training. The scenario was designed to be as realistic as possible, including simulated injuries and the challenges those injuries presented during the egress, survival and rescue phases. My crew was evaluated on our ability to egress from a downed aircraft and to use the survival gear provided within the raft. Our ability to perform as a team also was evaluated. The focus of this portion of the exercise was to use my crew as a cross section of the squadron to determine if an aircrew could perform their duties in the event of an actual ditch. We did extremely well, and the exercise exceeded its intended goal.

While we enjoyed our unexpected refresher on water survival, the rest of the squadron had its hands full, dealing with the aftermath of such a catastrophic event. The best way to investigate an organization's preparedness is to develop a practical examination that is unexpected and realistic. Unknown to our crew, the skipper had told the squadron our aircraft had ditched, and survivor status was unknown. This information was not preceded by the well known, "This is a drill," but merely laid out to the squadron as fact.

After allowing such a thought to sink in for a minute, the skipper told those at quarters it was a drill, and the squadron would be evaluated on its ability to employ the mishap plan. In those few seconds, the CO had accomplished something extremely difficult. He had managed to test the courage of those within his command. Each individual in the room, for a brief moment, was forced to come to terms with the fact they had a job to do under the worst possible circumstances. Now that their courage had been tested from within, it was time to move on to the more tangible phase of the exercise, to test our squadron training.

The mishap plan was set in motion, and virtually every member of the squadron had a part to play in implementing it. The major players involved were the duty office, the aircraft-mishap board (AMB), the emergency-reclamation team (ERT), maintenance control, the security detail, and the casualty-assistance-calls officers (CACO). Each of these teams had specific duties to be performed in a timely manner to make sure the proper information could be gathered, retained and disseminated. The duty office became a hub of action.

Within an hour, the mishap plan had been ripped apart as folks flooded the duty office to grab "their tab" of the plan. One of the valuable lessons learned during the course of the drill was to make the mishap plan more accessible by creating separate binders for each critical team. Smaller, individualized binders would have alleviated the extra burden on an already task-saturated duty office. The duty officer also learned to recruit extra personnel early and often. By grabbing additional officers and petty officers to act as runners, phone talkers, and recorders, the load further was reduced and information flow to the skipper improved.

Other areas of concern identified by each team leader during the afternoon all-hands debrief included:

• An outdated mishap kit (Polaroid versus digital camera).
• Uncertainty of an accurate manifest for the flight, because of pen and ink changes to the flight schedule.
• Uncertainty of exact inventory of classified material aboard.
• Security detail was unsure whom they could allow near the simulated wreckage site.
• Emergency-reclamation-team members were unsure of some of the avionics gear and its location aboard the aircraft.
• Maintenance control was slow to lock down NALCOMIS and to obtain an accurate "All tools accounted for" call.
• Aircrew page 2s were in need of update.
• No accurate listing of command CACOs existed.

We used this drill to improve our mishap plan. We now have a new mishap kit with digital cameras, GPS receivers, and hand-held radios. Our ERT has held training on the various P-3 avionics suites. Improved procedures for making sure accurate personnel manifests and crypto and ordnance load-outs now are in place. Admin conducted a thorough review of all page 2 data, and a listing of all CACOs has been placed in the SDO's Pre-Mishap Plan binder. I would guess that our lessons learned could be applied to many other aviation squadrons.

A foundation of our squadron always has been, "To stop striving forward is to atrophy…so press on to be the best!" Not challenging yourself or those you lead to improve certainly will hinder success when the time to perform arrives. We never again want to hear the skipper utter these words, "We have just lost an aircraft." But, if we do, Patrol Squadron Sixteen now is better equipped to handle such a catastrophe with courage and proper training.

Lt. McKone flies with VP-16

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraVP-16 History "...'War Eagles' take charge in hurrican relief - By LT(jg) Michael Minervini - VP-16 PAO - Thursday, December 8th, 2005..." WebSite: JaxAirNews http://pub.jaxairnews.com/Sections.aspx?sec=16697 [10DEC2005]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraVP-5K "...VP-5K holds fun run for charity - By LT(jg) Paul White - VP-5 PAO - Thursday, November 24, 2005 - (VP-5 and VP-16 mentioned)..." WebSite: JaxAirNews http://pub.jaxairnews.com/Sections.aspx?sec=16396 [29NOV2005]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraVP-30 History "...CPRW-11 Continues Leadership Seminar Series - By LT Tony Walters - CPRW-11 PAO - Thursday, October 27, 2005..." WebSite: JaxAirNews http://pub.jaxairnews.com/Sections.aspx?sec=15815 [28OCT2005]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VP History ThumbnailCamera050901-N-6205H-004 Jacksonville, Fla. (Sept. 1, 2005) "...Aviation Ordnanceman 3rd Class Curtis Ballard removes sonobouys from the underside of a P-3C Orion on board Naval Air Station Jacksonville, Fla. Petty Officer Ballard is assigned to the "War Eagles" of Patrol Squadron Sixteen (VP-16). U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate Airman Jacqueline Hall (RELEASED)..." WebSite: Navy Newsstand http://www.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=27819 [17SEP2005]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VP History ThumbnailCamera050817-N-8544C-003 Jacksonville, Fla. (Aug. 17, 2005) "...Photographer's Mate 3rd Class David Didier, assigned to the "War Eagles" of Patrol Squadron Sixteen (VP-16), utilizes the base refueling facility to refuel a government vehicle with compressed natural gas (CNG). Natural gas is environmentally friendly and more cost efficient than gasoline. The Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPACT) requires that 75 percent of a federal fleet's annual acquisitions in metropolitan areas be capable of operating on alternative fuels. U.S. Navy Photo by Photographer's Mate 2nd Class Susan Cornell (RELEASED)..." WebSite: Navy Newsstand http://www.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=27256 [20AUG2005]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraVP-16 History "...The "War Eagles" of VP-16 have reached out to develop a new partnership with Hyde Park Elementary..." JaxAirNews http://pub.jaxairnews.com/Sections.aspx?sec=12947 [08MAY2005]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraA group of NJROTC students. "...VP-16 hosts NJROTC students - By Lt. j.g. Michael Minervini, VP-16 PAO - Originally created Thursday, March 31, 2005..." JaxAirNews http://www.jaxairnews.com/stories/033105/mil_vp16001.shtml [04APR2005]

Picture: A group of NJROTC students from Nease High School in St. Augustine, Fla. toured VP-16 March 16. Photo courtesy of VP-16.

On Feb. 24 and March 16, the NAS Jacksonville, Florida-based VP-16 squadron welcomed more than 60 NJROTC students from two Southeast Region High Schools.

Midshipmen from Laurens High School, Laurens, S.C., and Nease High School, St. Augustine, spent time touring squadron spaces and observing daily functions of maintenance and aircrew personnel.

The young midshipmen were provided aircraft familiarization briefs along with actual tours of the aircraft, emergency equipment demonstrations and briefs on Navy Core Values.

Lt. Cmdr. Chris Archer, the squadron's command services officer said, ''It is great to introduce these students to naval aviation and give them a small glimpse into the many career opportunities available to them if they choose to join the Navy.''

VP-16 plans to host several JROTC students in April along with gearing up to train college midshipmen from all over the country this summer.


Circa 2004

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...NATO to kick off Destined Glory exercise - By Jason Chudy, Stars and Stripes - European edition, Wednesday, September 29, 2004..." WebSite: Stars and Stips http://www.stripes.com/ [15SEP2008]

NATO's largest amphibious and maritime exercise, Destined Glory, kicks off Thursday near Sardinia and will run through Oct. 16.

"[Destined Glory] enables NATO and the eight countries … with Naval Striking and Support Forces NATO to collectively train their personnel in a live-fire exercise," said exercise spokesman Royal Navy Lt. Craig Moran.

About 9,500 personnel on some 50 ships and 46 aircraft from 11 countries are taking part in the exercise at two locations along the southern Sardinian coast.

"Notable this year is that there are additional countries taking part other than the eight that are collectively part of STRIKFORNATO," he said.

The eight are Germany, Greece, Italy, the Netherlands, Spain, Turkey, the United Kingdom and the United States. The other participating countries are Belgium, France and Canada.

Nearly 200 U.S. personnel will be participating in Destined Glory, including the U.S. Navy's Lance Cpl. Roy M. Wheat, a container and roll-on/roll-off ship, and P-3 Orion maritime patrol aircraft from VP-16.

This year's exercise is also the first major test of NATO's multinational quick response force, which was created last October.

The British aircraft carrier HMS Invincible also is taking part, along with landing forces from Spain, Italy, the Netherlands and France.

Normally held annually, the last Destined Glory took place off both Sardinia and Greece in 2002.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Do we need VHF radios in S. America? - by Ltjg. Joshua Kelley/P-3 - Ltjg. Kelley flies with VP-16..." Naval Safety Center WebSite: http://www.safetycenter.navy.mil/media/approach/vault/articles/2004/0715.htm [04JUN2005]

In a word...yes.

Recently a P-3 trip to multiple SOUTHCOM Forward Operating Locations (FOLs) was attempted from NAS Jacksonville, FL. Pre-flight ran smoothly and we went wheels in the well at 0630. Upon checking in with Jacksonville Center approximately 20 minutes into the flight, the VHF radio failed. With maintenance support available from a sister squadron (VQ-2) in Curacao, Netherlands Antilles, we pressed onward. Radio calls during the remainder of our transit would be limited to the aircraft's two UHF radios. After making our southbound turn over Puerto Rico, ATC directed us to switch to Plesman Approach.

Only one problem...South American controllers are limited to VHF radios. During the next hour, we attempted to raise VQ-2 on UHF for assistance while dodging isolated thunderstorm cells that had been building since our departure. Thirty minutes from Curacao our precarious situation improved, thanks to the assistance provided by VQ-2. Upon explaining the current predicament, the maintenance detachment personnel coordinated our clearance to land in Curacao. Fortunately, the field was VMC and no other issues arose during our approach.

On the deck, most of the crew attended briefings on detachment operations while the Flight Engineers and In Flight Technician, along with several of VQ-2's Avionics Technicians (AT's) worked diligently to try and repair our malfunctioning radio. Two hours later, the VHF radio was still inoperable, mainly due to incompatible parts. Despite the commonality of the P-3 Orion airframe, EP-3's carry many different systems, including VHF radios.

Unfortunately, Curacao was not our last scheduled stop for the day as we were planning to continue our trip to El Salvador, another detachment site. As we considered our options over the next six hours, the hardworking maintainers from both squadrons finally had a breakthrough with the radio. Having received indications that the radio was working properly, we launched for El Salvador.

Shortly after taking off, the VHF radio failed again. There we were, holding over Aruba, effectively NORDO with enough gas to get us to El Salvador, Jacksonville, or back to Curacao. After carefully considering our options, we decided to turn around and make the six-hour transit back to NAS Jacksonville. Throughout the next hour, we repeatedly attempted to establish contact with New York Radio via HF radio in order to file a flight plan home. After several unsuccessful attempts, we finally established contact and were able to receive our clearance.

Completely exhausted and 17 hours into our crew day, the thought of an easy landing at home field allowed us to begin to relax. For you college football fans out there, just ask Lee Corso and he'll say "not so fast my friend." We checked ATIS to find the field VMC and prepared for our approach. Only one challenge stood between us and completing our mission, the winds on deck gave us a stiff crosswind making the landing less than "routine." There aren't too many times in the P-3 where the co-pilot looks across the cockpit out the left side window to see runway centerline. We established an approximate 30 degree crab into the wind on final, lining up the plane over the last hundred or so feet to come in for landing. The PPC set the plane down smoothly completing our South American adventure.

The entire incident provided many lessons learned. First and foremost, was the importance of using ORM as a guideline in the decision making process. Even with 3 pilots and 2 Flight Engineer's embarked on the flight, it was imperative to consider how effective the flight station would be after an 18-hour crew day. Second, understand the support available at your destination. All agreed the flight should be continued but no one realized the VHF part support incompatibility between the P-3C and EP-3 airframes. Lastly, never let your guard down. No matter how familiar you are with the field of intended landing, something can always arise during this critical phase of flight. The end result of our trip: a long day, a long list of lessons, and a great learning experience.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...A Simple Area Search-Cracked Windshield - by Lt. Shannon Clark/P-3 - Lt. Clark flies with VP-16..." Naval Safety Center WebSite: http://www.safetycenter.navy.mil/media/approach/vault/articles/2004/0657.htm [04JUN2005]

It was a beautiful morning in paradise. As a newly qualified Patrol Plane Commander/Mission Commander (PPC/MC), I had just detached with my crew to the island of Curacao--and what a great place to be. It was our first operational flight since we had arrived. It was a relatively simple area search that aircrew in the P-3 community call "mowing the lawn." It was a 10-hour flight searching for potential drug smugglers and because it was our first mission, we were looking forward to getting airborne. The preflight proceeded smoothly and we were off deck on time.

We had about an hour transit to on-station. Once we arrived, we started our descent to 1,000 feet AGL and performed our "On-station Checklist." About an hour into the on-station period I heard a loud pop in the flight station and looked up to see that my windshield had cracked. It started from the upper right hand corner and had split down, diagonally, to the middle of the screen.

"Deheat, Don, Determine." That's the little pneumonic that our community uses to remember the NATOPS procedure for a cracked windshield; turn off the windshield heat of the affected panel, don helmets with visors down, and then determine which layer of glass is cracked. So as I started reaching for my helmet, my Flight Engineer (FE) turned off the windshield heat and started looking at the screen to determine which layer had actually cracked. Once my helmet was on, the FE broke out NATOPS, we reviewed the procedures and agreed that it was definitely on the outer layer.

For the outer layer, NATOPS says not to exceed 240 knots below 10,000 feet. The copilot, FE, and I then discussed whether we should abort or stay on-station. The FE marked the end of the crack with a grease pencil and we decided to stay as long as the crack did not progress. We started talking about how our BINGO fuel would be affected by a lower transit altitude and the 240-kt speed restriction below 10,000 feet. As we were discussing these topics, I looked up to see the crack extend another two inches. I looked at my FE and we agreed that it was time to go home.

We started a gentle climb-out from 1,000 feet and watched the crack to see if the change in altitude would affect it. As we were climbing through 5,500 feet, the crack shot to the left side of the windshield. We both looked at it in amazement and we leveled off at 5,500 feet for the transit home and an uneventful full stop landing.

Looking back at the flight and my decision-making, I now wonder why I even thought of staying on-station with this emergency. Was the mission that critical? As a new Aircraft and Mission Commander, mission accomplishment was certainly at the forefront of my mind. But, what was the mission? Was it in support of ground troops or open-ocean maritime surveillance? Were we looking for a specifically briefed target with strong intelligence or were we looking for a needle in a haystack (a generic "go fast boat" in a 600 square mile box)? Due to the ever-expanding mission of the Orion, especially during Operations Enduring Freedom and Iraqi Freedom, the P-3 community has recently stayed on-station for malfunctions that in the past have been standard abort criteria. Looking back at this particular mission, the thought of remaining on-station should not have warranted much consideration. NATOPS does not specifically state to abort the mission for a cracked windshield, however, the thought of flying with glass in my lap and wind in my face should have made it an easy abort decision.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCamera040630-N-2645L-001 Sigonella, Sicily (June 30, 2004) "...Aviation Ordnanceman 2nd Class Mary Pratt, assigned the "War Eagles" of Patrol Squadron One Six (VP-16) downloads a Stand-off Land Attack Missile (SLAM) Extended Echo Ranging (EER) from a P-3C Orion aircraft during a recent deployment in Italy. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 2nd Class Michelle Lucht (RELEASED)..." Navy News Stand http://newshome.news.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=15824 [03MAR2005]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VP History ThumbnailCamera040810-N-2645L-006 Sigonella, Sicily (Aug. 10, 2004) "...Aviation Machinist Mate Airman Hector LeonRamo, assigned to Patrol Squadron Sixteen (VP-16), prepares an engine for installation on a P-3C Orion aircraft. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 2nd Class Michelle Lucht (RELEASED)..." Navy News Stand http://newshome.news.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=17009 [02MAR2005]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VP-16 History ThumbnailCameraOfficial U.S. Navy Photograph "..."War Eagles" Impact War on Drugs - By Lt. j.g. Trenton Tanski, Patrol Squadron 16 Public Affairs..." http://www.cffc.navy.mil/vp16-drugbust1026.htm [10DEC2004]

COMALAPA, El Salvador (Oct. 26, 2004) - VP-16 "War Eagles" from Jacksonville, Fla., made a dramatic impact in the war on drugs in the fall, supporting three interdictions, totaling more than 41 metric tons of cocaine.

With just a little more than one month operating in the Southern Command arena, VP-16's drug busts equate to a record-setting street value of more than $2 billion.

"We never anticipated this kind of success and are thrilled to be a major part of it," said Lt. Cmdr. Steve Schmidt, VP-16 officer in charge. "A key part of making this possible was having all the right people, equipment and motivation come into place."

During many missions over the past few weeks, several VP-16 P-3C crews and a Reserve crew from VP-65 of Pt. Mugu, Calif., have been credited with the detection and monitoring of several suspicious fishing vessels. After multiple days of War Eagle surveillance of the fishing vessels, USS Curts (FFG 38), with a U.S. Coast Guard law enforcement detachment aboard, intercepted the fishing vessel Lina Maria approximately 300 miles southwest of the Galapagos Islands. Aboard the vessel, the Coast Guard boarding team found approximately 14.5 tons of cocaine.

The following week, the War Eagles were again successful in locating San Jose, sister ship of the Lina Maria. A VP-16 P-3C Orion vectored USS Crommelin (FFG 37), with a U.S. Coast Guard law enforcement detachment on board, to intercept the fishing vessel Sept. 26. Aboard the vessel, the Coast Guard law enforcement detachment found approximately 13 tons of cocaine.

Shortly thereafter, a Customs P-3 AEW spotted a third vessel southwest of Manta, Ecuador. The Customs aircraft was relieved by a VP-16 P-3C Orion crew. The War Eagles maintained surveillance until a Coast Guard vessel was in the vicinity. Once the ship was boarded, the Coast Guard boarding team found more than 14 tons of cocaine hidden throughout the vessel.

"A rush would be an understatement, knowing that I'm on the tail of a drug runner, carrying tons of drugs. I think of my two kids and that those drugs will never make it to the States makes the long days worth it," said Aviation Warfare Systems Operator 2nd Class Trevor Godwin.

The War Eagles were involved in another drug interdiction patrol over open ocean in the Pacific, when a P-3C Orion proceeded inbound and visually confirmed a contact as a "go-fast" - a high-performance vessel used for smuggling drugs from South America into North America.

The War Eagle crew immediately reported the vessel to the Coast Guard Cutter Jarvis, which was about 90 miles away. Jarvis headed toward the area where the P-3C stayed in visual contact with the go-fast. The Orion crew witnessed many bails of contraband being tossed overboard by the smugglers in an effort to clear all illegal cargo off their boat. The P-3C aircraft maintained contact with the suspect vessel and marked the trail of bails with smoke markers until Jarvis arrived to recover 80 bails of cocaine from the positions marked by the P-3C crew. The contraband equated to a street cash value of more than $40 million.

"I stand in awe of the terrific work our Sailors are doing around the world," said Cmdr. Chuck Hollingsworth, commanding officer of VP-16. "They are truly impacting the war on terrorism in many significant ways. Their dedication and sacrifice are to be applauded, and in my book, they are all heroes."

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...'War Eagles' Assist Interdiction of 41.5 Tons of Illegal Drugs - Story Number: NNS041025-10 - Release Date: 10/26/2004 3:55:00 AM - By Lt. j.g. Trenton Tanski, Patrol Squadron 16 Public Affairs..." http://www.news.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=15675 [16NOV2004]

COMALAPA, El Salvador (NNS) -- VP-16 "War Eagles" from Jacksonville, Fla., made a dramatic impact in the war on drugs in the fall, supporting three interdictions, totaling more than 41 metric tons of cocaine.

With just a little more than one month operating in the Southern Command arena, VP-16's drug busts equate to a record-setting street value of more than $2 billion.

"We never anticipated this kind of success and are thrilled to be a major part of it," said Lt. Cmdr. Steve Schmidt, VP-16 officer in charge. "A key part of making this possible was having all the right people, equipment and motivation come into place."

During many missions over the past few weeks, several VP-16 P-3C crews and a Reserve crew from VP-65 of NAS Point Mugu, California, have been credited with the detection and monitoring of several suspicious fishing vessels. After multiple days of War Eagle surveillance of the fishing vessels, USS Curts (FFG 38), with a U.S. Coast Guard law enforcement detachment aboard, intercepted the fishing vessel Lina Maria approximately 300 miles southwest of the Galapagos Islands. Aboard the vessel, the Coast Guard boarding team found approximately 14.5 tons of cocaine.

The following week, the War Eagles were again successful in locating San Jose, sister ship of the Lina Maria. A VP-16 P-3C Orion vectored USS Crommelin (FFG 37), with a U.S. Coast Guard law enforcement detachment on board, to intercept the fishing vessel Sept. 26. Aboard the vessel, the Coast Guard law enforcement detachment found approximately 13 tons of cocaine.

Shortly thereafter, a Customs P-3 AEW spotted a third vessel southwest of Manta, Ecuador. The Customs aircraft was relieved by a VP-16 P-3C Orion crew. The War Eagles maintained surveillance until a Coast Guard vessel was in the vicinity. Once the ship was boarded, the Coast Guard boarding team found more than 14 tons of cocaine hidden throughout the vessel.

"A rush would be an understatement, knowing that I'm on the tail of a drug runner, carrying tons of drugs. I think of my two kids and that those drugs will never make it to the States makes the long days worth it," said Aviation Warfare Systems Operator 2nd Class Trevor Godwin.

The War Eagles were involved in another drug interdiction patrol over open ocean in the Pacific, when a P-3C Orion proceeded inbound and visually confirmed a contact as a "go-fast" - a high-performance vessel used for smuggling drugs from South America into North America.

The War Eagle crew immediately reported the vessel to the Coast Guard Cutter Jarvis, which was about 90 miles away. Jarvis headed toward the area where the P-3C stayed in visual contact with the go-fast. The Orion crew witnessed many bails of contraband being tossed overboard by the smugglers in an effort to clear all illegal cargo off their boat. The P-3C aircraft maintained contact with the suspect vessel and marked the trail of bails with smoke markers until Jarvis arrived to recover 80 bails of cocaine from the positions marked by the P-3C crew. The contraband equated to a street cash value of more than $40 million.

"I stand in awe of the terrific work our Sailors are doing around the world," said Cmdr. Chuck Hollingsworth, commanding officer of VP-16. "They are truly impacting the war on terrorism in many significant ways. Their dedication and sacrifice are to be applauded, and in my book, they are all heroes."


Circa 2003

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "..."Bird ORM" - by Ltjg. Josh Guerre/ P-3 - Ltjg. Guerre flies with VP-16..." Naval Safety Center WebSite: http://www.safetycenter.navy.mil/media/approach/vault/articles/2003/0526.htm [04JUN2005]

In a word...yes.

It was Sunday night at NAS Jacksonville and we were getting ready for an all night P-3 hop off the eastern seaboard as a part of COMPTUEX. The mission dictated a two-hour transit, five hours on station, and a two-hour return for a total flight time of 9 hours. The weather brief called the cloud deck broken at 3500 feet over the field with isolated thunderstorms outlying the local area. Because of our extended flight time, we were taking off with a full bag of gas, just barely under our maximum recommended takeoff gross weight of 135,000 lbs. After running through the normal briefs and checklists, we taxied out for takeoff on Runway 27.

Our takeoff was on time and uneventful with a liftoff at the three board. We cleaned up the aircraft and began a right turn to the north with a steady climb out to an assigned altitude of 5,000 feet. At about 2,000 feet, the number three engine fire warning erupted. We executed our procedures for emergency engine shutdown and inspected the engine nacelle for any visible fire indications. Without an external indication of fire, we requested the delta pattern over the field and began to discuss our options.

At this point we weighed approximately 131,000 lbs and had the availability of 14,000 lbs of fuel to dump. This would put us 3,000 lbs over our max landing weight (114,000) and approximately 14,000 lbs over our recommended max landing weight (103,880). The weather had us socked in below 3,500 ft and surrounding thunderstorms restricted our movement to the immediate area. Recognizing that the 3710.7 recommended altitude for fuel dump of 6000 feet would not be prudent, given our situation, we decided to climb to just below the cloud deck at 3000 feet, dumping fuel over the river while minimizing exposure to local housing developments.

While dumping fuel, we discussed with maintenance control the ramifications of landing at 114,000 versus 103,880 and its implications for excessive stress on the airframe. The decision was made to complete the fuel dump and to then burn fuel in the delta pattern until either the weather deteriorated or we were below the max recommended landing weight of 103,880.

We were in the middle of our fuel dump when we received a bird strike to the front windshield. With no visible damage to the windshield, we decided to continue to burn down to 103,880 as long as no other extenuating circumstances occurred. We finished our fuel dump and descended for the delta pattern. At this point we weighed 114,500 and would need approximately 2 hours before we could land. We had been in the delta pattern for about 30 minutes when extensive bird activity was noted. Recognizing the distinct possibility of additional bird strikes and the potential for a bird to take out a second engine, we decided to land at our current gross weight of 110,000 lbs. The three-engine landing on Runway 27 that followed was uneventful.

This flight revealed several important items for discussion. The first concerned our decision to dump fuel at an altitude lower than the 6000 ft recommended in the 3710.7. This minimum altitude is posted as a recommendation and the question arises at what point deviation from this may be necessary due to extenuating circumstances. The second issue concerns our decision to land over our recommended max landing weight of 103,880. During this evolution, the PPC was tasked with balancing adherence to a recommended limit for airframe conservation against an increasing amount of risk in the current environment. In the aftermath, the decision to land early appears to be justified. Post-flight inspection revealed multiple bird strikes to the airframe that had gone unnoticed while airborne.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY:  History ThumbnailCamera030721-N-0174W-002 Naval Air Station Jacksonville, Fla. (Jul. 21, 2003) "...Personnel assigned to Patrol Squadron Sixteen (VP-16) use an electric bomb hoist to load an AGM-84D Harpoon missile onto a P-3 Orion. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 3rd Class Richard W. Williams. (RELEASED)..." Navy News Stand http://newshome.news.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=8655 [05MAR2005]


Circa 2002

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...VP-16 'War Eagles' new CO arrives - Story courtesy of VP-16 - Thursday, March 21, 2002..." JaxAirNews http://www.jaxairnews.com/stories/032102/mil_VP16001.shtml [06APR2005]

 History ThumbnailCameraCmdr. Radomski

Cmdr. William Radomski assumed command of VP-16 following the Change of Command ceremony March 15 aboard NAS Jacksonville, Florida. Radomski relieved Cmdr. John Dziminowicz in the ceremony. Cmdr. James Sperry reported as executive officer.

Radomski, a native of Niagara Falls, N.Y. was commissioned through the Naval Reserve Officer Corps. He is a 1983 graduate of Marquette University, holding a bachelor of science degree in mathematics.

He also earned a master of science degree from Central Michigan University. Radomski qualified as a Naval Flight Officer (NFO) in 1984, followed by Fleet Replacement Squadron training (FRS).

In 1985, he reported to VP-45, homeported at NAS Jacksonville, Florida, where he earned the designation of Patrol Plane Tactical Coordinator, mission commander and instructor during deployments to NAS Sigonella, Sicily and NAS Bermuda.

His other assigned duties included NFO training officer and legal officer.

He reported to VP-30 at NAS Jax in 1989 as FRS instructor. Radomski served on the Commander Patrol Wings Atlantic Fleet (COMPATWINGLANT) Tactical Training Team and as the Fleet P-3c UIII Transition Officer and Avionics/Armament Division Officer.

 History ThumbnailCameraCmdr. Dziminowicz

In 1991, he received orders to the Commander Seventh Fleet (COMSEVENTHFLT) staff in Yokosuka, Japan and was assigned duties as assistant logistics and flag mess division officer.

Following a brief tour at Commander Patrol Reconnaissance Wing Eleven (COMPATRECONWING Eleven) and FRS refresher training, Radomski returned to VP-45 in 1995 and deployed to NS Roosevelt Roads, PR and NAS Sigonella, Sicily.

In 1997, Radomski reported to Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Force, U.S. Sixth Fleet (CTF-67) in NAF Naples, Italy.

He reported from VP-16 from Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Force Atlantic where he served as the operations officer.

He is married to the former Jacqueline Bagget of Jacksonville. They have three children, Robert, Cynthia and Kathleen.

Dziminowicz, a native of Springfield, Mass., graduated from the United States Naval Academy in 1982. He was designated as a Naval Aviator in 1983. His previous tours include: VP-10, VP-30, COMSIXFLT, Naval War College, VP-24, VP-30 (second tour), and the Office of the Secretary of Defense as Deputy Director for Asian and Pacific Affairs.

He is married to the former Wendy Stokoe of Yorkshire, England and has one son, Nicholas.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VP-16 History ThumbnailCameraOfficial U.S. Navy Photograph "...War Eagles Patrol Souda..." http://www.cffc.navy.mil/vp16-souda.htm [10DEC2004]

Souda Bay, Crete, Greece, Nov. 1, 2002 - A Navy P-3C "Orion" aircraft, assigned to the "War Eagles" of Patrol Squadron One Six (VP-16) lifts off to begin another patrol mission in the region. VP-16, a Jacksonville, Fla.-based squadron, is currently on a scheduled deployment to the Mediterranean theater in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. The P-3C is a multi-mission aircraft providing Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW) and Anti-Surface Warfare (ASUW) capabilities. VP-16 utilizes a wide range of communications, detection, monitoring, reconnaissance and navigation systems to perform their mission. In addition to advanced electronics, the P-3C can deliver an impressive mix of torpedoes, bombs, and missiles along with pinpoint mine-laying capabilities. U.S. Navy photo by Paul Farley.


Circa 2000

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Destroyer Squadron TWO FOUR - December of 2000 - VP-5, VP-16 and VP-30..." WebSite: Destroyer Squadron TWO FOUR http://www.cnsl.spear.navy.mil/cds24/history.htm [26OCT2005]

December of 2000 brought the first groupsail for the new Inter-Deployment Training Cycle. An SSBN provided services for COMDESRON TWO FOUR which allowed us to refresh our ASW skills. Additional ASW support was provided by VP-5, VP-16, VP-30, and HSL-48. ATG Mayport also assisted while we honed our SUW and AAW skills off the coast of Florida.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VP-16 P3 Misc Thumbnail "...VP-16 aircraft dropping 1000 lb MK 63 "Quickstrike" mines on the NAS Patuxent River, Maryland Range in August 2000..." Contributed by LT John "Hozer" Holzbaur jholzbaur@hotmail.com [26OCT2000]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VP-16 P3 Misc Thumbnail "...VP-16 aircraft dropping 1000 lb MK 63 "Quickstrike" mines on the NAS Patuxent River, Maryland Range in August 2000..." Contributed by LT John "Hozer" Holzbaur jholzbaur@hotmail.com [26OCT2000]


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