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HistoryVP-14 HistoryHistory

Circa 1945

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...My Dad, LT Richard Herman "Dick" KLINGE, served with VP-14 during WWII. Here are a few photograph's Dad took while serving in the South Pacific. Unfortunately, Dad didn't identify any of the Shipmates..." Contributed by Rick Klinge richard.klinge@gmail.com [21JUL2011]

    LEFT to RIGHT: PBY, PBY, LT Richard Herman "Dick" KLINGE looking out from the cockpit of his PBY, Crewmember, Crewmember, Crewmember, assistance from the native population in Papua New Guinea and My favorite while the quality is poor. It is a troop ship passing under the Golden Gate bridge returning after the war from the Pacific.

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HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...1946 The War Diary of the U. S. S. Chandeleur (AV-10). The story of a Seaplane Tender in World War II. 19 November 1942 to 19 November 1945. Compiled and edited by The Staff of "Tender Topics," the Ship's Paper...Squadrons Supported: VP-14, VP-21, VP-71, VP-202, VP-216, VH-1, and FAW-1..." Contributed by Bruce Barth bbarth1@austin.rr.com, Director Mariner/Marlin Association [30NOV2000]

The
WAR DIARY
of the
U. S. S. CHANDELEUR
(AV-10)

The Story of a Seaplane Tender in World War II
19 November 1942 to 19 November 1945
Compiled and edited by
The Staff of "Tender Topics," the Ship's Paper

The Tale of a Modern Mariner


It is said that the life of a ship begins when her keel is laid. The keel of the U. S. S. CHANDELEUR was laid at 1615 on 29 March 1941 by the Western Pipe and Steel Co. of San Francisco, California. At 1343 on 19 November 1941 she slid down the ways, sponsored by Mrs. W. T. Thea, wife of Rear Admiral THEA, USCG.

One year later to the day on 19 November 1942, after successful trial runs had been made the U. S. S. CHANDELEUR was officially accepted for the Navy Department by Captain William SINTON, U. S. N. who, at the same time, took over as her first Commanding Officer.

For those who sailed aboard her it will be interesting to note that the CHANDELEUR was named for Chandeleur Sound which, with the islands of the same name is located off the coast of Louisiana, north of the Mississippi River delta. The Sound was discovered on 2 February 1699-Candlemas Day, and so was named "Chandeleur," French for Candlemas.

EARLY DAYS OF THE AV-10


After her commissioning the CHANDELEUR started on a series of cargo runs which carried her twice to HAWAll and the NEW HEBRIDES ISLANDS. It was seven and one-half months after going into commission before the AV-10 did any seaplane tending. However, the fact that the CHANDELEUR was doing her part in the war effort is testified by a mailgram received from ComAirSoPac congratulating the ship on her cooperation and by a personal letter received by Captain SINTON from Admiral TOWERS, Com Air Pac.

It may be of interest to note that on 14 February 1943, at Apia, British Samoa, many months before PBM's were commonly in use by the Navy in the Pacific, the CHANDELEUR hoisted aboard a damaged PBM-3R for transportation back to the United States.

FIRST SEAPLANE OPERATIONS


On the Fourth of July, 1943 the U. S. S. took over the job for which she was built, tending seaplanes. On that date, at ESPIRITU SANTO, N. H., VP-71 came aboard and began operations using this vessel as a base. This patrol squadron conducted searches, bombing missions, and Dumbo operations using fifteen PBY's.

An interesting sidelight on the Solomons Campaign was an incident which took place on 12 January 1944 at GAVUTU HARBOR, FLORIDA ISLAND. A New Zealand PBY was taking off and, while making its run, hit an anti-submarine net and tore a large hole in its hull. Boats from the CHANDELEUR were immediately dispatched. When the plane landed it was brought alongside and hoisted aboard. The ship got underway and by maneuvering in very close to HALA VO BEACH, it was possible to beach the damaged PBY on the seaplane ramp by hoisting it into the water and towing it up on the beach.

Thus ended this phase of the CHANDELEUR'S seaplane tending career but bigger and more important things were in store for the A V-10.

BACK TO THE STATES


After the departure of our second PBY patrol squadron, VP-14, the CHANDELEUR'S next job was to make a run up to Bougainville Island's CAPE TOROKINA with a load of Marine Airmen. VMF-218, Marine Air Group 11, First Marine Aircraft Wing and VMSB-244, Marine Air Group 21, Second Marine Aircraft Wing were our passengers on this trip. This was on the 25th of January, 1944, when BOUGAINVILLE was being bitterly contested. The AV-10 came to anchor at 0659 on 25 January and was underway again at 1749 on the same date. The C.0. of the Marines on BOUGAINVILLE presented the ship with a certificate of merit for the effective expediting of this mission.

MUNDA in the New Georgia group was the next stop on our cargo run and was followed by another series of trips between the NEW HEBRIDES and GUADALCANAL.

Then came our long awaited orders home- back to stateside via Pearl Harbor. The CHANDELEUR passed under the Golden , Gate Bridge 21 March 1944 and tied up at the Carrier dock, NAS Alameda, California to discharge passengers and cargo.

March 24, 1944 found us in the yards of General Engineering and Drydock Company, Alameda, for thirty days availability for overhaul and repair. Six days of this time was spent in drydock. After completion of our period of availability in the yard, we made a cargo run between N. S. D., Oakland and Pearl Harbor and returned to Oakland for the final loading for our next assignment overseas.

THE SAIPAN OPERATION


On 18 May 1944, the U. S. S. CHANDELEUR got underway from N. S. D. Oakland for Pearl Harbor. From Hawaii our next stop was KW AJALEIN in the Marshall Islands, which we reached on 5 June 1944. After two weeks at KW AJALEIN, we departed for ENIWETOK. Arriving at ENIWETOK the CHANDELEUR took over the duty of tending these patrol squadrons. Each squadron was made up of fifteen PBM-3D's.

Then came our orders to get underway and on 23 June 1944 we left for SAIPAN, MARMARIANAS, which had been invaded by U. S. forces less than 10 days before. Arriving at SAIPAN on 26 June we immediately began tending our PBM's under the overall command of Captain TAFT, C. 0., U.S.S. POKOMOKE. Captain TAFT was succeeded soon after our arrival at SAIPAN by Commodore Dixwell KETCHAM, U. S. N., Commander FAW-1.

Operating conditions at SAIPAN were not always of the best due to rough water, high winds, and enemy shore batteries. This vessel was anchored in GARAPAN BAY and on several occasions the ship's planes came under fire from enemy shore guns scattering shrapnel and doing some minor damage to the PBM's. At one time, there was a bad run of weather with 15 to 20 foot swells. Plane maintenance crews had to go over the side into their boats via cargo nets and the sea made working on the planes extremely hazardous. .

During the CHANDELEUR's stay on SAIPAN we went to General Quarters many times but were never under actual attack, the raiders seemingly being intent on creating a nuisance and preventing the ship and squadron personnel from getting much needed rest.

During our stay on SAIPAN, the planes of VP-202 and VP-216 conducted long range searches and photographic missions. Planes of VH-1, a rescue and evacuation squadron, were also assigned to us for maintenance on 5 July giving the CHANDELEUR a total of 36 (thirty-six) PBM-3D's to keep flying.

On 10 July 1944, well before the island was secured, the CHANDELEUR placed the first PBM on the ramp of the Japanese seaplane base at SAIPAN for maintenance work. Some Chandeleur men received a commendatory mass from Capt. Goodney for their work in preparing the ramp for operations. Putting this ramp to use greatly facilitated seaplane maintenance during this important operation.

Early in September 1944 we were ordered to make preparations for a new operation. Our plane maintenance crews had thirty-six seaplanes to check before leaving and also eighteen engines to change but all work was accomplished with time to spare.

TENDING AT KOSSL PASSAGE


On 3 September 1944, Commodore Dixwell KETCHAM, U. S. N. came aboard the CHANDELEUR as Commander FAW-1 and Commander Task Group 59.3. This flag remained aboard the AV-10 until 15 October. After completing all checks on the planes of VP-202 and VP-216, and VH-1 the U. S. S. CHANDELEUR was ready to go and on 12 September, 1944 this vessel got underway as part of Task Group 59.3 consisting of the U. S. S. CHANDELEUR, USS Pocomoke (AV-9), USS Mackinac (AVP-13), U. S. S. YAKUTAT, and U. S. S. ONSLOW. The task group proceeded to a position latitude 7 degrees 30 minutes north and longitude 138 degrees east to await further orders. Upon receiving the expected orders the task group set its course for KOSSOL PASSAGE, PALAU ISLANDS and arrived at 1130 on 16 September 1944. Hundreds of mines were being sunk on all sides, many even after we were anchored.

The operation at KOSSOL PASSAGE proved to be one of our toughest jobs since the water was almost continuously rough. During one day, 7 November 1944, a wind of hurricane force hit this area with gusts up to 75 knots. Many of the seaplanes rode out this typhoon on the water but despite everything the planes were kept in commission and the patrols were met. Food had to be floated to the planes on a rubber life raft, towed by a boat, since the water was too rough for a boat to come alongside a plane. It was very important that the patrols be made as our planes were flying coverage for the invasion of the PHILIPPINES.

While at KOSSOL PASSAGE, VPB-202 was relieved by VP-21, the last crew of VPB-202 being relieved on 24 October. VH-1 was detached from our cognizance on 6 October and VPB-216 left for home on 21 November leaving the CHANDELEUR only VPB-21 to tend.

The operation at KOSSOL PASSAGE was uneventful in respect to enemy action. A few nuisance raiders came over from nearby BABEL THUAP ISLAND but there was only one instance of a bomb being dropped. On Thanksgiving Day, 30 November 1944 we got underway for dispersal due to an expected enemy air attack. The "attack" came off exactly on time but consisted of only one plane which dropped a bomb (causing no damage) and left the area. The only harm done was to everyone's disposition due to having a fine Thanksgiving dinner spoiled by General Quarters.

ULITHI AND SAIPAN-A BREATHING SPELL


Having completed her mission at KOSSOL PASSAGE, the U. S. S. CHANDELEUR got underway Christmas Day 1944 for ULITHI, CAROLINE ISLANDS, arriving the next day. We stayed at ULITHI for over a month carrying out routine maintenance on the fifteen PBM-3D's of VPB-21 and enjoying a breathing spell from the "no-liberty" port of KOSSOL PASSAGE.

On 8 February 1945 we got underway for SAIPAN, MARIANAS, where we remained until 23 March. The routine here was much the same as at ULITHI. However, things began getting busier during the end of our stay at SAIP AN and we knew that another opera- tion was shaping up.

KERAMA RETTO AND THE OKINAWA CAMPAIGN


On 23 March 1945, the U. S. S. CHANDELEUR embarked on what was to be the most important and difficult operation of her career. The task group consisted of three AV's (HAMLIN, ST. GEORGE, CHANDELEUR) and four AVP's (ONSLOW, HERING STRAIT, SHELIKOF, YAKUTAT) with Commander FAW-1, Commodore Dixwell KETCHAM, in the HAMLIN as CTG and OTC. While still underway we learned that our destination was KERAMA RETTO, a small group of islands in the NANSEI SHOTO or RYUKYU chain, seventeen miles west of OKINAWA.

Task Group 51.20 arrived at KERAMA RETTO 28 March 1945 only one day after the 77th Division, U. S. Army had landed and secured part of the group. Thus 28 March found us at KERAMA RETTO on D plus 1 Day for that group and D minus 3 Day for OKINA W A itself where the initial landing was made on 1 April 1945, Easter Sunday morning.

Immediately prior to leaving SAIPAN, our squadron, VPB-21, completed a change-over from PBM-3D aircraft to the PBM-5 type. Throughout the OKINA W A campaign VPB-21 used fifteen PBM-5's on their bombing, search, and rescue missions.

On 29 March 1945, before any planes had departed on flights, this vessel assumed control of seadrome operations and remained Seadrome Control Tender until relieved by the U. S. S. KENNETH WHITING on 5 August just before our departure for SAIPAN. During the period 29 March through 30 April 1945 the CHANDELEUR also had the duty of FLEET POST OFFICE ANNEX and handled air service for the press to COMMANDER IN CHIEF, PACIFIC OCEANS AREA, Public Relations, Guam.

At KERAMA RETTO the seaplane maintenance problem was made more difficult because of the number of planes returning from missions badly damaged from enemy action-frequently in a sinking condition. Then, too, much valuable working time was lost due to Red and Blue Alerts. In order to keep the planes flying, it became necessary to work even during Flash Blue, using dimmed lights at night. Only when General Quarters was sounded, did the maintenance crews leave their work.

While on the subject of General Quarters and enemy attacks, it is interesting to note that the CHANDELEUR went to General Quarters 204 times between 28 March and 15 July, a period of a little over three and one-half months. During this time enemy aircraft were brought under fire by the ship's guns on eight occasions, hits being scored at least twice. One enemy single-engine aircraft was splashed at 0121 29 April 1945. This plane came through a gap between two nearby islands, headed directly toward the CHANDELEUR. It was tracked and taken under accurate fire from two 40 mm. and eight 20 mm. guns at close range, (before any other ship opened fire). The plane pulled up momentarily, then fell into a dive crashing into the water and exploding about 30 seconds later.

The second time our guns scored hits was on the evening of 21 June 1945. At about 1838 two enemy planes, later identified as a FRANK and an OSCAR, approached our anchorage without warning and at low altitude. The FRANK immediately crashed into the U. S. S. CURTISS and the OSCAR circled to attack this vessel. Due to the alertness of the CHANDELEUR's fire control personnel the enemy plane changed its course and crashed about 10 yards short of the port side of the nearby KENNETH WHITING. Several hits were scored by our 20 mm. and 40 mm. gunners and the CHANDELEUR was credited with an assist for her part in splashing the would-be KAMIKAZE.

It was decided to move the seaplane base from KERAMA RETTO to OKINAWA proper and so on 15 July, after 109 busy days at KERAMA, the CHANDELEUR got underway for CHIMU WAN, OKINAWA in company with other units of Task Group 30.5.

At our new location, this vessel continued tending planes for VPB-21 with our same additional duties as Seadrome Control Tender. During the three weeks we were at CHIMU WAN, we went to General Quarters 16 times but did no firing at enemy targets.

While at CHIMU WAN, the CHANDELEUR had to get underway twice and stand out to sea in execution of Typhoon Plan X. Due to approaching storms, we evacuated our planes and left CHIMU WAN once on 19 July and again on 1 August. The storms quickly subsided however and operations were resumed in short order with no damage being done to any of our seaplanes.

On 5 August the CHANDELEUR was relieved of Seadrome Control and the next day got underway for SAIPAN, MARIANAS.

During the 131 days this vessel operated in the OKINAWA area, every landing and take-off made by planes of FAW-1 was controlled by us and despite 220 (two hundred twenty) general quarters, enemy at- tacks, typhoons, and other hazards to seaplane operation, we helped keep our search planes flying.

A few words about the accomplishments of our squadron during the OKINAWA operation would not be a risk at this point. We have tended VPB-21 continuously since 18 October 1944, eleven months together at KOSSOL PASSAGE, ULITHI, SAIPAN, KERAMA RETTO, CHIMU WAN, and now the Occupation of JAPAN at OMINATO.

In citing the deeds of the squadron at OKINAWA only, we are not forgetting the other months of the day-to-qay patrols but since the operation at OKINAWA was undoubtedly the largest and most important seaplane operation in history, the facts about this campaign seem the most logical to present.

During the OKINAWA operation, Mariniers of VPB-21 sank nine enemy vessels, probably sank three others, and damaged twenty-nine more. In addition to this, many land tar- gets were destroyed or damaged.

CHANDELEUR-based PBM's drew first blood at OKINAWA being in on the kill of a large Japanese submarine two days before the invasion of OKINAWA. Our search planes spotted the giant Japanese battleship YAMATO on the morning of 7 April 1945 and warned the carrier planes that later destroyed her.

During the OKINAWA operation, planes of VPB-21 rescued twenty downed airmen, shot down at least one Nip plane, and flew over five hundred combat missions for a total of 7,000 (seven thousand) hours.

Close co-operation between ship an squadron made such accomplishments possible and in helping VPB-21 pile up such an impressive record, the U. S. S. CHANDELEUR has definitely fulfilled her primary functions to act as a floating base for the maintenance of seaplanes and for the caring of their crews.

OCCUPATION OF JAPAN


After leaving OKINAWA, the U. S. S. CHANDELEUR stopped first at SAIPAN, arriving there 10 August. Orders to get underway again came and on 12 August we departed for ENIWETOK, arriving at this Marshall Island atoll three days later. At ENIWETOK we passed from under the cognizance of CFAW-l for the first time in over a year and during our stay here the CHANDELEUR was under the Commander of the Marshall and Gilberts Area.

The biggest news stories of the war, the atomic bomb, Russia's entry into the conflict, and Japan's surrender offer found us underway between OKINAWA and ENIWETOK and the rapid cessation of hostilities left us very uncertain as to our status.

After seven days availability alongside the U. S. S. LAERTES (AR-20) to make critically needed repairs in the engine room, our status began to clear as cold weather gear came aboard and the CHANDELEUR was ordered to get underway again.

The official V-J day, Sunday, 2 September 1945, found us underway en route to OMINATO, HONSHU, JAPAN. On 6 September the CHANDELEUR joined the main force of the North Pacific Fleet about 200 miles off the Northern coast of the main Japanese island of HONSHU, and thus came under direct command of Com Nor Pac, Vice Admiral Frank Jack FLETCHER, U.S. N.

Reaching OMINATO on 8 September with the other units of the North Pacific Fleet, the CHANDELEUR was one of the first large ships to enter the harbor and anchor. The next morning, Admiral FLETCHER received the formal surrender of Northern HONSHU and all of HOKKAIDO from the Japanese envoys on a nearby ship, U. S. S. PANAMINT.

Our PBM's arrived 10 September and using us as their base flew routine searches, Dumbo missions, and mail and passenger trips to TOKYO. The OMINATO operation was the culmination of the CHANDELEUR's war activity. On 16 October after the arrival of our relief, the U. S. S. TANGLER, we at last weighed anchor. SAIPAN, almost our home port, was our first stop, but in less than 24 hours we had provisioned, fueled and taken on passengers. On the morning of 23 October the familiar landscape of SAIPAN faded from sight and the CHANDELEUR, her days of war over, headed home.

Circa 1944

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...History of FAW-14 - History from 15OCT42-01DEC42 - Submitted December 22nd, 1944. Squadron's Assigned: VP-1, VP-2, VP-4, VP-11, VP-12, VP-13, VP-14, VP-15, VP-21, VP-23, VP-24, VP-33, VP-44, VP-53, VP-54, VP-71, VP-72, VP-81, VP-91, VP-101, VP-102, VP-103, VP-104, VP-106, VP-109, VP-111, VP-115, VP-117, VP-118, VP-119, VP-121, VP-122 and VP-202..." Official U. S. Navy Records (National Archives and Records Administration) via Fold3 http://www.fold3.com/ [06DEC2012]

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HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...FAW-1 - VP-14, VP-71, VP-81, VPB-104, VPB-106 - War Diary - January 1944..." Official U. S. Navy Records (National Archives and Records Administration) via Fold3 http://www.fold3.com/ [21OCT2012]

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HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Location of U. S. Naval Aircraft - Dated 11 Jan 1944..." WebSite: Naval Historical Center http://www.history.navy.mil/ [29SEP2006]

VP SQUADRONS MENTIONED

VD-1, VD-2, VD-3 and VD-4

VJ-1, VJ-2, VJ-3, VJ-4, VJ-5, VJ-7, VJ-8, VJ-9, VJ-10, VJ-11, VJ-12, VJ-13, VJ-14, VJ-15, and VJ-16

VP-6 Coast Guard

VP-11, VP-12, VP-13, VP-14, VP-15, VP-16, VP-17, VP-18 and VP-19

VP-20, VP-23 and VP-24

VP-32, VP-33 and VP-34

VP-43, VP-44 and VP-45

VP-52 and VP-54

VP-61 and VP-62

VP-71, VP-72, VP-73 and VP-74

VP-81 and VP-84

VP-91, VP-92 and VP-94

VP-101, VP-102, VP-103, VP-104, VP-105, VP-106, VP-107, VP-108 and VP-109

VP-110, VP-111, VP-112, VP-113, VP-115, VP-116 and VP-117

VP-126, VP-127, VP-128 and VP-129

VP-130, VP-131, VP-132, VP-133, VP-134, VP-135, VP-136, VP-137, VP-138 and VP-139

VP-140, VP-141, VP-142, VP-143, VP-144, VP-145, VP-146, VP-147, VP-148 and VP-149

VP-150 and VP-151

VP-201, VP-203, VP-204, VP-205, VP-208 and VP-209

VP-210, VP-211, VP-212, VP-213, VP-214, VP-215 and VP-216


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HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: Naval Aviation News Magazine "...Rescue Airmen - Naval Aviation News - September 1944..." WebSite: http://www.history.navy.mil/nan/backissues/1940s/1944/15sep44.pdf [07NOV2004]

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HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: ArticleArticle "...1,000 Miles Eyes by Sidney Shalett dated 23SEP44. Article mentions CAPTAIN Thurlow Gray DOYLE (served with VP-14 and VPB-102) as well as VPB-104..." Contributed by DOYLE, CAPTAIN Thurlow Gray (Deceased) c/o His Son Thomas Doyle tmdoyle4@earthlink.net [22JUN2001]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "00MAR44--AIRMAILGRAM...Plain...AIRMAILGRAM...Acting on orders of COMAIRMUNDA PBY-5 Plane #17, VP-14 Lt. Herman Klinge, USNR, PCC took of from hat horn sound at 0630/18 and landed at Green Island 0900/18. While maintaining a radio listening watch at 1220 a message was received to become airborne and at 1230 when airborne instructions were received to pick up a downed fighter pilot off Tawui Point. Escorted by 12 F4U's from Green Course was set for St. Georges Channel. Approaching between Duke of York and New Ireland at 12000 the PBY dove to an altitude of 500' off the mother and searched NW to Tawui Pt. Just off shore a life raft with the downed pilot was spotted between 2 native canoes. A 360 degree turn was made, floats lowered and landing made at 1400/18 just short of the downed pilot, 1/4 mile off shore. As soon as the plane stopped 3" shore batteries opened up. A shell hit in the Turtleback which severed controls knocking out both rudder controls and l/2 the elevator control. 3 attempts were made to rescue the downed pilot but such rescue was impossible due to the lack of rudder control. One of the escorting F4U's was shot down by the enemy and another fighter suffered tail damage. Meanwhile, the blisters of the Dumbo were blown out by shells which were bursting continuously about the plane, the after station now became half filled with water. The plane Captain Love was knocked down and suffered slight lacerations of his left hand. The pilot decided to leave-the immediate area and taxied on the step with full throttle in general SE direction. The plane became airborne in an emergency state in such a condition that another landing was impossible.

Water in the after station made the plane tail-heavy rendering it almost impossible to keep the plane in the air. At once the crew threw out all gear etc, n the after station to lighten the plane. Thus lightened, it was possible to take the planc of its stalled attitude. With no rudder control the plane had to be steered by throttles and aileron. A safe landing was made at 1500/18 at green on throttles and aileron. First Radioman Krisa in particular, Should be commended for his Alertness in standing his duty in maintaining communications at all times. All members of the crew performed miraculously in all duties called upon and showed great initiative in a most difficult situation from the time the enemy opened fire until landing was made at green. In consideration of the actions of the pilot and his crew it is recommended that the Silver Star be awarded Lt Herman Klinge and that Air Medals be awarded to all other members of the crew. In addition to the award of Air Medal it is further recommended that a Letter of Commendation be given to Radioman Krisa. List of crew appears below: Love, Vernon John AMM1C, USN, Cambridge, Idaho...Kendra, Frank USN, Highland, In...Pawlowski, Joseph John AMM2C V-6, USNR, Camden, New Jersey...Krisa, Nicholas ARM1C, USN, Washington, D.C...Danahy, Earl Brewster ARM2C V-6, USNR, Pineville, LA...Derosett, Joshua AOM1C, USN, Murphysboro, Ill...Ensign James P. Thompson, USNR, Hurlock, MD...Ensign Edward B. Tucker, USNR, McKenny, VA...Lt. Herman Klinge, USNR, Tocoma, WA. From: COMFAIRWING 1...220559...22 MARCH 44...To: COMSOPACO...Released by R. Henderson..." Contributed by George Winter pbycat@bellsouth.net [From Jim Thompson Files...]

UPDATE "...You have a great bit about my grandfather, Herman Richard "Dick", "Pops" Klinge, Chief Buoy Hooker http://www.pbyma.org/buoy_hooker_cert.html. I found your site last year soon after he passed away (May 15, 2000). What a delight it was to find your site, and particularly, this story about my grandfather. I had heard the story growing up, as did my father, but we had never read the official document. Recently, my aunt gave me this picture of him receiving his Silver Star. I felt it would be nice to share it with the you and your site. I do not have much information about the picture, for instance, who the other men are or what the date was, just that this is the picture of him being decorated with the Silver Star (See Below)...David Klinge lennon@genext.net..." [19DEC2001]

VP-14 History

UPDATE "...I am new to the internet and I was so excited when I came upon
A BIT OF HISTORY: 00MAR44--AIR MAILGRAM ... about Lt. Herman Klinge and PBY-5 Plane #17 of Squadron VP-14. I remember the incident very well. I was the first radioman on Lt. Tanners Plane #23 of Squadron VP-14. Lt. Klinge was a little older than many of us twenty and twenty one year olds. We called him POPS. He was well liked and respected by everyone. He played football for Washington or Washington State. He was a powerful man and the consensus was that his extraordinary strength enabled him to get that wounded cat into the air with all the water in the after station. Our crew could relate somewhat to this. We were taking a doctor and a corpsman to treat a wounded spotter on one of the bypassed islands. Although we had a man on the bow watching for coral we sliced a 6 or 8 foot gash in the hold trying to get as close to the shore as possible. We put the doctor and the corpsman out in a life raft and started bailing furiously. Unfortunately, the sea was very calm with little wind to help get the plane into the air. Fortunately we had an experienced and very capable pilot in Lt. Tanner. As I recall the plane bounced 14 times, each time staying in the air a little longer, before Lt. Tanner could get that wounded cat to stay in the air. On the way back to our tender we bailed as much water as we could, tore up our clothing to stuff in the gash pounding it together as best we could. When we got back to our tender Lt. Tanner put that cat down so smoothly right toward the beach where the ground crew put the wheels on it in a flash. I am wondering if anyone knows where a roster of PBY-5 Squadron VP-14 can be found?..." Contributed by Carl Haakana, ARM1C, V6-USNR dellcar@earthlink.net [22FEB99]in the stratosphere to within 25 feet of the ocean. She rode so close to the waves that I felt I could lean from the gun "blister' and drag my hands in the water as if I were riding in a rowboat.

"The big ship is safer near the water. At 25 feet no enemy fighter can get beneath her, and she is vulnerable only from above. Even if hit and badly hurt, she has only to sink a few feet to ride the waves."

A PBY was there when America entered World War II. While on the early morning patrol near Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7, the P-boat dropped a smoke pot on a midget submarine, which was then attacked by a destroyer. Japanese planes destroyed or damaged the remaining PBYs on the ground at NAS Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, Hawaii and those at Kaneohe air station. Heavy PBY losses also occurred in the Philippines. All the PBYs had been built at San Diego.

FLYING BOATS TAKE OFF FROM S. D. NEST Photo Courtesy San Diego Aerospace Museum...The Consolidated Aircraft rescue platform allows easy access from the side gun mount on the Catalina, allowing the Navy tp pick up downed aviators.

Before the decisive Battle of Midway in June 1942, a PBY-5 was the first to sight the Japanese warships. Four PBYs conducted a torpedo attack and sank an oiler the night of June 3. In Alaska a PBY waist gunner hit and forced down a Japanese Mitsubishi Zero airplane on June 4, 1942. The fighter was brought to North Island. After workmen secretly repaired the fighter in the blimp hangar, Navy pilots flew it with U.S. markings over San Diego County, where American planes "attacked" the Zero to discover its strengths and weaknesses. During the war, instead of attacking or being attacked, most PBY s simply spent thousands of hours patrolling the oceans seeking enemy shipping and submarines. But the Navy also organized Air-Sea Rescue squadrons to pick up downed aviators. Lt. Nathan Gordon I was awarded the Medal of Honor for rescuing 25 men from Kavieng Harbor, New Ireland, with his PBY-5Aunderfireon Feb.15, 1944. Wartime flying in PBYs was hours and hours of routine boredom punctuated by moments of deadly excitement.

At San Diego, Consolidated delivered 516 PBY-5s between April 1942 and July 1943. And 710 PBY-5As were delivered between December 1941 and March 1944. The Aviator Log Book of Navy Lt. Norris A. Johnson shows that in the month of September 1942 he test-hopped 36 of the PBY-5As after they left the factory at Lindbergh Field and before he landed them at North Island.

The San Diego Aerospace Museum exhibits PBY-5A, Bureau Number 48406, built in 1943, and donated by a civilian owner in 1985. It served in the Pacific war, the Coast Guard, and was parked at the Van Nuys airport before its last flight to North Island to be restored.

The British received 225 PBY-5B (Catalina IB) and 70 Catalina IVA flying boats between May 1942 and July 1943. A Dutch squadron in Ceylon got 12 PBY-5As in September 1942.

The war brought improvements to PBYs. The seaplanes received self-sealing tanks for part of their fuel load. Improved armament included two guns in the bow turret instead of one, and more ammunition all around. Five hundred pounds of armor protected the pilot, gunners and fuel sumps. Assemblers installed radar on the Consolidated PBY production line in May 1942.

Sailors quickly called them Black Cats. All-black PBYs carried out night bomber operations in the South Pacific. The planes flew out of Guadalcanal and Australia through 1943. They flew at night for two reasons. First, the comparatively slow PBYs were easy targets in daylight, and second, the enemy had difficulty seeing them in the dark, especially at 60 feet dropping delayed-action bombs.

Navy PBYs found the most targets in the Atlantic, where German U-boats had sent Allied ship after ship to the bottom with men and supplies that would never reach Europe. PBYs flew from Natal, Brazil, to patrol the South Atlantic, from Morocco to guard the Straits of Gibraltar, and from Great Britain over the Bay of Biscay.

Catalinas of VP-63 made the first detection of a submerged enemy submarine by the use of magnetic airborne detection gear near the Straits of Gibraltar on Feb. 24, 1944. Ships and planes attacked and sank U-761.

Canadian Flight Leader David Hornell received the Victory Cross posthumously after his successful attack on U-1225 on June 24, 1944, with a Canso, the Canadian nickname for the PBY. Before the sub sank. the German antiaircraft gunners shot off the plane's starboard engine. After the burning Canso landed the crew waited for rescue in the water for 21 hours.

In September 1944 a PBY-5 from VP-33 operating near the Philippines got a radar contact off Mindanao. A Japanese Seaplane Tender and two destroyer escorts soon became visible in the moonlight. Lt. j.g. William B. Sumpterdecided to attack. He dropped two 100-pound and two 500-pound bombs, which hit each of the three ships amidships. The P-boat crew felt the explosion and watched the ships erupt in smoke and flames. After a strafing pass, all that was left was the tender lying on its side and sinking.

Army PBYs, designated OA-10s, formed the Emergency Rescue Squadron in the Mediterranean in 1944 to pick up downed aviators and other survivors in the water. Both the Navy and the Army referred to the Catalinas used for rescues as Dumbo, the code name for a rescue mission.

In March 1944, the Consolidated Inspection Department at San Diego rubber-stamped its last Catalina; however, other factories continued making PH Y s. The Naval Aircraft Factory at Philadelphia built PENs and called them Nomads. In Canada, Hoeing built PBYs called Canso lIs and PH2Hs at Vancouver. Canadair Vickers built them at Montreal. Consolidated - Vultee New Orleans, the last company to build PBYs, began a contract for 60 planes in April 1944.

The last Catalina model produced was the PBY-6A amphibian. Russia got 48, the Army got 75 as the OA-10H, and the Navy got the rest.

After the war, perhaps 200 PBYs made their last landings at NAS Jacksonville, Florida. Although the Navy scrapped most of them wherever they gathered, many surplus Catalinas went to small air forces around the world. Perhaps the last military Catalina was retired by Denmark in 1970.

Civilian companies also purchased secondhand PBYs. They fought forest fires in Canada and the United States. A few individuals bought the airplanes for pleasure, business and economical reasons. They were comparatively inexpensive to operate with great reliability.

Navy Capt. William E. Scarborough described flying the P-boat as "hard work." It took a lot of physical effort without power steering. The airplane had an excellent autopilot, which was only good for straight-Iineflight. They cruised at about 110 miles per hour.

Takeoffs in water were blinded by spray over the windshield. Landings were made at about 80 knots (92 miles per hour) until reaching about 50 feet altitude. Power was then reduced. As the speed dropped, the nose was pulled up into a stall. If properly executed, the plane settled in the water at minimum forward speed. If not, a touchdown before a stall could result in a high bounce, popped rivets. and open hull seams.

The interior of a normally noisy PBY turned extremely cold in the Arctic. Tropical flying conditions caused high humidity inside the seaplane and temperatures in the 90s. Long patrols resulted in the loss of normal hearing for hours afterward.

The memory of flying in Consolidated PBY Catalinas shines brightly in the recollections of old P-boat aviators. An old Catalina will continue to be on exhibit at the San Diego Aerospace Museum to remind future generations what those men and those planes achieved.

Leisel; curator of the San Diego Aerospace Museum, used the following as major sources for this article; "Aero Biographies; The Story of the PBY Catalina" by Ray Wagner; The Consolidator magazine; "Historical Aviation Album, Consolidated PBY-5/-5A " by Capt. WE. Scarborough; and Journal of the American Aviation Historical Society.


Circa 1943

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Location of U. S. Naval Aircraft - Dated 31 May 1943..." WebSite: Naval Historical Center http://www.history.navy.mil/ [02OCT2006]

VP SQUADRONS MENTIONED

CASU

PATSU

VD-1, VD-2 and VD-3

VJ-1, VJ-2, VJ-3, VJ-4, VJ-5, VJ-7 and VJ-10

VP-1

VP-11, VP-12, VP-13, VP-14 and VP-15

VP-23

VP-32, VP-33 and VP-34

VP-43, VP-44 and VP-45

VP-52, VP-53 and VP-54

VP-61, VP-62 and VP-63

VP-71, VP-72, VP-73 and VP-74

VP-81 and VP-84

VP-91, VP-92 and VP-94

VP-101, VP-102, VP-103, VP-104, VP-105, VP-106, VP-107, VP-108 and VP-109

VP-125, VP-126, VP-127 and VP-128

VP-130, VP-131, VP-132, VP-133, VP-134, VP-135, VP-136, VP-137, VP-138 and VP-139

VP-140, VP-142, VP-144 and VP-146

VP-201, VP-202, VP-203, VP-204, VP-205, VP-206, VP-207, VP-208 and VP-209

VP-210, VP-211 and VP-212

History - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge Thumbnail

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Location of U. S. Naval Aircraft - Dated 09 Nov 1943..." WebSite: Naval Historical Center http://www.history.navy.mil/ [01OCT2006]

VP SQUADRONS MENTIONED

CASU and PATSU

VD-1, VD-2, VD-3 and VD-4

VJ-1, VJ-2, VJ-3, VJ-4, VJ-5, VJ-15, and VJ-16

VP-6 Coast Guard

VP-1

VP-11, VP-12, VP-13, VP-14, VP-15 and VP-16

VP-23 and VP-24

VP-32, VP-33 and VP-34

VP-43, VP-44 and VP-45

VP-52, VP-53 and VP-54

VP-61, VP-62 and VP-63

VP-71, VP-72, VP-73 and VP-74

VP-81 and VP-84

VP-91, VP-92 and VP-94

VP-101, VP-102, VP-103, VP-104, VP-105, VP-106, VP-107, VP-108 and VP-109

VP-110, VP-111, VP-112, VP-113, VP-114, VP-115 and VP-116

VP-125, VP-126, VP-127, VP-128 and VP-129

VP-130, VP-131, VP-132, VP-133, VP-134, VP-135, VP-136, VP-137, VP-138 and VP-139

VP-140, VP-141, VP-142, VP-143, VP-144, VP-145, VP-146, VP-147, VP-148 and VP-149

VP-150

VP-201, VP-202, VP-203, VP-204, VP-205, VP-206, VP-207, VP-208 and VP-209

VP-210, VP-211, VP-212, VP-213, VP-214, VP-215 and VP-216


History - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge Thumbnail

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Location of U. S. Naval Aircraft - Dated 09 Feb 1943..." WebSite: Naval Historical Center http://www.history.navy.mil/ [28SEP2006]

VP SQUADRONS MENTIONED

VJ-1, VJ-2, VJ-3, VJ-7 and VJ-8

VP-11, VP-12, VP-13 and VP-14

VP-23 and VP-24

VP-31, VP-32, VP-33 and VP-34

VP-41, VP-42, VP-43 and VP-44

VP-61, VP-62, and VP-63

VP-71, VP-72, VP-73 and VP-74

VP-81, VP-82, VP-83 and VP-84

VP-91, VP-92, VP-93 and VP-94

VP-101

VP-127, VP-128 and VP-129

VP-130, VP-132, VP-133 and VP-134

VP-201, VP-202, VP-203, VP-205, VP-206, VP-207, VP-208 and VP-209,

VP-210, VP-211 and VP-212
History - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge Thumbnail

Circa 1942

Note NOTICE: "...I am looking for information on the PBY-5 Buno 2360, of VP-14 was stationed at NAS Kaneohe Bay, It is reported to have survived the attack on pearl on 26 Aug 1942 it was temp. assigned to VP-71 , then returned to VP-14 15 JUN 1942. On 26 AUG 1942, it was burned by its crew to avoid the japs from getting her. I would like to know if any one knows the entire story of this plane?" Chuck Bones JARHEAD12Y@aol.com

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Op-40-A-KB - (SC)A6-4/VZ - January 6, 1942 - Location of U. S. Naval Aircraft..." WebSite: Naval Historical Center http://www.history.navy.mil/ [23SEP2006]

VP SQUADRONS MENTIONED

VP-11, VP-12 and VP-14

VP-23 and VP-24

VP-31, VP-32, VP-33 and VP-34

VP-41, VP-42, VP-43 and VP-44

VP-51, VP-52, VP-53 and VP-54

VP-61, VP-62, VP-63

VP-71, VP-72, VP-73 and VP-74

VP-81 and VP-83

VP-91, VP-92 and VP-94

VP-101

VP-201, VP-202, VP-203, VP-204, VP-205, VP-206, VP-207, VP-208, VP-209, VP-210, VP-211 and VP-212


History - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge Thumbnail

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...10JUL42 - PBYs (VP-14) attempt to bomb Japanese base at Tulagi-Gavutu area but bad weather prompts cancellation of the mission..." HyperWar WebSite: http://www.ibiblio.org/hyperwar/USN/USN-Chron/USN-Chron-1942.html [16SEP2005]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Air-to-Air Shoot Downs by Navy and Marine Corps Patrol Type Aircraft During World War II - This Squadron Mentioned...Naval Historical Center ADOBE Download File: http://www.history.navy.mil/avh-vol2/Appen4.pdf [12FEB2004]
Get Adobe Reader
Open VP History Adobe FileAir-To-Air Shootdowns 118KB

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Patrol Wing One Report for Pearl Harbor Attack - 1 January 1942..." WebSite: Naval Historical Site http://www.history.navy.mil/docs/wwii/pearl/ph12.htm [08APR2005]

DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY -- NAVAL HISTORICAL CENTER
805 KIDDER BREESE SE -- WASHINGTON NAVY YARD
WASHINGTON DC 20374-5060


Patrol Wing One Report for Pearl Harbor Attack
A16-3(1)/UNITED STATES PACIFIC FLEET
AIRCRAFT, SCOUTING FORCE
PATROL WING ONE
 
O2  
  FLEET AIR DETACHMENT
Naval Air Station
Kaneohe Bay, T.H.
1 January 1942.

From:Commander Patrol Wing ONE. 
To:Commander-in-Chief, U.S. Pacific Fleet. 
  
Subject:Report of Japanese Air Attack on Kaneohe Bay, T.H., - December 7, 1941.
  
Reference:(a) Cincpac desp. 102102 of December 1941.
(b) USS Hulbert Conf. ltr. A16-3/P15 (C-47) of December 8, 1941
(c) USS Avocet Conf. ltr. A16-3 (039) of December 12, 1941
(d) VP-11 Conf. ltr. of December 13, 1941.
(e) VP-12 Conf. ltr. A16-3 (0100) of December 14, 1941.
(f) VP-14 Conf. ltr. A16-3 of December 1941.



  1. The following report is submitted as the happenings on Sunday, December 7, 1941, in compliance with reference (a). References (b), (c), (d), (e), and (f), were the reports of Unit Commanders of this Wing.

  2. The first intimation had that anything was wrong was when a message was received from a patrol plane on the Dawn Patrol stating that they had dropped a depth bomb on and had sunk an enemy submarine one mile off Pearl Harbor entrance. (It was later discovered that a destroyer had attacked this submarine from close aboard and the patrol plane had added his bomb in assistance). Evidence seemed conclusive that the submarine was destroyed. When this message was received it seemed so impossible that the first reaction was that it was a case of mistaken identity as we had some of our submarines due to enter that morning. While investigating to insure that the information concerning our own submarines was in the hands of the patrolling aircraft, about nine (9) enemy fighters circled at low altitude over Kaneohe and attacked with machine guns the control tower located on hill at Naval Air Station and the four patrol planes moored in the bay.

  3. This was followed by an attack on the planes on the ramp. This attack lasted for some fifteen minutes. The very first plane to attack attacked the Wing Commander's OS2U-1 on the landing mat. At the time a chief petty officer was turning over the propeller by hand and it was apparently thought to be a fighter preparing to take off. This plane was thoroughly riddled. After the first wave there was a few minutes' lull and then another attack by an estimated six to nine fighters. All attacks were directed at the planes on the ground, in the water, and at the hangar. But there was some straffing of cars and quarters incident to the main attack. The first attack set on fire all planes on the water and some of those on the beach. The second attack hit additional planes, setting them on fire. At the very beginning of the first attack there was immediate action on the part of the personnel to get machine guns in action against the attacking planes. This was done before the completion of the first attack and on the first attack at least two enemy planes had their gas tanks punctured. Immediate action was taken to save the planes not then on fire and those not too far gone. Personnel attempting this were severely straffed. During both of the above attacks, personnel were straffed on the road in automobiles attempting to get to the hangar area. After the two above attacks all efforts were directed at getting all planes that could be possibly saved clear from the area of the burning planes.

  4. About 0930 a formation of nine, 2 seater bombers, came in formation over the Bay, more or less following the coast line from Kahuka Point, at an altitude of about 1000 to 1500 feet and dropped bombs on the hangar occupied by Patrol Squadrons VP-11 and VP-12. This attack caused the loss of the greatest number of personnel as considerable men were in the hangar getting replenishment ammunition. Two bombs hit in the hangar, two close alongside, and one dud hit in the hangar in which Lieutenant Commander Buckley was supervising the obtaining of ammunition. He miraculously escaped other than minor injuries. Immediately behind this wave of bombers were nine additional bombers and it is uncertain whether or not they dropped bombs -- so much smoke was in the area and people stunned by the first wave that this point is uncertain. If they did not, it is certain that an additional drop was made by the first wave of bombers, aimed at the other hangar, but which fell between the hangar and the water, some falling in the water and did very little damage, except for holes in the parking area. This part is not a tribute to the bombing accuracy of the attacking planes as they were only a 1000 or 15000 feet high and did not drop, that both drops were by the first formation. These same observers contribute the belief that they did not drop the bombs because the central bomber in the leading plane had been killed, as the volume of machine gun fire was directed at the leading plane and tracers indicated that the nose of this plane was receiving severe punishment.

  5. The conduct of all personnel throughout the entire attack was magnificent, in fact, too much so. Had they not, with no protection, deliberately set themselves up with machine guns right in line with the drop of the attacking and straffing planes and near the object of their attack, we would have lost less men. It was, however, due to this reckless resistance that two enemy planes were destroyed and six or more were sent away with heavy gas leaks. Several of these planes that were damaged in this respect departed at high speeds to the north west, all in the same direction. One of the two planes definitely brought down was seen to land in the ocean, smoking before it landed. The other one (a fighter) was brought down within the limits of the station.

  6. After the bombing attack there was a third straffing attack at 10 o'clock. The two fighters destroyed, mentioned above, were on this last attack. There were no further attacks after this one just mentioned.

  7. A survey at this time reveals that all planes actually at the base were put out of commission (33 patrol planes, 1 OS2U-1 and the J2F-1 belonging to the Air Station). The three patrol planes not destroyed were the ones on the Dawn Patrol. One of these was attacked by a number of enemy fighters in the air, receiving considerable bullet holes, but was not stopped and has been operating ever since. These planes had to be considerably patched up. The hangar occupied by squadrons VP-11 and VP-12 was destroyed. All records of those two squadrons were destroyed except the service records of the enlisted men of VP-11. All records of VP-14 are intact. No other buildings or equipment at this base was attacked. Although there were some straffing of quarters and cars incident to the main attack.

  8. The fire truck was destroyed by the bombing attack. All bombsights have been accounted for and are in good condition because they were stored in the Bombsight Vault which was not attacked. A large number of SBAE were destroyed, considerable number of machine guns, both .50 and .30 caliber, were destroyed in the planes.

  9. The conduct of all the personnel was magnificent. After careful consideration it is urgently recommended that the following persons should receive special recognition for their meritorious conduct in the face of enemy fire because their performance was courageous and outstanding:

    VP-11
    FOSS, R.S., Ensign, D-V(G), U.S.N.R.(Deceased)
    SMARTT, J.G., Ensign, A-V(N), U.S.N.R.(Deceased)
    FORMOE, C.M., AMM1c., U.S. Navy(Deceased)
    MANNING, M.A., AMM3c, U.S. Navy(Deceased)
    WEAVER, L.D., Sea1c, U.S. Navy(Deceased)
    BUCKLEY, J.D., AOM3c, U.S. Navy(Deceased)
    ROBINSON, J.H., Sea2c, U.S. Navy(Deceased)
    NASH, K. (n), Y1c, U.S. Navy(Seriously Injured)
    BYRON, H.G., ACMM(PA), U.S. Navy(Seriously Injured)
    CROWNOVER, J.T., RM1c, U.S. Navy(Seriously Injured)
     
    VP-12
    FOX, L. Jr., Ensign, A-V(N), U.S.N.R. (Deceased)
    UHLMANN, R.W., Ensign, D-V(G), U.S.N.R. (Deceased)
    INGRAM, G.W., Sea2c, U.S. Navy (Deceased)
    LAWRENCE, C. (n) AMM2c, U.S. Navy (Deceased)
    OTTERSTETTER, C.W., Sea2c, U.S. Navy (Deceased)
    PORTERFIELD, R.K., AMM3c, U.S. Navy (Deceased)
    WATSON, R.A., AMM1c, U.S. Navy (Deceased)
    BROWN, W.S., AMM2c, U.S. Navy (Deceased)
    GRIFFIN, D.T., AMM1c(NAP), U.S. Navy (Deceased)
    McCORMACK, J.J., Lieutenant, U.S. Navy (Seriously Injured)
    WALLANCE, M.R., Ensign, A-V(N), U.S.N.R. (Seriously Injured)
    HELM, T.W., III, RM1c, U.S. Navy (Seriously Injured)
    LLEWELLYN, F.N., RM2c, U.S. Navy (Seriously Injured)
    GRISHAM, L.A., ACOM(PA), U.S. Navy (Seriously Injured)
    LYONS, D.S., AMM1c(NAP), U.S. Navy(Seriously Injured)
     
    VP-14
    NEWMAN, L.G., AMM3c, U.S. Navy (Deceased)
    WALTERS, J.E., AOM3c, U.S. Navy (Seriously Injured)
    JONES, E.L., Sea2c, U.S. Navy (Seriously Injured)

[signed]
K. McGINNIS

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...05APR42--BUNO 2476 flown by VP-14 water-looped on landing at Pearl Harbor..." George Winter pbycat@bellsouth.net

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...12AUG42--USS Wright sailed again for the Fijis at the end of July, arriving there on 12 August; and landed the 46 officers and 399 men of VMF-222 and VMSB-236. She next proceeded to Rendova harbor, Rendova Island, and tended the planes of VP-14 until 17 January 1944..." http://namopdc.nawcad.navy.mil/talps/tapxo.htm


Circa 1941

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraVP-14 History "...CDR R. E. DIMMITT was assigned to VP-14 on October 1941. His PBY squadron deployed to the South Pacific where he was shot down by the Japanese. As an Operations Officer of VP-9 (P2V) in 1955 he got his first taste of Alaskan flying. In 1959 he too over as XO of VP-1 (P2V) and fleeted up to CO...." Official U. S. Navy Documention [24DEC2012]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...U.S. CONGRESS JOINT COMMITTEE ON PEARL HARBOR ATTACK, HEARINGS: EXHIBITS OF THE JOINT COMMITTEE, Pt. 16, pp. 2721-27..." WebSite: ibiblio Public Library http://www.ibiblio.org/pha/pha/misc/martin_1.html [16JAN2006]

From: U.S. CONGRESS JOINT COMMITTEE ON Pearl Harbor ATTACK, HEARINGS: 
EXHIBITS OF THE JOINT COMMITTEE, Pt. 16, pp. 2721-27.


                             EXHIBIT NO. 120

[1]          KIMMEL EXHIBIT 5 TO REPORT OF ACTION

                                            PATROL WING TWO
                                        U. S. NAVAL AIR STATION,
                                 Pearl Harbor, T. H., December 19, 1941.

Memorandum for Admiral H. E. Kimmel, U. S. Navy.

MY DEAR ADMIRAL: In accordance with our conversation of yesterday, I am 
forwarding to you the following information:

1. Availability and Disposition of Patrol Planes on morning of 7 
December, 1941:
                            Total
Squadron  In commission   available  Location   Under  Ready   In air
                          for flight            Repair at base
VP-11     12 PBY-5            12     Kaneohe      0      12         0
VP-12     12 PBY-5            11     Kaneohe      1      11         0
VP-14     12 PBY-5        [1] 10     Kaneohe      2       7     [1] 3
VP-21     12 PBY-3        [2] 11     Midway       1       4     [2] 7
VP-21      1 PBY-3 (spare)     1     Pearl Harbor 1       0         0
VP-21      1 PBY-3            12     Pearl Harbor 2      12         0
VP-22     14 PBY-3            12     Pearl Harbor 1      11         0
VP-24      6 PBY-5             5     Pearl Harbor 1       1     [3] 4

RECAPITULATION

                            Total
Squadron  In commission   available  Under  Ready   In air
                          for flight Repair at base

At Kaneohe     36          [1] 33       3       30     [1] 3
At Pearl       33          [3] 28       5       24     [3] 4
At Midway      12          [2] 11       1        4     [2] 7 
   Total       81              72       9       58        14

[2]                               NOTES

[1] 3 planes armed with two depth charges each conducting search of 
assigned fleet operating areas in accordance with U. S. Pacific Fleet 
Letter No. 2CL-41 (Revised) (Task Force NINE Operating Plan (91). 3 
planes in condition 2 (30 minutes notice).

[2] 5 planes conducting search of sector 120 170  radius 450 miles; 
departed Midway at 1820 GCT. 2 planes departed Midway at same time to 
rendezvous with U. S. S. LEXINGTON at a point 400 miles bearing 130  
from Midway to serve as escorts for Marine Scouting planes. Four planes 
additional plants armed with 2500 pound bombs each were on the alert at 
Midway as a ready striking force. These four planes took off at about
2230 GCT upon receipt of information on the attack on Pearl Harbor and 
searched sector 060  to 100  radius 400 miles. One plane was under 
repair in the hangar at Midway. A spare plane was under overhaul at 
Pearl Harbor.

[3] Four planes conducting inter-type tactics in area C-5 with U. S. 
Submarine.

[4] All planes except those under repair were armed with machine guns 
and a full allowance of machine gun ammunition.

[3]  2. Material condition:

(a) Of the 81 available patrol planes 54 were new PBY-5's; 27 were PBY-
3's having over three years service. The PBY-5's were recently ferried 
to Hawaii, arriving on the following dates:

Squadron Number Arrival date   Squadron Number Arrival date
         Planes                         Planes
VP-11      12   28 Oct. 1941    VP-23     12    23 Nov. 1941
VP-24       6   28 Oct. 1941    VP-14     12    23 Nov. 1941.
VP-12      12    8 Nov. 1941

(b) The PBY-5 airplanes were experiencing the usual shake-down 
difficulties and were hampered in maintenance by an almost complete 
absence of spare parts. In additions a program for installation of 
leakproof tanks, armor, and modified

engine nose sections was in progress. They were not fully ready for war 
until these installations were completed, nor were extensive continuous 
operations practicable until adequate spare parts were on hand.

(c) The 12 PBY-3 airplanes at Pearl Harbor (VP-22) had returned from
Midway on 5 December after an arduous tour of duty at Midway and Wake 
since 17 October. This squadron was in relatively poor material 
condition because of its extended operations at advance bases with 
inadequate facilities for normal repair and upkeep. In addition 10 of 
its planes were [4] approaching 18 months service and were due for 
overhaul.

(d) It should be noted that the material situation of the patrol 
squadrons made the maintenance of continuous extensive daily searches 
impracticable. Under such conditions the PBY-5's were to be expected to 
experience numerous material failures which would place airplanes out of 
commission until spare parts arrived. The PBY-3's of Patrol Squadron 
TWENTY-TWO at Pearl were scheduled for a week of upkeep for repair and 
maintenance.

(e) Under the circumstances, it seemed advisable to continue intensive 
expansion training operations and improvement of the material military 
effectiveness at the same time preserving the maximum practicable 
availability of aircraft for an emergency. Under the existing material 
and spare parts situation, continuous and extensive patrol plane 
operations by the PBY-5's was certain to result in rapid automatic 
attrition of the already limited number of patrol planes immediately 
available by the exhaustion of small but vital spare parts for which 
there were no replacements.

(f) In this connection it should be noted that there were insufficient 
patrol planes in the Hawaiian Area effectively to do the Job required. 
For the commander of a search group to be able to state with  [5]  some 
assurance that no hostile carrier could reach a spot 250 miles away and 
launch an attack without prior detection would require an effective 
daily search through 360  to a distance of at least 800 miles. Assuming 
a 16-mile radius of visibility this would require a daily 16 hour flight 
of 84 planes. A force of not less than 209 patrol planes, adequate spare 
parts and ample well trained personnel would be required for such 
operations.

                                             (Signed) P. N. L. BELLINGER
                                             Rear Admiral, U. S. Navy,
                                             Commander Patrol Wing TWO.

PW2/A16-3/
016
Confidential

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...07DEC41 - Japanese Type A midget submarine attempts to follow general stores issue ship Antares (AKS-3) into the entrance channel to Pearl Harbor; summoned to the scene by the auxiliary vessel, destroyer Ward (DD-139), on channel entrance patrol, with an assist from a PBY (VP-14), sinks the intruder with gunfire and depth charges. Word of the incident, however, works its way with almost glacial slowness up the chain of command..." WebSite: HyperWar http://www.ibiblio.org/hyperwar/USN/USN-Chron/USN-Chron-1941.html [15SEP2005]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Hearings Before The Joint Committee On The Investigation Of The Pearl Harbor Attack - Congress Of The United States - Seventy-Ninth Congress...Squadrons mentioned: VP-11, VP-13, VP-14, VP-21, VP-22, VP-23, VP-24, VP-31, VP-32, VP-41, VP-42, VP-43, VP-44, VP-51, VP-52, VP-71, VP-72, VP-73, VP-74, VP-81, VP-82, VP-83, VP-84, VP-91, VP-92, VP-93, VP-94, VP-101, VP-102, CPW-1, CPW-2, CPW-3, CPW-4, CPW-5, CPW-7, CPW-8 and CPW-9..." WebSite: The public's library and digital archive http://www.ibiblio.org/pha/pha/misc/rainbow5.html [01APR2005]
Get Adobe Reader
Open VP History Adobe FileHearings Before The Joint Committee On the Investigation Of The Pearl Harbor Attack 333KB

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: NAS History ThumbnailCameraNAS Kaneohe History "...Lost Shipmates (VP-11, VP-12, and VP-14) Photo #: NH 100928 - Naval Air Station Kanoehe Bay, Oahu, Hawaii - Memorial to the eighteen Navy men and one civilian killed in the 7 December 1941 Japanese air attack on NAS Kanoehe Bay. Naval personnel who lost their lives were members of the station crew and of Patrol Squadrons 11, 12 and 14. The monument was erected at Marine Corps Air Station Kanoehe Bay in December 1981. Photographed 4 May 1986 by H.E.("Ed") Coffer. Donation of H.E. Coffer, 1986. U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph." NAVAL HISTORICAL CENTER http://www.history.navy.mil/photos/pers-us/uspers-u/r-uhlman.htm [30MAY2003]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: APPENDIX 3 Submarines Sunk by Patrol Squadrons During World War II - Naval Historical Center http://www.history.navy.mil/branches/dictvol2.htm [04MAY2001]

Midget, 7 December 1941 (shared)
Type: Type A (Midget) Koryu
Laid Down: 1940, Ourazaki, Kure
Commissioned: 1941
Commander: Lieutenant Naoji Iwasa
Career: Assigned to tender Chiyoda, at Base P on the island of Ourazaki, spring 1941; SubRon 1, Kure Naval Arsenal, late summer 1941; I-22, 21 October 1941.
Successes: None

Fate: Prior to the attack on Pearl Harbor VP-14 had launched three PBY-5 Catalinas for routine patrol. Aircraft 14-P-1, flown by Ensign William P. Tanner, spotted a Japanese midget submarine at the entrance to the harbor and assisted Ward (DD 139) in sinking the intruder. Lieutenant Naoji Iwasa and Petty Officer Naoharu Sasaki had been launched from I-22 half an hour before sunrise 5 10 miles from the entrance to the harbor as part of a contingent of five midget subs launched from fleet submarines. Iwasa's orders were to enter the harbor and rise to the surface to attack once the air attack had begun, then circle Ford Island, exit the harbor and proceed to the rendezvous with I-22. Iwasa was attempting to follow the tug Antares through the harbor entrance while Antares had a barge in tow. Ensign Tanner saw the wake of the periscope and alerted Ward, which dropped one depth charge.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...JOHN W. FINN - PEARL HARBOR - MEDAL OF HONOR Recipient" [04AUG99]

JOHN W. FINN - PEARL HARBOR - MEDAL OF HONOR Recipient
FINN Medal of Honor

8 x 10" glossy B&W 1941 Official US Navy photo showing a close-up of a propaganda map found on a Japanese pilot's knee pad that was shot down during that Day of Infamy. On December 7, 1941, John W. Finn was aviation chief ordnance man stationed at the MCAS/NAS Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii, on December 7, 1941. During the first Jap bombing attack he manned a machine gun in an exposed section of the parking ramp. Painfully wounded several times, he was persuaded to leave his post for medical attention only by specific orders. Following first-aid treatment he returned to the squadron area to supervise the rearming of planes". Signed and lengthy inscribed at bottom right: "John W. Finn ACOM, USN, VP-14. U.S.N.A.S, Kaneohe Bay, T.H. (Territory of Hawaii), Dec. 7, 1941". (*Note the cartoonish "head" of President Roosevelt in the center of the ship breaking in half). The translation reads: "HEAR! THE VOICE OF THE MOMENT OF DEATH! WAKE UP YOU FOOLS!"

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...07DEC41--Patrol Wing TWO (CPW-2), U. S. Naval Air Station, Pearl Harbor. T.H., War Diary Sunday, December 7, 1941...Prior to the sudden attack by Japanese aircraft on Oahu, the forces under the Commander Patrol Wing TWO were disposed as follows: VP-21 at Midway; VP-11, VP-12, and VP-14 at Kaneohe; VP-22, VP-23, and VP-24 at Pearl Harbor. All tenders except the WRIGHT were at Pearl Harbor, the WRIGHT was enroute Pearl from Midway. Following is the exact status of aircraft at the time of attack:

VP-21 7 planes in air conducting search 120 to 170 degrees to 450 miles from Midway. 4 planes on surface at Midway armed each with 2 five hundred pound bombs and on 10 minutes notice.

VP-11 12 planes ready for flight on 4 hours notice

VP-12 6 planes ready for flight on 30 minutes notice. 5 planes ready for flight on 4 hours notice.

VP-14 3 planes in the air on morning security patrol armed with depth charges. 3 planes ready for flight on 30 minutes notice. 4 planes ready for flight on 4 hours notice.

VP-22 12 planes ready for flight on 4 hours notice.

VP-23 11 planes ready for flight on 4 hours notice.

VP-24 4 planes in the air conducting inter-type tactics with submarines. 1 plane ready for flight on 30 minutes notice.

Total 72 in the air or ready for flight in 4 hours or less..." http://www.pby.com[14MAY2000]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...07DEC41--On 7 Dec 41, NAS Kaneohe was the home of the three squadrons of Patrol Wing One (PatWing One). Each of the three squadrons operated 12 Consolidated PBY-5 Catalina seaplanes. The three squadrons and their aircraft status were: Patrol Squadron Eleven (VP-11): All 12 PBY-5's could be made ready for operations on four hours notice...Patrol Squadron Twelve (VP-12) 6 PBY-5's were ready for operations on 10 minutes notice5 PBY-5's could be ready for operations on four hours notice 1 PBY-5 was under repair...Patrol Squadron Fourteen (VP-14) 3 PBY-5's were in the air on patrol 3 PBY-5's were ready for operations on 10 minutes notice 4 PBY-5's could be ready for operations on four hours notice 2 PBY-5's were under repair..." World War II Discussion List WWII-L@UBVM.BITNET http://listserv.acsu.buffalo.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A2=ind9312A&L=wwii-l&D=&H=&T=&O=&F=&P=4270

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...07DEC41--orders were issued for the 1 plane at Pearl Harbor, which had somehow escaped uninjured during the second attack, to cover the sector from 280 to 300 degrees. The Commander Patrol Wing ONE at Kaneohe felt that the orders to cover the sector 280 to 300, which had been transmitted to him by telephone for the 2 planes on the ground, required his taking action (Hawaii area) and he accordingly diverted 14-P-1 and 14-P-3 from the sectors that they had been searching. One crashed into Pali that night trying to find base...various memebers of staff maintained communications with Army information centers and requested that attempts be made to track the retiring Japanese planes by RADAR. Unfortunately, the CURTISS RADAR was placed out of commission by the damage contained by that vessel. During the mid-afternoon, 14-P-2 reported being attacked by enemy planes and was thereafter not heard from for 2 or 3 hours. As it was felt that this plane had been shot down...all were lost with planes..." Contributed by Bill Podbreger SAIL@D-WEB.NET

Naval Aviation News March-April 1990"...The Neutrality Patrol - To Keep Us OUt of World War II - Part 1 of 2 by Capt. William E. Scarborough, USN(Ret.)...Naval Aviation News March-April 1990 Page 18 through Page 23..." [24NOV2000]

VP-82 PBY ThumbnailCameraVP-52-P-7 VP-52 In February 1941, VP-52 was at San Juan, P.R., and flew a survey party to British Guiana to inspect a "destroyers-for-bases" site for future naval air station. No. 7 is moored for an overnight stop on the Essequebo River, upstream from Georgetown. On September l, 1939, the German invasion of Poland began a long anticipated and feared WW II. Declarations of war against Germany by Britain and France two days later showed that the war would undoubtedly expand to all of Europe a repeat of the beginning of WW I in 1914. The Allies would again be dependent on support by the United States for supplies and munitions which could reach them only aboard ships crossing the Atlantic. Germany would surely make every effort to halt such trafftc by U-boat and surface raider attacks and the Atlantic would again, as it had in WW I, become a major battleground. It was a foregone conclusion that the war in the Atlantic would endanger the neutrality of the United States, and the Navy moved promptly to minimize the threat.

The day war began in Europe the Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) informed U.S. forces that German U-boats were ready to begin operations in Atlantic shipping lanes, and reports indicated thata dozen German merchant ships were being armed as raiders. The advisory noted that neutral merchantmen, including U.S. flag ships, could expect similar actions by the British and that it was the duty of the U.S., as a neutral, to prevent such activities in our territorial waters and to assure no interference with our rights on the high seas. The Neutrality Act of 1935, made further restrictive by amendment in 1937, forbade arms exports, either direct or by transhipment. to any belligerent and was looked upon by isolationist groups as the best insurance against U.S. involvement in a European war.

Naval Aviation News March-April 1990At Coast Guard Air Station, Charleston, the Coast Guard flew Douglas RD-4, Grumman J2F-2, and Fairchild J2K-2 aircraft on coastal and inshore patrols. In return for shared facilities, VP-52 provided copilots for RD and J2K flights. Building at bottom center was a converted warehouse for squadron shops and offices. President Franklin D. Roosevelt issued his first proclamation of neutrality on September 5, 1939, declaring in part that any use of U.S. territorial waters for hostile operations would be regarded as unfriendly, offensive, and a violation of U.S. neutrality.

The Navy had initiated action on September 4, by CNO dispatch to Commander, Atlantic Squadron, directing establishment of air and ship patrols to observe and report by classified means movement of warships of the belligerents within designated areas. The patrol would cover an area bounded on the north by a line east from Boston to latitude 42-30, longitude 65; south to latitude 19; then around the the windward and leeward islands to Trinidad.

The next day CNO amplified his directive by ordering classified contact reports on foreign men-of-war approaching or leaving the U.S. East Coast or the eastern boundary of the Caribbean. Ships sighted by the patrols, both air and surface, were to be identified by name, nationality, estimated tonnage, color, and markings, and were to be photographed whenever possible. Course and speed were to be estimated and all information was to be recorded and reported on return to base.

VP-82 P2Y ThumbnailCameraVP-15-P-7 VP-15 VP-15 (later redesignated VP-53 and VP-73) P2Y-2 off Breezy Point, NAS Norfolk, Virginia, Spring 1939. Neutrality Patrol star on bow was not authorized until March 19, 1940.

On September 6, Commander, Atlantic Squadron reported to CNO that the patrol was operating and by the 20th, when a revised Atlantic Squadron OpOrder (20-39) became effective, Atlantic coastal waters from Nova Scotia, Canada, to the Lesser Antilles, West Indies, were under daily surveillance by surface and air patrols. Forces involved were primarily patrol planes from Patrol Squadron VP-51 (12 PBY-1s), VP-52 (6 P2Y-2s), VP-53 (12 P2Ys), and VP-54 (12 PBY-2s) of Patrol Wing (PatWing) 5 and VP-33 (12 PBY-3s) of PatWing-3, plus four Seaplane Tenders assigned to the PatWings.

Surface forces were battleships and cruisers of the Atlantic Squadron and their attached OS2U and SOC aircraft of Observation Squadron (VO) 5 and Cruiser Scouting Squadron (VCS) 7, Ranger (CV-4) with her air group and Wasp (CV-7), which was not yet in commission. Forty destroyers plus an undetermined number of old destroyers (to be recommissioned) and about 15 old submarines were the assigned surface forces.

Aircraft patrols were initiated by the patrol squadrons, deployed to assigned Neutrality Patrol bases - most of them ill-equipped to support aircraft and crews for flight operations at the level required for daily patrols. General orders to the patrols stressed safety of the operations, avoidance of nonneutral acts, and the exercise of care in approaching vessels to avoid actions which might be interpreted as hostile.

VP-82 PBY ThumbnailCameraVP-52-P-10 VP-52 VP-52-P-10, Spring 1941. These PBY-5's were transferred from San Diego-based VP-14 in January 1941. To expedite operations and conserve funds. VP-14 markings (black stipes on tail) were retained and only squadron numbers changed.

VP-51: Deployed PBY-1 s to San Juan, P.R., departing NAS Norfolk, Virginia, on September 12, with first patrols flown on the 13th. The squadron utilized seaplane facilities, including ramp and hangar, of Pan American Airways at the San Juan airport, housing crew and supporting activities in tents on the airport. Ttle site utilized was the area on which the future Naval Air Station (NAS), San Juan would be built, construction starting in 1940. VP-51's patrols covered harbors and shipping lanes in the West Indies from Puerto Rico to Trinidad, with special attention to the southern approaches to the Caribbean through the Lesser Antilles.

VP-52 and VP-53: Both continued flying P2Ys from home port NAS Norfolk, Virginia, patrolling mid-Atlantic coastal shipping lanes, coordinating operations with Atlantic Squadron destroyers. VP-53 had returned to NAS Norfolk, Virginia September 1 after a regular summer deployment to Annapolis, Md., for midshipman aviation training.

VP-54: Based at NAS Norfolk, Virginia deployed a detachment of PBY-2s to Newport, R.I., operating from the Naval Torpedo Factory Air Facility on Gould Island in Narragansett Bay, R.I. Daily searches were coordinated with destroyer surface patrols in the assigned offshore areas.

VP-33: Deployed PBY-3s from NAS Coco Solo, Panama, Canal Zone, to NAS Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Patrols covered the area from Guantanamo to San Juan, coordinated with VP-51, destroyers, and the cruisers Tuscaloosa (CA-37) and San Francisco (CA-38), Cruisers Ouincy (CA-39) and Vincennes (CA-44): Patrolled sea approaches between Norfolk and Newport. Battleship Division 5 and Ranger were based at Norfolk as a reserve force.

Experience during the first month of operations dictated changes in the deployment of the forces to improve coverage of the assigned areas.

VP-52 moved to the U.S. Coast Guard air station located on the Cooper River in the Charleston, S.C., navy yard in December. Renovation and modification of existing buildings provided facilities to house crew and squadron administrative and maintenance activities. The air station supplied a seaplane ramp, aircraft parking area, and shared space in a small hangar. Officers were quartered in the Coast Guard BOO. Moving the squadron proved a major exercise in itself.

VP-52 had been home-ported at NAS Norfolk, Virginia since it was first commissioned as VP-14 on November 1, 1935, when the station was NAS Hampton Roads. As a self-supported squadron, a full allowance of maintenance equipment, spares, records, and myriad other authorized and unauthorized odds and ends accumulated required packing and loading aboard railroad cars for the move south. The operation was further complicated by a full schedule of training flights in addition to daily patrols of the assigned areas offshore.

VP-33's initial move to NAS Guantanamo Bay, Cuba posed problems similar to those of VP-52, somewhat diminished by the in-place facilities of the fully operational naval station there. However, the October move of the VP-33 detachment to Naval Station, Key West, Fla., long out of service and moth-balled, demanded much effort by the plane crews and their support personnel. Key West businesses and the population in general were so pleased by the arrival of the PBYs and several submarines that a celebration, including a parade on the main street, was staged! A VP-33 contingent turned out for the event. The Key West detachment flew regular patrols from Dry Tortugas to Miami, Fla., and to the Yucatan Peninsula in Mexico, covering the Florida Straits and the Yucatan Channel.

In November 1939, VP-53 exchanged P2Ys for a mixed bag of older model PBYs-3 PBY-1s, 3 PBY-2s, and 3 PBY-3s. In February 1940, the squadron moved to Key West, remaining there until April 1941 when it returned to NAS Norfolk, Virginia and exchanged the old PBYs for new PBY-5s.

Naval Aviation News March-April 1990CGAS Charleston hanger shared with VP-52 for major P2Y maintenance. Coast Guard aircraft in photo, left to right: J2K, J2F, RD, and two J2Fs.

Also in October of that year, Ranger and her air group had joined the Cruiser Division (CruDiv) 7 ships and their VCS-7 SOCs to form a strike group with long-range search capability, on standby to fill gaps in the areas covered by the regular patrols. In November, a surface patrol of destroyers was established in the Gulf of Mexico to track shipping in that area. The Navy patrol effort was expanded by Coast Guard surface and aircraft coverage of inshore areas and cooperation by exchange of information, assuring complete area coverage and recording of all contacts.

On October 16, Commander, Atlantic Squadron expanded his earlier orders to the patrol forces with the issuance of OpOrder 24-39. In addition to reporting foreign men-of-war, "suspicious" vessels were to be noted and both they and men-of-war were to be tracked until their actions were considered satisfactory. All units of the Atlantic Squadron were included in the task organiza;tion but the major portion of the patrol activity was conducted by the patrol squadrons and destroyers, the latter primarily responsible for developing (visually checking at close range) contacts made by aircraft. Employment of the battleships was minimized and the ships of CruDiv-7 were soon withdrawn from the patrol for other duties.

The scope of Neutrality Patrol operations gradually expanded during 1940. Concurrently, the aircrews normally required training in all aspects of patrol plane operations - tactics, instruments, navigation, gunnery, bombing, etc. For example, VP-52 deployed detachments from Charleston to advanced bases such as Parris Island and Winyah Bay (both in S.C.) for operations with the aircraft tenders Owl (AM-2) in August and Thrush (AVP-3) in October. In addition to regular patrols, a normal schedule of training flights was flown from the advanced bases.

In spite of the increasing tempo of operations and the resulting workload, the effort proved well worth its costs; the experience markedly enhanced the readiness of Neutrality Patrol squadrons for the tasks that lay a scant year ahead in WW II.

The war in Europe during 1940 saw the apparently invincible German forces defeat France and threaten to bring Britain to her knees by the blitz on her cities and the success of the U-boat actions in the Atlantic. The specter of a British defeat and the danger to the United States of such an event were obvious and dictated further expansion of the forces in the Atlantic. In the famous destroyers-for-bases agreement negotiated by President Roosevelt and Winston Churchill in September 1940, sites for bases in the Atlantic and Caribbean were exchanged for 50 WW I destroyers. Two of the sites, Argentia, Newfoundland, and Bermuda, presented rent-free as a "gift" for 99 years, would become key elements in the Battle of the Atlan- tic. Six other sites, in the Bahamas, Jamaica, St. Lucia, Antigua, and British Guiana, were leased, rent-free for the same period.

Both air and surface elements of the patrol force expanded during 1940 as the scope of the operation grew. Pat-Wing 5 at NAS Norfolk, Virginia commissioned VP-55 on August 1 and VP-56 on October 1. Both were to be equipped with PBM-1 s but problems with the new planes delayed deliveries and severely restricted squadron training. Eventually, the squadrons would be merged into a single command, designated VP-74, with all early production PBMs assigned. On November l, 1940, the Atlantic Squadron was redesignated Patrol Force, Atlantic Fleet and on December 17, then-Rear Admiral Ernest J. King relieved Rear Admiral Hayne Ellis as Commander, Patrol Force. On February l, 1941, the augmented and reorganized patrol forces were established under Admiral King as the U.S. Atlantic Fleet.

This force reorganization included establishment of task forces responsible for operations in specific sectors of the Atlantic. Task Force 1 com posed of battleships, cruisers, and destroyers -covered the trade routes to northern Europe. Task Force 2 - aircraft carriers, cruisers, and destroyers -patrolled the central North Atlantic. Task Force 3 - cruisers, destroyers, and mine craft - was based at San Juan and Guantanamo to cover the South Atlantic. Task Force 4 was Support Force, Atlantic Fleet, under Rear Admiral A. L. Bristol, established on March 1, 1941. The support force included destroyers and the patrol wing, with VP-51, VP-52, VP-55, and VP-56, and the tenders Albemarle (A V -5) and George E. Badger (AVD-3) attached. On April 5, VP53 rejoined the wing at NAS Norfolk, Virginia and, during the month, exchanged its old model PBYs for new PBY-5s. The establishing directive for the support force required preparation of the force for service in high latitudes and em- phasized training in antisubmarine warfare, protection of shipping, and defense against air, submarine, and surface raider attack. Primary mission of the force was operations from North Atlantic bases to prevent Axis forces from interfering with the shipment of war material from the United States to Great Britain.

Other air and surface forces originally operating with the Neutrality Patrol were subsequently designated Task Force 6 and elements based north of the Gulf and Caribbean became the Northern Patrol. The mission of the Northern Patrol, operating from bases at Norfolk, Bermuda, Narragansett Bay and Argentia, would be to investigate reports of potential enemy vessels and other non-American activity in the North Atlantic. This task gave the PatWing Support Force major responsibility for the advance of Naval Aviation to the north and east to insure safe passage of war materials to Britain.

VP-82 PBY ThumbnailCameraVP-53-P-9 VP-53 Courtesy of Fred C. Dickey. Prior to establishment of the Pat-Wing Support Force, a number of squadron redeployments were directed. VP-54 moved to NAS Bermuda, based on the tender George E. Badger and began Neutrality Patrol operations on November 15, 1940. In December, VP-52 exchanged its P2Y- 25 (last of the model in fleet service) for PBY-5s. The P2Ys were ferried from Charleston to Pensacola for use there in the training squadron. Replacement PBY-5s were ferried cross-country from San Diego by VP-14 and delivered to VP-52 at NAS Pensacola, Florida during January. VP-52 flew the new planes, as received, to its old home port, NAS Norfolk. The move from Charleston was essential as the facilities there could not support PBY operations.

On February l, 1941, VP-52 was transferred to San Juan for what proved to be a brief taste of tropical operations. The squadron joined VP-51 on still-unfinished NAS San Juan, sharing the Neutrality Patrols through the West Indies to Trinidad. In addition to the patrols there were mail runs and survey flights to island sites of the new stations being built under the destroyers-for-bases agreement. At the end of February, VP-52 was ordered back to NAS Norfolk, Virginia and, on March 3, all planes departed for the return. For the remainder of the month, the squadron flew patrols and convoy escort and contine. VP-53 was ordered to move from NAS Norfolk, Virginia to NAS Quonset Point, Rhode Island. Construction of the base at Argentia, another of the destroyers-for-bases sites, had not yet begun.

The deployment of VP-52 would be the first move toward im- plementing the mission of the Northern Patrol of the Support Force. The major North Atlantic shipping lanes would now be within range of the PBYs for convoy escort.

Albemarle arrived at Argentia on May 15, with VP-52's ground crew and squadron gear onboard. Preparations for aircraft operations were begun with a seaplane mooring area designated and buoys laid in the southwestern end of Placentia Harbor near the ship anchorage. This operating area was adjacent to the peninsula on which NAS Argentia, Newfoundland, Canada would eventually be built.

After an attempt on May 18, aborted because of below-minimums weather in Argentia, all 12 VP-52 planes arrived on May 20. The weather was again marginal but, utilizing Albemarle's radio beacon, all aircraft made instrument approaches and safe landings. The next day, the weather was excellent and all crews were scheduled for and flew area familiariza- tion flights. This proved most fortunate because the weather was below minimums on the following two days and, on the 24th, the squadron was ordered to fly a major operation -one of the least- known events in pre-WW II Naval Aviation history.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...PATROL WING TWO - U.S. NAVAL AIR STATION - PEARL HARBOR, T.H. - 20 Dec 1941..." http://www.ibiblio.org/hyperwar/USN/rep/Pearl/PatWing1.html [08JAN2001]

UNITED STATES PACIFIC FLEET AIRCRAFT
PATROL WING ONE
FLEET AIR DETACHMENT
MCAS/NAS Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii
1 January 1942.


From: Commander Patrol Wing ONE.
To: Commander-in-Chief, U.S. Pacific Fleet.

Subject: Report of Japanese Air Attack on Kaneohe Bay, T.H., - December 7, 1941.

Reference: (a) Cincpac desp. 102102 of December 1941. (b) USS Hulbert Conf. ltr. A16-3/P15 (C-47) (c) USS Avocet Conf. ltr. A16-3 (039) (d) VP-11 Conf. ltr. of December 13, 1941. (e) VP-12 Conf. ltr. A16-3 (0100) of December 14, 1941. (f) VP-14 Conf. ltr. A16-3 of December 1941.

The following report is submitted as the happenings on Sunday, December 7, 1941, in compliance with reference (a). References (b), (c), (d), (e), and (f), were the reports of Unit Commanders of this Wing.

The first intimation had that anything was wrong was when a message was received from a patrol plane on the Dawn Patrol stating that they had dropped a depth bomb on and had sunk an enemy submarine one mile off Pearl Harbor entrance. (It was later discovered that a destroyer had attacked this submarine from close aboard and the patrol plane had added his bomb in assistance). Evidence seemed conclusive that the submarine was destroyed. When this message was received it seemed so impossible that the first reaction was that it was a case of mistaken identity as we had some of our submarines due to enter that morning. While investigating to insure that the information concerning our own submarines was in the hands of the patrolling aircraft, about nine (9) enemy fighters circled at low altitude over Haneohe and attacked with machine guns the control tower located on hill at Naval Air Station and the four patrol planes moored in the bay.

This was followed by an attack on the planes on the ramp. This attack lasted for some fifteen minutes. The very first plane to attack attacked the Wing Commander's OS2U-1 on the landing mat. At the time a chief petty officer was turning over the propeller by hand and it was apparently thought to be a fighter preparing to take off. This plane was thoroughly riddled. After the first wave there was a few minutes' lull and then another attack by an estimated six to nine fighters. All attacks were directed at the planes on the ground, in the water, and at the hangar. But there was some straffing of cars and quarters incident to the main attack. The first attack set on fire all planes on the water and some of those on the beach. The second attack hit additional planes, setting them on fire. At the very beginning of the first attack there was immediate action on the part of the personnel to get machine guns in action against the attacking planes. This was done before the completion of the first attack and on the first attack at least two enemy planes had their gas tanks punctured. immediate action was taken to save the planes no then on fire and those not too far gone. personnel attempting this were severely straffed. During both of the above attacks, personnel were straffed on the road in automobiles attempting to get to the hangar area. After the two above attacks all efforts were directed at getting all planes that could be possibly saved clear from the area of the burning planes.

About 0930 a formation of nine, 2 seater bombers, came in formation over the Bay, more or less following the coast line from Kahuka Point, at an altitude of about 1000 to 1500 feet and dropped bombs on the hangar occupied by Patrol squadrons ELEVEN and TWELVE. This attack caused the loss of the greatest number of personnel as considerable men were in the hangar getting replenishment ammunition. Two bombs hit in the hangar, two close alongside, and one dud hit in the hangar in wt Lieutenant Commander Buckley was supervising the obtaining of ammunition. He miraculously escaped other than minor injuries. Immediately behind this wave of bombers were nine additional bombers and it is uncertain whether or not they dropped bombs -- so much smoke was in the area and people stunned by the first wave that this point is uncertain. If they did not, it is certain that an additional drop was made by the first wave of bombers, aimed at the other hangar, but which fell between the hangar and the water, some falling in the water and did very little damage, except for holes in the parking area. This part is not a tribute to the bombing accuracy of the attacking planes as they were only a 1000 or 15000 feet high and did not drop, that both drops were by the first formation. These same observers contribute the belief that they did not drop the bombs because the central bomber in the leading plane had been killed, as the volume of machine gun fire was directed at the leading plane and tracers indicated that the nose of this plane was receiving severe punishment.

The conduct of all personnel throughout the entire attack was magnificent, in fact, too much so. Had they not, with no protection, deliberately set themselves up with machine guns right in line with the drop of the attacking and straffing planes and near the object of their attack, we would have lost less men. it was, however, due to this reckless resistance that two enemy planes were destroyed and six or more were sent away with heavy gas leaks. Several of these planes that were damaged in this respect departed at high speeds to the north west, all in the same direction. One of the two planes definitely brought down was seen to land in the ocean, smoking before it landed. The other one (a fighter) was brought down within the limits of the station.

After the bombing attack there was a third straffing attack at 10 o'clock. The two fighters destroyed, mentioned above, were on this last attack. There were no further attacks after this one just mentioned.

A survey at this time reveals that all planes actually at the base were put out of commission (33 patrol planes, 1 OS2U-1 and the J2F-1 belonging to the Air Station). The three patrol planes not destroyed were the ones on the Dawn Patrol. One of these was attacked by a number of enemy fighters in the air, receiving considerable bullet holes, but was not stopped and has been operating ever since. These planes had to be considerably patched up. The hangar occupied by squadrons ELEVEN and TWELVE was destroyed. All records of those two squadrons were destroyed except the service records of the enlisted men of ELEVEN. All records of Patrol Squadron FOURTEEN are intact. No other buildings or equipment at this base was attacked. Although there were some straffing of quarters and cars incident to the main attack.

The fire truck was destroyed by the bombing attack. All bombsights have been accounted for and are in good condition because they were stored in the Bombsight Vault which was not attacked. A large number of SBAE were destroyed, considerable number of machine guns, both .50 and .30 caliber, were destroyed in the planes.

The conduct of all the personnel was magnificent. After careful consideration it is urgently recommended that the following persons should receive special recognition for their meritorious conduct in the face of enemy fire because their performance was courageous and outstanding:

PATROL SQUADRON ELEVEN

FOSS, R.S., Ensign, D-V(G), U.S.N.R. (Deceased)
SMARTT, J.G., Ensign, A-V(N), U.S.N.R. (Deceased)
FORMOE, C.M., AMM1c., U.S. Navy (Deceased)
MANNING, M.A., AMM3c, U.S. Navy (Deceased)
WEAVER, L.D., Sea1c, U.S. Navy (Deceased)
BUCKLEY, J.D., AOM3c, U.S. Navy (Deceased)
ROBINSON, J.H., Sea2c, U.S. Navy (Deceased)
NASH, K. (n), Y1c, U.S. Navy (Seriously Injured)
BYRON, H.G., ACMM(0A), U.S. Navy (Seriously Injured)
CROWNOVER, J.T., RM1c, U.S. Navy (Seriously Injured)

PATROL SQUADRON TWELVE

FOX, L. Jr., Ensign, A-V(N), U.S.N.R. (Deceased)
UHLMANN, R.W., Ensign, D-V(G), U.S.N.R. (Deceased)
INGRAM, G.W., Sea2c, U.S. Navy (Deceased)
LAWRENCE, C. (n) AMM2c, U.S. Navy (Deceased)
OTTERSTETTER, C.W., Sea2c, U.S. Navy (Deceased)
PORTERFIELD, R.K., AMM3c, U.S. Navy (Deceased)
WATSON, R.A., AMM1c, U.S. Navy (Deceased)
BROWN, W.S., AMM2c, U.S. Navy (Deceased)
GRIFFIN, D.T., AMM1c(NAP), U.S. Navy (Deceased)
McCORMACK, J.J., Lieutenant, U.S. Navy (Seriously Injured)
WALLANCE, M.R., Ensign, A-V(N), U.S.N.R. (Seriously Injured)
HELM, T.W., III, RM1c, U.S. Navy (Seriously Injured)
LLEWELLYN, F.N., RM2c, U.S. Navy (Seriously Injured)
GRISHAM, L.A., ACOM(PA), U.S. Navy (Seriously Injured)
LYONS, D.S., AMM1c(NAP), U.S. Navy (Seriously Injured)

PATROL SQUADRON FOURTEEN

NEWMAN, L.G., AMM3c, U.S. Navy (Deceased)
WALTERS, J.E., AOM3c, U.S. Navy (Seriously Injured)
JONES, E.L., Sea2c, U.S. Navy (Seriously Injured)


[signed] K. McGINNIS

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...PATROL WING TWO - U.S. NAVAL AIR STATION - PEARL HARBOR, T.H. - 20 Dec 1941..." http://www.ibiblio.org/hyperwar/USN/rep/Pearl/PatWing2.html [08JAN2001]

UNITED STATES PACIFIC FLEET AIRCRAFT
PATROL WING TWO
FLEET AIR DETACHMENT
MCAS/NAS Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii
1 January 1942.


From: The Commander Task Force NINE (Commander Patrol Wing TWO).
To: The Commander-in-Chief, United States Pacific Fleet.

Subject: Operations on December 7, 1941.

On Sunday morning, December 7, 1941, forces under my command were disposed as follows: Patrol Squadron TWENTY-ONE at Midway, Patrol Squadrons ELEVEN, TWELVE, FOURTEEN at Kaneohe, TWENTY-TWO, TWENTY-THREE and TWENTY-FOUR at pearl Harbor, all tenders except Wright at Pearl Harbor; Wright enroute to Pearl Harbor from Midway.

The condition of readiness in force was Baker 5 (50% of assigned aircraft on 4 hours notice) with machine guns and ammunition in all planes not undergoing maintenance work. In addition to the above, three squadrons (VP-21 at Midway, VP-23 at Pearl, and VP-11 at Kaneohe) were in condition Afirm 5 (100% of assigned aircraft on 4 hours notice). This was augmented by specific duty assignments on December 7 which required six planes from Patrol Squadrons FOURTEEN, TWENTY-FOUR, and TWELVE to be ready for light on 30 minutes notice.

The general orders listed above were modified by circumstances and planes actually ready for flight were as follows:

VP-21 7 planes - in the air conducting search 120 to 170 to 450 miles from Midway.
  • 4 planes - on the surface at Midway armed each with 2 five hundred pound bombs and on 10 minutes notice.

    VP-11 12 planes - ready for flight on 4 hours notice.

    VP-12 6 planes - ready for flight on 30 minutes notice. 5 planes - ready for flight on 4 hours notice.

    VP-14 3 planes - in the air on morning security patrol armed with depth charges.
  • 3 planes - ready for flight on 30 minutes notice.
  • 4 planes - ready for flight on 4 hours notice.

    VP-22 12 planes - ready for flight on 4 hours notice.

    VP-23 11 planes - ready for flight on 4 hours notice.

    VP-24 4 planes - in the air conducting inter-type tactics with submarines.
  • 1 plane - ready for flight on 30 minutes notice.

    Total 72 planes - in the air or ready for flight in 4 hours or less.

    In this connection it may be stated that the 4 hours notice was primarily set to permit rest and recreation of personnel and was in no wise a criterion of material readiness. For example, one plane of VP-23, theoretically on 4 hours notice, was actually in the air 45 minutes after the first bomb dropped.

    To summarize the foregoing, at the moment the first bomb dropped, aircraft of this command were in the following condition:
  • 14 - in the air (7 on a search from Midway).
  • 58 - on the surface ready for flight in four hours or less.
  • 9 - undergoing repairs.
  • 81 - Total.

    Illustrative of the efforts made by personnel, one of the nine planes undergoing repairs took off for a search at 1356, local time, loaded with 4 one thousand pound bombs.

    A narrative of events of the day follows:
  • TIME (LOT)
  • 0700 14-P-1 sank enemy submarine one mile off Pearl Harbor entrance.
  • 0715 Message coded and transmitted to base.
  • 0735 Message and decoded and information received by Staff Duty Officer.
  • 0737 Message relayed to Operations Officer.
  • 0740 Relayed by telephone to Staff Duty Officer of Commander-in-Chief.
  • 0750 Search plan drafted by Operations Officer.
  • 0757 First bomb dropped near VP-22 hangar.
  • 0758 Message ordered broadcasted to all ships present quote "AIR RAID PEARL HARBOR X THIS IS NO DRILL" unquote (An identical message was sent by CinCPac).
  • 0800 Search plan transmitted by radio and telephone (Received by some of the planes in the air at 0805).

    From this time on an accurate chronological account is impracticable.

    The Commander Patrol Wing TWO arrived at the Operations Office during the first attack and approved the orders that had been issued. Telephonic communication with the various squadrons at Pearl harbor was established in order to supplement and possibly accelerate the radio transmissions. As was usually the case, it was difficult to communicate with Kaneohe. The page printer had gone out of commission and it was quite difficult to obtain a telephonic connection. Immediately upon termination of the first attack, an endeavor was made to determine the sectors of the search actually being covered. it was determined, with some difficulty that, of all planes at the bases of Kaneohe and Pearl Harbor, only 3 were still in commission. These were dispatched to fill holidays in what appeared to be the most promising sectors for search. in addition, available planes from the Utility Wing were ordered out. The 2 planes still available for duty at Kaneohe were ordered by telephone to cover the sector between 280 and 300 degrees. The one plane still available at Pearl harbor had some difficulty in being launched due to the wreckage and fires of other planes in the way. Abut this time the second attack came in. Fire was opened by tenders of this command and from machine guns mounted in planes on the ground or removed from the planes to extemporized mountings with greater arcs of fire. As a result of this second attack, all communications, radio, telephone and page printer were knocked out of commission. Immediate steps to restore communications were taken while the second attack was still underway and communications personnel, who unfortunately have not yet been identified, proceeded to repair the radio antenna during the height of the attack. Before the end of the second attack, radio communications were established on the tenders of this command. Shortly thereafter, telephonic communication was reestablished and information was received that the 2 planes at Kaneohe previously reported as ready for service had been destroyed. Accordingly, orders were issued for the 1 plane at Pearl Harbor, which had somehow escaped uninjured during the second attack, to cover the sector from 280 to 300 degrees. The Commander Patrol Wing ONE at Kaneohe felt that the orders to cover the sector 280 to 300, which had been transmitted to him by telephone for the 2 planes on the ground, required his taking action and he accordingly diverted 14-P-1 and 14-P-3 from the sectors that they had been searching. Information of this action was not received by me.

    The Fleet Aviation Officer, Captain A.C. Davis, U.S.N., kept in constant touch by telephone and made many valuable suggestions. Various members of my staff maintained communications with Army information centers and requested that attempts be made to track the retiring Japanese planes by RADAR. Unfortunately, the Curtiss RADAR was placed out of commission by the damage sustained by that vessel. During the mid-afternoon, 14-P-2 reported being attacked by enemy planes and was thereafter not heard from for 2 or 3 hours. As it was felt that this plane had been shot down and a hole thus left in what appeared to be the most promising sector of the search, every effort was made, as additional planes from whatever source became available, to plug the gap.

    All hands exerted their utmost efforts to get more planes ready for flight and to arm them for offensive action. Three more patrol planes were reported ready at Pearl harbor and dispatched, each carrying 4 one thousand pound bombs. Thirteen SBD planes, loaded with 500 pound bombs, came in from Lexington and were pressed into service. Nine were dispatched to search a sector to the north, while the remaining 4 were ordered to attack 4 Japanese troop ships reported off Barbers point. This report proved to be unfounded.

    The accompanying charts indicate the search as actually conducted. The urgent necessity for conducting daily searches since December 7 and for putting all planes possible back in commission, together with urgency for immediate operations, have precluded an exhaustive analysis of the events of the day. Certain highlights however may be of interest:

    All planes in commission had guns on board together with full allowances of service ammunition. During the first attack, fire was opened from the guns as mounted in the planes, and when it was discovered that these were not effective for fire from the ground due to structural interference, many personnel removed these guns from the planes and set them upon benches in vises and opened up an effective fire against the second attack. As nearly as can be determined, a total of 4 Japanese planes were shot down by personnel of patrol plane squadrons by this method.

    Two planes or Utility Squadron One conducted an extensive search although these planes being of a non-combatant type were not equipped with machine guns. Despite the lack of defense against attacks by hostile aircraft, the pilots of these planes persisted in their search until the threatened exhaustion of their fuel forced their return to Pearl Harbor. The devotion to duty of these pilots will be made the subject of a special report.

    These and numerous other instances of distinguished conduct occurred which Commander Task Force NINE has not yet had time to investigate.

    Attention is invited to the following dispatches and mailgrams indicating the extensive searches conducted by units of this command during the period 30 November to 7 December, 1941, from Wake and Midway:

    CinCPac 280450
    280447 of November.
    040237 of December.

    ComTaskForce NINE 291124
  • 292101
  • 292103 of November.
  • 302359
  • 050323 of December.

    [signed] P.N.L. BELLINGER.

    Copy to: Comairscofor.

    Circa 1940

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Circa 1940 AIRCRAFT SCOUTING FORCE - Rear Admiral Arthur L. Bristol - HULBERT (AVD-6) - LCDR J. V. Carney..." Contributed by John Lucas john.lucas@netzero.net [15DEC98]

    PATROL WING ONE - CDR W. K. Harrill

    TENDERS

    USS HULBERT (AVD-6) - LCDR J. V. Carney
    USS PELICAN (AVP-6) - LT H. J. Dyson
    USS AVOCET (AVP-4) - LT R. E. Dixon

    SQUADRONS

    VP-11 - LCDR J. W. Harris
    VP-12 - LCDR C. W. Oexle
    VP-13 - LCDR S. B. Cooke
    VP-14 - LCDR W. T. Rassieur

    PATROL WING TWO - CAPTAIN Patrick N. L. Bellinger

    TENDERS

    USS WRIGHT (AV-1) - CDR J. M. Shoemaker,
    USS WILLIAM B. PRESTON (AVD-7) - LCDR F. J. Bridget
    USS SWAN (AVP-7) - and LT A. R. Truslow, Jr.

    SQUADRONS

    VP-22 - LCDR W. P. Cogswell
    VP-23 - LCDR G. Van Deurs
    VP-24 - LCDR D. C. Allen
    VP-25 - LCDR A. R. Brady
    VP-26 - LCDR A. N. Perkins


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