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HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: Squadron Logo [28AUG99]

UPDATE "...I am interested in buying this patch. Any help would be appreciated. Thanks...Michael Aldana mlaldana@world-net.net..." [28JUN2003]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: Squadron Logo [28AUG99]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VQ-2 Patch Thumbnail [14AUG99]

UPDATE "...I am interested in buying this patch. Any help would be appreciated. Thanks...Michael Aldana mlaldana@world-net.net..." [28JUN2003]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: P3 Logo [12MAR99]

UPDATE "...I am interested in buying this patch. Any help would be appreciated. Thanks...Michael Aldana mlaldana@world-net.net..." [28JUN2003]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: Squadron Logo [28AUG99]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: Squadron Logo [12MAR99]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: Patch ThumbnailCameraVQ-2 Patch Contributed by Tom Grannis grannis1@earthlink.net [21DEC2003]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...The P4M-1 Martin Mercator was designed primarily for antisubmarine warfare, and competed with the Lockheed P2V Neptune for Navy procurement in the mid-to-late 1940s. The aircraft first flew on 20 September 1946; the last of 21 aircraft bought by the Navy was delivered in September 1950. VP-21 got the first aircraft. The P4M originally was designed for a nine-man crew. Its propulsion was provided by two Pratt and Whitney R-4360s, producing 3,200 horsepower, and two Allison J-33s, 4,6000-pound-thrust engines. It had an operating range of 2,000 smiles and a ceiling of 17,000 feet. It could cruise at 150 knots or dash up to 340 knots with all four engines on line. The Q-configuration was installed in the P4M-1 that was delivered to the Patrol Unit/NavComUnit 32G in February/March 1951. The back-end installation was unsatisfactory, so work to modify the configuration commenced immediately. Four APR-4s and four APR-9s were installed - each with its own tuning unit and panoramic adaptor. An improved intercom system isolated the cockpit and forward stations from the operators and the supervising evaluator. The evaluator could talk to each or all of his operators and the pilot; the pilot could override and be heard by all crew members for flight safety. Each operator position also had a direction-finding capability and wire recorder. The evaluator had an SLA-1 pulse analyzer that could be switched to receive video and audio signals from any operator position. A camera mounted on the SLA-1 camera harness was solenoid-actuated by the first video signal pulse so that the visual record of an intercept could be achieved. This was an exceptionally useful tool in cases where the signals were of very short duration because it permitted later analysis. Frequency coverage was from 50 to 10,750. This configuration was incorporated in three additional P4M-1Qs, which arrived to replace all of the PB4Y-2s by June 1951. Lieutenant Robert L. Ashford, U. S. Naval Reserve, was the original designer. The configuration eventually served as the basis for the modification of the WV-2 and A-3B aircraft to a Q-configuration (WV-2Q/EC-121M/and EA-3B). These aircraft became operational in the Tactical Electronic Warfare Squadrons, VQ-1 and VQ-2, a few years later..." "Cold War Snooper" by R. C. M. Ottensmeyer, NAVAL HISTORY, United States Naval Institute April 1997, Page 40 Contributed by George Winter pbycat@bellsouth.net


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