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HistoryVP-101 HistoryHistory

Circa 1946

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...The first few PB-1Ws went to VBP-101 in April of 1946. The PB-1W eventually evolved into an early-warning aircraft by virtue of its APS-20 search radar. By 1947, PB-1Ws had been deployed to units operating with both the Atlantic and Pacific fleets. VPB-101 on the East Coast was redesignated VX-4 and assigned to NAS Quonset Point, Rhode Island. VX-4 became VW-2 in 1952 and transferred to NAS Patuxent River, Maryland. VW-2 had the primary mission of early warning, with a secondary mission of antisubmarine warfare and hurricane reconnaissance. VW-1 was established in 1952 with four PB-1Ws at NAS Barbers Point, Hawaii. Elements of VW-1 were drawn from VC-11 at NAS Miramar and VP-51 at NAS San Diego. VW-1 had a mission similar to that of VW-2. PB-1Ws continued in service until 1955, gradually being phased out in favor of the Lockheed WV-2, a military version of the Lockheed 1049 Constellation commercial airliner. PB-1Ws were retired to the Naval Aircraft Storage Center at Litchfield Park, Arizona. They were stricken from inventory in mid-1956 and many were sold as surplus and ended up on the civil register. 13 of them were sold as scrap..." http://www.csd.uwo.ca/~pettypi/elevon/baugher_us/b017-19.html

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "00APR46--Twenty-four B-17Gs (including one B-17F that had been modified to G standards) were used by the Navy under the designation PB-1W. The W stood tor anti-submarine warfare. A large radome for an ASP-20 search radar was fitted underneath the fuselage, and additional internal fuel tanks were added for longer range. These planes were painted dark blue, a standard Navy paint scheme which had been adopted in late 1944. Most of these planes were Douglas-built aircraft, flown directly from the Long Beach factory to the Naval Aircraft Modification Unit in Pennsylvania during the summer of 1945, where the APS-20 search radar was fitted. However, the war ended before any PB-1Ws could be deployed, and the defensive armament was subsequently deleted. . The first few PB-1Ws went to VBP-101 in April of 1946. The PB-1W eventually evolved into an early-warning aircraft by virtue of its APS-20 search radar. By 1947, PB-1Ws had been deployed to units operating with both the Atlantic and Pacific fleets. VPB-101 on the East Coast was redesignated VX-4 and assigned to NAS Quonset Point, Rhode Island...." http://www.fairmont.wvnet.edu/www/webteam/bob/b1719.html


Circa 1945

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: Naval Aviation News Magazine "...28 Units Receive Commendation - Naval Aviation News - October 1945.." WebSite: http://www.history.navy.mil/nan/backissues/1940s/1945/15oct45.pdf [10NOV2004]

VP History ThumbnailCamera

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: Naval Aviation News Magazine "...Patrol Squadrons Cited - Naval Aviation News - March 1945.." WebSite: http://www.history.navy.mil/nan/backissues/1940s/1945/15mar45.pdf [10NOV2004]

VP History ThumbnailCamera

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...1945: Airborne Early Warning Radar..." http://www.nwc.navy.mil/press/Review/1999/summer/art5-su9.htm [13FEB2000]

The U.S. Navy's Role in Continental Air Defense


The Navy had gained significant experience in air defense during World War II. In the battles of Coral Sea and Midway and in several other engagements, the Navy had learned hard lessons on how to defend carrier task forces. These lessons had led to important developments in air search radar, combat direction systems, and air-intercept-control procedures. The Navy's bitter experience with Japanese kamikaze suicide planes late in the war had generated intense interest in the development of radar systems for long-range detection of low-flying aircraft. The Navy had deployed radar picket destroyers late in the war but had concluded that airborne surveillance platforms were necessary for extended detection ranges.

In 1944, the Navy launched the first program for the development of airborne early warning radar and aircraft, thereby taking the lead in this vital technology. Lincoln Laboratory (then known as the Radiation Laboratory), working closely with the Naval Research Laboratory at NAS Anacostia, Washington, D.C., developed an airborne radar and a radio link to transmit radar video to displays in a ship's combat information center (CIC). This system was installed in TBM torpedo bombers (designated the TBM-3W, the W standing for airborne early warning). By the time flight trials began in January 1945, however, the Navy had concluded that the video link did not permit the TBM-3W to operate at the ranges from its carrier task force necessary for early warning. The solution was to place the CIC in the aircraft. Commander Lucien F. "Red" Dodson proposed mounting the APS-20, a one-megawatt air search radar, in a large, long-range, land-based aircraft. Commander Dodson was placed in command of Patrol Bomber Squadron 101 (VPB-101), based at NAS Willow Grove, Pennsylvania, and development efforts began, using two Boeing B-17 Flying Fortress test beds already in the Navy inventory.

For its first land-based airborne early warning aircraft, the Navy in 1945 purchased twenty new B-17Gs and modified each to the PB-1W configuration by sealing shut its bomb bay, removing the armament, and mounting an APS-20 air search radar in a large dome beneath the fuselage. The first PB-1Ws were delivered to VPB-101 in the spring of 1946; the Navy was to purchase a total of thirty-one. The PB-1W was a delight to fly, being much lighter than the original B-17G, but its lack of cabin pressurization made it cold and uncomfortable for the men operating the radar and tracking systems. In late 1946 VPB-101 was moved to NAS Quonset Point, Rhode Island, and redesignated Airborne Early Warning Development Squadron Four (VX-4). VX-4 moved from NAS Quonset Point, Rhode Island to NAS Patuxent River, Maryland, in July 1948; NAS Patuxent River, Maryland, as it was commonly known, became the center of Navy airborne early warning for the next seventeen years. Lessons learned from flying the PB-1W were applied to development of the Lockheed PO-1W (a redesigned Lockheed 749 Constellation airliner later designated WV-1), which first flew in 1949, and to the highly successful Lockheed WV-2 (based on the famous L-1049G Super Constellation), which was first delivered to the Navy in 1954..." [23MAY2001]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Meritorious Achievement April 29 to May 20, 1945..." [19MAY2000]

VP-101


The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the GOLD STAR in lieu of the Second Air Medal to

ROLLY LLOYD GRAHAM, JR.
AVIATION RADIOMAN FIRST CLASS
UNITED STATES NAVAL RESERVE


for service set forth in the following CITATION:

"For meritorious achievement in aerial flight as an Aircrewman in Patrol Bombing Squadron ONE HUNDRED ONE, during operations against enemy Japanese forces in the vicinity of the Kurile Islands from April 29 to May 20, 1945. Completing his tenth flight during this period, GRAHAM contributed materially to the success of the missions. His technical skill, courage and devotion to duty in the face of grave hazards were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Reserve."

For the President

James Forrestal
Secretary of the Navy

Circa 1944 - 1949

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraPB4Y-2 Squadron Assignments "...PB4Y-2 Squadron Assignments 1944 - 1949 by W. T. Larkins 5-11-1984. A review of the aircraft history cards for the 740 aircraft 59350-60009 and 66245-66324 allows the following squadrons with one or more aircraft. Unfortunately the original assignment on many in 1944 is simply "PAC" for Pacific area. No card was found to verify VB-200 as the first squadron delivery or any Marine Corps squadrons. Squadrons listed include VP-12, VP-21, VP-22, VP-23, VP-25, VP-26, VP-27, VP-28, VP-29, VPB-100, VPB-101, VPB-10, VPB-102, VPB-104, VPB-106, VPB-107, VPB-108, VPB-109, VPB-111, VPB-114, VPB-115, VPB-116, VPB-117, VPB-118, VPB-119, VPB-120, VPB-121, VPB-122, VPB-123, VPB-124, VPB-143, VPB-197, VPB-200, VP-HL-1, VP-HL-2, VP-HL-4, VP-HL-6, VP-HL-7, VP-HL-8, VP-HL-9, VP-HL-10, VP-HL-11, VP-HL-12, VP-HL-13, VPM-1, VPW-1, VPW-2, VPW-3, VX-1 and VX-2..." Contributed by Bill Larkins wtl@earthlink.net [01AUG2010]


Circa 1944 - 1945

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...VPB-101 Flight Log Book of A. M. Martin..." WebSite: EBay http://search.ebay.com/_W0QQsassZkastauffer [18JUL2007]

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Circa 1944

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Patrol Squadron ONE HUNDRED ONE (VP-101) - U. S. Action with Enemy on 29SEP44..." Official U. S. Navy Documention [05FEB2013]

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HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Patrol Squadron ONE HUNDRED ONE (VP-101) - U. S. Action with Enemy on 28SEP44..." Official U. S. Navy Documention [05FEB2013]

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HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Patrol Squadron ONE HUNDRED ONE (VP-101) - U. S. Action with Enemy on 25SEP44..." Official U. S. Navy Documention [05FEB2013]

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HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Patrol Squadron ONE HUNDRED ONE (VP-101) - U. S. Action with Enemy on 24SEP44..." Official U. S. Navy Documention [05FEB2013]

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HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...History of FAW-14 - History from 15OCT42-01DEC42 - Submitted December 22nd, 1944. Squadron's Assigned: VP-1, VP-2, VP-4, VP-11, VP-12, VP-13, VP-14, VP-15, VP-21, VP-23, VP-24, VP-33, VP-44, VP-53, VP-54, VP-71, VP-72, VP-81, VP-91, VP-101, VP-102, VP-103, VP-104, VP-106, VP-109, VP-111, VP-115, VP-117, VP-118, VP-119, VP-121, VP-122 and VP-202..." Official U. S. Navy Records (National Archives and Records Administration) via Fold3 http://www.fold3.com/ [06DEC2012]

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HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Full Text Citations For Award of The Navy Cross - To U.S. Navy Personnel - World War II - (2,889 Awards) - Navy Cross Citations U.S. Navy - World War II..." WebSite: Home of Heros http://www.homeofheroes.com/ valor/ 1_Citations/ 03_wwii-nc/ nc_06wwii_navyL.html [22NOV2007]

MILLER, JUSTIN ALBERT

Citation:

The Navy Cross is presented to Justin Albert Miller, Commander, U.S. Navy, for extraordinary heroism and distinguished service as Commander of a PBY4Y airplane in Patrol Bombing Squadron ONE HUNDRED ONE (VPB-101), in action against enemy Japanese during an armed reconnaissance mission over Puerto Princessa and the surrounding areas in the Philippine Islands on 19 October 1944. Commander Miller initiated a series of devastating runs in daring defiance of the deadly antiaircraft fire. He executed repeated fierce attacks at perilously low level which caused the sinking of two cargo vessels with a third probably sunk, the destruction of 10 hostile planes on an enemy airstrip, and the damaging of 15 others. He subsequently attacked and destroyed three Japanese seaplanes and probably wrecked three others before sustaining severe damage to his plane which forced him to effect a dangerous crash landing at sea. Commander Miller's outstanding courage, daring airmanship and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

Bureau of Naval Personnel Information Bulletin No. 344 (November 1945)
Home Town: Washington, D.C.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Full Text Citations For Award of The Navy Cross - To U.S. Navy Personnel - World War II - (2,889 Awards) - Navy Cross Citations U.S. Navy - World War II..." WebSite: Home of Heros http://www.homeofheroes.com/ valor/ 1_Citations/ 03_wwii-nc/ nc_06wwii_navyL.html [22NOV2007]

MCDANIEL, HECTOR S.

Synopsis:

The Navy Cross is presented to Hector S. McDaniel, Lieutenant (j.g.), U.S. Navy, for extraordinary heroism and distinguished service as Co Pilot of a PBY4Y airplane in Patrol Bombing Squadron ONE HUNDRED ONE (VPB-101), in action against enemy Japanese during an armed reconnaissance mission over Puerto Princessa and the surrounding areas in the Philippine Islands on 19 October 1944. His outstanding courage and determined skill were at all times inspiring and in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...U. S. S. Heron AM-10..." WebSite: History Central m/NAVY/Minelayer/heron.html [20NOV2006]

...Departing Australia 22 March 1944, she next participated in the landings in the Admiralty Islands during April and then continued her plane tending duties. Steaming to the Solomons 1 September, Heron served as tender for Patrol Squadron 101, which was engaged in search and rescue work as the Pacific campaign moved into high gear...

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Location of U. S. Naval Aircraft - Dated 11 Jan 1944..." WebSite: Naval Historical Center http://www.history.navy.mil/ [29SEP2006]

VP SQUADRONS MENTIONED

VD-1, VD-2, VD-3 and VD-4

VJ-1, VJ-2, VJ-3, VJ-4, VJ-5, VJ-7, VJ-8, VJ-9, VJ-10, VJ-11, VJ-12, VJ-13, VJ-14, VJ-15, and VJ-16

VP-6 Coast Guard

VP-11, VP-12, VP-13, VP-14, VP-15, VP-16, VP-17, VP-18 and VP-19

VP-20, VP-23 and VP-24

VP-32, VP-33 and VP-34

VP-43, VP-44 and VP-45

VP-52 and VP-54

VP-61 and VP-62

VP-71, VP-72, VP-73 and VP-74

VP-81 and VP-84

VP-91, VP-92 and VP-94

VP-101, VP-102, VP-103, VP-104, VP-105, VP-106, VP-107, VP-108 and VP-109

VP-110, VP-111, VP-112, VP-113, VP-115, VP-116 and VP-117

VP-126, VP-127, VP-128 and VP-129

VP-130, VP-131, VP-132, VP-133, VP-134, VP-135, VP-136, VP-137, VP-138 and VP-139

VP-140, VP-141, VP-142, VP-143, VP-144, VP-145, VP-146, VP-147, VP-148 and VP-149

VP-150 and VP-151

VP-201, VP-203, VP-204, VP-205, VP-208 and VP-209

VP-210, VP-211, VP-212, VP-213, VP-214, VP-215 and VP-216


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HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Two WWII veterans commended at Gilmer airshow - By JIM HARDIN - Sunday, October 09, 2005..." WebSite: NewsJournal.com http://216.109.125.130/search/cache?_adv_prop=web&ei=UTF-8&vp=patrol+bombing+squadron&vp_vt=any&vst=0&vf=all&vm=i&fl=0&n=100&b=101&u=www.news-journal.com/featr/content/features/stories/2005/10/09/20051009LNJAirshow.html&w=%22patrol+bombing+squadron%22&d=HKqycmFULtNY&icp=1&.intl=us [14NOV2005]

GILMER Saturday was a memorable day for Doil Maxwell and Ralph Cushman.

"It will be a big day the rest of my life," said Maxwell, a Gilmer resident.

"It may be our last hurrah," added Cushman of Burlington, Iowa.

Maxwell and Cushman are among four survivors of an 11-man U.S. Navy crew that made an historic flight almost 61 years ago. They were honored Saturday during the 5th Annual Flight of the Phoenix Airshow in Gilmer.

According to information presented at the event, their crew of the VPB-101, FAW-17, 7th Fleet, is credited with fighting off 12 Japanese warplanes on Dec. 2, 1944, in what could have been the longest running gun battle of the Pacific. The crew downed four enemy aircraft, damaged five other Japanese fighters and outgunned the final three enemy attackers until their fuel was spent. The crew was awarded the Air Medal for meritorious service.

"We were very fortunate to get through that," Maxwell said, adding that the air battle lasted an hour and 20 minutes. He said crew members counted 280 bullet holes in their B-24 aircraft.

As the ordnance officer, Maxwell said he was responsible for the crew's ammunition. He normally loaded 6,000 rounds of ammunition, Maxwell said, but that day he added an additional 7,500 rounds. When they landed, he said, they had only 92 rounds left.

"Without that, they could have come in on us and destroyed us," Maxwell said.

Maxwell said the two other surviving crew members Ceaser Diamente of Silver Springs, Md., and Dub Creaseman of Lebanon, Tenn. could not attend the event because of health problems.

Cushman said he hadn't planned to attend the Gilmer event, but decided to participate because there are only four survivors and two have health problems. He said this may be the last time any of the crew members get together.

Two deceased members were represented by family members. Patricia Young of Hornell, N.Y., represented her husband, Robert C. Young, and Carolyn Law of Tyler was there for her uncle, A.C. Lubberts.

The honorees were presented plaques. Maxwell also was presented a key to the city by Gilmer Mayor R.D. "Buck" Cross.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...The U.S. Navy's Role in Continental Air Defense..." http://www.nwc.navy.mil/press/review/1999/summer/art5%2Dsu9.htm [30MAY2003]

In 1944, the Navy launched the first program for the development of airborne early warning radar and aircraft, thereby taking the lead in this vital technology. Lincoln Laboratory (then known as the Radiation Laboratory), working closely with the Naval Research Laboratory NAS Anacostia, Washington, D.C., developed an airborne radar and a radio link to transmit radar video to displays in a ship's combat information center (CIC). This system was installed in TBM torpedo bombers (designated the TBM-3W, the W standing for airborne early warning). By the time flight trials began in January 1945, however, the Navy had concluded that the video link did not permit the TBM-3W to operate at the ranges from its carrier task force necessary for early warning. The solution was to place the CIC in the aircraft. Commander Lucien F. "Red" Dodson proposed mounting the APS-20, a one-megawatt air search radar, in a large, long-range, land-based aircraft. Commander Dodson was placed in command of VPB-101, based at NAS Willow Grove, Pennsylvania, and development efforts began, using two Boeing B-17 Flying Fortress test beds already in the Navy inventory.

For its first land-based airborne early warning aircraft, the Navy in 1945 purchased twenty new B-17Gs and modified each to the PB-1W configuration by sealing shut its bomb bay, removing the armament, and mounting an APS-20 air search radar in a large dome beneath the fuselage. The first PB-1Ws were delivered to VPB-101 in the spring of 1946; the Navy was to purchase a total of thirty-one. The PB-1W was a delight to fly, being much lighter than the original B-17G, but its lack of cabin pressurization made it cold and uncomfortable for the men operating the radar and tracking systems. In late 1946 VPB-101 was moved to NAS Quonset Point, Rhode Island, and redesignated Airborne Early Warning Development Squadron Four (VX-4). VX-4 moved from NAS Quonset Point, Rhode Island to NAS Patuxent River, Maryland, in July 1948; "Pax River," as it was commonly known, became the center of Navy airborne early warning for the next seventeen years. Lessons learned from flying the PB-1W were applied to development of the Lockheed PO-1W (a redesigned Lockheed 749 Constellation airliner later designated WV-1), which first flew in 1949, and to the highly successful Lockheed WV-2 (based on the famous L-1049G Super Constellation), which was first delivered to the Navy in 1954.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...VPB-101 Squadron Awards..." Contributed by Mahlon K. Miller mkwsmiller@cox.net [23APR2001]

  • Navy Unit Commendation
    02 Jun 44 - 31 Dec 44

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...28SEP44--Here is a story about my father and some combat he was involved in during the war. My father, William F. Goodwin, Jr. was a PBY pilot in the Pacific. At the time of the story his squadron was into flying night missions attacking Japanese shipping in the Southwest Pacific. In the early evening of September 28, 1944 PBY No.08233 from Patrol Squadron 101 took off from the sheltered waters just off the island of Morotai, Dutch East Indies. They were going out on a nightime "Black Cat" bombing mission looking for Japanese shipping. This Catalina flying boat was commanded by Lt. John (Jack) Schenck, USNR. When he got his plane in the air and trimmed up, he pointed its nose to the west and flew out over the Molucca Sea towards Borneo. Jack Schenck's crew was no different from any of the other PBY air crews of the Pacific War. It consisted of three commissioned pilots and six enlisted crewmen. The three pilots were Lt. Schenck, Lt.(jg) William F. Goodwin, Jr. and Ensign Arthur W. Kuhlman. This Black Cat night mission for Schenck and his crew would turn out to be the most successful Black Cat mission for any PBY in VP-101 during the squadron's third and final combat tour of duty in the Pacific. After nightfall they started their patrol up and down the east coast of the huge island of Borneo. At about 11:00 that night they flew into Darvel Bay on the northeastern coast of the island and checked on the Japanese held port town of Lahad Datu. There they found four enemy freighters moored alongside the dock. The dock itself was piled high with war material being off loaded from the ships. They could also see a large concentration of barges moored close by. Schenck went in to attack for what would turn out to be a long and eventful battle. Schenck's first run-in was a strafing attack using their two 50 caliber and two 30 caliber machne guns setting the stores on the dock and a few of the barges afire. They flew out to sea and circled back around for another attack. On the next attack they hit the dock with one 500 lb. bomb and scored a near-miss on one of the freighters with another. The stores on the dock turned out to be ammunition and gasoline which soon exploded, spreading fire and destruction to all four of the large ships and to a large warehouse close by. Schenck came in again and dropped his last two 500 lb. bombs and all four of his 100 lb. bombs into the blazing inferno. He cicled out to sea again and then came back in a forth time and sunk six more barges with heavy machine gun fire. This attack lasted two hours, during which the Japanese fired everything they had at this lone intruder. The PBY was hit at least 50 times, knocking out the auxiliary power unit, slightly damaging one engine and cutting some of the control cables. Miraculously, none of the crew were hit. When they finally headed out to sea with all their ordnance expended, they left the four freighters and all the barges sunk, the dock and warehouse totally destroyed. As they headed back to base they could look back and still see the resulting fire from 75 miles out to sea. With the exception of Jack Schenck and Paul Schilling, everyone on board the plane that night would be awarded the Air Medal for this engagement. Schenck received the Distinguished Flying Cross for this action and Schilling received a Gold Star to go along with an Air Medal he had received for a previous action with another crew. Jack Schenck noted the damage to his plane from this mission in his log book. He wrote "50 holes in plane, 3 in fuel tanks, two in starboard engine, elevator controls severed." He logged the night's mission as taking 14.8 hours. The entry in the back of one of the other crew member's log book best summed up that night's mission with: "Our plane got holes in hull, engine, putt-putt, wing and elevator cable was shot away. NO ONE WAS HURT, THANK GOD!" Three days after this mission my father and the rest of this crew were shot down and captured while on another Black Cat mission. A few weeks later they were all executed by their Japanese captors. The above story is taken from one of the chapters in my book I wrote about the death of my father and the PBY crew he was flying with. For those who might be interested, the book is called SHOBUN, A FORGOTTEN WAR CRIME IN THE PACIFIC published by Stackpole Books, 1995..." Contributed by Mike Goodwin GoodyPBY@AOL.COM

    UPDATE "...I found some pictures of his dads crew, not his Dad, but some of the crew members who were shot down and beheaded in Kendari. Unfortunately, Mr. Goodwin must have changed e-mail providers because my e-mail can't get through..." Contributed by Larry Katz papakatz@sbcglobal.net [03JUL2000]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...The following were the original flight crews of VP-101 that were all together. These were the ones that I did not have Bureau #'s. However this bunch was Flight Crews from VP-101, VP-21, and VP-22...Here is the rest of the crews from February 1944 including the BuNo's. Half of them were part of the bunch that came out in December of 1941 and some were replacements..." Contributed by Larry Katz papakatz@sbcglobal.net [31MAY99]

    PLANE CREW #1
    PPC LT Rejebian
    Co-Pilot LT(jg) Hartman
    3rd Pilot A. P. Ronning
    Plane Captain Tipton
    2nd Mech Fox
    1st Radio Wiese, Raymond
    2nd Radio Bob Everly
    PLANE CREW #2
    PPC. LT Roper
    Co-Pilot ENS Eslinger
    3rd Pilot ENS Cawthorne
    Plane Captain Wild Bill Mahoney
    2nd Mech Watkins
    1st radio Joe (Cuz) Rizza 2nd Radio Carr
    PLANE CREW #3
    PPC LT Dillon
    Co-Pilot LT(jg) Hawkins
    3rd Pilot AP. Anderson
    Plane Captain W. J. Brown
    2nd Mech Nichols
    1st Radio Simon
    2nd Radio Larry Katz
    Air Gunner Lowrance
    PLANE CREW #4
    PPC LT P. W. Brown
    Co-Pilot LT(jg) Armbruster
    3rd Pilot CAPTAIN Jarmon
    Plane Captain Jameson
    2nd Mech Jameson
    2nd Mech McGlothlin
    1st Radio H. V. Smith
    2nd Radio Blinco
    PLANE CREW #5
    PPC LT Hardy
    Co-Pilot LT(jg) Birch
    3rd Pilot AP. Harvey
    Plane Captain Newton
    2nd Mech McKenna
    1st Radio Conway
    2nd Radio Rudy Acosta
    Air Gunner Tommy Maestas
    PLANE CREW #6
    PPC LT(jg) Hill
    Co-Pilot LT(jg) Peters
    3rd Pilot NAP. Rafferty
    Plane Captain Wimmer
    2nd Mech Hover
    1st Radio Buttler
    2nd Radio M. E. (Matty) Fay
    PLANE CREW #7
    PPC LT(jg) Deck
    Co-Pilot ENS Walker
    3rd Pilot AP. Beck
    Plane Captain M. L. Brown
    2nd Mech Cook
    1st Radio G. W. Smith
    2nd Radio Crone
    PLANE Crew #8
    PPC LT Schmuck
    Co-Pilot Soli
    3rd Pilot CAPTAIN Dixon
    Plane Captain Ferrara
    2nd Mech Finch
    1st Radio J. M. Barrett
    2nd Radio R. C. Johnson
    PLANE CREW #9
    PPC LT(jg) Clark
    Co-Pilot LT(jg) Ettinger
    3rd Pilot CAPTAIN Schnell
    Plane Captain D. R. Johnson
    2nd Mech Gray
    1st Radio Faul
    2nd Radio Commons
    PLANE CREW #10
    PPC LT Marshall
    Co-Pilot LT(jg) Harvey
    3rd Pilot CAPTAIN Bounds
    Plane Captain George (Blackie) Bomfa
    2nd Mech Plotts
    1st Radio Ludlam
    2nd Radio Grote
    PLANE CREW #11
    PPC LT Thanos
    Co-Pilot LT(jg) Wood
    3rd Pilot CAPTAIN Eddy
    Plane Captain Rummy Hubbard
    2nd Mech J. A. Barrett
    1st Radio V. G. Smith
    2nd Radio Holden
    PLANE CREW #12
    PPC LT Hastreiter
    Co-Pilot LT(jg) Dykes
    3rd Pilot NAP. K. O. Smith
    Plane Captain F. H. Smith
    2nd Mech Owen
    1st Radio Hart, U. L
    2nd Radio Murphy
    PLANE CREW #13
    PPC LT(jg) Paul Stevens
    Co-Pilot LT(jg) Eiselle
    3rd Pilot NAP. Bierman
    Plane Captain McElreath
    2nd Mech Kempski
    1st Radio Nick Scura
    2nd Radio W. (Ned) Kelly
    PLANE CREW #14
    PPC LT Ranney
    Co-Pilot LT(jg) Copeland
    3rd Pilot NAP Curtis
    Plane Captain Love
    2nd Mech Harbecke
    1st Radio Gassett
    2nd Radio Tuttle
    PLANE CREW #15
    PPC LT Petitjean
    Co-Pilot LT(jg) Nolan
    3rd Pilot CAPTAIN Ballauf
    Plane Captain Dunlap
    2nd Mech Marlin
    1st Radio L. V. Hart
    2nd Radio Joey Sommer
    PLANE CREW #16
    PPC LT(jg) Kee
    Co-Pilot LT(jg) Waldeck
    3rd Pilot CAPTAIN Ruzak
    Plane Captain R. L. Hogan
    2nd Mech H. M. Davis
    1st Radio Carrier
    2nd Radio Bill Draper
    Air Gunner Wright
    PLANE CREW #17
    PPC LT Lund
    Co-Pilot LT(jg) Brown
    3rd Pilot CAPTAIN Stang
    Plane Captain C. R. Smith
    2nd Mech B. Davis
    1st Radio Jay Collins
    2nd Radio Bardahl
    FLIGHT CREW #18
    Pilot ENS Bill Mitchell
    CAPTAIN Cashwell
    Radioman Jim Kempton
    Radioman Geoff Cooper and Jim A. Murry
    PLANE CREW #19
    PPC LT H. B. Brown
    Co-Pilot LT(jg) Walt Hartley
    3rd Pilot NAP Hoover
    Plane Captain Richter
    2nd Mech Herdman
    1st Radio. Hickey
    2nd Radio Ed Colbert
    PLANE CREW #20
    PPC LT(jg) Trewitt
    Co-Pilot LT(jg) Ruth
    3rd Pilot Kurlak
    Plane Captain Henner
    2nd Mech August
    1st Radio G. W. Jensen
    2nd Radio Jack Farr
    PLANE CREW #21
    PPC LT Chrisman
    Co-Pilot LT(jg) Adler
    3rd Pilot CAPTAIN Kouns
    Plane Captain Kennedy
    2nd Mech Cambell
    1st Radio John Semmler
    2nd Radio Woody Woodward
    FLIGHT CREW #22
    PPC LT Whitacre
    3rd Pilot ENS Wainwright
    Plane Captain Chandler
    2nd Mech Larramore
    1st Radioman Dickson
    2nd Radioman Harold Donohue
    FLIGHT CREW #23
    PPC LT E. D. Smith
    Co-Pilot LT(jg) Thompson
    3rd Pilot ENS Hartvig
    Plane Captain Frison
    2nd Mech Henerley
    1st Radio Ray Blanchard
    2nd Radio Charlie Adolphus
    PLANE CREW #24
    PPC LT Henderson
    Co-Pilot LT(jg) Graff
    3rd Pilot LT(jg) Bersenbrugge
    Plane Captain Martin
    2nd Mech R. L. Davis
    1st Radio Folmer
    2nd Radio Paddy Ryan

    Plane #1 (BuNo08134) Crew #1
    PPC LT(jg) Gavette
    1st Pilot LT(jg) McElwee
    2nd Pilot ENS Jack
    Plane Captain Boyce AMM1C
    2nd Mech Barta AM2C
    Air Gunner Kersey AMM2C
    1st Radio Larry Katz ARM1C
    2nd Radio Lillley ARM2C
    Air Bomber C. C. Smith
    PLANE #2 (BuNo.2428) Crew #2
    PPC LT(jg) Paxson
    1st Pilot LT(jg) Pearse
    2nd Pilot CAP. Johnson
    Plane Captain Price (Walter) AMM1C
    2nd Mech Emery Bell AMM2C
    Air Gunner Faulkner AMM2c
    1st Radio H. V. Smith ARM1/c
    2nd Radio Gene Hollfelder ARM2/c
    Air Bomber Red Tarr AOM2c
    PLANE #3 (BuNo.2383) Crew 3
    PPC Lt(jg) Genuit
    1st Pilot LT(jg) Simon
    2nd Pilot LT(jg) Conrad and ENSMcmillan.
    Plane Captain. Brockett AMM1/c
    2nd Mech Green AMM1c
    Air Gunner Harper AMM2/C
    1st Radio Jake Semmler ARM1/C
    2nd Radio Paddy Ryan ARM2/C
    Air Bomber K. S. Cook AOM2/C
    PLANE #4 (BuNo.08227) Crew #4
    PPC LT(jg) Johansen
    1st Pilot LT(jg) Schenck
    2nd Pilot ENS L. G. Smith
    Plane Captain. George Bomfa (Blackie) AMM1c
    2nd Mech Prestridge AMM2/c
    Air Gunner Talley, John AMM2/C
    1st Radio ACRM Dudgeon
    2nd Radio Drooger ARM 3/C
    Air Bomber Sepich AOM2/C
    PLANE #5 (BuNo 08155) Crew #5
    PPC LT(jg) Barnes
    1st Pilot Lt(jg) Baldwin
    2nd Pilot ENS Bill Lankford and ENS Francis
    Plane Captain. Dickmann Amm1/c
    2nd Mech Herzog AMM2/C
    Air Gunner Watkins AMM2C
    1st Radio Cuz. Joe Rizza ACRM
    2nd Radio Menefee ARM2/C
    Air Bomber Duckworth AOM2/C
    PLANE #6 (BuNo.08430) Crew #6
    PPC LT(jg) Onofrio
    1st Pilot LT(jg) Machek
    2nd Pilot LT(jg) Burt
    Plane Captain Ed Pike AMM1/c
    2nd Mech Beck AMM2c
    1st Radio Woody Woodward ARM1/C
    2nd Radio Wulf ARM2/C
    Air Bomber Lawrence AOM2/c and J. Sauer AOM2/C
    PLANE #7 (BuNo 2411) Crew #7
    PPC LT(jg) Guy
    1st Pilot LT(jg) Hall
    2nd Pilot ENS Hafey
    Plane Captain Davis
    2nd Mech MAYCRINK AMM2/c
    Air Gunner Bailey AMM2/C
    1st Radio Nick Scura ARM1/C
    2nd Radio Parrott ARM2/C
    Air Gunner Allen AOM2/C
    PLANE #8 (BuNo 2417) Crew 8
    PPC LT(jg) Blakeslee
    1st Pilot LT(jg) Petre
    2nd Pilot Lt(jg) White
    Plane Captain Gaulard AMM1/C
    2nd Mech Tomasello AMM2/C
    Air Gunner Ray Lynch AMM2/c
    1st Radio Crone ARM1/C
    2nd Radio Foley, ARM 3/C
    Air Gunner Lorah AOM2/C
    PLANE #9 (BuNo 08465) Crew #9
    PPC LT(jg) Hayward
    1st pilot LT(jg) Cummings
    2nd Pilot ENS Lesauvage
    Plane Captain J. A. Barrett AMM2/C
    2nd Mech POSPIESZYNSKI AMM2/C his name isto be pronounced (PAPA ZINS KEE)
    Air Gunner Junior George Castille AOM 2/C
    1st Radio Red Enterline ACRM
    2nd Radioman Blake ARM2/C
    Air Bomber Renner AOM2/C
    PLANE #10 (BuNo 08368) Crew #10
    PPC LT(jg) Cheverton
    1st Pilot LT(jg) Barnett
    2nd Pilot ENS Warbois
    Plane Captain Belashek AMM2/C
    2nd Mech Dyer AMM2/c
    Air Gunner Jake Nilva AMM2/C
    1st Radio Ed Colbert ARM1/C
    2nd Radio Duran
    Air Bomber Comeaux AOM2/C
    PLANE #12 (BuNo 08257) Crew 11
    PPC LT(jg) Schenk
    1st Pilot LT(jg) Graham
    2nd Pilot Ens Fretz
    Plane Captain Edwards AMM1/C
    2nd Mech Perry AMM2/c
    Air Gunner Kapple AOM2/C
    1st Radio Geoff E. Cooper ARM2/C
    2nd radio Charles Adolphs
    Air Bomber Little AOM2/C
    PLANE #13 (BuNo 08255) Crew 12
    PPC LT(jg) Roth
    1st Pilot LT(jg) Stanwood
    2nd Pilot ENS Maxwell also ENS Greager
    Plane Captain Hover AMM1/C
    2nd Mech Harbecke AMM2/C
    Air Gunner F. W. Cook AMM2/C
    1st Radio Joey Sommer ARM1/C
    2nd Radio Walsh ARM2/C
    Air Bomber Paul Schilling AOM2/C
    PLANE #14 (BuNo 08391) Crew 13
    PPC LT Johnson
    1st Pilot LT(jg) Zane
    2nd Pilot LT(jg) Houghland and ENS MacDonald
    Plane Captain Gray AMM1/c
    2nd Mech Mastellone AMM2/C
    Air Gunner Marlin AMM2/C
    1st Radio Jack Farr ARM2/C
    2nd Radio Trailer ARM2/C
    Air Bomber Becker AOM2/C
    Plane #15 (BuNo 08403) Crew 14
    PPC LT Joe Gardner
    1st Pilot LT(jg) Martin
    2nd Pilot ENS Smith, D. E. also ENS Goodwin
    Plane Captain Precourt AMM1/C
    2nd Mech Leland AMM1/C
    Ari GunnerMoore AMM2/C
    1st Radio Ray Wiese ARM1/C
    2nd Radioman Wright ARM2/C
    Air Bomber L. Sauer AOM2/C

    "...This is the end of the crews. These men (most of them were lost, missing, shot down, and/or just died) were all in this from the attack on Pearl Harbor and in the Philippines. The reason for putting all this down, is that the future will never forget what we all went through. I also realize that we were all in different squadrons and did what we were called on to do. I was glad that I had all this down.

    I lost a lot of dear friends (Michael J. Goodwins book Shobun) that I flew with and pulled liberties with. Names like Bill Goodwin, Jack Schenck, Walter Price, Henry Zollinger, Harvey Harbecke, Paul Schilling, Arthur Kuhlman, Raymond Cart, and my good friend Jake Nilva, and my very dear friend Joey Sommer. Here are a few names that did not have crews at that time as most were Chiefs taking care of our planes and men..." Contributed by Larry Katz papakatz@sbcglobal.net

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships, Vol. VIII, pp. 480-83..." http://www.hazegray.org/danfs/auxil/az1.htm [25JUN2000]

    Waiting for permission to post entire article.

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VP-101 History "...Justin Albert Miller was a USNA graduate in 1931. He became a Naval Aviator before WWII, and rose to Commanding Officer of VPB-101 in the Pacific. Captain Miller retired in July 1960..." Contributed by John Lucas john.lucas@netzero.net [20APR2002]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VP-101 History "...Justin Albert Miller was a USNA graduate in 1931. He became a Naval Aviator before WWII, and rose to Commanding Officer of VPB-101 in the Pacific. Captain Miller retired in July 1960..." Contributed by John Lucas john.lucas@netzero.net [20APR2002]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VP-101 History "...Justin Albert Miller was a USNA graduate in 1931. He became a Naval Aviator before WWII, and rose to Commanding Officer of VPB-101 in the Pacific. Captain Miller retired in July 1960..." Contributed by John Lucas john.lucas@netzero.net [20APR2002]


    Circa 1943

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...History of CPW-10 - Interview of LCDR Clarence Keller and LT William Janechek in the Bureau of Aeronautics 12 March 1943. Squadrons Mentioned: VP-12, VP-21, VP-22, VP-101 and VP-102..." Official U. S. Navy Records (National Archives and Records Administration) via Fold3 http://www.fold3.com/ [11DEC2012]

    History - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge Thumbnail
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    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...San Pablo AVP-30..." WebSite: History Central m/navy/MISC%202/sanpablo.html [21NOV2006]

    ...On 15 June, the small seaplane tender departed the west coast and headed for the South Pacific. At Espiritu Santo, San Pablo embarked marines and deck cargo then proceeded to Noumea, New Caledonia. After offloading there, she went to Naval Seaplane Base Brisbane, Australia, to pick up the flight crews and aviation supplies, including spare parts and fuel, of patrol squadron VP-101; then returned to Noumea to commence operations as tender and base for "Black-Cat" (night-fighting, air-search, and reconnaissance) PBM's and PBY's. With VP-101 and assigned crash boats, San Pablo formed Task Group 73.1 and established their seaplane base by charting the bay, setting out mooring and marker bouys, and constructing quarters for squadron personnel at nearby Honey Hollow. They also built an advanced base at Samarai, Papua, New Guinea. For the next several months, the "Black Cats" operated from these bases, preying on enemy shipping along the coasts of New Guinea, New Britain, New Ireland, and in the Bismarck Sea. They inflicted great losses on inter-island barge traffic as well as to heavy shipping; harassed enemy troops with night bombing and strafing missions; conducted photo intelligence operations provided at-sea search and rescue support for downed Army fliers and sailors of sunken vessels; and carried high ranking officers, friendly coast watchers, and native guerrilla units. While continuously on the alert for enemy air attack, San Pablo sailors worked around the clock to fuel, repair, arm, and control the seaplanes, and to feed and care for their crews. On 9 October, she was relieved by Half Moon (AVP-26) and sailed to Brisbane for long needed repair, replenishment, and shore leave. She returned to Noumea on 20 December and resumed operations with VP-52...

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Location of U. S. Naval Aircraft - Dated 31 May 1943..." WebSite: Naval Historical Center http://www.history.navy.mil/ [02OCT2006]

    VP SQUADRONS MENTIONED

    CASU

    PATSU

    VD-1, VD-2 and VD-3

    VJ-1, VJ-2, VJ-3, VJ-4, VJ-5, VJ-7 and VJ-10

    VP-1

    VP-11, VP-12, VP-13, VP-14 and VP-15

    VP-23

    VP-32, VP-33 and VP-34

    VP-43, VP-44 and VP-45

    VP-52, VP-53 and VP-54

    VP-61, VP-62 and VP-63

    VP-71, VP-72, VP-73 and VP-74

    VP-81 and VP-84

    VP-91, VP-92 and VP-94

    VP-101, VP-102, VP-103, VP-104, VP-105, VP-106, VP-107, VP-108 and VP-109

    VP-125, VP-126, VP-127 and VP-128

    VP-130, VP-131, VP-132, VP-133, VP-134, VP-135, VP-136, VP-137, VP-138 and VP-139

    VP-140, VP-142, VP-144 and VP-146

    VP-201, VP-202, VP-203, VP-204, VP-205, VP-206, VP-207, VP-208 and VP-209

    VP-210, VP-211 and VP-212

    History - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge Thumbnail

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Location of U. S. Naval Aircraft - Dated 16 Jan 1943..." WebSite: Naval Historical Center http://www.history.navy.mil/ [01OCT2006]

    VP SQUADRONS MENTIONED

    CASU and PATSU

    VJ-1, VJ-2, VJ-3, VJ-4, VJ-5, VJ-6, VJ-7 and VJ-8

    VP-6 Coast Guard

    VP-3

    VP-11 and VP-12

    VP-23 and VP-24

    VP-31, VP-32, VP-33 and VP-34

    VP-41, VP-42, VP-43 and VP-44

    VP-51, VP-52, VP-53 and VP-54

    VP-61, VP-62 and VP-63

    VP-71, VP-72, VP-73 and VP-74

    VP-81, VP-82, VP-83 and VP-84

    VP-91, VP-92VP-93, and VP-94

    VP-101, VP-102, VP-103, VP-104, VP-105, VP-106, VP-107, VP-108 and VP-109

    VP-110

    VP-127, VP-128 and VP-129

    VP-131, VP-132, VP-133 and VP-134

    VP-200, VP-201, VP-202, VP-203, VP-204, VP-205, VP-206, VP-207, VP-208 and VP-209

    VP-210, VP-211, VP-210, and VP-216


    History - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge Thumbnail

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Location of U. S. Naval Aircraft - Dated 09 Nov 1943..." WebSite: Naval Historical Center http://www.history.navy.mil/ [01OCT2006]

    VP SQUADRONS MENTIONED

    CASU and PATSU

    VD-1, VD-2, VD-3 and VD-4

    VJ-1, VJ-2, VJ-3, VJ-4, VJ-5, VJ-15, and VJ-16

    VP-6 Coast Guard

    VP-1

    VP-11, VP-12, VP-13, VP-14, VP-15 and VP-16

    VP-23 and VP-24

    VP-32, VP-33 and VP-34

    VP-43, VP-44 and VP-45

    VP-52, VP-53 and VP-54

    VP-61, VP-62 and VP-63

    VP-71, VP-72, VP-73 and VP-74

    VP-81 and VP-84

    VP-91, VP-92 and VP-94

    VP-101, VP-102, VP-103, VP-104, VP-105, VP-106, VP-107, VP-108 and VP-109

    VP-110, VP-111, VP-112, VP-113, VP-114, VP-115 and VP-116

    VP-125, VP-126, VP-127, VP-128 and VP-129

    VP-130, VP-131, VP-132, VP-133, VP-134, VP-135, VP-136, VP-137, VP-138 and VP-139

    VP-140, VP-141, VP-142, VP-143, VP-144, VP-145, VP-146, VP-147, VP-148 and VP-149

    VP-150

    VP-201, VP-202, VP-203, VP-204, VP-205, VP-206, VP-207, VP-208 and VP-209

    VP-210, VP-211, VP-212, VP-213, VP-214, VP-215 and VP-216


    History - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge Thumbnail

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Location of U. S. Naval Aircraft - Dated 09 Feb 1943..." WebSite: Naval Historical Center http://www.history.navy.mil/ [28SEP2006]

    VP SQUADRONS MENTIONED

    VJ-1, VJ-2, VJ-3, VJ-7 and VJ-8

    VP-11, VP-12, VP-13 and VP-14

    VP-23 and VP-24

    VP-31, VP-32, VP-33 and VP-34

    VP-41, VP-42, VP-43 and VP-44

    VP-61, VP-62, and VP-63

    VP-71, VP-72, VP-73 and VP-74

    VP-81, VP-82, VP-83 and VP-84

    VP-91, VP-92, VP-93 and VP-94

    VP-101

    VP-127, VP-128 and VP-129

    VP-130, VP-132, VP-133 and VP-134

    VP-201, VP-202, VP-203, VP-205, VP-206, VP-207, VP-208 and VP-209,

    VP-210, VP-211 and VP-212
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    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...29 JUN 43 - Elements of VP-101 arrived at Brisbane from Perth, Austrailia, thereby extending the patrol coverage of Fleet Air Wing 10 to the east coast of Australia and marking the beginning of a northward advance of patrol operations toward the Papuan Peninsula of New Guinea..." http://www.history.navy.mil/avh-1910/PART05.PDF [28MAY2003]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "29JUN43--Elements of VP-101 arrived at Brisbane from Perth, thereby extending the patrol coverage of Fleet Air Wing 10 to the east coast of Australia and marking the beginning of a northward advance of patrol operations toward the Papuan Peninsula of New Guinea..." http://www.history.navy.mil/branches/avchr5.htm


    Circa 1942

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraVP-101 History "...CAPTAIN Harmom T. UTTER served with VP-101. Three days after Pearl Harbor was attacked, his PBY was shot down by two Japanese Zeroes. On Christmas of the same year, his plane was burned on the water by enemy aircraft. He spent six weeks on Bataan and excaped to Australia, returning to the states in 1942. He served with FAW-9 until the Spring of 1943..." Official U. S. Navy Documention [22DEC2012]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Op-40-A-KB - (SC)A6-4/VZ - January 6, 1942 - Location of U. S. Naval Aircraft..." WebSite: Naval Historical Center http://www.history.navy.mil/ [23SEP2006]

    VP SQUADRONS MENTIONED

    VP-11, VP-12 and VP-14

    VP-23 and VP-24

    VP-31, VP-32, VP-33 and VP-34

    VP-41, VP-42, VP-43 and VP-44

    VP-51, VP-52, VP-53 and VP-54

    VP-61, VP-62, VP-63

    VP-71, VP-72, VP-73 and VP-74

    VP-81 and VP-83

    VP-91, VP-92 and VP-94

    VP-101

    VP-201, VP-202, VP-203, VP-204, VP-205, VP-206, VP-207, VP-208, VP-209, VP-210, VP-211 and VP-212


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    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...San Pablo - A shallow, northern extension of San Francisco Bay in California. (AVP-30: dp. 2,619; l. 310'9"; b. 41'2"; dr. 12'7"; s. 18.5 k.; cpl. 367; a. 2 5", 8 40mm., 8 20mm.; cl. Barnegat) (Squadrons Mentioned: VP-11, VPB-25, VP-33, VP-34, VP-52, VP-101..." WebSite: Naval Historical Center http://www.history.navy.mil/danfs/s4/san_pablo.htm [25DEC2005]

    San Pablo (AVP-30) was laid down on 2 July 1941 302 by the Associated Shipbuilding Co., Seattle, Wash.; launched on 31 March 1942; sponsored by Mrs. W. A. Hall; and commissioned on 15 March 1943, Comdr. R. R. Darron in command.

    Following commissioning and outfitting, San Pablo conducted shakedown in the Puget Sound area and then steamed to San Diego for readiness training. On 15 June, the small seaplane tender departed the west coast and headed for the South Pacific. At Espiritu Santo, San Pablo embarked marines and deck cargo; then proceeded to Noumea, New Caledonia. After offloading there, she went to Naval Seaplane Base Brisbane, Australia, to pick up the flight crews and aviation supplies, including spare parts and fuel, of patrol squadron VP-101; then returned to Noumea to commence operations as tender and base for "Black-Cat" (night-fighting, air-search, and reconnaissance) PBM's and PBY's.

    With VP-101 and assigned crash boats, San Pablo formed Task Group 73.1 and established their seaplane base by charting the bay, setting out mooring and marker bouys, and constructing quarters for squadron personnel at nearby Honey Hollow. They also built an advanced base at Samarai, Papua, New Guinea. For the next several months, the "Black Cats" operated from these bases, preying on enemy shipping along the coasts of New Guinea, New Britain, New Ireland, and in the Bismarck Sea. They inflicted great losses on inter-island barge traffic as well as to heavy shipping; harassed enemy troops with night bombing and strafing missions; conducted photo intelligence operations; provided at-sea search and rescue support for downed Army fliers and sailors of sunken vessels; and carried high ranking officers, friendly coast watchers, and native guerrilla units.

    While continuously on the alert for enemy air attack, San Pablo sailors worked around the clock to fuel, repair, arm, and control the seaplanes; and to feed and care for their crews. On 9 October, she was relieved by Half Moon (AVP-26) and sailed to Brisbane for long needed repair, replenishment, and shore leave. She returned to Noumea on 20 December and resumed operations with VP-52. During January 1944, she gave direct support to the force which occupied Finschhafen, New Guinea, and helped to establish a new advance base at Langemak Bay. At times, she also tended the planes of VP-34, then flying rescue missions for the 5th AAF from Port Moresby. She once temporarily based two OS2U scout planes from Boise (CL-47).

    From Langemak Bay, San Pablo's planes helped to prevent the Japanese from supplying garrisons on Rabaul and Kavieng. On 25 February, relieved again by Half Moon, San Pablo returned to Noumea for repairs alongside Dobbin (AD-3). During the work, she assisted in removing a screw from Aaron Ward (DM-34) using her seaplane winch. This speeded repairs to the destroyer-minelayer and allowed her to reach Ulithi in time to prepare for the forthcoming Okinawa campaign.

    By 24 March, San Pablo was conducting operations at Seeadler Harbor, Admiralty Islands, with VP-33 and VP-52 planes. They carried out night bombing missions in the Carolines and search flights by day. The pace had so quickened by the end of March that USS Tangier (AV-8) was brought in to help carry the load. On 13 May, they moved to Hollandia to patrol the approaches to Wakde Island prior to Allied landings there. Relieved by Orca (AVP-49) on 26 May, San Pablo then refueled PT boats at Humboldt Bay and transported personnel and cargo between Manus, Seeadler, Emirau, and Wpendi. On 19 August, she commenced ASW patrols with VP-11 planes at Woendi and, during October and November, conducted ASW operations off Morotai and Hollandia. Later relieved by Saw Carlos (AVP-51), she moved to Anibong on Bay, Leyte, to support planes conducting search missions in the Philippines.

    On 8 December, San Pablo received survivors of Mahan (DD-364) who had been picked up by one of her PBM's after that destroyer had suffered three kamikaze hits and sank in Ormoc Bay. She then joined a convoy en route to Mindoro and came under severe attack by suicide planes for ten consecutive days. Most of the kamikazes were beaten off by AA fire from the convoy screen or by CAP planes. However, one hit an ammunition ship which completely disintegrated in a tremendous explosion, and another crashed into a Liberty ship and caused severe damage. On 30 December at Mindoro, a Val barely passed astern of San Pablo and crashed into Orestes (AGP-10), wounding four San Pablo men with shrapnel. On the 31st, a Betty bombed nearby Porcupine (IX-126) and then crashed into Gansevoort (DD-608). Through January and early February 1945, San Pablo made search missions in the South China Sea and along the China coast with VPB-25 and VP-33 squadrons. On 13 February, she was relieved by USS Tangier (AV-8) and returned to Leyte.

    Through April, she escorted LST-777, Chestatee (AOG-49), and various merchant transports between Leyte and Palawan. She then steamed, via Morotai, to Manus. At the end of June, she moved to Samar and the Lingayen Gulf area for air search and rescue operations in the South China Sea-Formosa area. These lasted until 15 August when she received orders to cease offensive operations. On 2 September, the day of Japan's formal surrender ceremony, San Pablo was in Lingayen Gulf providing ASW patrols to cover occupation convoys bound for Japan.

    San Pablo returned to Bremerton, Wash., on 17 November to prepare for inactivation. She moved to Alameda, Calif., on 25 March 1946 and remained idle until placed out of commission, in reserve, on 13 January 1947.

    Following conversion to a hydrographic-survey vessel, San Pablo was reconunissioned on 17 September 1948 at San Francisco, Comdr. T. E. Chambers in command. She conducted shakedown training off San Diego from 29 October to 15 November and was then ordered to report to the Norfolk Naval Shipyard. San Pablo reached Portsmouth, Va., on 14 December and completed outfitting prior to sailing on 3 February 1949, in company with Rehoboth (AVP-50) for oceanographic work in the western approaches to the Mediterrannean. Calling at Ponta Delgada, Azores; Plymouth, England; Gibraltar; and Bermuda; she returned to Philadelphia on 18 April. During the remainder of the year, she conducted two similar cruises to survey and measure ocean currents; and, during the last, made a study of the North Atlantic Drift. She included in her ports of call Scapa Flow; the Orkney Islands; Oslo, Norway; and Copenhagen, Denmark. San Pablo was redesignated AGS-30, effective 25 August 1949.

    Beginning 18 January 1950, she conducted a survey of the Gulf Stream; and, from 5 to 26 June, served as Survey Headquarters Ship for a group of American and Canadian vessels engaged in broad coverage behavioral studies of that massive current. After a cruise to Casablanca, French Morocco, in July and August, she returned to the east coast of the United States to conduct survey operations between New London and Key West for the remainder of the year.

    During 1951, San Pablo conducted oceanographic studies during various cruises, ranging from Scotland to the Mediterranean and along the coast in the Narragansett Bay operating area. Her tasks included making accurate profile studies of the ocean bottom for the purpose of evaluating new sonar devices. In 1952, she spent the majority of her time in the North Atlantic, and devoted the latter part of the year to training operations out of Norfolk. From 1953 through 1968, San Pablo alternated between the North Atlantic and the Caribbean conducting studies on salinity, sound reflectivity, underwater photography techniques, deep bottom core sampling, bottom profile mapping, subsurface wave phenomena, and other topics still classified. For several months during 1965, she utilized the port and docking facilities at Rosyth, Scotland, as a temporary home port, courtesy of the British Royal Navy. From 1 January to 29 May 1969, she underwent inactivation at Philadelphia.

    San Pablo was decommissioned on 29 May 1969 and struck from the Navy list on 1 June. After being used by the Ocean Science Center of the Atlantic Commission, Savannah, Georgia, she was sold on 14 September 1971 to Mrs. Margo Zahardis of Vancouver, Wash.

    San Pablo earned four battle stars for World War II service.

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "00SEP42--The navalized Liberator was assigned the designation PB4Y-1. The initial PB4Y-1s were essentially B-24Ds delivered to the Navy with very little change and assigned Navy Bureau of Aeronautics serial numbers. They were drawn from a variety of B-24D block numbers. The Navy Liberators first entered service with VP-101 at NAS Barbers Point, Hawaii in September of 1942. Their first U-boat kill took place on November 5, 1942..." http://www.hut.fi/~mpietil1/b-24.html

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...I am an aviation historian resident in a suburb of Perth, Western Australia. I am preparing a Masters thesis titled "The Air War in Western Australia 1939-1945". From March 1942 to August 1944 we had Patrol Wing Ten (Fleet Air Wing Ten from 01 NOV 42) based at Crawley on the Swan River, near Perth. PWTen appears to have doubled as a training and local patrol unit, with patrol squadrons being rotated as the war in the Southwest Pacific progressed. From the Wing's War Diary I have ascertained that the following squadrons were present at Crawley: VP-101 (includes merged VP-21, VP-22 and VP-102 after the evacuation of Java in MAR 42), VP-11, VP-33, VP-34, VP-52. After FAWTen left Perth in AUG 44, a utility training unit, VS-61 continued until well into 1945. I am seeking information on these squadrons when they were in Western Australia. I know of their bases at Geraldton and Exmout Gulf (POTSHOT) but I have a problem with the mobile base, "Heron Haven". I have a copy of Messimer's "In the Hands of Fate" and a few other published references, so have an overall picture. Any help would be appreciated..." Contributed by Lindsay J. Peet (Mr.) ppeetlj@ic-net.com.au [22JUL98]

    UPDATE "...Lindsay, Since our recent communication I have delved into the matter of Heron Haven, and have enjoyed doing so.

    Since my interest begins with aircraft and their squadrons, I approached this exercise from an "aircraft on aggressive ops. using Seaplane Tenders" point of view. This allowed me to rule out some matters, such as :---

  • 1 Regular seaplane patrols from such as Geraldton.
  • 2 Seaplane mine laying ops from West Bay in Napier Broome Bay which began 17Nov44.

    I set aside some matters temporarily, being :---
  • 1 The seven and then five USN PBY flying Crawley to Townsend Haven to Darwin in Jun43.
  • 2 The joined usage of "Townsend Haven(Heron Haven)".

    I then found that only RAAF Catalinas were thereafter used on aggressive ops from [or returning to] WA advanced bases in my search timeframe and area. I shall list these under "locality" headings, of which there are just three, being
  • 1 Exmouth Gulf
  • 2 Cygnet Bay
  • 3 Yampi Sound
    Exmouth Gulf.

    In Aug43 and Nov43, RAAF Catalinas did mining sorties to Soerabaya Harbour. They flew Darwin, Soerabaya, Heron Haven for fuel, then return to Darwin.

    In both months, tender Preston is mentioned for refuelling.

    Pilot Honan was on the Nov43 Sortie, describes his career in book "That's That", clearly states Heron Haven was at Exmouth Gulf, shows it so on a map.

    Cygnet Bay.

    In Jan44, RAAF investigated Cygnet Bay for use by mine laying Catalinas. It was accepted for RAAF use, perhaps because of radar station at Cape Leveque and protective airfield at Derby. Tidal mudflats were a problem.

    Tender Preston laid moorings and supported the Catalinas. The sorties were flown Cygnet Bay - Balikpapan - Cygnet Bay.

    Cygnet Bay was used only once for RAAF ops, for a set of three mine laying sorties to Balikpapan on 20, 22, and 24Feb44.

    Yampi Sound. [Codename "Shecat"]

    In Apr44 Yampi Sound was selected as advanced base for more minelaying ops to Balikpapan. A radar station was at Cockatoo Island. Tender Childs set the moorings.

    A set of three ops were done this month, flying Yampi Sound - Balikpapan - Yampi Sound.

    More sets of ops were done from Yampi Sound in May, June, and July44, to Balikpapan and to Soerabaya.

    After Jul44, no more aggressive Catalina ops were done from WA coast until West Bay came into use.

    *****************

    So, from the above, I'm happy that Heron Haven was a "common usage" name for Exmouth Gulf, and only Exmouth Gulf. I can't see it as a formal "code name" since it could relate to the operational vessel USS Heron. I see there is a "Heron Point" adjacent Learmonth in Exmouth Gulf.

    Heron may have done a reconnaisance to Cygnet Bay in early Jun43, prior to the VP-101 flights to Darwin in Jun43. As for Heron's dalliance in the Dampier Archipeligo, perhaps the fishing was good. Where was General Blamey just then? No jest!

    There is a "Townshend River" at Cygnet Bay. Perhaps it was Cygnet Bay, by whatever name, where the USN Catalinas refuelled on their way to Darwin in Jun43. Perhaps the USN avoided Exmouth Gulf in Jun43 as the Japanese bombed there [no physical damage] in May43, after which the submarine base was closed.

    I would love to read about the VP-101 flights in context, would appreciate any info you might be able to provide...

    Hope this helps, best wishes, Bruce G..." Contributed by Wynnum B Graham wbg@bigpond.com [26AUG98]

    Circa 1941 - 1945

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Air-to-Air Shoot Downs by Navy and Marine Corps Patrol Type Aircraft During World War II - This Squadron Mentioned...Naval Historical Center ADOBE Download File: http://www.history.navy.mil/avh-vol2/Appen4.pdf [12FEB2004]
    Get Adobe Reader
    Open VP History Adobe FileAir-To-Air Shootdowns 118KB


    Squadron History:  VP-101

    Lineage

    Established as Pacific Air Detachment on 17 January 1923.
    Redesignated Patrol Squadron FOURTEEN (VP-14) on 29 May 1924.
    Redesignated Patrol Squadron ONE-Naval District 14 (VP-1D14) on 21 September 1927.
    Redesignated Patrol Squadron ONE-B (VP-1B) on 1 July 1931.
    Redesignated Patrol Squadron ONE-F (VP-1F) on 15 April 1933.
    Redesignated Patrol Squadron ONE (VP-1) on 1 October 1937.
    Redesignated Patrol Squadron TWENTY-ONE (VP-21) on 1 July 1939.
    Redesignated Patrol Squadron ONE (VP-1) on 30 July 1940.
    Redesignated Patrol Squadron ONE HUNDRED ONE (VP-101) on 3 December 1940.
    Redesignated Patrol Bombing Squadron TWENTY-NINE (VPB-29) on 1 October 1944.
    Disestablished on 20 June 1945.

    Squadron Insignia and Nickname

    The squadron insignia was officially approved by CNO on 18 September 1934. Patrol Squadron One adopted the elephant for its representative since that animal had always been noted for its endurance and patience. The elephant of VP-1 stood on a cloud with one eye cocked downward at a target, a bomb securely held by his trunk, waiting for the proper time to make an unerring drop. The elephant was used because it occupies the same relative position in the animal kingdom as the patrol seaplane did in regard to other naval aircraft, e.g., heavy duty. The bomb was the primary armament of seaplanes of that period. The cloud denoted high altitude. Colors: elephant, gray with black outline and markings; eye and tusks, white; bomb, black with white markings; cloud, white outlined in black; background, royal blue; and circle, red. The same insignia was used throughout successive changes in squadron designation until the disestablishment of VPB-29 in 1945.

    Nickname: None on record.

    Chronology of Significant Events

    (Squadron history from 15 Aug 1928 to WWII removed as not pertinent to this website.)

    1 Jul 1939: VP-1 was redesignated Patrol Squadron 21 and assigned to the Asiatic Fleet, becoming the nucleus for the newly formed Patrol Wing 10 at Cavite Naval Base, Luzon, Philippines.

    7 Dec 1941: VP-101 was placed on war alert upon receiving news of the attack on Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, and war patrols commenced.

    14 Dec 1941: PatWing-10 was relocated from the devastated Cavite Naval Base at Luzon, to Balikpapan in an attempt to keep ahead of the advancing Japanese forces.

    23 Dec 1941: VP-102 was merged with VP-101 to combine the squadrons’ dwindling assets in aircraft, crews and material. On the 25th VP-101 was relocated to Ambon, N.E.I.

    27 Dec 1941: Six of the squadron’s PBY-4 Catalinas, led by Lieutenant Burden R. Hastings, conducted an early morning attack against Jolo, in the central Philippines. Enemy aircraft and AA fire broke up the formation before a bombing run could be made. Ensign Elwin L. Christman and his crew followed through alone and made a drop on an enemy vessel at 1,000 feet. The Catalina, heavily damaged by AA fire, caught fire. Three crewmen bailed out, but the others remained with the aircraft until Christman made a controlled water landing near shore. Three crewmen died; the others were eventually rescued. Aviation Machinist Mate’s First Class Andrew K. Waterman was the plane captain and waist gunner on the aircraft. He shot down one enemy aircraft while defending the Catalina during the attack on shipping in the harbor, but in doing so received mortal wounds. For his courageous actions under fire Waterman was posthumously awarded the Navy Cross. Radioman First Class Robert L. Pettit also stuck by his post even after the aircraft, flooded with aviation gas from perforated tanks, caught fire. For his devotion to duty Pettit was posthumously awarded the Navy Cross. Ensign Christman led the surviving members of his crew to safety on the shore of Jolo Island. Lieutenant Jack B. Dawley and the surviving members of his crew, who had also been shot down immediately after dropping their bombs, joined Christman’s group on Jolo Island. The two officers led their crews inland away from the Japanese, eventually reaching U.S. Naval Headquarters at Surabaya, Java, N.E.I. Aircraft Chief Machinist’s Mate Donald D. Lurvey was awarded the Navy Cross for assisting Ensign Cough, the second pilot of Dawley’s aircraft, into a life vest and guiding him to shore.  Aviation Machinist’s Mate First Class Joseph Bangust received the Navy Cross posthumously for his action as waist gunner in Dawley’s aircraft, shooting down one enemy aircraft before being mortally wounded by incoming fire. Aviation Machinist’s Mate First Class Evren C. McLawhorn, the plane captain, took over the waist gun position after Bangust was mortally wounded. He received seven wounds during the fight, but survived and received the Navy Cross for his heroism. For their courage under fire and leadership in guiding their crews through enemy-occupied territory to safety, Ensign Christman and Lieutenant Dawley were awarded the Navy Cross. Lieutenant Hastings, as leader of the gallant but unsuccessful strike, was later awarded the Navy Cross for guiding the force into the target area in the face of overwhelming odds. Lieutenant Hastings’ award was made posthumously, as he and his men were the only aircrew captured by the Japanese. They were interrogated by their captors and beheaded on the parade ground of the Jolo garrison. The fourth Catalina shot down during the strike was manned by Lieutenant Hazelton and his crew. Hazelton made a sea landing and the entire crew safely escaped the sinking aircraft into life rafts and were picked up two days later by a squadron aircraft.

    16 Jan 1942: VP-101 was ordered to evacuate Ambon due to the presence of an approaching Japanese naval task force. Assets and personnel were moved to Surabaya.

    1 Mar 1942: VP-22’s assets were merged with VP-101, which was then ordered to evacuate Surabaya and withdraw to Perth, Australia, to reform and refit the devastated squadron.

    7 Mar 1942: VPs 102, 21 and 22 were officially disestablished, with the remaining personnel and aircraft assets being combined to bring up to full strength the remaining squadron, VP-101.

    26 Apr 1942: A desperate attempt was made to rescue personnel otherwise doomed to capture on the besieged island of Corregidor. Two Catalinas, formerly assigned to VP-102, flew a circuitous route back to the Philippines, arriving around midnight of the 29th . Over 30 nurses were flown out that night under cover of darkness.

    1 May 1942: The reformed VP-101 recommenced combat patrols off the coast of Australia, operating from bases at Exmouth Gulf, Pelican Point, Geraldton and Albany. Tender support was provided by Childs (AVD 15), Heron (AVP 2) and Preston (DD 379).

    9 Nov 1942–29 Jun 1943: Upon return to Perth, Australia, VP-101 was split into three units—HEDRON, SCORON and VP-101. Combat patrols were continued from Perth until VP-101 was relocated to Naval Seaplane Base Brisbane, Australia, on 29 June 1943, under operational control of FAW-17.

    1 July 1943: The first element of VP-101 flew into Port Moresby, Papua, New Guinea. Its aircraft were in poor mechanical shape and the decision was made to use them to supply guerrilla fighters in the vicinity of Wewak. Landings were made on the Sepik River leading into Lake Yibiri. The flights continued through October 1943, but were discontinued due to increased Japanese opposition. The guerrilla fighters were rescued in December 1945 by aircraft from VP-11. The second element of VP-101 was moved to the eastern end of New Guinea to begin Black Cat operations from the seaplane tender San Pablo (AVP 30), anchored in Namoia Bay. The squadron’s Catalinas were fitted with ASV radar sets that allowed them to find targets on the darkest of nights. The highly touted Norden bombsights proved worthless, being unable to hit fast moving, dodging Japanese ships from any height. Instead, a low-level bombing tactic was worked out using one foot of altitude for each pound of bomb weight. Thus, a 500-pound bomb was released from a 500-foot altitude leading into a target, resulting in only a gentle updraft from the bomb blast. This technique was necessary due to the lack of a four-to-five second delay on the bomb fuses.

    1–28 Dec 1943: VP-101 squadron headquarters were established at Palm Island, Australia, with advance bases at Samarai and Port Moresby, New Guinea. Combat patrols and crew training were conducted concurrently through the 28th, when the squadron returned to Perth, Australia. Upon return, the squadron again came under the operational control of FAW-10.

    1 May 1944: VP-101 was relocated to Samarai, New Guinea. Dumbo missions were conducted in the area of the Green, Treasury and Manus islands, and Emirau, coming under the operational control of FAW-17.

    1–16 Jul 1944: Five squadron aircraft were based at Manus, five at Green Island, two at Emirau, and one at Treasury Island. On the 16th, the detachments were relocated to the Admiralty Islands and later the Solomon Islands chain. Operations consisted primarily of Dumbo rescue missions to recover downed Army and Navy airmen.

    19 Sep 1944: VP-101 was relieved by VP-52 in the Solomons and relocated to Morotai, north of New Guinea, aboard Half Moon (AVP 26). After settling in at Morotai, the squadron commenced combat operations as a Black Cat squadron on 21 September.

    b>

    1 Oct 1944: VP-101 was redesignated VPB-29. The squadron continued to conduct Black Cat missions, antisubmarine patrols and night patrols around the area of Mindanao and Tawi Tawi.

    10 Nov 1944: The squadron was relieved by VPB-20 for return to the continental U.S., arriving at NAS Alameda, Calif., on 30 November. The squadron commenced re forming and training following the return of personnel from leave and the arrival of new assignments.

    20 Jun 1945: VP-101 was disestablished at NAS San Diego, Calif.

     

    Home Port Assignments

    Location Date of Assignment
    NB Cavite, Luzon, Philippines 1 Jul 1939
    Perth, Australia 1 Mar 1942
    Naval Seaplane Base Brisbane, Australia 29 Jun 1943
    Palm Island, Australia 1 Dec 1943
    Perth, Australia 28 Dec 1943
    Samarai, New Guinea 1 May 1944
    Morotai 19 Sep 1944
    NAS Alameda, Calif 30 Nov 1944
    NAS San Diego, Calif. 12 Dec 1944

     

    Commanding Officers

    Name Date Assumed Command
    LCDR J. V. Peterson 1941
    Unknown 1942–1943
    LCDR Lauren E. Johnson Nov 1943
    Unknown 1944–Jan 1945

     

    Aircraft Assignment

    Type of Aircraft Date Type First Received
    PBY-4 Oct 1938
    PBY-5 May 1942

     

    Major Overseas Deployments

    Date of Departure Date of Return Wing Base of  Operations Type of Aircraft Area of Operations
    14 Dec 1941 * PatWing-10 Balikpapan PBY-4 SoPac
    25 Dec 1941 * PatWing-10 Ambon PBY-4 SoPac
    16 Jan 1942 * PatWing-10 Surabaya PBY-4 SoPac
    1 Mar 1942 * PatWing-10 Perth PBY-4 SoPac
    Childs (AVD 15)
    Heron (AVP 2)
    Preston (DD 379)
    29 Jun 1943 * FAW-17 Brisbane PBY-5 SoPac
    Jul 1943 * FAW-17 New Guinea PBY-5 SoPac
    San Pablo (AVP 30)
    1 Dec 1943 * FAW-17 Palm Island PBY-5 SoPac
    28 Dec 1943 * FAW-10 Perth PBY-5 SoPac
    1 May 1944 * FAW-17 Samarai PBY-5 SoPac
    1 Jul 1944 * FAW-17 Manus PBY-5 SoPac
    19 Sep 1944 10 Nov 44 FAW-17 Morotai PBY-5 SoPac
    Half Moon (AVP 26)
    • Continued combat deployment in the Pacific, moving from base to base.

     

    Wing Assignments

    Wing Tail Code Assignment Date
    PatWing-10/FAW-10 * 1 Jul 1939
    FAW-17 29 Jun 1943
    FAW-10 28 Dec 1943
    FAW-17 1 May 1944
    FAW-8 30 Nov 1944
    FAW-14 12 Dec 1944

     

    Unit Awards Received

    Unit Award Inclusive Date Covering Unit Award
    PUC 8 Dec 1941 3 Mar 1942
    NUC 2 Jun 1944 31 Dec 1944

    Circa 1941 - 1942

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Prowling The Pacific Night - Harassing The Enemy With A PBY By Michael Martin - Squadron Mentioned: VP-11, VP-23, VPB-33, VPB-52, VP-101 and VP-102..." WebSite: Flight Journal http://www.flightjournal.com/articles/pacific_night/pacific_night.asp [04JAN2005]

    Waiting for permission to post entire article.


    Circa 1941

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Full Text Citations For Award of The Navy Cross - To U.S. Navy Personnel - World War II - (2,889 Awards) - Navy Cross Citations U.S. Navy - World War II..." WebSite: Home of Heros http://www.homeofheroes.com/ valor/ 1_Citations/ 03_wwii-nc/ nc_06wwii_navyR.html [23NOV2007]

    WATERMAN, ANDREW KENNETH (MIA)

    Citation:

    The Navy Cross is presented to Andrew Kenneth Waterman (02340582), Aviation Machinist's Mate First Class, U.S. Navy, for extraordinary heroism and distinguished service as waist gunner of an airplane in Patrol Squadron ONE HUNDRED ONE (VP-101), Patrol Wing TEN (Patwing-10), in action against enemy Japanese naval forces located near Jolo, in the Philippine Islands, on the morning of 27 December 1941. In the ensuing action, Japanese Zero fighters and anti-aircraft bursts filled the air around the harbor, but the U.S. Navy PBY-4 bombers made their approach, dropped their bombs and inflicted heavy damage upon several enemy war and merchant ships. Although he was wounded shortly after the approach was made, Aviation Machinist's Mate First Class Bangust shot down one enemy airplane before being mortally wounded and, remaining at his station, continued to fire upon the Japanese Zero fighters until enemy bullets killed him at his post. His outstanding courage and determined skill were at all times inspiring and in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.

    Bureau of Naval Personnel Information Bulletin No. 304 (July 1942)
    Born: December 20, 1913 at Lewis County, Kentucky
    Home Town: San Diego, California

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Full Text Citations For Award of The Navy Cross - To U.S. Navy Personnel - World War II - (2,889 Awards) - Navy Cross Citations U.S. Navy - World War II..." WebSite: Home of Heros http://www.homeofheroes.com/ valor/ 1_Citations/ 03_wwii-nc/nc_06wwii_navyN.html [22NOV2007]

    PETTIT, ROBERT LEE

    Citation:

    The Navy Cross is presented to Robert Lee Pettit (3108990), Radioman First Class, U.S. Navy, for extraordinary heroism and distinguished service as First Radioman of an airplane in Patrol Squadron ONE HUNDRED ONE (VP-101), Patrol Wing TEN (Patwing-10), in action against enemy Japanese naval forces located near Jolo, in the Philippine Islands, on the morning of 27 December 1941. When his PBY-4 Catalina was attacked during an assault on enemy shipping, and despite the fact that his aircraft was flooded with aviation gasoline from perforated tanks which then caught fire, Radioman Pettit remained at his post until he was mortally wounded. His outstanding courage and determined skill were at all times inspiring and in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.

    Bureau of Naval Personnel Information Bulletin No. 304 (July 1942)
    Born: November 17, 1906 at Claire, Michigan
    Home Town: Clare, Michigan

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Full Text Citations For Award of The Navy Cross - To U.S. Navy Personnel - World War II - (2,889 Awards) - Navy Cross Citations U.S. Navy - World War II..." WebSite: Home of Heros http://www.homeofheroes.com/ valor/ 1_Citations/ 03_wwii-nc/ nc_06wwii_navyL.html [22NOV2007]

    MCLAWHORN, EVEREN C.

    Citation:

    The Navy Cross is presented to Everen C. McLawhorn, Aviation Machinist's Mate First Class, U.S. Navy, for extraordinary heroism and distinguished service as gunner of an airplane in Patrol Squadron ONE HUNDRED ONE (VP-101), Patrol Wing TEN (Patwing-10), in action against enemy Japanese naval forces located near Jolo, in the Philippine Islands, on the morning of 27 December 1941. During an air attack on enemy ships when Anti-Aircraft Fire broke up the formation of PBY-4 Catalinas and killed two waist gunners, Aviation Machinist's Mate First Class McLawhorn manned both waist guns alternately, refusing to leave his post despite being wounded seven times. When enemy incendiaries ignited a number of ammunition cases in the plane and machine gun bullets in the cases began to explode, despite the pain of his wounds, Aviation Machinist Mate First Class McLawhorn calmly jettisoned the exploding cases, risking his life in doing so. His outstanding courage and determined skill were at all times inspiring and in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

    Bureau of Naval Personnel Information Bulletin No. 304 (July 1942)
    Born: April 10, 1921 at Lenoir County, North Carolina
    Home Town: New Bern, North Carolina

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Full Text Citations For Award of The Navy Cross - To U.S. Navy Personnel - World War II - (2,889 Awards) - Navy Cross Citations U.S. Navy - World War II..." WebSite: Home of Heros http://www.homeofheroes.com/ valor/ 1_Citations/ 03_wwii-nc/ nc_06wwii_navyL.html [22NOV2007]

    LURVEY, DON DEXTER

    Synopsis:

    The Navy Cross is presented to Don Dexter Lurvey, Aviation Chief Machinist's Mate, U.S. Navy, for extraordinary heroism and distinguished service as gunner of an airplane in Patrol Squadron ONE HUNDRED ONE (VP-101), Patrol Wing TEN (Patwing-10), in action against enemy Japanese naval forces located near Jolo, in the Philippine Islands, on the morning of 27 December 1941. Aviation Machinist's Mate First Class Lurvey saved his pilot from drowning after their airplane crashed into the sea. His outstanding courage and determined skill were at all times inspiring and in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

    Bureau of Naval Personnel Information Bulletin No. 304 (July 1942)
    Born: July 13, 1908 at Draent Center, Massachusetts
    Home Town: San Diego, California

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Full Text Citations For Award of The Navy Cross - To U.S. Navy Personnel - World War II - (2,889 Awards) - Navy Cross Citations U.S. Navy - World War II..." WebSite: Home of Heros http://www.homeofheroes.com/ valor/ 1_Citations/ 03_wwii-nc/ nc_06wwii_navyC.html [20NOV2007]

    DAWLEY, JACK BALDWIN

    Citation:

    The Navy Cross is presented to Jack Baldwin Dawley, Lieutenant, U.S. Navy, for extraordinary heroism and distinguished service as Pilot of an airplane in Patrol Squadron ONE HUNDRED ONE (VP-101), Patrol Wing TEN (Patwing-10), in action against enemy Japanese naval forces located near Jolo, in the Philippine Islands, on the morning of 27 December 1941. During an air attack on enemy ships when Anti-Aircraft Fire broke up the formation of PBY-4 Catalinas, Lieutenant Dawley was shot down. He rallied his survivors and joined with another downed officer in evading the enemy and leading his men to safety. His outstanding courage and determined skill were at all times inspiring and in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

    Bureau of Naval Personnel Information Bulletin No. 304 (July 1942)
    Born: November 3, 1913 at Seattle, Washington
    Home Town: Seattle, Washington

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Full Text Citations For Award of The Navy Cross - To U.S. Navy Personnel - World War II - (2,889 Awards) - Navy Cross Citations U.S. Navy - World War II..." WebSite: Home of Heros http://www.homeofheroes.com/ valor/ 1_Citations/ 03_wwii-nc/ nc_06wwii_navyC.html [20NOV2007]

    CHRISTMAN, ELWYN LEWIS

    Citation:

    The Navy Cross is presented to Elwyn Lewis Christman, Lieutenant (j.g.), U.S. Navy (Reserve), for extraordinary heroism and distinguished service as Pilot of an airplane in Patrol Squadron ONE HUNDRED ONE (VP-101), Patrol Wing TEN (Patwing-10), in action against enemy Japanese naval forces located near Jolo, in the Philippine Islands, on the morning of 27 December 1941. During an air attack on enemy ships when Anti-Aircraft Fire broke up the formation of PBY-4 Catalinas, Lieutenant Christman followed through alone and made a drop on an enemy vessel at 1,000 feet, before his badly damaged aircraft caught fire. Three members of the crew bailed out, but three others remained at their posts while Christman made an emergency water landing, and then led his surviving comrades to shore. His outstanding courage and determined skill were at all times inspiring and in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
    Bureau of Naval Personnel Information Bulletin No. 304 (July 1942)
    Born: July 14, 1915 at Monitor, Oregon
    Home Town: San Diego, California

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Full Text Citations For Award of The Navy Cross - To U.S. Navy Personnel - World War II - (2,889 Awards) - Navy Cross Citations U.S. Navy - World War II..." WebSite: Home of Heros http://www.homeofheroes.com/ valor/ 1_Citations/ 03_wwii-nc/ nc_06wwii_navy.html [19NOV2007]

    BANGUST, JOSEPH

    Citation:

    The Navy Cross is presented to Joseph Bangust (3812689), Aviation Machinist's Mate First Class, U.S. Navy, for extraordinary heroism and distinguished service as waist gunner of an airplane in Patrol Squadron ONE HUNDRED ONE (VP-101), Patrol Wing TEN (Patwing-10), in action against enemy Japanese naval forces located near Jolo, in the Philippine Islands, on the morning of 27 December 1941. In the ensuing action, Japanese Zero fighters and anti-aircraft bursts filled the air around the harbor, but the U.S. Navy PBY-4 bombers made their approach, dropped their bombs and inflicted heavy damage upon several enemy war and merchant ships. Although he was wounded shortly after the approach was made, Aviation Machinist's Mate First Class Bangust remained at his station and continued to fire upon the Japanese Zero fighters until enemy bullets killed him at his post. His outstanding courage and determined skill were at all times inspiring and in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.

    Bureau of Naval Personnel Information Bulletin No. 304 (July 1942)
    Born: May 30, 1915 at Niles, Ohio
    Home Town: San Diego, California

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Full Text Citations For Award of The Navy Cross - To U.S. Navy Personnel - World War II - (2,889 Awards) - Navy Cross Citations U.S. Navy - World War II..." WebSite: Home of Heros http://www.homeofheroes.com/ valor/ 1_Citations/ 03_wwii-nc/nc_06wwii_navyH.html [19NOV2007]

    HASTINGS, BURDEN ROBERT

    Citation:

    The Navy Cross is presented to Burden Robert Hastings, Lieutenant, U.S. Navy, for extraordinary heroism and distinguished service as Commanding Officer and Pilot of an airplane in Patrol Squadron ONE HUNDRED ONE (VP-101), Patrol Wing TEN (CPW-10), in action against enemy Japanese naval forces located near Jolo, in the Philippine Islands, on the morning of 27 December 1941. Pressing home his attack in the face of overwhelming air and antiaircraft opposition, Lieutenant Hastings led his formation, maneuvering his bombers to pass clear of lower clouds until the objective was reached and they had dropped their bombs, inflicting heavy damage upon several enemy war and merchant ships. Lieutenant Hastings' outstanding courage, daring airmanship and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

    Bureau of Naval Personnel Information Bulletin No. 304 (July 1942)
    Home Town: Washington, D.C.

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VP-101 History ThumbnailCameraVP-101 PostCard "...6-23-1941..." WebSite: EBay http://cgi.ebay.com/1941-PATROL-SQUADRON-101-naval-cover- VP-101_W0QQitemZ160112094795QQihZ006QQcategoryZ139774QQssPageName ZWDVWQQrdZ1QQcmdZViewItem#ebayphotohosting [02MAY2007]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VP-101 History ThumbnailCameraVP-101 PostCard "...6-23-1941..." Contributed by John Lucas JohnLucas@netzero.com [02APR2004]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VP-101 History ThumbnailCameraVP-101 PostCard "...7-17-1941..." [07JAN2007]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VP-101 History ThumbnailCameraVP-101 PostCard "...7-17-1941...W II "1st Day Postal Service - Greeting from the Navy Mail Clerk Aboard"; Patriotic Cacheted Naval Cover; "Patrol Squadron 101" CDS; to Louie Bean, Anacostia, Washington, D.C; July 17, 1941..." WebSite: EBay http://cgi.ebay.com/ WW-II-1st-Day-Postal-Service-Greeting-from-the-Navy_W0QQitemZ200019217119QQihZ010QQcategoryZ684QQssPageNameZWDVWQQrdZ1QQcmdZViewItem [20AUG2006]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Office of the Chief of Naval Operations - Naval History Division Washington - USS Snyder (DE-745)..." WebSite: HyperWar http://www.ibiblio.org/hyperwar/USN/ships/dafs/DE/de745.html [16JAN2006]

    Russell Snyder--born on 29 October 1915 in Corbin, Ky.--enlisted in the United States Naval Reserve on 30 August 1937. After undergoing elimination flight training at Robertson, Mo., he was appointed an aviation cadet and received further flight training at Pensacola, Fla. He was appointed a naval aviator on 8 December 1938 and promoted to Ensign on 28 August 1939.

    Ensign Snyder was killed in action in December 1941, while attached to Patrol Squadron 101 in the Pacific.

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...This Day in Naval History - Dec. 10 Story Number: NNS011210-16 - Release Date: 12/10/2001 5:36:00 PM..." WebSite: Navy News http://www.news.navy.mil/search/display_history.asp?story_id=295 [11DEC2005]

    10MAY41 - A patrol bomber from VP-101 shoots down a Japanese zero fighter in first Navy air-to-air kill during World War II.

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...08DEC41 - Seaplane tender (destroyer) William B. Preston (AVD-7) is attacked by fighters and attack planes from Japanese carrier Ryujo in Davao Gulf, P.I.; William B. Preston escapes, but two PBYs (VP-101) she is tending are strafed and destroyed on the water..." WebSite: HyperWar http://www.ibiblio.org/hyperwar/USN/USN-Chron/USN-Chron-1941.html [15SEP2005]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...10DEC41 - While flying to safety during the raid on Cavite, Lieutenant Harmon T. Utter's PBY (VP-101) is attacked by three Japanese Mitsubishi A6M2 Type 0 carrier fighters (ZERO) (3rd Kokutai); Chief Boatswain Earl D. Payne, Utter's bow gunner, shoots down one, thus scoring the U.S. Navy's first verifiable air-to-air "kill" of a Japanese plane in the Pacific War. Utter, as a commander, will later coordinate the carrier air strikes that lead to the destruction of Japanese battleship Yamato (see 7 April 1945)..." WebSite: HyperWar http://www.ibiblio.org/hyperwar/USN/USN-Chron/USN-Chron-1941.html [15SEP2005]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...25DEC41 - Admiral Thomas C. Hart turns over all remaining naval forces in the Philippines to Rear Admiral Francis W. Rockwell (Commandant Sixteenth Naval District). After Japanese bombers destroy PBYs (VP-101 and VP-102) earmarked to transport him and his staff south, Hart sails in submarine Shark (SS-174) (held in readiness for that eventuality) to establish new Asiatic Fleet headquarters in Java (see 1 January 1942). During Japanese bombing of shipping in Manila Bay, submarine Sturgeon (SS-187) is straddled but is not damaged..." WebSite: HyperWar http://www.ibiblio.org/hyperwar/USN/USN-Chron/USN-Chron-1941.html [15SEP2005]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...27DEC41 - Six PBYs (VP-101) bomb Japanese shipping at Jolo, P.I. against heavy fighter opposition; four Catalinas are lost..." WebSite: HyperWar http://www.ibiblio.org/hyperwar/USN/USN-Chron/USN-Chron-1941.html [15SEP2005]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Hearings Before The Joint Committee On The Investigation Of The Pearl Harbor Attack - Congress Of The United States - Seventy-Ninth Congress...Squadrons mentioned: VP-11, VP-13, VP-14, VP-21, VP-22, VP-23, VP-24, VP-31, VP-32, VP-41, VP-42, VP-43, VP-44, VP-51, VP-52, VP-71, VP-72, VP-73, VP-74, VP-81, VP-82, VP-83, VP-84, VP-91, VP-92, VP-93, VP-94, VP-101, VP-102, CPW-1, CPW-2, CPW-3, CPW-4, CPW-5, CPW-7, CPW-8 and CPW-9..." WebSite: The public's library and digital archive http://www.ibiblio.org/pha/pha/misc/rainbow5.html [01APR2005]
    Get Adobe Reader
    Open VP History Adobe FileHearings Before The Joint Committee On the Investigation Of The Pearl Harbor Attack 333KB

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...VP-101 Squadron Awards..." Contributed by Mahlon K. Miller mkwsmiller@cox.net [23APR2001]

  • Presidential Unit Citation
    08 Dec 41 - 03 Mar 42

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Lest We Forget..." U. S. Naval Institute Proceedings January 2001..." WebSite: USNI http://www.usni.org

    Waiting for permission to post entire article.

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Crushed...crushed...crushed. Once again the PB-1W is ignored in Naval Aviation History. The PB-1W was a vital patrol aircraft which served the Navy between 1945 and 1956 in the following squadrons: VX-4, VW-1, VW-2, VPW-1, VP-51, VC-11, and VPB-101. Yet it is virtually ignored on this page and in most accounts of Naval aviation. It was vital in the development of land-based airborne radar and instrumental in the deployment of airborne-early warning. The PB-1W was also used for ASW through the late forties and early fifties. I think it's a shame that the hundreds (thousands?) of aviatiors and ground crew which kept these airplanes going are so often ignored. There is a book on the Navy B-17: "B-17 In Blue" by yours truly. Check out http://www.aerovintage.com/b17.htm..." Contributed by Scott Thompson SThompson@aerovintage.com


    Circa 1940

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...VP-29 is not the same as VPB-29. VPB-29 was the last squadron designation from VP-101. That squadron included VP-101 from the Philippines in 1940 plus VP-22, and VP-21 from NAS Pearl Harbor, Hawaii..." Contributed by Larry Katz papakatz@sbcglobal.net [18JUL99]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Why no mention of original VP-26 which was part of Patrol Wing TWO at Pearl and which went to Subic (Olongapo) in fall of 1940 and became second squadron (VP-102) of Patrol Wing TEN. VP-21 had come out year earlier and became VP-101 at Cavite. LT J. J. Hyland, USN, was Engineer Officer of VP-102. As Admiral, USN, and either CINCPAC or COM7thFLT he flew last flying boat war patrol in Viet-Nam. Deceased 25 Oct 1998. Both top notch pilot (he served 18 months as Admiral E. J. King's pilot during WWII and if he hadn't been good wouldn't have lasted a week) and fine officer - he was first OIC of USN detachment at Geraldton, Australia (north of Freemantle) in 1942 and my brother (AOM1c at the time) remembers him with respect and admiration..." Contributed by Allan LeBaron alebaron@HiWAAY.net [24JAN99]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "00DEC40--Patrol Wing 10 is established in Cavite, Philippines = with the arrival of VP-101..." http://www.halisp.net/listserv/pacwar/1314.html


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