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Circa 2017

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY:  Maritime Patrol Association Planeside Quarterly NewsletterCPRW-11 History "...CPRW-11 Sailors Visit Sonobuoy Manufacturer Sparton... Maritime Patrol Association Planeside Quarterly Newsletter - 2017: Issue 2..." WebSite: Maritime Patrol Association [25MAY2017]
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Circa 2015

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY:  Maritime Patrol Association Planeside Quarterly NewsletterCPRW-11 History "...CPRW-11 to Conduct Change of Command... Maritime Patrol Association Planeside Quarterly Newsletter - 2015: Issue 3..." WebSite: Maritime Patrol Association [29JUL2015]
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Circa 2014

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY:  Maritime Patrol Association Planeside Quarterly NewsletterCPRW-11 History "...Wing 11 Wardrooms Play for Squadron Pride... Maritime Patrol Association Planeside Quarterly Newsletter - 2014: Issue 4..." WebSite: Maritime Patrol Association [04NOV2014]
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HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...CPRW-11 (and VP-45) keeps media informed From Staff - Posted: March 26, 2014 - 7:14pm..." WebSite: JaxAirNews http://jaxairnews.jacksonville.com/ [28MAR2014]

Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing (CPRW) 11 Capt. Sean Liedman held flight line news conferences March 18 and 21 at NAS Jacksonville to update media on Malaysian Air Flight MH370.

“The latest P-8 Poseidon missions flown by VP-16 in Australia March 23 did not discover any new information regarding the whereabouts of Malaysian Air Flight MH370. The search was flown 1,500 miles south and west of Perth Australia; in the vicinity of where the previously reported satellite imagery indicated possible debris,” explained Liedman.

“The crew searched an area of 1,200 square miles, which is less than what they searched in their previous missions due to the fact they decreased the track spacing of the ladder search in order to increase the visual probability and protection of small objects in the water.”

“I anticipate they will continue to fly one mission per day until the mission is complete or we move on to the next phase of the operation. I would like to underscore that today’s results do not indicate mission failure, but rather indicate the daunting challenge of locating small objects in the vast expanse maritime domain,” Liedman added.

According to Liedman, this type of search operations is part of the VP-16 deployment cycle.

“VP-16 deployed with six P-8 Poseidons to Okinawa last December where they were postured to respond to incidents such as this. Immediately after the incident, about three weeks ago, they were tasked by the U.S. Navy 7th fleet commander to reposition the aircraft – first to Malaysia, and then to Perth, Australia – where they could execute operations in support of the southern corridor theory,” he said.

“The P-8 has the speed, range and endurance necessary to execute a search at a range of 1,500 miles from the nearest land.”

When asked to explain how the search was being conducted, he said, “Floating objects in the maritime domain move around significantly due to wind, current and wave action, which complicates the search. We will continue to search until the mission is complete or we move on to the next phase of the search till more information comes to light to refine our search area.

“It takes the airplane three hours to transit to on station and can remain on station, executing search operations for approximately three to four hours before it returns to the base in Perth.”

“Search operations will be conducted during daylight hours only due to the challenge of detecting small objects in the maritime domain. The crew will continue to fly one mission per day during day light hours.”

“VP-16 is executing operations in conjunction with allies and partners in the region. There has been reports that Australian P-3s and New Zealand P-3s are operating alongside VP-16s’ P-8 in the region. It truly is an international search effort,” Liedman stated.

When asked how many P-8s were actually deployed to assist with in search he said, “VP-16 has six P-8 Poseidon’s on deployment in Okinawa; they detached one P-8 to Perth Australia to participate in search operations.”

When asked about what other capabilities the aircraft had that could aid in the search he replied, “In addition to the range, speed and endurance that the Poseidon brings, it also has an integrated sensor suite with high definition sensors such as a radar that can detect small objects in the maritime domain. Additionally, it has an advanced communication suite that can transmit imagery from any of those sensors off board via satellite communication links to higher headquarters.”

Read more at Jacksonville.com: http://jaxairnews.jacksonville.com/military/jax-air-news/2014-03-26/story/cprw-11-keeps-media-informed#ixzz2xE9Dkp2B

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Circa 2013

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCamera130115-N-RE636-047 JACKSONVILLE, Fla. (Jan. 15, 2013) "...Capt. Eric Wiese, Commander of CPRW-11, and Cmdr. Molly Boron, commanding officer of VP-16, discuss the differences between the P-3C Orion and the Navy's newest aircraft, the P-8A Poseidon, with Florida U.S. Senator Marco Rubio and his aides. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Gulianna Dunn/Released)..." WebSite: NavyNews http://www.navy.mil/ [20JAN2013]


Circa 2012

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: Maritime Patrol Association Planeside Quarterly NewsletterCPRW-11 History "...CPRW-11 CAPTAIN WIESE Relieves CAPTAIN Wheeler... Maritime Patrol Association Planeside Quarterly Newsletter - 2012: Issue 2..." WebSite: Maritime Patrol Association [05JAN2013]
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HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCamera120920-N-YZ910-041 JACKSONVILLE, Fla. (Sept. 20, 2012) "...Lt. Josh Lowery, assigned to Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing (CPW) 11, left, answers questions about the P-8A Poseidon weapons system from Brig. Gen. Odber Argueta of Guatemala and Brig. Gen. Jorgen Jacobsen of Denmark during a foreign attache visit to Naval Air Station Jacksonville. (U.S. Navy photo by Clark Pierce/Released)..." WebSite: Navy NewsStand http://www.navy.mil/ [12OCT2012]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCamera120220-N-RE636-049 OKINAWA, Japan (Feb. 20, 2012) "...Capt. William Wheeler III, CPRW-11, holds an all-hands call with Sailors assigned to the War Eagles of VP-16. VP-16 is homeported in NAS Jacksonville, Florida, and is deployed to NAF Kadena, Okinawa, Japan, supporting Commander, U.S. 7th Fleet. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Gulianna Mandigo\Released)..." WebSite: NavyNews http://www.navy.mil/ [25FEB2012]


Circa 2011

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCamera110614-N-YZ910-001 JACKSONVILLE, Fla. (June 14, 2011) "...Rear Adm. Tim Alexander, center, Commander of Navy Region Southeast, and Capt. Trey Wheeler, right, CPRW-11, present a check for $326,732 to Dave Faraldo, director of Navy and Marine Corps Relief Society at NAS Jacksonville, Florida Jaguars mascot Jaxson de Ville looks on during the closeout ceremony of the 2011 fund drive for the relief society. (U.S. Navy photo by Kaylee LaRocque/Released) ..." WebSite: NavyNews http://www.navy.mil/ [27OCT2011]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCamera110104-N-6646M-005 JACKSONVILLE, Fla. (Jan. 4, 2011) "...Capt. William Wheeler III, CPRW-11, welcomes back Sailors assigned to the War Eagles of VP-16 during their "Back in the Saddle" briefing. VP-16 is starting the first 12-month inter-deployment readiness cycle for a maritime patrol squadron in six years. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Gulianna Mandigo/Released)..." WebSite: NavyNews http://www.navy.mil/ [27OCT2011]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCamera110104-N-6646M-029 JACKSONVILLE, Fla. (Jan. 4, 2011) "...Capt. William Wheeler III, CPRW-11, welcomes back Sailors assigned to the War Eagles of VP-16 during their "Back in the Saddle" briefing. VP-16 is starting the first 12-month inter-deployment readiness cycle for a maritime patrol squadron in six years. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Gulianna Mandigo/Released)..." WebSite: NavyNews http://www.navy.mil/ [27OCT2011]


Circa 2010

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Wing 11 Focused on Today's Mission, Tomorrow's Vision by Clark Pierce, Editor - Thursday, April 8, 2010..." WebSite: JaxAirNews http://jacksonville.com/ [09APR2010]

With a little more than eight months into his job as CPRW-11, Capt. Mark Turner reports that, "I've got one of the best jobs in our community, and it requires the best from my team every day."

He tells his people, "If you don't like change, you're in the wrong wing. Change is our constant companion - as evidenced by the recent dedication of Hangar 511 and the upcoming ground breaking for our P-8 Integrated Training Center."

In his previous job as P-3/P-8 requirements officer, Turner was the Chief of Naval Operations' (CNO) representative on all issues related to the P-3 Orion.

"At the Pentagon, you think in terms of six-year plans and the strategic future of the Navy's maritime patrol community. But here at the wing level, we have daily issues that demand attention," said Turner.

"One minute we're meeting with the P-8 fleet integration team - and the next minute, we're planning support for relief missions, anti-piracy operations and other deployments. It's a challenging assignment that I'm glad to have, especially in these turbulent times."

In the MPRF (Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Force) manning-training-equipping continuum, CPRW-11 customers are the forward commodores of the 5th and 6th Fleets, plus CTF-72 staff in Japan.

"We make sure our team delivers the best-trained product, so when squadrons deploy from NAS Jacksonville, Florida, our forward commodores and staff have no doubt they're receiving mission-ready assets," said Turner.

Since the BRAC (base realignment and closure commission) closure of NAS Brunswick, Maine, CPRW-11 added four VP squadrons - three straight-stick squadrons and one special projects squadron. Now, with a total of eight squadrons (seven active, one reserve), the pace of operations has doubled and CPRW-11 has added staff to ensure successful home cycles for the east coast VP squadrons at NAS Jacksonville, Florida.

"My charter, as commodore, is to take care of our people. I'm pleased to say that the Brunswick transition exceeded my expectations - because stable families and informed spouses enable our Sailors and junior officers to be properly focused. Wing 11 is charged with manning, training and equipping the squadrons as they go through their home cycle, in order to prepare them for their next deployment," said Turner.

One of the most significant events in recent MPRF history took place Dec. 15, 2007, when the Navy saw 25 percent of its P-3 Orion fleet grounded due to structural fatigue concerns. As P-3/P-8 requirements officer, Turner was part of the team who briefed the secretary of defense, secretary of the Navy and CNO on the impact of shutting down one-fourth of the P-3 inventory virtually overnight.

Turner explained, "That put a huge demand signal on Fleet Readiness Centers (FRC) and contractors. God bless FRC Southeast, because we threw an unprecedented amount of work at them with the P-3 'Red Stripe' recovery plan. At its inception, we had more than 15 P-3s down on the NAS Jacksonville, Florida flight line."

"After an end-to-end assessment, FRCSE enhanced their rework process to increase their output of rejuvenated P-3s. Now, we're down to about three Orions waiting for rework. Capt. Sohl and Cmdr. Buckler are premier supporters of our community."

"The spread of MPRF mission sets has only increased as our P-3 fleet has aged. From ISR support in 5th Fleet and broad-area ASW (anti-submarine warfare) operations in 7th Fleet to counter-piracy operations off the Horn of Africa and drug interdiction operations in the Caribbean, we call on our Sailors to be exceptional at a lot of things - and they continue to meet our expectations," said Turner.

As Red Stripe P-3s repopulate the NAS Jacksonville, Florida flight line, it means more assets for advanced training to create the best product going forward. Turner's focus is on pilot proficiency and core warfighting competency in ASW.

P-3 flight simulators also fall under the domain of CPRW-11.

"We're finishing the installation of a simulator from NAS Brunswick to support our increased number of P-3 squadrons. The next step in our simulation development is preparing for the new P-8 Poseidon - which will really change the way we train. On the P-3 Orion, we train 30 percent in simulators and 70 percent in the aircraft. With P-8, we'll flip the training process to 70 percent in 'high fidelity' simulation and 30 percent in the aircraft for touches and operational readiness.

"The concept is to reduce total operating costs of P-8 Poseidon - so the wave of the future is simulation. Just ask any parent who's raising kids in the X-box generation.

"Poseidon is truly a generational change for the Navy in terms of our people and our mission systems. While the P-3 has the MAD (magnetic anomaly detector) boom, P-8 will not - because that's like putting an 8-track sound system into a Lexus," he said.

Turner added that MPRF power projection and sea control in the future will involve a family of mission systems in platforms such as P-8 operating in concert with BAMS unmanned aerial vehicles.

"Whenever my schedule permits, I attend NFO winging ceremonies at VP-30, because I'm blown away by the focus and dedication exhibited by today's ensigns and jay-gees. These are the professionals who will lead the P-8 transition - not admirals and captains.

"That's why I'm constantly telling our JOs and maintainers that their number one priority is safety. As we prep for the new, more capable P-8, it's essential to control our enthusiasm and 'finish strong' as we exit the legacy P-3 platform," concluded Turner.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Haiti's Shattered Landscape: A View From Above - Navy crew sets out to capture images of a shattered landscape by Timothy J. Gibbons - Story updated at 1:31 AM on Monday, Jan. 25, 2010. Squadron Mentioned: CPRW-11, VP-8, VP-16 and VP-26..." WebSite: JaxAirNews http://jacksonville.com/ [25JAN2010]

ABOARD A U.S. MILITARY AIRCRAFT - Even from 12,500 feet in the air, even in black and white, the devastation in Haiti is unmistakable.

Crumbled buildings, toppled shipping containers, destroyed homes: The scenes of destruction scrolled across monitors aboard a Navy P-3 Orion on Saturday as the surveillance plane sculled slowly through the air and studied the damage beneath it.

It was the first time this particular crew from NAS Jacksonville, Florida handled this particular job, but the mission is one the P-3 community has embraced in the past two weeks.

Airplanes from CPRW-11, the NAS Jacksonville, Florida unit that oversees all the P-3s on the East Coast, have been providing details on the situation in Haiti since the day the earthquake struck. Within hours of the quake, a plane from squadron VP-26 - on deployment in El Salvador - was in the skies overhead, providing the first pictures of the destruction.

In the days following, squadrons VP-8 and VP-16 joined in the mission, with three planes a day heading to the scene to check out helicopter landing zones, survey roads and pinpoint spots that need help. What they see is transmitted to ships in the area and brought back on tape to be analyzed.

"We look for a pattern of life," said Cmdr. Anthony Corapi, commanding officer of VP-16, the squadron known as the War Eagles whose plane surveyed the area Saturday afternoon.

In turn, those images will be used by the military and nongovernmental organizations as they plan their response to the disaster.

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SCAN, CAPTURE, ASSIST

Getting those images is a somewhat different job than the typical P-3 mission, which usually involves tracking pirates in the Mediterranean, finding drug runners in the Caribbean or hunting for submarines anywhere they may lurk. In fact, even as the War Eagles document the devastation in Haiti, they're also preparing for a more typical deployment coming up in about four months.

But supporting Operation Unified Response in Haiti flows naturally out of the more routine jobs, Corapi said.

"The combat missions we train for lead to this," he said. "They teach us cooperation and how to think on our feet."

Those things are vital in the skies above Haiti, with civilian agencies, different branches of the military and a number of countries trying to work together.

When the War Eagles arrived over Haiti around 11 a.m. Saturday, the radio was filled with chatter, a welter of American and Haitian accents as ships and planes and forces on the ground talked to each other.

As the plane, code named Red Talon, began its patrol, Petty Office 2nd Class Nick Dimare, the aircraft's camera operator, worked to get the lay of the land, zooming in on a white speck far below that resolved into a sailboat and tagging the various U.S. ships in the area.

The War Eagles started the mission by checking out assigned areas that those in charge wanted to keep an eye on, from a jumble of shipping containers in the port to parts of downtown slowly being cleared of rubble.

The goal was to provide a big-picture view for the helicopters and planes flitting through the sky thousands of feet below the War Eagles, said Lt. Errol Youngborg, who was in charge of the plane.

"Hopefully we'll be able to provide the assistance they're asking for," he said.

In some ways, this mission is easier than those that are more combat focused, said Lt. Rebecca Johnson, who as the tactical officer coordinates everything going on, from telling the pilots where to take the plane to advising the camera operator what pictures are required. The focus during the beginning of the five hours the War Eagles would stay on station was broad documentation, providing a literal 10,000-foot view.

Throughout the day, the plane's navigator, Lt j.g. Rachel Ingram, captured snapshots from the image feed as the plane moved over land: A listing crane slumped in the harbor. Unscathed building standing incongruously in the midst of rubble. Tent cities filled with the displaced.

MISSION COMPLETE

Things turned a bit more dynamic in mid-afternoon as the aircraft carrier USS Carl Vinson began handing out new tasks: Determine the mood of some people a group of Marines down below are about to run into. Check out a soccer field to see if tents are being set up.

Dimare zoomed and paned, zeroing in on tiny details. "I can just pick stuff out," he said. "I've done this a lot."

The job wrapped up around 4 p.m., the War Eagles replaced by another P-3 who would patrol into the evening.

"I think it was a pretty good mission," said Lt. Cmdr. Jon Spore, the mission commander aboard the P-3. "We helped provide more intelligence."

As the plane winged its way home, the crew relaxed a bit, the busy part of the day over.

Somewhat incongruously, the 116-foot-long tube hurtling through the air miles off the ground features a sort of homey feel, a side effect, perhaps, of a crew used to spending 12 hours or more working together.

Multiple pilots and flight engineers - required by regulations on long flights - allows some of the crew to take brief breaks: Grab some food, use the solid-waste-not-encouraged toilet or sit down for a few hands of Spades and Rummy. It's a brief lull in the long day, which started with briefings around 5 a.m. and still isn't over for the crew when the plane breaks through low-hanging clouds and gently touches down at NAS Jacksonville, Florida around 7 p.m.

A long day, Spore said, but worth it.

It feels like it was successful," he said. "Talking to the others on the crew, we think we helped to do some good."

timothy.gibbons@jacksonville,com, (904) 359-4103

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraCPWR-11 History "...CPRW-11 Holds First ASW Competition - Thursday January 7, 2010...Squadrons Mentioned: VP-5, VP-8, VP-16 and VP-62..." WebSite: JaxAirNews http://www.jaxairnews.com/ [08JAN2010]


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