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HistoryVP-40 HistoryHistory

Circa 2009

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCamera091124-N-9860Y-001 OAK HARBOR, Wash. (Nov. 24, 2009) "...Lt. Tom Barlow, from American Fork, Utah, assigned to the Fighting Marlins of Patrol Squadron (VP) 40, is greeted by his daughters during a homecoming for VP-40 at Naval Air Station Whidbey Island. VP-40 returned to Whidbey Island from a seven-month deployment supporting Operation Iraqi Freedom. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Tucker M. Yates/Released)..." WebSite: NavyNews http://www.navy.mil/ [19DEC2009]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Patrol Squadron Home For Holidays By MC3 Michael Jame - Thursday, December 3, 2009..." WebSite: NorthWest Navigator http://www.northwestnavigator.com/ [05DEC2009]

Many "Fighting Marlins" of Patrol Squadron (VP) 40 have an extra reason to be thankful this Thanksgiving. They are home from Iraq.

The first VP-40 airlift bringing home 105 Marlins, and one of their P-3 Orion aircraft with 16 on board arrived Nov. 24, representing the first wave to return after completing a seven-month deployment in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF). Marlins will continue flying the remaining aircraft home over the next two weeks.

VP-40 deployed to Iraq supporting Commander Task Force 57, providing vital intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance to Central Command troops and commanders.

During this global deployment, they sent crews to Sigonella, Italy under Commander, Task Force 67, supporting Operation Active Endeavor; to Kadena, Japan supporting 7th Fleet operations and detached crews to Bulgaria, Germany, France, Norway and Scotland, participating in various exercises.

"Everyone gains something from an experience like this; for some it's professional, for others it's a character building experience," said Command Master Chief (AW/SW) Maurace Clark. "These Sailors give it their all to get these planes off deck and accomplish the mission. Very few people have faced conditions like we've faced here in Iraq."

Over the course of the deployment, Sailors faced extreme weather conditions, reaching temperatures in excess of 130 degrees and blowing sand.

"Not even Sailors from Texas or Arizona have seen weather like this and for Northerners, they might as well be on the moon," said Clark.

During the deployment, VP-40 flew 4,000 flight hours and more than 400 combat sorties in support of OIF. The squadron also flew 120 events and 500 flight hours supporting 7th Fleet theater security objectives. The Marlins' Maintenance Department diagnosed and repaired 5,471 discrepancies, encompassing 12,091 man hours.

"With operational mission accomplishment as the centerpiece of each day, 24/7, for seven months, every Marlin did it right, did it proud and did it safe," said Cmdr. Michael McClintock, VP-40 commanding officer. "Our Sailors have operated in the most austere conditions, and I couldn't be more proud of the Marlins' performance."

Even while operating at an extremely vigorous operational tempo, personnel were still able to carry out essential training, qualifying 31 personnel in different flight crew positions and 43 personnel in essential maintenance positions. Training that will empower the next generation of Marlins to carry out its mission.

"We provide an essential piece of the intelligence picture to the Iraqi theater so that multi-national forces here can create an effective plan," said Chief Aviation Electrician's Mate (AW/NAC) Brett Edwards, VP-40 Operations leading chief petty officer. "Very few Navy personnel get to see this side of the Navy. It has been an extremely rewarding experience."

© 2009 Sound Publishing, Inc.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCamera091124-N-9860Y-001 OAK HARBOR, Wash. (Nov. 24, 2009) "...Lt. Tom Barlow, from American Fork, Utah, assigned to the Fighting Marlins of Patrol Squadron (VP) 40, is greeted by his daughters during a homecoming for VP-40 at Naval Air Station Whidbey Island. VP-40 returned to Whidbey Island from a seven-month deployment supporting Operation Iraqi Freedom. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Tucker M. Yates/Released)..." WebSite: NavyNews http://www.navy.mil/ [27NOV2009]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Whidbey Spouses Ensure Smooth Moves, Family Readiness - By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Elizabeth Acosta, Navy Public Affairs Support Element West, Det. Northwest - Story Number: NNS090720-14 - Release Date: 7/20/2009 11:02:00 PM..." WebSite: NavyNews http://www.navy.mil/ [22JUL2009]

OAK HARBOR, Wash. (NNS) -- The VP-40 Officer Spouses Club is using a new way to reach out to families transferring to the area and helping them adjust to Whidbey Island living.

The Umbrella, a more than 150-page guidebook, provides information for newcomers to the area, primarily Navy Sailors and their families, on activities, events and attractions in the local area.

"We were two Navy spouses new to the area looking for a comprehensive guide to the Whidbey area. We had bought Washington State guide books, but they only had two pages or so regarding our new home," said Kate Pennington.

So, Pennington said, she partnered with Alison Keating to lead a three-month process to develop the book.

The guidebook also mentions how to get around the area via unique transportation methods available and provides information on other unique opportunities associated with the area.

"We also explain about traveling between Canada and the U.S., how to use the ferry system, Seatac {Seattle-Tacoma) shuttles and other Whidbey 'insider tips,'" Pennington said.

According to Pennington, the idea was inspired by similar publications available to personnel stationed in Hawaii and Newport, R.I.

"Alison Keating and I spearheaded the book's creation after using similar ones in other Navy towns. We co-wrote the book and did much of the research together. There were many long phone calls and field trips involved to check out the places we were writing about," said Pennington.

Since its initial publication October 2008, the guide has sold more than 100 copies. An updated release of 100 more copies was concluded in April.

"Hopefully, "The Umbrella", will jump start their exploration of the Pacific Northwest and help them to enjoy their tour here more fully," said Pennington.

The guidebooks are available for sale at area book stores.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraVP-46 History "...Wing 10 Change of Command Season Wraps Up by LT(jg) Daniel MacCabe Wing 10 - Thursday, June 4, 2009 (Squadrons Mentioned: CPRW-10, VP-1, VP-40, VP-46, VQ-1 and VQ-2)..." WebSite: NorthWest Navigator http://www.northwestnavigator.com/ [05JUN2009]

Photograph Caption: Following VP-46's change of command ceremony May 22, four of the five new Patrol and Reconnaissance squadron commanding officers flank Capt. Ken Seliga, commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing 10. From left the new skippers are Cmdr. Brett Coffey, VQ-2; Cmdr. Mark Hamilton, VP-46; Cmdr. Michael Giannetti, VQ-1; and Cmdr. Mark Rudesill, VP-1. Not pictured is Cmdr. Michael McClintock, VP-40. Photograph by LT(jg) Daniel MacCabe

The Grey Knights of Patrol Squadron 46 celebrated their 73rd change of command May 22. After serving one year as commanding officer and guiding the squadron through a combat deployment in the 5th Fleet area of operations, Cmdr. Carlos Sardiello was relieved by Cmdr. Mark Hamilton.

For Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing 10, VP-46s change of command ended a very compressed turnover season that began May 1 with Patrol Squadron 40 "Fighting Marlins" changing hands as Cmdr. Michael McClintock relieved Christopher Saindon. VP-40 has since departed for a six-month deployment with 5th and 6th Fleets supporting Operation Iraqi Freedom, Operation Enduring Freedom and other European Command missions.

The following week, Fleet Air Reconnaissance Squadron 2 "Rangers" celebrated their leadership's turnover as Cmdr. Brett Coffey assumed command from Cmdr. Robert Pauley, May 7 and the Patrol Squadron 1 "Screaming Eagles" followed suit the next day with Cmdr. Mark Rudesill relieving Cmdr. Christopher Corgnati.

The season continued May 14 as the Fleet Air Reconnaissance Squadron 1 "World Watchers" held their change as Cmdr. Michael Giannetti took over for Cmdr. James Gibson.

"It is with a great sense of pride that we celebrate the end of each commanding officer's extraordinary level of commitment, sense of duty and superb leadership each brought to bear within the command during their tours," said Capt. Ken Seliga, Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing 10. "We look forward to the energy and leadership each new commanding officer will bring in the year ahead."

© 2009 Sound Publishing, Inc.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...VP-40 Commemorates Memorial Day in Iraq By MC3 Michael James VP-40 - Thursday, May 28, 2009..." WebSite: NorthWest Navigator http://www.northwestnavigator.com/ [29MAY2009]

Sailors, Airmen and Soldiers stationed at Ali Air Base in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF) gathered on Memorial Day to honor the memory of those fallen in defense of democracy and freedom.

Aviation System Warfare Operator 1st Class Randle Eason (NAC/AW) took part in the ceremony, along with service members from both the Army and Air Force. Eason is attached to Patrol Squadron 40 (VP-40), currently serving with Commander Task Group 57.18, providing patrol and reconnaissance support for OIF.

Eason, the VP-40 Sailor-of-the-Year, was selected to represent the command at the ceremony.

"To honor our heroes in this Area of Responsibility (AOR) with all of these services is a humbling experience," said Eason.

The day's observances included 228 service members standing guard in shifts for 19 hours in temperatures in excess of 100 degrees Fahrenheit. For many of those attending the service, the retreat ceremony was a very personal and emotional experience.

"Here, is where your fallen heroes are. This is the perfect place to observe Memorial Day," said Chief Master Sergeant Gerald Delebraeu of the 407th Air Expeditionary Group. "For some people, Memorial Day is an excuse to take a vacation, but we are using it for what it is meant to be; a day of remembrance and mourning."

"The Fighting Marlins" departed NAS Whidbey Island, Washington in early May for a scheduled deployment.

© 2009 Sound Publishing, Inc.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCamera090429-N-2102J-003 WHIDBEY ISLAND, Wash. (April 29, 2009) "...Cmdr. Christopher Saindon is splashed by water thrown by members of his squadron, Patrol Squadron 40, as he departs the flight line for the final time before turning over command of VP-40 in a change-of-command ceremony May 1st. VP-40 is scheduled to deploy to Iraq in May. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Michael James/Released)..." WebSite: Navy NewsStand http://www.navy.mil/ [15MAY2009]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Wing 10 Honors best, Brightest By MC2 Elizabeth Acosta - NPASE Det. NW - Thursday, April 30, 2009 (Squadrons Mentioned: CPRW-10, VP-1, VP-40, VP-46, VP-69, VQ-1 and VQ-2)..." WebSite: NorthWest Navigator http://www.northwestnavigator.com/ [01MAY2009]

Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing (CPRW) 10 held its annual ceremony to recognize the contributions of their Sailors, April 23.

This is the 14th year CPRW-10 and the Oak Harbor community honored the significant accomplishments of Wing 10 Sailors.

"Each of you earned your command's nomination because of your selfless sacrifice and commitment. Your work has made us a better wing and I hope each of you finds pride in your many contributions," Capt. Ken Seliga, commodore of CPRW-10.

The CPRW Sea Sailor of the Year (SOY) was Personnel Specialist 1st Class (AW) Gladys Willis, of VP-1, who was also recognized as the Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Group (CPRG) Pacific Sea SOY in January, and Junior Sailor of the year was Naval Aircrewman Operator 2nd Class (AW/NAC) Mark Hill of VP-1. The Shore Sailor of the Year was Aviation Electronics Technician 1st Class (AW) Danyall Benavides, of CPRW-10, whose contributions also led to recognition by CPRG as their Pacific Shore SOY, and Junior Sailor of the Year was Information Systems Technician 3rd Class Blake Hausman, of CPRW-10. The Reserve Sailor of the year was Naval Aircrewman Operator 1st Class (AW/NAC) Stephen Daley, of VP-69.

"It's pretty big; It feels really good to get this award. It was a very honorable experience" said Benavides.

Gifts were presented by Jim Slowik, Mayor of Oak Harbor, Patrick Travenetti, director, Embry Riddle Aeronautical University, Marjean Knokey, Columbia College, Barbara Bockman, Chapman University, Mike Sevy, USAA Insurance Company, Kim Braylens and Robin King, of Navy Federal Credit Union, to further recognize the contributions these Sailors make.

The Battle Efficiency award was presented to VQ-2, the Commander Naval Air Pacific Isbell Trophy, VP-1, and the Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Aviation Safety award, VQ-1. Also honored at the ceremony was the Aviator of the Year, Lt. Ronald Rumfelt, of VP-40, and Flight crew of the Year, Combat Aircrew 2, of VP-46.

"As we congratulate the winners of each category this morning, I ask that you take a moment to appreciate the momentous commitment and sacrifices our Sailors made during the past year to ensure we were prepared for, and executed, each mission we were asked to complete. And may you especially recall the commitment to excellence of our award winners today- those who went above and beyond to earn the endorsement of their respective command," said Seliga.

© 2009 Sound Publishing, Inc.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraVP-40 History "...Fighting Marlins Take Part In Under Sea Warfare Eexercise by LT(jg) Jason Dietz VP-40 - Thursday, March 26, 2009 (Squadrons Mentioned: VP-5, VP-8, VP-9, VP-40, VP-47 and maintainers from CMO-2, CMO-10, CMO-11 and CPRW-2..." WebSite: Northwest Navigator http://www.northwestnavigator.com/ [27MAR2009]

Photograph Caption: The Fighting Marlins of VP-40 recently participated in take part in an under sea warfare exercise with the USS John C. Stennis Strike Group off the coast of Okinawa.The Fighting Marlins of VP-40 recently took part in the USS John C. Stennis Strike Group Under Sea Warfare Exercise (USWEX) out of NAF Kadena, Okinawa, Japan.

One of the largest exercises in recent years, the exercise was conducted overseas in the 7th Fleet area of responsibility. The event took place off the coast of Okinawa and included participants from the Stennis strike group, forward deployed naval forces from CTF-70, maritime patrol forces from CTF-72, three surface ships, three submarines as well as three P-3 aircrews from the Japanese Maritime Self-Defense Force (JMSDF).

The Fighting Marlins, along with VP-5, VP-8, VP-9, VP-47 and maintainers from CMO-2, CMO-10 and CMO-11, formed a combined detachment under the leadership of Commander, CPRW-2, encompassing sixteen combat aircrews and eight P-3s. They provided continuous 24-hour operational support to the Strike Group throughout the exercise and stood ready alerts able to react to any potential real world events.

The exercise spanned over five days of around-the-clock operations including several weeks of joint planning with the Strike Group, who was en-route to their six-month Western Pacific (WESTPAC) deployment.

With an average of three planes airborne at any given time during the exercise, the maintainers tirelessly worked to have aircraft available for real world events including the numerous scheduled exercise events. As expected, they answered the challenge, launching fifty-one sorties of the fifty-two scheduled over the course of the exercise.

For the Combat aircrews from VP-40 the exercise provided invaluable "real world" experience in a dynamic and fast paced environment.

The crews successfully balanced the high operational demands and minimum turn-around times without missing a beat. In the condensed time span of the exercise, the detachment amassed just over three hundred flight hours.

The four Marlin aircrews flew over one hundred hours during sixteen events, which accounted for one-third of the total flight time. They were directly responsible for seven of the fifteen simulated submarine kills by maritime patrol forces during the exercise, highlighting the ASW operational capabilities of the VP Community.

The success of the strike group laid the foundation for future major exercises within 7th Fleet.

© 2009 Sound Publishing, Inc.


Circa 2008

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraAircrew Wings "...Wings Oof Gold Awarded To New Aircrew by LT Phillip Sautter - VP-30 Public Affairs Officer (VP-1, VP-4, VP-5, VP-8, VP-10, VP-16, VP-26, VP-30, VP-16, VP-40 and VP-46. ) - Thursday, October 9, 2008..." WebSite: JaxAirNews http://adserver1.harvestadsdepot.com/jaxairnews/ss/jaxairnews/ [09OCT2008]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "... Sailors Support Local Community While Deployed to El Salvador - Story Number: NNS080805-15 - Release Date: 8/5/2008 3:53:00 PM - From Forward Operating Location Comalapa Public Affairs..." WebSite: NAVY.MIL http://www.news.navy.mil/ [29AUG2008]

COMALAPA, El Salvador (NNS) -- Personnel and Sailors deployed to Forward Operating Location (FOL), with VP-40, Sea Operations Detachment and CMO-10, volunteered their time and skills during a local community relations project July 25.

Volunteers worked together to build two houses in nearby San Rafael and Los Angeles. The Sailors mixed sand, rocks and cement together, and then transported it to the foundation of certain parts of the houses.

U.S. Coast Guard Sailors work seven days a week on their 30-day deployment at the FOL, but Coast Guard Avionics Electrical Technician 2nd Class Monica Gibson said even though today was her day off, there was no other place she would rather be than assisting a family in need.

"This is an amazing experience. Being able to lend a hand fills the heart. Knowing someone less fortunate and from a few hours of hard work on our part can make a difference in someone's lives, you just can't get a better feeling than that," said Gibson.

Operations Specialist 3rd Class Tasha Newton from Sea Operations Detachment also spent time at the event.

"Helping out here in El Salvador is such a big blessing to me. Giving back to those less fortunate is an experience unable to be described with words. I'm very thankful and happy to be here to lift the spirits of those in need of a helping hand in their community. I couldn't possibly thank of a better way to spend my days. I've made great friends with the people here, and all I can do is smile," said Newton.

Chief Yeoman (SW/AW) Byron L. Shambley is the FOL Comalapa, administrative officer and very active in the command community relations program.

"I enjoy helping people and always look forward in participating in these Habitat for Humanity Projects," Shambley said.

FOL Comalapa's primary mission is to provide logistical support to aerial counter-drug aircraft and their crews from U.S. military and government law enforcement organizations and to promote Theater Security Cooperation (TSC) like community relations projects in the El Salvador area. TSC also includes military-to-military interaction and bilateral training opportunities.

The FOL is under operational control of U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command (NAVSO)/U.S. 4th Fleet. As the Navy component commander for U.S. Southern Command, NAVSO/4th Fleet oversees maritime operations throughout Latin America, including exercises and deployments, counter illicit trafficking support, and TSC events.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...FOL Comalapa Personnel Serve Salvadoran Community - Story Number: NNS080520-30 - Release Date: 5/20/2008 4:39:00 PM - From Forward Operating Location Comalapa Public Affairs. (VP-4, VP-40 and CMO-2)..." WebSite: NavyNews http://www.navy.mil/ [18JUN2008]

COMALAPA, El Salvador (NNS) -- Service members and PAE contractors from Forward Operating Location (FOL) Comalapa, completed two community relations projects May 16-17, to build partner relations with their host country.

The service members were from VP-4, VP-40 and CMO-2.

On May 16, FOL Comalapa personnel worked together to raise a water tower to provide water pressure for the El Salamar Elementary and Middle School in Comalapa. The project will benefit the 500 students who attend the school. This particular place was chosen because the students are not able to use the lavatory in the schoolhouse.

The event kicked off with the students singing the El Salvadoran National Anthem and entertaining service members with various dances. FOL Comalapa commanding officer Cmdr. Charles Groves and PAE program manager Jose Peralta presented the school a $200 check to fund the project. The service members did the work to give back to the El Salvadoran community and improve relations between the U.S. and El Salvador.

"It was great to help out the school with obtaining the supplies they needed to have proper lavatories in the building," said Chief Yeoman (SW/AW) Byron L. Shambley, FOL Comalapa administrative officer. "Seeing the kids smiling faces lets all of us know how much they appreciated the assistance. It felt great to make a difference in the community and solidifying even more the great relationship that we have worked so hard to establish."

The following day, FOL Comalapa service members built a home for a family in need in San Luis Talpa, a town near the FOL. The project was part of the Habitat for Humanity organization, which helps build new homes for families in need. The service members, who spent four weeks building the house, were grateful for the opportunity to help a needy family.

"This was a great humanitarian project to help a family desperately in need of a house and to enhance our relationship with the local community," said Shambley. "Knowing that a family is in need and having the opportunity to provide some manual labor was gratifying for us all."

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...New Skipper Takes Reigns of VP-40 - By Lt.j.g David Sparks - Friday, May 2, 2008..." WebSite: NavyNews http://www.navy.mil/ [03MAY2008]

The command of the Fighting Marlins of VP-40 changed May 2 during a ceremony as Cmdr. Mark Stevens relinquished command to Cmdr. Christopher Saindon, the squadron's executive officer for the past year.

The squadron, joined by the guest of honor, Capt. Kenneth Seliga, Commander, CPRW-10, as well as family, friends, and other distinguished visitors at NAS Whidbey Island, Washington.

The completion of the ceremony marked the end of a highly successful tour for Cmdr. Stevens, who took command March 30, 2007. Under his command, VP-40 achieved the significant milestone of 40 years and 260,000 mishap-free flight hours.

Additionally, VP-40 completed one of the most successful deployments in P-3 history flying over 10,000 hours and completing over 1,500 missions while being deployed to 5th Fleet, based primarily out of Al Udeid, Qatar. This achievement was honored by VP-40 being named the winner of the 2007 Battle E award, CNO Safety "S" and nominated for the Arleigh Burke Trophy. Additionally, the command achieved a plus-one year DUI free milestone.

Saindon spoke highly of his predecessor as commanding officer.

"Serving under Skipper Stevens during this past year has truly been an honor," Saindon said. "He was a true deck-plate leader who always remained focused on the mission. I would like to thank him personally for his friendship, mentorship and guidance."

Stevens will report to the Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense where he will assume the duties as assistant for maritime defense.

As he prepares to start a new chapter in his career, Stevens praised the Sailors of VP-40.

"Serving with this phenomenal group of officers, chiefs and Sailors has been one of the most rewarding experiences of my career," he said. "The team had a record setting deployment in one the harshest environments in the world. Their hallmarks were professional execution, pride in job well done, making things better and taking care of each other. I'm extremely proud to have served with all of them."

Saindon assumes command of VP-40 in the midst of a busy inter-deployment readiness period. During the next year as the squadron prepares for their next deployment, Fighting Marlins combat aircrews will conduct numerous detachments around the globe in support of both operational and training mission objectives.

Cmdr. Michael "Bossman" McClintock steps in as VP-40 executive officer.

© 2008 Sound Publishing, Inc.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: Wings of Gold Thumbnail "...Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Group - RADM Brian C. Prindle, USN. Wings of Gold - Spring 2008 - Page 6-8. (Squadrons/Wings Referenced: VP-62, VP-69, VQ-1, VQ-2, VPU-1, VPU-2, VP-1, VP-4, VP-5, VP-8, VP-9, VP-10, VP-16, VP-26, VP-30, VP-40, VP-45, VP-46, VP-47, CPRW-2, CPRW-5, CPRW-10 and CPRW-11..." WebSite: Association of Naval Aviation http://www.anahq.org/index.htm [23APR2008]
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HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...NAS Whidbey Island Sailors Clean Flood Damage at State Park - Story Number: NNS080123-13 - Release Date: 1/23/2008 2:37:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Tucker M. Yates, Fleet Public Affairs Center, Det. Northwest..." WebSite: NavyNews http://www.navy.mil/ [26FEB2008]

CHEHALIS, Wash. (NNS) -- Sailors from Naval Air Station (NAS) Whidbey Island participated in a clean up of flood damage at Rainbow Falls State Park, Jan. 21.

The clean up was in response to the flooding of Lewis County in December. The event was held as part of the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Day of Service hosted by Washington Conservation Corps branch of AmeriCorps. Approximately 200 people participated, including 40 AmeriCorps members and 25 Sailors.

"The (Dr. Martin Luther) King Day of Service was started about 12 years ago as a prominent way to honor Dr. King by serving and volunteering to make a difference," said Bill Basl, director of State Commission for National Service. "It's kind of a different national holiday in that perspective because it's the one holiday we're asking people not to just relax, but to make a contribution to the community."

The event began with volunteers being divided into groups and given a section of the 139-acre park on which to concentrate. Participants spent the day moving brush, digging up and moving camp equipment and clearing trails. A lunch of hot dogs, chips, cookies, and beverages was provided by Washington State Parks, Southwest Region along with a portion donated by a local business with enough food for 240 people.

"I thought this would be something nice to do for the state of Washington, and we'll help (the park) to be able to open on time so people can come here and see what it's all about," said Culinary Specialist 3rd Class Jessica Keseloff, of VP-40. "Today made a big difference because there were a lot of bushes and mud wrapped around trees. The trees were falling, the tables were tipped over and wedged in trees, and you had to beat them with a rock to get the bushes off. It was a lot of hard work."

Aviation Warfare Systems Operator 1st Class (AW) Chad Lewis, NAS Whidbey Island Search and Rescue (SAR), was one of the members of the SAR crews who flew to Lewis County during flood support and rescue operations. He was surprised to see how far the area had come since the time of the flooding.

"It's obvious people have put a lot of work into this. I thought it'd be much worse than it is right now; I saw people's houses literally floating in this area so I'm really impressed with what the people have done here," said Lewis. "The work these people are doing is invaluable; state and national parks are some of the most important resources we possess to a lot of people. You have to have places like this and you have to take care of them."

Not only was the day about nature conservation, but also about historical conservation as the Park and Ranger Station are more than 70 years old, originally built in 1935 along the banks of the Chehalis River by the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC), a program started by President Franklin D. Roosevelt. Basl felt that the day's events were an appropriate representation of Roosevelt's ideals.

"President Roosevelt talked about this idea of service and started the first big service organization in the world with the CCC. Today we have people representing national military service and national civilian service restoring this park once again, several years later," said Basl.

During National Volunteer Week, the third week in April, Basl is hoping to organize another major park cleanup so it will be able to open back up to the public around Memorial Day.


Circa 2007

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "... VP-40 Returns to Whidbey Island - Story Number: NNS071214-05 - Release Date: 12/14/2007 1:17:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Tucker M. Yates, Fleet Public Affairs Center, Det. Northwest..." WebSite: Navy News http://www.navy.mil/ search/ display.asp? story_id=33867 [09FEB2007]

OAK HARBOR, Wash. (NNS) -- Patrol Squadron (VP) 40 returned home Nov. 29 from a deployment to the Persian Gulf and the Horn of Africa.

The "Fighting Marlins" were deployed in May for more than six months in support of Operations Iraqi Freedom and Enduring Freedom as well as conducting anti-piracy operations.

"We did a lot of anti-piracy flights out of Djibouti supporting Joint Task Force Horn of Africa, near Somalia," said Cmdr. Chris Saindon, VP-40 executive officer. "We also did a number of flights over Iraq, supporting multinational coalition forces doing counter-improvised explosive device operations and eye in the sky coverage for forces on the ground."

The contributions made by VP-40 were well received by the forces they were serving.

The crew of 140 conducted approximately 1,600 sorties and logged an unprecedented 10,500 flight hours using P-3 Orion aircraft.

"As long as I can remember, and I've been in the VP community for about 18 years, that's the most flight hours executed on a single deployment," said Saindon.

There were 16 new parents welcomed home by their newborn sons and daughters. Lt. Cmdr. James Keating was present for the birth of his first two children, but missed the latest addition to the family by 10 days.

"It's definitely different for me and it's kind of hard, but there are really no words that describe seeing your children for the first time," said Keating.

Cmdr. Mark Stevens, VP-40 commanding officer, was thankful of his crew for the effort they put forth during the deployment.

"We worked extremely hard out there providing time-critical intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance to support 5th Fleet commanders," said Stevens. "I thank you for all the hard work. I couldn't have done it without you."

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Family time is the best gift of all - Dec 26 2007 - By Lt. Alex Santis - Fighting Marlins reporter..." WebSite: Whidbey NewsTimes http://www.whidbeynewstimes.com/ portals-code/ list.cgi?paper=84&cat=23&id=1129388&more=0 [27DEC2007]

The last group of returning Fighting Marlins touched down at NAS Whidbey earlier this month, as the men and women of Patrol Squadron 40 were reunited with their loved ones.

The squadron left NAS Whidbey on May 26 in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom. Designated as Commander Task Group 57.2 while forward-deployed, they logged over 10,000 flight hours and conducted almost 1,600 sorties over six months with assistance from augment aircraft and aircrews from nine sister squadrons.

The unprecedented 10,000-hour milestone is an achievement never before attained by a single Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Task Group. Missions flown provided surveillance and reconnaissance to Commander U.S. Central Command, U.S. Fifth Fleet and coalition ground forces in Iraq.

VP-40 also supported Joint Task Force Horn of Africa, conducting anti-piracy and routine maritime patrol operations in the Gulf of Aden and off the East Coast of Africa.

Exercises includes Talisman Saber in Australia, Valiant Shield in Guam and multiple Japanese Maritime Self Defense Force Cooperative Operations in the Seventh Fleet.

A number of short-duration detachments were made to Masirah, Oman, the Seychelles, Diego Garcia, Sigonella, Sicily, Australia, Japan, South Korea, the Philippines and Guam.

The 400 men and women of VP-40 wish to thank a number of sister squadrons that provided aircraft and aircrews. Just as important is the solid support network at home that helped make this deployment a success.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCamera071123-N-8719O-170 CAMP LEMONIER, Djibouti (Nov. 23, 2007) "..."That 70's Show" star Wilmer Valderrama, who made his character "Fez" a household name, signs an autograph for Aviation Warfare Systems Operator 2nd Class (AW/SW) Amy Bellesheim, assigned to Patrol Squadron (VP) 40, during the USO show at Camp Lemonier. Valderrama, world-famous comedian Russell Peters and model-actress Mayra Veronica joined Vice Chairman of the Joint Chief of Staff Marine Gen. James Cartwright on a Thanksgiving tour of military installations to entertain the troops. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class John Osborne (RELEASED)..." WebSite: NavyNews http://www.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=53160 [11DEC2007]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VP-40 History ThumbnailCameraLCDR Jim Keating "...Marlins return home - By Lt. Gary A. Santis - VP-40 reporter - Friday, December 7, 2007..." WebSite: Northwest Navigator http://www.northwestnavigator.com/ index.php/ navigator/ whidbey/ marlins_return_home/ [07DEC2007]

Photograph Caption: Lt. Cmdr. Jim Keating, Patrol Squadron (VP) 40, the "Fighting Marlins," is welcomed home to Naval Air Station Whidbey Island by his sons, Aidan and Jackson, and his wife, Allison. VP-40 has been deployed since May of this year in support of Operations Iraqi Freedom and Enduring Freedom as well as conducting anti-piracy operations in the Arabian Gulf.

The "Fighting Marlins" of Patrol Squadron 40 (VP) 40 are home!

The first airlift arrived at NAS Whidbey Island, Nov. 29, as excited Marlins reunited with their families and loved ones. They had just wrapped up a demanding but successful six-month deployment to the Arabian Gulf and Iraq.

Since leaving on Deployment May 26 in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF) and Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF), their achievements have been truly unprecedented. Designated as Commander Task Group 57.2 while forward deployed, the Fighting Marlins logged over 10,000 flight hours and conducted almost 1,600 sorties over the course of six months with the assistance of augment aircraft and aircrews from nine sister VP squadrons.

The 10,000-hour milestone is an achievement never before attained by a single Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Task Group. The missions flown by Task Group 57.2 provided surveillance and reconnaissance to Commander U.S. Central Command, U.S. Fifth Fleet and Coalition ground forces in Iraq.

In addition to supporting OIF and OEF, VP-40 also supported Joint Task Force Horn of Africa, conducting anti-piracy and routine maritime patrol operations in the Gulf of Aden and off the east coast of Africa. Marlins also sharpened their skills by participating in a number of high-profile exercises including Talisman Saber in Australia, Valiant Shield in Guam and multiple Japanese Maritime Self Defense Force Cooperative Operations in Seventh Fleet.

Although the primary deployment sites were in the Arabian Gulf, the Marlins also conducted numerous short-duration detachments to Masirah, Oman, the Seychelles, Diego Garcia, Sigonella Sicily, Australia, Japan, South Korea, the Philippines and Guam.

These impressive operational achievements were possible not only through the hard work and dedication of the 400 Sailors aboard VP-40, but also through the efforts of numerous sister VP squadrons that provided aircraft and aircrews, and through the solid support network at home, including the Marlin Ombudsmen and families who also pulled extra duty.

© 2007 Sound Publishing, Inc.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VP-40 History ThumbnailCamera071029-N-5359K-003 TALLIL, Iraq (Oct. 29, 2007) "...Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. Gary Roughead talks with members of VP-40 and VP-47 at Forward Operating Base (FOB) Tallil. FOB Tallil was one of several stops Roughead made during his weeklong visit to locations throughout the U.S. Central Command area of responsibility, including Bahrain, Kuwait and Iraq. Roughead discussed the recently released maritime strategy and CNO guidance, and thanked squadron members for their contributions in support of U.S. and coalition efforts in maritime security operations. U.S. Navy photo by Cmdr. Pamela Kunze (RELEASED)..." WebSite: NavyNews http://www.navy.mil/ view_single.asp?id=52297 [03NOV2007]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VP-40 History ThumbnailCameraLCDR Jim Keating "...Marlins return home - By Lt. Gary A. Santis - VP-40 reporter - Friday, December 7, 2007..." WebSite: Northwest Navigator http://www.northwestnavigator.com/ index.php/ navigator/ whidbey/ marlins_return_home/ [07DEC2007]

Photograph Caption: Lt. Cmdr. Jim Keating, Patrol Squadron (VP) 40, the "Fighting Marlins," is welcomed home to Naval Air Station Whidbey Island by his sons, Aidan and Jackson, and his wife, Allison. VP-40 has been deployed since May of this year in support of Operations Iraqi Freedom and Enduring Freedom as well as conducting anti-piracy operations in the Arabian Gulf.

The "Fighting Marlins" of Patrol Squadron 40 (VP) 40 are home!

The first airlift arrived at NAS Whidbey Island, Nov. 29, as excited Marlins reunited with their families and loved ones. They had just wrapped up a demanding but successful six-month deployment to the Arabian Gulf and Iraq.

Since leaving on Deployment May 26 in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF) and Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF), their achievements have been truly unprecedented. Designated as Commander Task Group 57.2 while forward deployed, the Fighting Marlins logged over 10,000 flight hours and conducted almost 1,600 sorties over the course of six months with the assistance of augment aircraft and aircrews from nine sister VP squadrons.

The 10,000-hour milestone is an achievement never before attained by a single Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Task Group. The missions flown by Task Group 57.2 provided surveillance and reconnaissance to Commander U.S. Central Command, U.S. Fifth Fleet and Coalition ground forces in Iraq.

In addition to supporting OIF and OEF, VP-40 also supported Joint Task Force Horn of Africa, conducting anti-piracy and routine maritime patrol operations in the Gulf of Aden and off the east coast of Africa. Marlins also sharpened their skills by participating in a number of high-profile exercises including Talisman Saber in Australia, Valiant Shield in Guam and multiple Japanese Maritime Self Defense Force Cooperative Operations in Seventh Fleet.

Although the primary deployment sites were in the Arabian Gulf, the Marlins also conducted numerous short-duration detachments to Masirah, Oman, the Seychelles, Diego Garcia, Sigonella Sicily, Australia, Japan, South Korea, the Philippines and Guam.

These impressive operational achievements were possible not only through the hard work and dedication of the 400 Sailors aboard VP-40, but also through the efforts of numerous sister VP squadrons that provided aircraft and aircrews, and through the solid support network at home, including the Marlin Ombudsmen and families who also pulled extra duty.

© 2007 Sound Publishing, Inc.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VP-8 Patch ThumbnailCameraOperation Enduring Freedom "...VP-5, VP-8, VP-10, VP-26, VP-40 and VP-45 - Deployment PATRON Al Udeid Air Base, Qatar Dec 2006 - Jun 2007..." Contributed by LT Donald W. Hartsell donald.hartsell@navy.mil [03MAY2007]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VP-40 History ThumbnailCameraVP-40 Photo "...Four Fighting Marlins selected to chief - By Lt. Gary Santis - VP-40 reporter - Friday, October 12, 2007..." WebSite: Northwest Navigator http://www.northwestnavigator.com/ index.php/ navigator/ whidbey/ four_fighting_marlins_selected_to_chief/ [12OCT2007]

Photograph Caption: Patrol Squadron (VP) 40 Commanding Officer Mark Stevens, center, stands with newly selected chief petty officers, from left, Chief Aviation Warfare Systems Operator (AW/NAC) Mark Phillips, Chief Aviation Structural Mechanic (AW) David Anderson, Chief Aviation Structural Mechanic (AW) Michael Blankenship and Chief Aviation Machinist Mate (AW) Andrew Adams.

To be a chief petty officer is to be part of an elite organization, rich in tradition and tasked with leading the young enlisted Sailors while mentoring junior officers as well. Four Sailors from Patrol Squadron (VP) 40 were recently selected to the rank of chief petty officer.

Selected were: Chief Aviation Warfare Systems Operator (AW/NAC) Mark Phillips, Chief Aviation Structural Mechanic (AW) David Anderson, Chief Aviation Structural Mechanic (AW) Michael Blankenship and Chief Aviation Machinist Mate (AW) Andrew Adams.

"It brought tears to my eyes when I found out I made it. I can't put it into words," Anderson said. "As a chief, you're in a position to help the next Sailor come up through the ranks. I owe a lot to my family for hanging in there with me for the last seven years and the Sailors I have worked with. Because of them, I am here today."

Blankenship agreed. "I've been wishing for it, hoping for it, working hard for it. None of us would be here without the people working under us and for our peers who have helped guide us to this point."

© 2007 Sound Publishing, Inc.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...VP-40 Command Structure..." WebSite: VP-40 http://www.naswi.navy.mil/vp-40/base.html/ [03MAY2007]

History ThumbnailCameraCO - CDR Mark L. Stevens Commander Mark Stevens attended the University of Arizona on a Navy ROTC scholarship and earned a Bachelor of Science in Aeronautical Engineering in May 1989. He was commissioned and reported to Naval Aviation Schools Command to begin instruction toward becoming a Naval Flight Officer (NFO).

He earned his "Wings of Gold" in June 1990 and reported to Patrol Squadron THIRTY ONE, NAS Moffett Field, California for fleet replacement training in the P-3C aircraft. In March 1991 he reported to his first operational squadron, Patrol Squadron FIFTY. After completing a deployment to Adak, Alaska the "Blue Dragons" were decommissioned and he was transferred to Patrol Squadron FORTY. He joined them on a multi-site, deployment in June 1993 to Adak, Alaska, Key West, FL and Panama. He served as Weapons Training Officer, NFO Training Officer and NFO NATOPS Officer. During his tenure the "Fighting Marlins" were awarded Arnold J. Isbell Trophy for Tactical Anti-Submarine Warfare Excellence and two consecutive Battle "E" Ribbons for Squadron Excellence. In January 1995 he reported to Patrol Squadron THIRTY, NAS Jacksonville, Florida for Fleet Replacement Squadron Instructor duty. During this tour he served as the Legal Officer, Maintenance Admin Officer, P-3 Fleet NATOPS Evaluator and NFO Training Officer. In November 1997, he reported to the USS JOHN C. STENNIS (CVN 74) home ported in Norfolk, Virginia where he served as the Assistant Navigator. The USS JOHN C. STENNIS maiden deployment was highlighted by an around the world and homeport change to San Diego, CA. He conducted two deployments to the Arabian Gulf in support of Operation SOUTHERN WATCH and enforcement of United Nations sanctions against Iraq. The John C. Stennis was awarded with a Navy Unit Commendation and Battle ‘E'. In August 2000, he reported to Patrol Squadron ONE, NAS Whidbey Island, Washington where he has served as the "Screaming Eagles" C4I Officer, Training Officer and Operations Officer. He conducted two deployments, one to SEVENTH Fleet and the other to FIFTH Fleet in support of Operations ENDURING FREEDOM and SOUTHERN WATCH. In November 2002 he reported the OPNAV staff in the Pentagon as the Assistant P-3 and Multi-mission Maritime Aircraft Requirements Officer. He was responsible for the planning, accounting and management of Maritime Patrol Aircraft mission systems, airframes and associated weapon systems. In August 2004 he reported to the National War College, Washington, DC where he earned a Masters Degree in National Security Strategy and Policy in June 2004.

Commander Stevens wears the Meritorious Service Medal, Navy Commendation Medal (three awards), Navy Achievement Medal, National Defense Service Medal (two awards), Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal, Global War on Terrorism Expeditionary Medal, Global War on Terrorism Service Medal, Expert Pistol Medal, and numerous other awards.

History ThumbnailCameraXO - CDR Christopher M. Saindon Commander Saindon attended the University of Central Florida where he earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in Psychology in August 1989. While attending college, he also attained qualification as an FAA licensed pilot.

He entered the naval service and reported to Aviation Officer Candidate School as a Naval Aviator Candidate in November 1989. After receiving his commission in April 1990, he completed flight training at NAS Whiting, Florida and NAS Corpus Christi, Texas and earned his "Wings of Gold" in September 1991.

Upon completing the FRS at Patrol Squadron THIRTY-ONE, NAS Moffett Field California, he joined Patrol Squadron FORTY-SIX in June 1992. While assigned to VP-46 he completed a deployment to Misawa, Japan and a deployment to Diego Garcia, B.I.O.T. During this tour he qualified as Primary NATOPS Instructor Pilot and Mission Commander, and served as Personnel Officer, Aviation Safety Officer and Pilot NATOPS Officer.

In March 1996, he reported to Patrol Squadron THIRTY for the FRS IUT. During his tour as an FRS Instructor Pilot he served as Command Security Manager, Aviation Safety Officer, Assistant Pilot Training Officer, and IUT Instructor Pilot. He also served as FLEET NATOPS Pilot Evaluator, conducting unit evaluations at each MPRA homeport location and various special mission squadrons.

In September 1999 he reported aboard USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) for duties as Operations Administration Officer. While aboard JFK he completed numerous underway periods, a Mediterranean/Arabian Gulf deployment, and attained qualification as Officer of the Deck (OOD) underway, General Quarters OOD, and Command Duty Officer.

In April 2002, he reported to Patrol Squadron FORTY-SIX, Naval Air Station Whidbey Island, for his Department Head tour where he served as Safety/NATOPS Officer, Training Officer, and Operations Officer. During the squadron's 2002-2003 FIFTH FLEET deployment, he served as Masirah, Oman, Detachment Officer in Charge and Mission Commander, Combat Aircrew SIX and flew over 250 hours and 25 combat sorties in direct support OIF and OEF.

Upon completion of his tour in VP-46, he reported to Naval Personnel Command, Millington, Tennessee, as the CV/CVN Placement Officer. As CV/CVN Placement, he ensured proper manning and distribution of ship's company officers for the Navy's aircraft carrier fleet.

CDR Saindon's next assignment was to Naval War College, Newport, Rhode Island, where he earned a Masters Degree in National Security Strategy and Policy in November 2006.

His personal awards include the Air Medal (Strike Flight), Five Navy Commendation Medals (one with Combat Distinguishing Device), the Navy Achievement Medal, and numerous other unit and service awards.

History ThumbnailCameraCMDCM(SW) - Robert P. Cooley Robert Paul graduated high school in May 1977. After graduation he enlisted in the United States Navy in May 1978, and attended boot camp in San Diego, California.

After boot camp Seaman Cooley attended Enlisted Basic Submarine School in Groton, Connecticut and then Submarine Sonar Technician "A" School in San Diego, California and was promoted to Petty Officer Third Class in December of 1978.

Petty Officer Cooley then reported to USS WOODROW WILSON (SSBN 624)(BLUE), home ported in Charleston, South Carolina, in January of 1979 where he Qualified in Submarines and completed two Strategic Deterrent Patrols and was advanced to Petty Officer Second Class.

Petty Officer Cooley then returned to the Fleet Anti Submarine Warfare Training Center in San Diego, California where he attended Basic Electricity and Electronics School and Submarine Special Purpose Maintenance School.

In June of 1980 Petty Officer Cooley reported to USS HENRY L. STIMSON (SSBN 655)(GOLD), home ported in Charleston, South Carolina. While onboard he completed numerous Strategic Deterrent Patrols, a two-year overhaul period in Newport News, Virginia, a Demonstration and Shakedown Operation and was advanced to Petty Officer First Class in June 1984.

In February of 1985 Petty Officer Cooley then reported to the Submarine Maintenance Monitoring and Support Detachment at Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, Georgia where he collected and trend evaluated data on vital submarine systems and conducted emergent troubleshooting and repairs on sonar systems of submarines assigned to Submarine Squadron Sixteen.

In May 1988 Petty Officer Cooley returned to USS HENRY L. STIMSON (SSBN 655)(GOLD) as Sonar Division Leading Petty Officer. While onboard he was promoted to Chief Petty Officer in September 1989.

In October 1989 Chief Petty Officer Cooley reported to USS JOHN C. CALHOUN (SSBN 630)(GOLD) home ported in Charleston, South Carolina. While there he served as Sonar division Leading Chief Petty Officer, Weapons Department Leading Chief Petty Officer, Command Drug and Alcohol Program Advisor and Command Career Counselor. During his tour onboard USS JOHN C. CALHOUN was awarded the COMSUBLANT Silver Anchor Award for retention and the Submarine Squadron Sixteen Battle "E". In April 1993 he was promoted to Senior Chief Petty Officer.

In September 1993 he reported to Fleet Technical Support Center, Detachment Kings Bay, Georgia as the Certification/Inspection Department Head.

In June 1996 Senior Chief Cooley reported to USS WEST VIRGINIA (SSBN 736)(GOLD) as Weapons Department Leading Chief Petty Officer and Sonar Division Leading Chief Petty Officer. While onboard he completed his twentieth Strategic Deterrent Patrol and was awarded the Gold Patrol Pin and completed certification as Chief of the Boat.

In May 1998 Senior Chief Cooley attended the Senior Enlisted Academy enroute to the USS FLORIDA (SSBN 728)(BLUE) where he served as Chief of the Boat and was subsequently advanced to Master Chief Petty Officer. During his tour USS FLORIDA (BLUE) was awarded the Squadron Sixteen Battle "E", the SRATCOM Omaha Trophy, the Submarine Group Ten Command Excellence Award, Best Trident (2 years), the Captain's Cup (two years) and numerous other awards.

On 10 May 2001 Master Chief Cooley reported to Enlisted Placement Management Center, New Orleans, Louisiana as the Command Master Chief.

Master Chief Cooley's awards include the Navy Meritorious Service Medal, the Navy and Marine Corp Commendation Medal (2 awards), the Navy and Marine Corp Achievement Medal (2 awards), the National Defense Medal, the Expert Pistol Medal, Gold Strategic Deterrent Patrol Pin and various unit and service ribbons.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraPhoto by YN3 Rebecca Williams "...Wing 10 sweats with stars - By Lt.j.g. Evan Larsen - Wing 10 reporter - Friday, April 6, 2007..." WebSite: Northwest Navigator http://www.northwestnavigator.com/index.php/ navigator/whidbey/ wing_10_sweats_with_stars/ [06APR2007]

Photograph Caption: From left, fitness instructor Carol Sele, Capt. Eric Kaniut, Commodore David Taylor, and Rear Adm. Brian Prindle, commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Group workout in the base gym.

Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Group, Rear Adm. Brian Prindle, visited Wing 10 last week to address his squadrons during a formal anniversary dinner, All-Hands calls and the VP-40 change of command.

During his visit to NAS Whidbey Island, Washington, he spent some time with the Wing 10 staff physically training at the base gym and fitness center. Wing 10's regular command Physical Training is a 2007 initiative from Commodore David Taylor, with the goal of fostering a command fitness climate.

How did Aviation Warfare Specialist 1st Class Bruce Miranda feel about working out with the admiral? "I was excited to see the admiral and happy that he had a chance to observe our teamwork in action," Miranda said.

Prindle was also guest of honor for the Grey Knight's 75th anniversary dinner. As their former commanding officer, he was delighted to preside over the event and recognize VP-46 as the 2006 Pacific Fleet Battle Efficiency Maritime Patrol squadron.

The admiral was also guest speaker at VP-40s change of command. The Fighting Marlins expertly hosted this event where Cmdr. Stevens took the torch from Cmdr. David Cutter. Stevens' year of command promises to be an exciting one.

Finally, Prindle spent some time addressing the Wing 10 Sailors' concerns about the ongoing transition in the maritime patrol and reconnaissance community towards a consolidated maintenance organization. He was able to provide clarity for all hands in regards to career paths and the benefits of having a new aircraft platform, the P-8A Poseidon multi-mission maritime aircraft.

© 2007 Sound Publishing, Inc.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraCmdr. Mark Stevens "...Stevens takes command of VP-40 - By Lt.j.g. Paul Hatfield - Fighting Marlins reporter - Friday, March 30, 2007..." WebSite: Northwest Navigator http://www.northwestnavigator.com/ index.php/navigator/whidbey/ stevens_takes_command_of_vp_40/ [31MAR2007]

The Fighting Marlins of VP-40 will hold change of command ceremony, March 30, as Cmdr. Mark Stevens relieves Cmdr. David Cutter.

Cutter led the Fighting Marlins through a very successful Fleet Response Plan surge and Inter Deployment Readiness Cycle. The Fighting Marlins achieved a grade of outstanding on their recent Operational Readiness Exercise. They also surpassed 250,000 hours mishap-free and flew over 700 hours in support Operation Iraqi Freedom.

Cutter was awarded the Navy Meritorious Service Medal for his accomplishments as commanding officer. He took command of VP-40 on April 14, 2006.

He will report to Commander Patrol and Reconnaissance Force Fifth Fleet in Bahrain, as officer in charge Task Force 57 Forward.

Stevens' last assignment was as VP-40 executive officer.

He has served at NAS Whidbey Island, Washington two other times in his career—in 1993 with VP-40 and with VP-1 in 2000.

© 2007 Sound Publishing, Inc.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraAW1 (AW/NAC) Matthew Robinson "...Wing 10 selects year's top Sailors - By Lt.j.g. Evan Larsen - CPRW-10 reporter - Friday, January 26, 2007. (CPRW-10, VP-1, VP-40, VP-46, VP-69, VQ-1 and VQ-2 menioned)..." WebSite: Northwest Navigator http://www.northwestnavigator.com/ index.php/navigator/whidbey/ wing_10_selects_years_top_sailors/ [01FEB2007]

Photograph Caption: AW1 (AW/NAC) Matthew Robinson is seen on patrol in Iraq during Individual Augmentation duty.

Aviation Warfare Systems Operator 1st Class (AW/NAC) Matthew Robinson was recognized, Jan. 19, by Commodore David Taylor as the 2006 CPRW-10, Shore Sailor of the Year.

His selection came as a result of his tremendous professionalism and steadfast sacrifice exerted during a 300-day Individual Augmentation while supporting the U.S. Army's 13th Sustainment Command in Iraq. As a member of the Joint Crew Composite Squadron One, and aligned with ground combat troops, he utilized his electronic warfare expertise to develop training and maintenance programs for ground forces which mitigated the radio-controlled improvised electronic device threat.

While conducting a routine ground combat patrol, he demonstrated uncommon valor during an attack on his patrol by stabilizing the wounded and preparing a landing zone for a medical evacuation helicopter.

Additionally, he showed the initiative to continue the patrol and search for secondary IEDs, resulting in a Meritorious Service Medal awarded from the Brigade's Commanding General.

Aviation Ordnanceman 1st Class (AW/NAC) Robert Parish of Patrol Squadron 69 (VP-69) received top honors as CPRW-10 Senior Sea Sailor of the Year for 2006.

A consummate expert and extraordinary leader, his enthusiasm, professionalism and dedication to his shipmates' career advancement and education resulted in his selection as the Sea Sailor of the Year.

One of only five full system Quality Assurance Representatives, he proved invaluable during a number of engine changes and the quality inspection of countless work center repairs which directly contributed to the high level of operational success achieved by the six operational squadrons assigned to CPRW-10.

The award for CPRW-10 Shore Junior Sailor of the Year went to Aviation Warfare Specialist 2nd Class (NAC) Carey Langley of CPRW-10.

Her expertise proved crucial in supporting 36 forward-deployed aircrews, as a result of her keen analysis from over 260 missions. As a leader in her field, Langley's attention-to-detail led to critical enhancements in our national security.

CPRW-10 Junior Sea Sailor of the Year honors went to Avionics Electrician Mate 2nd Class (AW) Justin Leetham, currently serving in VP-46. Leetham recently returned from deployment with VP-46 in which he proved to be an exceptional leader.

He demonstrated honesty, integrity and an absolute dedication to duty. While at VP-46, his actions increased aircraft availability that executed 220 combat sorties and over 2,000 mishap-free flight hours in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom.

Oak Harbor Mayor Pro-Tem Danny Paggao, along with several local business and educational organizations, took time to pay homage at all the Sailors of CPRW-10.

As in the past, they provided gifts to recognize the winners and participate in recognition of the finest examples the Navy has to offer.

Every command in CPRW-10 had their senior and junior Sailors of the Year present for the presentation ceremony. These included;

-- VP-1 Senior Sailor of the Year, PS1(AW) Jared Zdrojowy; Junior Sailor of the Year, AW2(AW) Michael Headings;

-- VP-40 Senior Sailor of the Year, AM1(AW) David Anderson; Junior Sailor of the Year, AM2(AW) Matthew Vitello;

-- VP-46 Senior Sailor of the Year, AW1(AW) Gamorro Cameron; Junior Sailor of the Year, AE2(AW) Justin Leetham;

-- VP-69 Senior Sailor of the Year, AO1 (AW/NAC) Robert Parish; Junior Sailor of the Year, AT2(AW/NAC) David A. Smith; Selected Reserve PR1 (AW) Mark Wilde;

-- VQ-1 Senior Sailor of the Year, AM1 (AW) Luigi Giugliano; Junior Sailor of the Year, YN2(AW) Nicholas Hulse;

-- VQ-2 Senior Sailor of the Year, AM1(AW) John Bouquio; Junior Sailor of the Year, AT2 (AW/NAC) Peter Benninger;

-- Mobile Operations Command and Control Center Golf Senior Sailor of the Year, ET1(SW) William Lewis, Junior Sailor of the Year, ET2 Colleen Colver; and

-- CPRW-10 Shore Sailor of the Year, AW1 (AW/NAC) Matthew Robinson; Junior Sailor of the Year AW2 (NAC) Carey Langley.

© 2007 Sound Publishing, Inc.


Circa 2006

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraPhoto by LT(jg) Evan Larsen "...Multi-mission aircraft trailer stops here - By Lt.j.g. Evan Larsen - CPRW-10 Reporter - Friday, September 22, 2006. (VP-40 and CPRW-10 menioned)..." WebSite: Northwest Navigator http://www.northwestnavigator.com/ index.php/ navigator/ whidbey/ multi_mission_aircraft_trailer_stops_here/ [22SEP2006]

Photograph Caption: AT3 Adrian Pineiro flies the MMA simulator.

Aircrew and families alike got a chance to check out the future of Maritime Patrol Aviation Sept. 1 when Boeing Corp. brought a trailer to NAS Whidbey Island, Washington that had a fully interactive simulator with a working flight station and tactical stations from the new P-8A Multi-Mission Aircraft.

The trailer has been touring all over the country to give people a chance to see what's coming down the pipe.

The P-8A MMA will be a variation of the Boeing 737 which will include technological advances in all of the mission systems currently in the P-3.

The first P-8As are scheduled to begin entering fleet squadrons in 2011.

VP-40s Avionics Technician 3rd Class Adrian Pineiro was one of the many people to tour the trailer. He got to try his hand at flying the new MMA while he was there.

"It was pretty high tech, and it seemed pretty easy to use," Pineiro said.

CPRW-10 hosted MMA representatives from NAVAIR and Boeing who gave several briefs while they were here. CPRW-10 Weapons Training Instructor, Lt. Kevin Johnston, helped coordinate the visit and the scheduling of the tours.

The NAVAIR representatives commented on how they "were impressed with the amount of support they received from their hosts at CPRW-10."

This was the last of 13 stops for the MMA trailer. It started in Brunswick, Maine, and then made a long cross-country trip before finishing at NAS Whidbey Island, Washington.

© 2006 Sound Publishing, Inc.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraPhoto by Lt. Larry Rosenthal "...Adventure on the high seas attract the Navy's best at camp - By Lt. Larry Rosenthal - Special to Navigator - Friday, August 10, 2006..." WebSite: Northwest Navigator http://www.northwestnavigator.com/ index.php/ navigator/ whidbey/adventure_on_the_high_seas_attract_the_navys_best_at_camp/ [11AUG2006]

Photograph Caption: AT2 John Peterson is under siege by Webelo Scouts at Camp Casey Pool.

"Ahoy" bellowed Captain Black Beard (AZ1 Corey Baker of VP-40) as he welcomed more than 75 Oak Harbor and Coupeville Cub Scouts and their adult leaders on a muggy Monday morning at the gang plank of one of the best Cub Scout Day Camps in the Mount Baker Council. Scout leaders and volunteers spent many months and hundreds of hours in preparation for the week-long day camp that ran July 17 to 21 at Coupeville Elementary School.

After a hearty morning of sea stories and shipboard songs the pirates of Oak Harbor and Coupeville Cub Scout Packs shipped off and participated in such activities as archery and BB gun safety, wood working, arts and crafts, citizenship, communication, outdoor cooking, flag ceremonies, flag etiquette, map and compass, knot tying, field trips, flag football, physical fitness, swimming, conservation and a black powder demonstration.

Scouts worked all week on rank requirements and then prepared a raw Pirate Egg for the annual walking the plank ceremony from 60 feet above the ground. Egg after egg walked the plank and fell to their fate at the cheers from family and friends. The week ended Friday with temperatures in the 80s and the long anticipated Water War looming on the horizon. The Scouts prepared for the fight as they loaded their water cannons and headed to battle. The war was initiated when the Island County Fire Department drove onto the battlefield and hurled thousands of gallons of water toward the Scouts.

NAS Whidbey Island, Washington was well represented at Scout camp, with 11 full time active duty volunteers at camp. Without such Navy support, the camp would not have been a success. The Sailors held key positions at day camp and were constantly told how professional and great they were in teaching the Scouts the safe and right way to do the many tasks before them that week.

These Sailors are to be commended for their work with the Cub Scouts: AZ1 Corey Baker, VP-40; ATCS Steven Dixon, FASO; AME2 Orlin Anderson, AIMD; ATC (Select) Jacob Wedekind, VAQ-129; CE1 Donald Labrie, NOPF; ET1 Joseph Vigil, NOPF; SK2 Jason Garcia, VAQ-129; HM2 Sean Valdez, NHOH; AT2 John Peterson, AIMD; AT1 Eric Johnson, VAQ-138; AT3 Ahmad Ford, AIMD.

Special thanks also goes out to BU1 Troy Hunt, BU2 Nicholas Rees, EM3 Ryan Traphagan, HT2 David Schrier, EM2 Allen Hodges, CM1 Christian Beltramo, CM3 Benjamin Deshepper, CM3 Neal Bowen, CM3 Ryan Mason and CMCN Nathan Breen from the Seabees at EODMU-11. Without their help, Scouts and leaders would not have had tents set up to work in and be sheltered from the elements.

© 2006 Sound Publishing, Inc.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...VP-40 flies in Valiant Shield - By Daniel Aranda III - Fighting Marlins reporter - Friday, August 10, 2006..." WebSite: Northwest Navigator http://www.northwestnavigator.com/index.php/navigator/whidbey/vp_40_flies_in_valiant_shield/ [11AUG2006]

The Fighting Marlins Combat Air Crew Two (CAC-2) detached from NAS Whidbey for two weeks in June to take advantage of the anti-submarine warfare training opportunities available during recent Valiant Shield exercise which took place in the Western Pacific.

Valiant Shield, the largest Pacific military exercise since World War II, was held off the coast of Guam.

Twenty-eight naval vessels, including three carrier strike groups, 300 aircraft and approximately 20,000 service members from the Navy, Army, Air Force, Marine Corps and Coast Guard participated in the exercise. The event also comprised a multitude of countries in attendance including China, Australia, Japan, India, Singapore, Republic of Korea and Russia, showcasing American war-fighting capabilities to friend and foe alike.

Additionally, the exercise afforded VP-40 the opportunity to work closely with the Carrier Strike Group in a coordinated hunt for opposing force submarines. According to Lt. Glenn Pierce, "Valiant Shield was an amazing opportunity to operate in a dynamic environment, with the three Carrier Strike Groups."

Despite a tough operational schedule, CAC-2 also took time to enjoy the beauty of the Pacific. The crews hiked to the summit of historic Mt. Suribachi and explored the beaches of Iwo Jima. While on the historic island, Marlins observed the sunken remains of ships and landing craft, rusting gun emplacements and unexploded ordinance scattered around Invasion Beach; stark reminders of a battle back in February of 1945.

They filled small jars with the black sand from Invasion Beach to commemorate their solemn visit.

The Valiant Shield exercise was a major accomplishment, demonstrating the power projection capability of the U.S. Armed Forces in the region. The crew was provided unparalleled joint training and the opportunity to see the history of the region up close.

© 2006 Sound Publishing, Inc.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraPhoto by MC2 Lewis Hunsaker "...VP-40 awarded Battle ‘E' - By Lt.j.g. Daniel Aranda III - Fighting Marlins reporter - Friday, July 21, 2006..." WebSite: Northwest Navigator http://www.northwestnavigator.com/ index.php/ navigator/ whidbey/ vp_40_awarded_battle_e/ [22JUL2006]

Photograph Caption: Lt. Bonnie Niggeman, Chief Aviation Electrician's Mate C. Cody Allen, Aviation Electronic Technician 1st Class Albert Smith and Yeomen Michael Belasco receive the Battle 'E' Award.

VP-40 recently received the Battle Efficiency Award for performance during their 2005 7th Fleet deployment.

The award was presented by Capt. John Dziminowicz, commodore of Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing 10.

Representing the hard work and professionalism of the Fighting Marlins for this award were Lt. Bonnie Niggeman, Chief Aviation Electrician's Mate C. Cody Allen, Aviation Electronic Technician 1st Class Albert Smith and Yeomen Michael Belasco.

The Fighting Marlins proved to be the most combat effective squadron in Wing 10, executing over 1,200 sorties totaling 5,500 flight hours during their six months in theater. This total was added to over 248,000 mishap free flight hours, spanning some 38 years of squadron history.

Twelve combat air crews were fully trained in airborne acoustic intelligence, extended echo ranging and standoff land attack missile-expanded response to name just a few of their advanced qualifications.

Besides the standard anti-submarine warfare mission, VP-40 broke ground with multiple pioneering operations with other communities, both inside and out of the Navy.

VP-40 aggressively tackled P-3/EP-3 joint operations, increasing the U.S. Navy's ability to locate and identify targets of interest, further solidifying the P-3/EP-3 interoperability and cooperation.

The Marlins also worked with F/A-18s developing cooperative tactics in the joint environment.

VP-40 also worked with other nations, tracking submarines with both the Indian and Australian Navies in joint operations, which directly strengthened cooperation and mutual respect between key allies.

Hard work, attention to detail and dedication to safety from each Fighting Marlin directly resulted in the efficient and safe execution of many complex operations. Allen, who served as a flight line coordinator and branch chief for the Aviation Electronics work center, is an example of Fighting Marlin spirit.

His leadership averted a potential catastrophic mishap due a major malfunction in a generator and the navigation system on one aircraft. He also coordinated all vehicles for the Kadena detachment personnel and liaised with housing on personnel and room issues.

Belasco was critical in the Admin Department, assuring all orders and logistics for the numerous detachments were handled expeditiously and accurately. His efforts ensured smooth detachments to every detachment site in the area of operation.

These accomplishments underscore the core values of the United States Navy and the Fighting Marlins. Motivated and dedicated, the Sailors of VP-40 continue to set the standard for others to follow.

© 2006 Sound Publishing, Inc.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraU.S. Navy Photo "...Fighting Marlins host Japanese allies - By Daniel Aranda III - VP-40 Fighting Marlins reporter - Friday, July 7, 2006..." WebSite: Northwest Navigator http://www.northwestnavigator.com/ index.php/ navigator/ whidbey/ fighting_marlins_host_japanese_allies/ [07JUL2006]

Photograph Caption: The visiting Japanese aircrew discuss tactics.

"Join the Navy, see the world" is one of the most iconic recruiting phrases of the U.S. Navy, fostering images of foreign port calls at exotic destinations around the globe.

Recently, the Pacific Northwest became a port call itself, as Patrol Squadron 40 (VP-40) hosted a contingent from the Japanese Maritime Self Defense Force.

The complement of eighty JMSDF (Japanese Navy) service members, 30 officers and 50 enlisted Sailors, came from the Japanese Patrol Squadrons VP-1 and VP-7 based out of Kanoya, Japan.

After a brief stop in Hawaii to participate in the RIMPAC 2006 exercise, a large multi-national exercise fostering interoperability among America's allies along the Pacific Rim nations, the first of four Japanese P-3Cs landed at NAS Whidbey Island, Washington Thursday. VP-40s Commanding Officer, Cmdr. David Cutter, was on hand to welcome JMSDF VP Det. 41s Commanding Officer, Capt. Makoto Sato, and his detachment to the Pacific Northwest.

After a quick welcome reception with pizza and refreshments, the newly arrived visitors departed for their first evening in Washington State. Over the weekend, Japanese guests enjoyed many local attractions including time out on the greens for golf, shopping trips to the local outlet mall, tours of the Everett Boeing facilities, even attending a baseball game as the Mariners swept the Giants at Seattle's Safeco Field.

Monday, the flying portion of the visit began with a joint USN/JMSDF exercise wherein American and Japanese P-3s collaborated in a simulated Anti-Submarine Warfare scenario, practicing coordinated ASW prosecution and combined on-station operations. Over the following days, four American and four Japanese crews gained invaluable joint operating experience and increased tactical proficiency while they operated off the coasts of Washington and Oregon. Guests also toured the base, met with NAS Commanding Officer, Capt. Syd Abernethy, and Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing 10 Commodore, Capt. John Dziminowicz.

Following an extremely productive week of American/Japanese naval aviation cooperation, the Fighting Marlins hosted a Sayonara (Japanese for "Goodbye") Party at the Whidbey Island Chief Petty Officers' Club for the Japanese aviators to bid a temporary farewell to their fellow warriors from one of America's staunchest and most valued allies.

After an extremely successful week of joint training and cultural exchange, both squadrons are looking forward to VP-40 upcoming Western Pacific deployment to Japan and the 7th Fleet area of responsibility as an invaluable opportunity to further refine each nation's war-fighting capabilities.

© 2006 Sound Publishing, Inc.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Mishap-Free Milestones..." WebSite: Naval Safety Center http://www.safetycenter.navy.mil/media/approach/issues/mayjun06/Mishap-Free_Milestones.htm [26JUN2006]

VP-40
39 years
249,000 hours

VP-47
33 years
190,000 hours

VAW-124
13 years
24,800 hours

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraPhoto by PH2 Lewis Hunsaker "...Another milestone for Marlins - By Lt.j.g. Blake Whetstone - VP-40 - Friday, May 5, 2006..." WebSite: Northwest Navigator http://www.northwestnavigator.com/ index.php/ navigator/ whidbey/ another_milestone_for_marlins/ [06MAY2006]

Photograph Caption: Chief Aviation Ordnanceman Stephen Day checks a MK-54 Torpedo loaded in the bomb bay of a P3-C Orion.

In typical fashion, the Fighting Marlins of Patrol Squadron Forty, Pacific Fleet 2005 Battle Efficiency winners, executed another Naval Air Station Whidbey Island Patrol Squadron first.

The Fighting Marlins completed four, high profile, Torpedo Exercises April 20. The evolution began the day prior with the Marlins loading torpedoes and building buoy loads throughout the night and the maintenance department ensuring that the planes were ready to launch the following morning.

Overcoming numerous obstacles, including swapping planes for maintenance and turning the first airplane around for the last event, combat aircrews 2, 3, 8 and 11 were able to accomplish their mission. The flights were flown on the Nanoose Range, just west of Vancouver, Canada. To get on station, the aircrews had to battle through poor weather and low ceilings. Once on-station the area was crowded with seaplanes and intermittent fog, which posed a constant threat to the safety of flight.

"During the flight there was a plane crossing our nose as another was about to cross behind us," said Patrol Plane Pilot, Lt.j.g. Wayne Lewis II.

Altogether, the four combat aircrews dropped a total of 6 MK-54 torpedoes. The MK54 has been co-developed by Raytheon Integrated Defense Systems and the U.S. Navy. It is the next generation anti-submarine warfare weapon deployed from surface ships, helicopters and fixed wing aircraft to attack underwater targets.

This exercise is the first time that a patrol squadron from Whidbey Island has conducted four Torpedo Exercises and fired 6 MK-54 torpedoes, all in one day.

© 2006 Sound Publishing, Inc.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraCmdr. David Cutter "...Cutter takes charge of VP-40 - By Lt.j.g. Blake Whetstone - Fighting Marlins reporter - Friday, April 21, 2006..." WebSite: Northwest Navigator http://www.northwestnavigator.com/ index.php/ navigator/ whidbey/ cutter_takes_charge_of_vp_40/ [22APR2006]

The Fighting Marlins of Patrol Squadron 40 held a change of command ceremony last week as Cmdr. David Cutter relieved Cmdr. Kenneth Bowen II.

Cutter assumed command of VP-40 on April 14, 2006 and will have command until next spring. Born in Boulder, Colo., he graduated from the Colorado School of Mines in 1986 with a bachelor's degree in chemical engineering and a minor in mathematics. Following graduation, he attended Aviation Officer Candidate School in Pensacola.

Completing AOCS as Regimental Commander, he earned a regular Navy commission under the Distinguished Naval Graduate program.

Following commissioning, he attended flight training in NAS Pensacola, Florida and Sacramento, Calif., where he was designated as a naval flight officer in September 1988.

After completing Fleet Replacement Squadron training at VP-30, Cutter began his first squadron tour with VP-26 at NAS Brunswick, Maine. Qualifying as an Instructor Tactical Coordinator and ISAR Radar Mission Commander, he made deployments to NS Rota, Spain; NAF Lajes, Azores, Portugal; NS Roosevelt Roads, PR and Panama. During this tour, he served as assistant tactics, naval flight officer, naval air training and operating procedures standards and schedules officers.

In 1992, Cmdr. Cutter reported for instructor duty at Fleet Replacement Squadron VP-30 in NAS Jacksonville, Florida, and served as NFO Training Officer, Commander Naval Air Forces U.S. Atlantic Fleet NATOPS Evaluator and Public Affairs Officer during the VP FRS consolidation and the Republic of Korea Navy foreign military training program.

Cutter was next assigned as Operations Admin Officer aboard USS Nimitz (CVN 68) in August 1995. Homeported in Bremerton, Wash., Nimitz deployed to the Arabian Gulf in support of Operation Southern Watch and later participated in the Strait of Taiwan crisis during April 1996. Qualifying as both command duty officer under way and officer of the deck under way, he also earned his Surface Warfare designation aboard USS Nimitz.

In June 1997, he reported to the Secretary of the Navy's staff in Washington D.C. where he served as personal aide to the Secretary of the Navy.

Cutter next reported to VP-16 in May 1999 for his department head tour. Serving as tactics, administration and operations officers, VP-16 deployed to NAS Sigonella, Sicily; NAS Keflavik, Iceland; and NS Roosevelt Roads, PR.

He was then assigned as assistant Washington DC placement officer at the Bureau of Naval Personnel in June 2001. In January 2003, Cutter enrolled in the Financial Management curriculum at the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey, Calif., earning a masters of business administration.

Cutter has recently been serving as chief staff officer for CPRW-10, NAS Whidbey Island, Washington.

Bowen led the Fighting Marlins on their last Western Pacific deployment, which was the most successful deployment by a Patrol squadron in recent history. The Fighting Marlins of VP-40 flew over 5,000 hours, over 1,200 hours in direct support of Operation Enduring Freedom and received the Battle Efficiency Award.

Bowen was awarded the Navy Meritorious Service Medal for his accomplishments as commanding officer.

"This medal symbolizes all the hard work of the sailors in this squadron," Bowen said. He took command of VP-40 on March 18, 2005 and his next assignment will be Force Structure, Resources and Assessment Directorate (J-8), on the Joint Chiefs of Staff, Washington, DC.

© 2006 Sound Publishing, Inc.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraVP-40 History "...VP-40 visits Oak Harbor Rotary Association - By Lt.j.g. Scott Monger - Friday, March 31, 2006..." WebSite: Northwest Navigator http://www.northwestnavigator.com/ index.php/ navigator/ whidbey/ vp_40_visits_oak_harbor_rotary_association/ [01APR2006]

Photo by PH2 Lewis Hunsaker - Pictured are retired U.S. Navy Adm. Lyle Bull, Aviation Mechanic Kevin Haynes and Jim Slowik, president of the Oak Harbor Rotary Association.

Patrol Squadron 40s distinguished Blue Jacket of the Quarter, Aviation Mechanic Airman (AMAN) Kevin Haynes, attended the Oak Harbor Rotary Association meeting at the local yacht club on March 10.

Haynes was warmly received and members thanked him and VP-40 in general for their contribution to Seventh Fleet Operations in the Global War on Terrorism.

Haynes said, "It's nice to see all the leaders of Oak Harbor get involved with the community. There were members there from ranging from a local tire shop owner to a Whidbey Island Bank president."

Over one third of the Rotary Association of Oak Harbor members have previously served in the military and the association has long supported VP-40 and its mission. The mission of the association is to work in the community and build a better place for us to live.

Haynes said everyone is very excited to be involved in the Oak Harbor High School remodeling project that will give the High School a new gymnasium.

The Association has over 100 Rotarians in the Oak Harbor Association alone. Association members include three retired Admirals, the Mayor of Oak Harbor, numerous business owners, current Oak Harbor superintendent and a local high school principal. VP-40 is grateful to have groups like the Rotary Club in the area working toward developing a better community and a more beautiful Whidbey Island.

The squadron will remain involved in their cause and looks forward to future opportunities to get together.

© 2006 Sound Publishing, Inc.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraWing 10 Photo "...Heroes declared this President's Day - Friday, February 24, 2006 - Squadrons Mention: CPRW-10, VP-1, VP-40, VP-46, VQ-1 and VQ-2..." WebSite: Northwest Navigator http://www.northwestnavigator.com/index.php/navigator/whidbey/heroes_declared_this_presidents_day/ [27FEB2006]

Photograph Caption: Lt. Cmdr. Steven Richards and Aviation Structural Mechanic (Safety Equipment) 2nd Class (Air Warfare/Naval Aircrewman) Kyle Musto, VP-46, just two of the Wing 10 aviation professionals recognized at the recent annual awards ceremony, stand ready by the P-3 Orion.

Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing Ten (CPRW-10) held its annual awards quarters Wednesday. The heroes we recognized on President's Day, like our forefathers, exemplify what it means to be a patriot; giving of themselves to make this a better country, one shipmate at a time.

"There are few duties more rewarding than the opportunity to thank these tremendous performers who are flying and maintaining our combat aircraft," said Capt. John Dziminowicz, commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing 10. "I treasure these opportunities to acknowledge the excellent men and women who make our Force a capable, formidable tool for war fighting commanders across the globe."

Command Support Professional

Awarded to Hospital Corpsman 3rd Class(AW) Maurice Brown, of Fleet Air Reconnaissance Squadron Two (VQ-2). Brown ensured squadron medical readiness in the midst of a complex homeport move from Rota, Spain to NAS Whidbey and with consistent attention to detail, enabled the smooth and on-time deployment of 22 detachments,

Maintenance Professional

Awarded to Aviation Ordnanceman 1st Class (AW) Donald Weatherby of Patrol Squadron One (VP-1). Weatherby achieved numerous qualifications including Safe for Flight (releasing aircraft for flight), a position not normally achieved by a first class petty officer. His leadership in Maintenance Control was instrumental in executing over 40 percent of VP-1's flight hours, and resulted in zero discrepancies for the ordnance shop during the most recent Aviation Maintenance Inspection.

Aircrewman

Aviation Electronics Technician 1st Class (AW/NA) Joseph Medina of VQ-1 was recognized for his leadership as president of VQ-1s 1st Class Petty Officer Association, leading 77 first class petty officers in numerous volunteer efforts. He authored and taught 15 avionics presentations, trained 29 aircrew, significantly increasing the squadron's operational readiness. As Aircrew Detachment leading petty officer he trained and led eight aircrewmen in the repair of 40 in-flight discrepancies, resulting in a 100 percent sortie completion rate.

Enlisted Instructor

Aviation Structural Mechanic (Safety Equipment) 2nd Class (AW/NA) Kyle Musto, VP-46s top Flight Engineer, played an integral part in training 18 flight engineers, instructor pilots, and observers. As an instructor and handpicked as primary Flight Engineer Evaluator, he administered check rides and proctored positional exams, while racking up over 390 aircraft hours and 200 simulator hours as an instructor.

Officer Instructor

Lt. Edward Kribs, also of VP-46, recognized as the officer instructor of the year, attained every qualification available to a first tour pilot, with 450 hours as an aircraft commander and over 200 as an instructor. Leading the VP-46 training department, often under challenging conditions, he directly contributed to the qualification of 15 plane commanders and pilots and sat on 28 qualification boards.

Aviator

Lt. Jeffery Walker of VQ-1 is a fully qualified Senior Evaluator and Mission Commander and has been an outstanding performer during unit evaluations, achieving his warfare qualification 10 months ahead of the Wing 10 goal. While accumulating over 900 flight hours, including 263 combat hours, he remains committed to mentoring other junior officers. His guidance as NFO training officer significantly reduced training time for NFO "upgraders."

Electronic Warfare Crew

VQ-2s Combat Reconnaissance Crew 24 has flown 233 mishap-free combat hours in Operation Iraqi Freedom and for the Coalition Forces Maritime Component Commander in the Arabian Gulf. They spent 71 days in the Central Command Area of Responsibility, during which time they were the sole provider of threat intelligence that saved American lives during an OIF combat mission. As the first to arrive in response to troops under fire, they increased the situational awareness and security of ground forces under attack.

Flight Crew

VP-40s Combat Aircrew 6 flew over 170 combat flight hours in support of Operation Enduring Freedom-Philippines, providing real-time imagery and data collection for forces on the ground. Due to their professionalism and dedication to performance, they maintained 100 percent readiness throughout the home cycle and qualified three designated aircrew instructors.

Junior Officer Leader Excellence

Lt. Michael Haymon of VP-40 is a combat-tested veteran, who flew over 107 flight hours in support of OEF-P, and is directly responsible for his crew's unprecedented success in providing crucial information to ground forces. As the senior naval flight officer instructor he ensured compliance and currency of all 26 NFO's, leading them through the last Seventh Fleet deployment.

Peer Leadership

The Navy and Marine Association recognized the following individuals based on votes by their peers.

E-7 to E-9 category, Senior Chief Aviation Machinist Mate (AW/NA) Glenn Grimmer, VP-1

Junior Officer (O-1 to O-3) category, Lt. Dennis Jensen, VP-40

Department Head (O-4) category, Lt. Cmdr. Steven Richards, VP-46

Command (O-6) category, Cmdr. Raymond Keledei, VP-46

Dziminowicz closed the ceremony with thanks to all the men and women of Wing 10 who faced and mastered the numerous challenges in 2005, both here at home and around the world.

© 2006 Sound Publishing, Inc.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraPhoto by PH2 Lewis Hunsaker "...Students welcome Patrol Squadron 40 home from deployment - MC and Ahmo 2: Command Master Chief Robert Cooley(SS/AW) and first grader Erika Carter present Commander Ahmo with the global war on terrorism service medal. By Lt.j.g. Blake Whetstone - Fighting Marlins' reporter - Friday, January 20, 2006..." WebSite: Northwest Navigator http://www.northwestnavigator.com/index.php/navigator/whidbey/students_welcome_patrol_squadron_40_home_from_deployment/ [20JAN2006]

Photograph Description: MC and Ahmo 2: Command Master Chief Robert Cooley(SS/AW) and first grader Erika Carter present Commander Ahmo with the global war on terrorism service medal.

On Wednesday, Jan. 11, personnel from Patrol Squadron Forty (VP-40) visited the faculty and students of Olympic View Elementary School.

The visit solidified the relationship VP-40 and Olympic View built prior to the squadron's recent WestPac deployment. The squadron was extremely busy, providing detachments to 18 different countries and directly supporting the global war on terrorism.

Students welcomed the squadron back from their six-month deployment with a large assembly and turnover ceremony. Accompanying VP-40 was Commander Ahmo, the school's Killer Whale mascot and goodwill ambassador to the countries VP-40 visited. In the ceremony, VP-40 Command Master Chief, Robert Cooley, returned Commander Ahmo to the students of Olympic View Elementary School.

VP-40 is Olympic View's Navy Partner, a program in which the squadron and the school participate to promote correspondence and relations. Students get a better understanding of Navy life and can write Sailors who are on deployment.

In a ceremony before VP-40 left, students gave Commander Ahmo to VP-40 Commanding Officer, Cmdr. Ken Bowen, to accompany them during their six-month Japan deployment. Commander Ahmo visited many different countries including Australia, Iraq, Japan, Korea, Thailand and Tonga.

"Today was a great opportunity for the kids and the troops loved it," said Cooley.

© 2006 Sound Publishing, Inc

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraRetired U.S. Air Force Col. Edward Hubbard "...POW delivers inspirational speech - By Lt.j.g. Blake Whetstone VP-40 - Friday, March 24, 2006..." WebSite: Northwest Navigator http://www.northwestnavigator.com/ index.php/ navigator/ whidbey/ pow_delivers_inspirational_speech/ [26MAR2006]

Photo by PH2 Lewis Hunsaker - Retired U.S. Air Force Col. Edward Hubbard presents a motivational speech at the VP-40 change of command dinner.

The chiefs, officers and guests of Patrol Squadron 40 attended a change of command dinner on Jan. 10 and had the opportunity to hear guest speaker Col. Edward Lee Hubbard, USAF, Retired, discuss his experience as a prisoner of war for 2,420 days during the Vietnam War.

Hubbard, a professional speaker, gives motivational lectures to corporations and organizations across the country. He traveled from Fort Walton Beach, Fla., to spend the weekend with VP-40 and pass on his valuable insight.

First, Hubbard asked if anyone had experienced a bad day in the last month. Everyone in the crowd raised a hand. He then related the bad day he encountered nearly 40 years ago on July 20, 1966 when he was shot down in an EB66C Skywarrior over Vietnam and captured by enemy forces.

His presentation focused on the ideas that humanity needs to always look for the positive in life, perception is everything and the human mind is stronger than anyone thinks.

"Life is simple once you realize it's simple," he said. "I've built a philosophy that human potential is nothing more than a state of mind. Every day I experience more that proves how correct my theory is."

Hubbard has written an inspirational book titled "Escape from the Box, the Wonder of Human Potential," in which he shares the valuable lessons he learned during his imprisonment in North Vietnam.

What follows is the personal story of Col. Edward Hubbard (USAF ret).

(Source: We Came Home, copyright 1977 Capt. and Mrs. Frederic A Wyatt (USNR ret), Barbara Powers Wyatt, editor P.O.W. Publications, 10250 Moorpark St., Toluca Lake, CA 91602 Text is reproduced as found in the original publication (including date and spelling errors).

UPDATE - 09/95 by the P.O.W. NETWORK, Skidmore, MO

EDWARD LEE HUBBARD
Major - United States Air Force
Shot Down: July 20, 1966
Released: March 4, 1973

I am Edward Lee Hubbard, known to all my friends as Ed. I was born 18 May 1938 in Kansas City, Missouri and spent the first 24 years of my life in the Kansas City area. In June 1955 I joined the USAF Reserve at Richards Gebaur AFB where I flew as a flight engineer in the C-119 for several years. I graduated from Shawnee Mission High School in May 1956. From December 1957 until August 1961 I worked in the mens clothing business in Kansas City.

In August 1961 I went on active duty, going to the aviation cadet program at James Connally AFB, Texas for Basic Navigation Training. I was commissioned and received my wings on July 6, 1962.

Then I went to Navigator-Bombadier Training at Mather AFB, Calif. From there to survival school at Stead AFB, Nev., then photo school and RB-66 crew training at Shaw AFB, S.C. Following that I departed for Europe on Oct. 1, 1963, first to Alconbury AB in England for about two years and then Chambley AB in France for about a year.

In May 1966 I left Chambley AB, going directly to SEA with just a few days leave in Kansas City. I stopped for a few days at Clark AB for jungle survival school and then on to Takhli AB, Thailand. On July 20, 1966, on my 26th mission over North Vietnam, we were shot down by two SAMs. I spent 2420 days as a POW in North Vietnam, being released on March 4, 1973. When I returned to the USA, I had been gone for 9 1/2 years except for the few days leave in May of 1966.

The greatest single thing I found that helped sustain me throughout our long ordeal was the fantastic ability of Americans to always find something to laugh about no matter how bad things got. So, to me, the biggest asset we had was our sense of humor.

As to the future, I will attend Air Command and Staff College and then go to Torrejon Air Base, Spain to fly F4s. My son, David, was born in Kansas City on Oct. 2 1963, the day after I left for Europe. I have written an open letter to be published in the local paper and to be sent to all the people who have written me.

I asked them to keep their bracelets in remembrance of the men who gave their lives in Southeast Asia, and the men who returned but will forever carry the burden of the war because of their injuries.

I would like to see the enthusiasm, energy and efforts used for our reception redirected to the disabled veterans, the men who gave more than the POWs, the men who are more deserving of the great reception we received, the men whose lives will never return to normal as mine has.

Don't let those men be forgotten. Every American should do his or her utmost to guarantee that these men are NEVER FORGOTTEN!

Edward Hubbard retired from the United States Air Force as a Colonel. He and his wife Jennifer reside in Florida.

© 2006 Sound Publishing, Inc.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraWing 10 Photo "...Heroes declared this President's Day - Friday, February 24, 2006 - Squadrons Mention: CPRW-10, VP-1, VP-40, VP-46, VQ-1 and VQ-2..." WebSite: Northwest Navigator http://www.northwestnavigator.com/index.php/navigator/whidbey/heroes_declared_this_presidents_day/ [27FEB2006]

Photograph Caption: Lt. Cmdr. Steven Richards and Aviation Structural Mechanic (Safety Equipment) 2nd Class (Air Warfare/Naval Aircrewman) Kyle Musto, VP-46, just two of the Wing 10 aviation professionals recognized at the recent annual awards ceremony, stand ready by the P-3 Orion.

Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing Ten (CPRW-10) held its annual awards quarters Wednesday. The heroes we recognized on President's Day, like our forefathers, exemplify what it means to be a patriot; giving of themselves to make this a better country, one shipmate at a time.

"There are few duties more rewarding than the opportunity to thank these tremendous performers who are flying and maintaining our combat aircraft," said Capt. John Dziminowicz, commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing 10. "I treasure these opportunities to acknowledge the excellent men and women who make our Force a capable, formidable tool for war fighting commanders across the globe."

Command Support Professional

Awarded to Hospital Corpsman 3rd Class(AW) Maurice Brown, of Fleet Air Reconnaissance Squadron Two (VQ-2). Brown ensured squadron medical readiness in the midst of a complex homeport move from Rota, Spain to NAS Whidbey and with consistent attention to detail, enabled the smooth and on-time deployment of 22 detachments,

Maintenance Professional

Awarded to Aviation Ordnanceman 1st Class (AW) Donald Weatherby of Patrol Squadron One (VP-1). Weatherby achieved numerous qualifications including Safe for Flight (releasing aircraft for flight), a position not normally achieved by a first class petty officer. His leadership in Maintenance Control was instrumental in executing over 40 percent of VP-1's flight hours, and resulted in zero discrepancies for the ordnance shop during the most recent Aviation Maintenance Inspection.

Aircrewman

Aviation Electronics Technician 1st Class (AW/NA) Joseph Medina of VQ-1 was recognized for his leadership as president of VQ-1s 1st Class Petty Officer Association, leading 77 first class petty officers in numerous volunteer efforts. He authored and taught 15 avionics presentations, trained 29 aircrew, significantly increasing the squadron's operational readiness. As Aircrew Detachment leading petty officer he trained and led eight aircrewmen in the repair of 40 in-flight discrepancies, resulting in a 100 percent sortie completion rate.

Enlisted Instructor

Aviation Structural Mechanic (Safety Equipment) 2nd Class (AW/NA) Kyle Musto, VP-46s top Flight Engineer, played an integral part in training 18 flight engineers, instructor pilots, and observers. As an instructor and handpicked as primary Flight Engineer Evaluator, he administered check rides and proctored positional exams, while racking up over 390 aircraft hours and 200 simulator hours as an instructor.

Officer Instructor

Lt. Edward Kribs, also of VP-46, recognized as the officer instructor of the year, attained every qualification available to a first tour pilot, with 450 hours as an aircraft commander and over 200 as an instructor. Leading the VP-46 training department, often under challenging conditions, he directly contributed to the qualification of 15 plane commanders and pilots and sat on 28 qualification boards.

Aviator

Lt. Jeffery Walker of VQ-1 is a fully qualified Senior Evaluator and Mission Commander and has been an outstanding performer during unit evaluations, achieving his warfare qualification 10 months ahead of the Wing 10 goal. While accumulating over 900 flight hours, including 263 combat hours, he remains committed to mentoring other junior officers. His guidance as NFO training officer significantly reduced training time for NFO "upgraders."

Electronic Warfare Crew

VQ-2s Combat Reconnaissance Crew 24 has flown 233 mishap-free combat hours in Operation Iraqi Freedom and for the Coalition Forces Maritime Component Commander in the Arabian Gulf. They spent 71 days in the Central Command Area of Responsibility, during which time they were the sole provider of threat intelligence that saved American lives during an OIF combat mission. As the first to arrive in response to troops under fire, they increased the situational awareness and security of ground forces under attack.

Flight Crew

VP-40s Combat Aircrew 6 flew over 170 combat flight hours in support of Operation Enduring Freedom-Philippines, providing real-time imagery and data collection for forces on the ground. Due to their professionalism and dedication to performance, they maintained 100 percent readiness throughout the home cycle and qualified three designated aircrew instructors.

Junior Officer Leader Excellence

Lt. Michael Haymon of VP-40 is a combat-tested veteran, who flew over 107 flight hours in support of OEF-P, and is directly responsible for his crew's unprecedented success in providing crucial information to ground forces. As the senior naval flight officer instructor he ensured compliance and currency of all 26 NFO's, leading them through the last Seventh Fleet deployment.

Peer Leadership

The Navy and Marine Association recognized the following individuals based on votes by their peers.

E-7 to E-9 category, Senior Chief Aviation Machinist Mate (AW/NA) Glenn Grimmer, VP-1

Junior Officer (O-1 to O-3) category, Lt. Dennis Jensen, VP-40

Department Head (O-4) category, Lt. Cmdr. Steven Richards, VP-46

Command (O-6) category, Cmdr. Raymond Keledei, VP-46

Dziminowicz closed the ceremony with thanks to all the men and women of Wing 10 who faced and mastered the numerous challenges in 2005, both here at home and around the world.

© 2006 Sound Publishing, Inc.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraPhoto by PH2 Lewis Hunsaker "...Students welcome Patrol Squadron 40 home from deployment - MC and Ahmo 2: Command Master Chief Robert Cooley(SS/AW) and first grader Erika Carter present Commander Ahmo with the global war on terrorism service medal. By Lt.j.g. Blake Whetstone - Fighting Marlins' reporter - Friday, January 20, 2006..." WebSite: Northwest Navigator http://www.northwestnavigator.com/index.php/navigator/whidbey/students_welcome_patrol_squadron_40_home_from_deployment/ [20JAN2006]

Photograph Description: MC and Ahmo 2: Command Master Chief Robert Cooley(SS/AW) and first grader Erika Carter present Commander Ahmo with the global war on terrorism service medal.

On Wednesday, Jan. 11, personnel from Patrol Squadron Forty (VP-40) visited the faculty and students of Olympic View Elementary School.

The visit solidified the relationship VP-40 and Olympic View built prior to the squadron's recent WestPac deployment. The squadron was extremely busy, providing detachments to 18 different countries and directly supporting the global war on terrorism.

Students welcomed the squadron back from their six-month deployment with a large assembly and turnover ceremony. Accompanying VP-40 was Commander Ahmo, the school's Killer Whale mascot and goodwill ambassador to the countries VP-40 visited. In the ceremony, VP-40 Command Master Chief, Robert Cooley, returned Commander Ahmo to the students of Olympic View Elementary School.

VP-40 is Olympic View's Navy Partner, a program in which the squadron and the school participate to promote correspondence and relations. Students get a better understanding of Navy life and can write Sailors who are on deployment.

In a ceremony before VP-40 left, students gave Commander Ahmo to VP-40 Commanding Officer, Cmdr. Ken Bowen, to accompany them during their six-month Japan deployment. Commander Ahmo visited many different countries including Australia, Iraq, Japan, Korea, Thailand and Tonga.

"Today was a great opportunity for the kids and the troops loved it," said Cooley.

© 2006 Sound Publishing, Inc


Circa 2005

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...'Fighting Marlins' come home today - Local News..." WebSite: Herald NEt http://heraldnet.com/stories/05/12/08/100loc_b1fyi001.cfm [10DEC2005]

The "Fighting Marlins" of Patrol Squadron 40 (VP-40) bring the last of their P-3C Orion aircraft home to NAS Whidbey Island, Washington today after a six-month deployment in Japan.

The 400-member squadron took part in five major exercises and 42 training exercises in 15 different countries, chalking up more than 5,100 flight hours.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraVP-40 Photo "...Fighting Marlins prepare to return home - By Lt.j.g. Blake Whetstone - Fighting Marlins' reporter - Friday, December 9, 2005 - (VP-40, VP-45 and VP-69 mentioned)..." WebSite: Northwest Navigator http://www.northwestnavigator.com/index.php/navigator/whidbey/fighting_marlins_prepare_to_return_home/ [09DEC2005]

Photograph Description: The Fighting Marlins of VP-40 are preparing to return home from a six-month deployment in Japan.

It has been an extremely challenging yet rewarding deployment for the Fighting Marlins of VP-40. Early airlift personnel departed on May 24 to prepare for bulk of the squadron to deploy in early June.

Completing the last month of the Fleet Response Plan surge window, VP-40 deployed after finishing its first 18-month Inter-Deployment Readiness Cycle. This time was put to good use, as the Fighting Marlins were the first squadron to deploy with 12 fully qualified combat aircrews.

Additionally, the Maintenance department's efforts, aided by the newly formed Professional Development department, enabled VP-40 to train unprecedented numbers of maintainers to support numerous detachments and exercises in the 7th Fleet theater.

On June 6, Cmdr. Kenneth Bowen, VP-40 commanding officer, assumed operational command as Commander, Task Group 72.2 and 72.4. VP-40 personnel hit the ground running as many went straight from the airlift to turning wrenches, or for the aircrew, attending operational indoctrination briefs.

Once these briefs and indoctrination flights were complete, VP-40 aircrews immediately assumed the ready and began to fly operationally out of Misawa and Kadena. Furthermore, they significantly contributed to the global war on terror in Southeast Asia while flying in Operation Enduring Freedom. VP-40 provided a consistent Forward Airborne Presence throughout the PACOM theater.

The Pelicans of VP-45 augmented the Task Group with a contingent of aircrew and maintainers in Kadena and Misawa the entire deployment. Additionally, the Marlins team in Misawa was responsible for conducting schedule maintenance and inspection on all P-3 aircraft in both the 5th and 7th Fleet. The Marlins and Pelicans worked together in every aspect to provide a well tuned, fighting, and cooperative task group deployment.

Throughout the 2005 deployment, the Fighting Marlins and Pelicans represented the Navy in five major exercises and 42 total exercises in 15 different countries. The Task Group's area of responsibility extends from the Northern Pacific Ocean, down to Australia and west to the middle of the Indian Ocean.

The grand list of countries or sites that VP-40 has visited is as follows: Australia (Townsville and Pearce), Cocos Islands, Brunei (Rimba), Diego Garcia, Fiji, Guam, India (Goa), Indonesia (Juanda), Maldives, Malaysia (Kuantan), Philippine Islands (Subic Bay), Singapore (Paya Lebar), South Korea (Pohang, Chinhae, Seoul and Osan), Kingdom of Tonga and Thailand (Utapao). The total number of hours flown on deployment by VP-40 totals over 5,100 hours, by far greater than anyone expected.

In October, the Totems of VP-69 joined the Marlins in their 7th Fleet reserve augmentation. Led by their OIC, Lt. Cmdr. Bob Collins, the VP-69 aircrew and maintainers seamlessly integrated with the deployed squadron.

After all the work on deployment, VP-40 is ready for a long awaited return to their home in NAS Whidbey Island, Washington. Many members have been counting the days until the last plane leaves Japan and now they are counting the hours. Time has flown, almost as much as the planes, but it does not seem that it flies as fast as most want it to do so.

The crew is looking forward to spending lots of time with our friends and loved ones.

© 2005 Sound Publishing, Inc.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraAn unidentified South Korean soldier "...Marlins represent U.S. Navy at Seoul Air Show - By Lt.j.g. Joe Parsons - VP-40 - Friday, November 4, 2005..." WebSite: Northwest Navigator http://www.northwestnavigator.com/index.php/navigator/whidbey/marlins_represent_us_navy_at_seoul_air_show/ [11NOV2005]

Photograph Description: An unidentified South Korean soldier stands guard at the head of a negotiating table in the Joint Security Area in Panmunjon. The microphones in the center of the table form a line on the border between North and South Korea that divides the table in half."

Last week Combat Air Crew Twelve (CAC-12) of the VP-40 Fighting Marlins left Misawa AB, Japan with a P-3 full of VP-40 and VP-45 aircrew, maintenance and administrative personnel for an eight-day trip to South Korea to participate in the 2005 Seoul Air Show.

The P-3 Orion was the only naval aircraft of the 83 platforms on display from the various air forces of 22 countries who participated in the air show. The first four days of the air show were limited access admission, mostly defense contractors and military officials who were invited to view the daily flight demonstrations.

The final two days of the air show were open to the general public and accommodated over 150,000 visitors each day.

While the Marlins maintained a team of aircrew and support personnel at the aircraft throughout the air show to answer questions and give tours, everyone was able to take advantage of some time off to explore Seoul and some nearby attractions.

The commercial district of Itaewon in Seoul offered unique things like the Electronics Market, a six-block area with nothing but cameras, computers and cell phones as far as the eye can see, as well as a wide selection of local and international cuisine and a lively nightlife.

Several of the aircrew took a trip to visit the demilitarized zone (DMZ), which acts as a buffer between North and South Korea. The trip included a visit to an observatory that overlooks the DMZ and into North Korea, a hike 240 feet underground into a tunnel dug by the North Koreans for use in infiltrating South Korea unchallenged and finally a visit to the United Nations controlled Joint Security Area in the border village of Panmunjom which straddles the military demarcation line (the official border between North and South Korea).

The highlight of the DMZ visit was walking around in a room where negotiations are held between North and South Korea; the negotiating table is literally divided in half by the Military Demarcation Line.

One of the visitors, Lt.j.g. Matt Swartzwelder of VP-45, said of the experience "It was almost surreal, standing on the border of one of the world's most bitter divisions as a visitor, seeing what I'd only read about in history books before."

When it was time to leave, it became apparent that almost everyone had also gotten a chance to take the short bus ride south to Osan for some shopping; the 21 people on the trip had amassed so much extra baggage in the one week that there almost wasn't enough room on the plane to bring everything back to Japan.

© 2005 Sound Publishing, Inc.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraVP-40 Photo "...Fighting Marlins fly to Australia - By Lt.j.g. Joe Parsons - Fighting Marlin Reporter - Friday, November 4, 2005..." WebSite: Northwest Navigator http://www.northwestnavigator.com/index.php/navigator/whidbey/fighting_marlins_fly_to_australia/ [05NOV2005]

Photograph Description: CAC-8 on Cocos Island. From left to right; standing: Lt. Josh Saunders, Aviation machinest's Mate 1st Class(AW) Enrique Flores; Lt.j.g. J.J. Franz, Aviation Warfare System's Operator 1st Class Brad Breaux; Aviation Warfare System's Operator 3rd Class Allen Jones; Lt. Ryan Casey, Lt.j.g. Matt McKerring. Seated, Aviation Electrician's Mate 1st Class Gilbert Carey, Aviation Electronics Technician Airman Patrick Bannister, Lt.j.g. Kristen Courtney, Aviation Warfare System's Operator 2nd Class Eric Heath; and Chief Aviation Electronics Technician(AW) Harold Holman

Combat Aircrews two and eight along with a maintenance team from Patrol Squadron 40 recently completed a successful detachment in support of Lungfish 05, marking the second time this deployment that the Fighting Marlins have journeyed to Australia.

Lungfish 05, a joint military exercise conducted with the Australian Navy, provided the Fighting Marlins an opportunity to demonstrate their Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW) skills in a combined operations environment.

The two crews and their maintenance contingent were able to gain logistical and operational experience working out of a forward location with a close American ally. Participating units included two VP-40 aircraft and multiple submarines.

Based out of Pearce Royal Australian Air Force Base in Western Australia, VP-40 completed twelve flights consisting of ASW missions for the exercise as well as unexpected search and rescue (SAR) missions external to the exercise.

Combat Aircrew Eight (CAC-8) had been scheduled to do a surveillance flight when the detachment officer in charge received a request to aid search and rescue efforts for a man overboard in the Indian Ocean.

The crew received their updated tasking and after a five-hour transit they arrived on station. Communication was established with the Stargold Trader, the vessel that had requested assistance, and an updated search area was passed.

The crew provided assistance and airborne support for five hours before landing Cocos Island for fuel and sleep. Unfortunately, the person who went overboard was never found.

The crew was able to enjoy the next morning on Cocos island before returning to Australia. CAC-2 left Australia that same morning to continue the search and rescue efforts. While their flight was very similar to that of CAC-8, CAC-2 got to participate in "Wacky Wednesday" with the locals, which consisted of playing golf on the island's lone airstrip.

The locals apparently have similar sporting events every other day to break the monotony of living on a tiny island.

As the crew took off and flew over the island for their return to Australia, they noticed many lawn chairs lining the runway and spotting the yards, all full in preparation for another day of easy living in a tropical paradise.

Throughout the trip, the personnel involved also had the opportunity to see what the city of Perth had to offer.

There were local zoos and wildlife parks for people who wanted to pet a kangaroo or hold a koala bear and the nightlife attractions were plentiful in the town of Fremantle, a popular destination for many U.S. Navy visitors.

Some Fighting Marlins also attended an Australian rules football game and learned the rules from the locals who were there cheering on the home team.

© 2005 Sound Publishing, Inc.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraVP-40 Photo "...Fighting Marlins fly to Australia - By Lt.j.g. Joe Parsons - Fighting Marlin Reporter - Friday, November 4, 2005..." WebSite: Northwest Navigator http://www.northwestnavigator.com/index.php/navigator/whidbey/fighting_marlins_fly_to_australia/ [05NOV2005]

Photograph Description: CAC-8 on Cocos Island. From left to right; standing: Lt. Josh Saunders, Aviation machinest's Mate 1st Class(AW) Enrique Flores; Lt.j.g. J.J. Franz, Aviation Warfare System's Operator 1st Class Brad Breaux; Aviation Warfare System's Operator 3rd Class Allen Jones; Lt. Ryan Casey, Lt.j.g. Matt McKerring. Seated, Aviation Electrician's Mate 1st Class Gilbert Carey, Aviation Electronics Technician Airman Patrick Bannister, Lt.j.g. Kristen Courtney, Aviation Warfare System's Operator 2nd Class Eric Heath; and Chief Aviation Electronics Technician(AW) Harold Holman

Combat Aircrews two and eight along with a maintenance team from Patrol Squadron 40 recently completed a successful detachment in support of Lungfish 05, marking the second time this deployment that the Fighting Marlins have journeyed to Australia.

Lungfish 05, a joint military exercise conducted with the Australian Navy, provided the Fighting Marlins an opportunity to demonstrate their Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW) skills in a combined operations environment.

The two crews and their maintenance contingent were able to gain logistical and operational experience working out of a forward location with a close American ally. Participating units included two VP-40 aircraft and multiple submarines.

Based out of Pearce Royal Australian Air Force Base in Western Australia, VP-40 completed twelve flights consisting of ASW missions for the exercise as well as unexpected search and rescue (SAR) missions external to the exercise.

Combat Aircrew Eight (CAC-8) had been scheduled to do a surveillance flight when the detachment officer in charge received a request to aid search and rescue efforts for a man overboard in the Indian Ocean.

The crew received their updated tasking and after a five-hour transit they arrived on station. Communication was established with the Stargold Trader, the vessel that had requested assistance, and an updated search area was passed.

The crew provided assistance and airborne support for five hours before landing Cocos Island for fuel and sleep. Unfortunately, the person who went overboard was never found.

The crew was able to enjoy the next morning on Cocos island before returning to Australia. CAC-2 left Australia that same morning to continue the search and rescue efforts. While their flight was very similar to that of CAC-8, CAC-2 got to participate in "Wacky Wednesday" with the locals, which consisted of playing golf on the island's lone airstrip.

The locals apparently have similar sporting events every other day to break the monotony of living on a tiny island.

As the crew took off and flew over the island for their return to Australia, they noticed many lawn chairs lining the runway and spotting the yards, all full in preparation for another day of easy living in a tropical paradise.

Throughout the trip, the personnel involved also had the opportunity to see what the city of Perth had to offer.

There were local zoos and wildlife parks for people who wanted to pet a kangaroo or hold a koala bear and the nightlife attractions were plentiful in the town of Fremantle, a popular destination for many U.S. Navy visitors.

Some Fighting Marlins also attended an Australian rules football game and learned the rules from the locals who were there cheering on the home team.

© 2005 Sound Publishing, Inc.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraVP-40 Photo "...VP-40 takes part in CARAT Singapore - By Lt. Bill Pritchett - Marlins' reporter - Friday, October 28, 2005..." WebSite: Northwest Navigator http://www.northwestnavigator.com/index.php/navigator/whidbey/vp_40_takes_part_in_carat_singapore/ [28OCT2005]

Photograph Description: Lt. Dennis Jensen, center, and his Singapore counterparts pose after a successful flight.

The Fighting Marlins of Patrol Squadron Forty (VP-40) have been busy travelers during their ongoing Pacific deployment.

Establishing VP-40 as a constant presence in the ongoing CARAT exercise series, members of Combat Aircrew One and a select maintenance crew flew a P-3 to Paya Lebar Air Base in Singapore. Under the direction of detachment Officer-in-Charge Lt. Cmdr. Andy Hess, Mission Commander Lt. Kevin Johnston and Plane Commander Lt. Dennis Jensen, the crew embarked upon their mission of goodwill and good training.

The detachment began with a briefing at the Singapore Fleet Command Building. All players involved in the international exercise were present. In all, more than eight surface ships, several Sing submarines, a U.S. Navy helicopter detachment, Sing fighters and patrol aircraft and the mighty P-3 Orion from VP-40 were present at the meetings. The nuts and bolts of the next week were discussed as counterpart Commanding Officers traded tactics and ideas. The role of the P-3 during the exercise was also thoroughly outlined.

As the ships shoved off to sea and headed toward the area of the exercise, the Fighting Marlins had some time to enjoy some liberty in the beautiful city of Singapore. Everyone agreed the people were very welcoming and hospitable. With such an optimum location and economy for world trade, Singapore enjoys the fusion of many cultures, languages and customs.

Because of its proximity to the equator, Singapore is also a welcome environment for some rather exotic animals. At one point or another, almost everyone made their way to the world-famous Singapore Zoo.

Continuing in their hospitality, members of the Republic of Singapore Air Force Squadron 121 invited the crew to a Maritime Patrol Aircraft Symposium in their squadron spaces. Crewmembers were able to share more specifics on their techniques and roles in the aircraft. After much discussion, it became clear aviators are rather similar all over the world.

Plane Commander Lt. Dennis Jensen extended his ambassador duties and gratefully accepted an invitation to ride as an observer in the Singapore Air Force Fokker F50.

The Fighting Marlins of Combat Aircrew One returned the favor later in the exercise and were able to take two Sing Officers on a P-3 mission. Both visitors were impressed with the size and capability of the mighty Orion as the crew supported the nighttime surface interdiction mission of the war games below.

Members of Combat Aircrew One and the accompanying maintenance detachment did an excellent job on this very important mission, extending the goodwill of our country while strengthening the relationship with yet another foreign Navy and military.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraPhoto by JO2(SW) Alicia Boatwright "...VP-46, VP-69 join forces - By JO2(SW) Alicia Boatwright - Naval Air Reserve - Friday, August 12, 2005..." WebSite: Northwest Navigator http://www.northwestnavigator.com/index.php/navigator/whidbey/vp_46_vp_69_join_forces/ [14AUG2005]

Photo Description: As a result of combining their maintenance departments, personnel from NAS Whidbey Island, Washington squadrons VP-46 and VP-69, such as AD2 Roberto Sampson and ADAN Joseph Ihrig, now work together to maintain the squadrons' aircrafts.

Many people know that today's Reserves are playing a more prominent role in Operation Iraqi Freedom. What may not be known is that many of these "citizen-Sailors" have been providing support to active duty missions for many years, in and out of wartime.

At NAS Whidbey Island, Washington, the Totems of VP-69 have been providing support for over 30 years to their sister active squadrons, VP-46, VP-1 and VP-40.

Recently, the concept of "one Navy" became more than just a concept for two of the island's squadrons.

Reserve Squadron VP-69 (the Totems) and active squadron VP-46 (Grey Knights) have combined their personnel and aircraft into one hangar space, meaning both squadrons' maintenance and aircrew departments are working side-by-side to carry out the Navy's mission.

The P-3C aircraft squadrons' primary missions include submarine/surface warfare, surveillance/reconnaissance and Search and Rescue operations.

VP-46, the oldest continuously operating patrol squadron in the Navy, was commissioned in 1931. VP-69 is one of six Maritime Patrol Squadrons assigned to Commander, Reserve Patrol Wing and was commissioned in 1970.

The shift to total integration began in December 2004 when the base was scrambling for hangar space for a returning squadron.

"There was nowhere for VP-46 to go [when they returned from their deployment]," said VP-69 Officer in Charge Lt. Cmdr. Patrick Sanders.

The squadrons have encountered challenges and benefits along the way. VP-69 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Michael Krueger said one significant challenge has been met.

"We're breaking down the barriers between the active and reserve components by realizing our different backgrounds and educating each other on what each of us brings to the table."

VP-69 Command Master Chief John Callahan said the biggest challenge was the change in leadership within the departments.

"Initially, there were some reservations," he said, adding that the different ways of carrying out tasks also posed a problem.

"Active duty Sailors are more hands on, but the reserve side has a more cautious way of dealing with problems." However, Callahan said, with the top-notch leadership in both commands, the problem was quickly solved.

According to VP-69 air crewman AT2 (AW) Marc Grant, combining both crews into one maintenance department has led to a considerable decrease in workload. "Our hours were pretty extensive [before the integration]. The increased manpower has taken some of the work load off of us."

VP-46 Operations Chief AWC(AW) John Biggs said sharing resources has improved the effectiveness of their mission by reducing the cost of aircraft maintenance.

"[Combining our aircraft] has helped us out tremendously because it has allowed us to accomplish our mission more efficiently," he said.

Sanders noted Reservists are used to solving issues beyond what the billet requires. "They are valuable because they bring a wide range of skills from their civilian jobs," he said. "Active duty Sailors can utilize those skills."

As a result of combining air and maintenance crews, those skills are used to support 12 ready flight crews.

Although Krueger acknowledges that the end result of incorporating Reservists into an active duty squadron has been a more efficient and stronger force, not knowing what is going to happen next causes some concern. "There is some anxiety because the future is uncertain."

Despite the anxiety, the Totems and Grey Knights continue to do their part as a team to make the Navy a more efficient force.

© 2005 Sound Publishing, Inc.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VP History ThumbnailCamera050621-N-7783B-001 Utapao, Thailand (June 21 2005) "...Aviation Structural Mechanic 2nd Class Kevin Leonard signal engines have started on a P-3C Orion aircraft, assigned to the "Fighting Marlins" of Patrol Squadron Four Zero (VP-40), as it prepares to take off and deliver a MK-62 250-pound mine during the Thailand phase of exercise Cooperation Afloat Readiness and Training (CARAT) 2005. CARAT is a regularly scheduled series of bilateral military training exercises with several Southeast Asia nations designed to enhance the interoperability of the respective sea services. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 1st Class Thomas J. Brennan (RELEASED)..." WebSite: Navy Newsstand http://www.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=25527 [13JUL2005]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VP History ThumbnailCamera050329-N-2976H-005 Whidbey Island, Wash. (Mar. 29, 2005) "...Aviation Electrician 3rd Class Jason Justice, assigned to the "Fighting Marlins" of Patrol Squadron Four Zero (VP-40), changes a pulse generator magnet on a P-3C Orion propeller on board Naval Air Station Whidbey Island, Wash. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 1st Class John D. Hamill (RELEASED)..." WebSite: Navy Newsstand http://www.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=23223 [13JUL2005]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Mishap-Free Milestones - VP-40 38 years 243,000 hours..." WebSite: Naval Safety Center http://www.safetycenter.navy.mil/media/approach/issues/mayjun05/mishapfree.htm [04JUL2005]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Fighting Marlins deploy to Japan - By Lt.j.g. Joe Parsons - Fighting Marlins' reporter - Friday, June 17, 2005..." WebSite: Northwest Navigator http://www.northwestnavigator.com/index.php/navigator/whidbey/fighting_marlins_deploy_to_japan/ [17JUN2005]

The VP-40 Fighting Marlins left NAS Whidbey Island, Washington last week, deploying to the Seventh Fleet area of responsibility from June to December of this year.

The squadron will be predominantly split between two locations, establishing its support infrastructure at Kadena AB (on the southern Japanese island of Okinawa) and Misawa AB (on the main Japanese island of Honshu), in addition to multiple detachment sites, facilitating the conduct of air operations and multilateral exercises throughout the theater.

VP-40 leaves on this deployment having completed an 18-month Inter-deployment Readiness Cycle in support of the Fleet Response Plan, a challenge that the Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Aircraft community hasn't seen in over 10 years. The MPRA community was formerly on an 18-month cycle composed of a 12-month IDRC and six-month deployment, but with the advent of the "surge" concept throughout the Navy, the MPRA community now answers that call by maintaining its readiness for the last six months of the IDRC fully-combat-deployable before actual squadron movement overseas. This shift in concept and execution of an extended IDRC brought with it unique challenges for the squadron, especially as the VP-46 Grey Knights returned to NAS Whidbey Island, Washington from deployment in December 2004.

For the last six months, the simultaneous presence of all three of CPRW-10's active duty P-3 squadrons has placed an increased demand on limited training resources, making it even more difficult to maintain combat readiness since finite simulator time and available aircraft are now divided three ways instead of two. This has been a challenge to overcome for VP-40 in particular, as they have been called upon to arrive on deployment in Seventh Fleet with an increased requirement of 12 combat ready aircrews in all primary mission areas, but one that they have been unquestionably able to answer.

Wielding the ability to respond more quickly and on a larger scale than ever before, the Fighting Marlins' 12 combat aircrews also bring with them advanced technologies never before seen on a P-3 deployment.

In the realm of Anti-Submarine Warfare, VP-40 has continued to lead the way among the community in the development and tactical employment of Extended Echo Ranging search patterns and localization patterns, demonstrating the effectiveness of EER as a large area search tool with the MPRA community's first EER convergence of a large area search.

The squadron has also demonstrated its ability to quickly gather specialized acoustic intelligence. Until now, this ability has only been found among a select few aircrews within each squadron. The Fighting Marlins are deploying an entire squadron trained in acoustic intelligence collections.VP-40 is now positioned as an even more integral player in our nation's underwater battlespace dominance, able to offer invaluable intelligence with little delay to the end user, as well as to offer long-range protection from subsurface threats to U.S. carrier battle groups.

The Fighting Marlins have also added to their already impressive offering of Anti-Surface Warfare qualifications with the integration of the Selective Emitter Identification capability and the integration of the Standoff Land Attack Missile/Expanded Response into their arsenal.

The use of SEI, a system that helps identify individual surface vessels by the unique radar signature they emit, greatly expands the MPRA community's role in embargo enforcement and anti-terrorism operations.

Each SEI-equipped P-3 will be able to accurately identify specific surface vessels, regardless of attempts to disguise a ship engaged in smuggling activities. This new capability is invaluable as a force multiplier in a region riddled with terrorist activity using sea lanes as a primary mode of transportation regionally and internationally throughout Southeast Asia.

The SLAM-ER weapon system has several applications for the fleet and theater commanders, all of which are now part of VP-40's capabilities since the system was recently released to them by the Fleet Introduction Team from VP-30. The precision-guided missile can be launched from a P-3 or F/A-18 and given accurate targeting updates across the weapon's flight profile until target impact.

What gives the missile a unique punch is that it greatly enhances the ability of the shooter to protect the fleet and project force over a greater distance than before with extreme accuracy. The effectiveness of this concept was proven when a cooperative strike involving a P-3 and F/A-18 was demonstrated on April 28 on the Naval Air Weapons Division Sea Test Range.

The longest shot in SLAM-ER program history was successfully conducted when an F/A-18D from Naval Weapons Test Squadron China Lake launched a SLAM-ER and passed the missile terminal control to a P-3 from VP-47 steering the missile into the specified spot of a moving target vessel.

VP-40's maintenance department and Combat Aircrew 11 were integrally involved when they flew a P-3 from NAS Whidbey Island, Washington to Naval Weapons Test Squadron Point Mugu to serve as a backup aircraft for the SLAM-ER test shot. This support proved crucial to the success of the event when the primary aircraft was unable to fly.

The Fighting Marlins' many successes in the air have only been possible with the superior support provided on the ground by their Maintenance Department. Maintenance personnel have not only managed to keep the aging P-3 fleet airworthy, they have also been able to groom the aircraft's tactical systems to make it a versatile Command, Control, Computers, Communication and Intelligence (C4I) platform. This hard work was punctuated by the awarding of the Platinum Link Award, eclipsed only by its receipt of the Golden Wrench Award for the fourth straight year.

With its consistent ability to conduct precision ASW, expanded role in ASUW, its integral role in the employment of the MPRA community's most accurate strike weapon system and its ever-increasing C4I connectivity capabilities, VP-40 enters Seventh Fleet as a "force multiplier" that is sure to be in high demand throughout the region for the next six months.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Sub-hunter squadron arrives in Japan for six-month deployment - By Jennifer H. Svan, Stars and Stripes - Pacific edition, Saturday, June 11, 2005..." WebSite: Stars and Strips http://www.estripes.com/article.asp?section=104&article=28823&archive=true [16JUN2005]

NAF Misawa, Japan — A new group of sub hunters from NAS Whidbey Island, Washington, arrived here this week for a six-month deployment in support of the 7th Fleet.

The "Fighting Marlins" of VP-40 replaced the VP-8 "Tigers" from NAS Brunswick, Maine, on June 6, according to Navy officials.

More than 400 aircrew members, maintainers and other support personnel deployed with the squadron to Japan.

Just less than half of that group is headed to NAF Kadena, Okinawa, Japan.

An additional 120 persons from the VP-45 "Pelicans," based at NAS Jacksonville, Florida, will support VP-40 at both locations during its Japan deployment, said Cmdr. David C. Cutter, VP-40 executive officer.

Patrol squadrons' personnel and aircraft, the P-3 Orion sub hunter, typically rotate from the States through Misawa and Kadena about every six months.

"These men and women are tasked with keeping a close watch on the Sea of Japan, the Tsugaru Strait and other waters surrounding Japan" and with patrolling Western Pacific waters, according to information at GlobalSecurity.org.

"The crews and their advanced aircraft work closely with other 7th Fleet assets to ensure the safety of shipping in this part of the world."

While in Japan, the VP-40 squadron's primary mission is anti-submarine warfare, said squadron officer-in-charge Lt. Cmdr. Brad Upton. "We're sub hunters," he said.

The squadron's other missions include search and rescue, battle group support and bilateral exercises with the Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force, he said.

The squadron will operate and maintain 11 P-3s between Misawa and Kadena, Upton said.

"We flew a few across and traded (some) with VP-8," said Cutter of the aircraft.

Though VP-40 has deployed to Japan before — the last time was January 2002 — it's the first time the squadron has had to integrate with another on this deployment, Upton said.

The change is part of the Navy's Fleet Response Plan, which "adjusted deployments and recalibrated where everybody goes and when they go," Cutter said.

The Navy has said the plan is intended to maximize the Navy's ability to respond to contingencies.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VP History ThumbnailCameraCmdr. Kenneth J. Bowen "...Bowen takes charge of VP-40 - By Lt.j.g. Joe Parsons - Fighting Marlins' reporter - Friday, March 25, 2005..." WebSite: Northwest Navigator http://www.northwestnavigator.com/index.php/navigator/news/bowen_takes_charge_of_vp_40/ [08APR2005]

The Fighting Marlins of VP-40 held a change of command ceremony last week as Cmdr. Kenneth J. Bowen II relieved Cmdr. Stanton W. Dietrich.

Dietrich, who took command of VP-40 on Feb. 27, 2004, will become Director, Programming Division for the Deputy Chief of Naval Operations (N80) (Resources, Requirements and Assessment) in Washington, D.C.

Bowen, a native of Piedmont, S.C., graduated from Clemson University in 1986. He received his commission from Aviation Officer Candidate School in April 1987. Earning his wings as a Naval Aviator in June 1988, he was placed on the Commodore's List of Distinguished Graduates.

Bowen reported to VT-3 as a selectively retained graduate flight instructor where he instructed students in primary and intermediate flight training. During his tour, he received every flight instructor qualification and received the coveted Red Max award for flight instructional excellence and earned his master's degree from Troy State University.

From 1990 to 1993, Bowen served with the Fighting Tigers of VP-8. He completed a split site deployment to Sigonella, Sicily and Jeddah, Saudi Arabia flying combat missions in Desert Storm. His next deployment was in the Caribbean theater conducting counter-narcotic operations in support of JTF-4.

In 1993, Bowen reported to the Commander, Naval Safety Center in Norfolk, Va., where he served as Flag Lieutenant. His next assignment was on board USS George Washington (CVN 73) as V-2 Division Officer qualifying as Catapult/Arresting Gear Officer and Primary Flight Control Officer. He completed deployments to the Mediterranean Sea and Persian Gulf.

He returned to the Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance community joining VP-30 where he qualified as a Fleet Replacement Squadron (FRS) instructor pilot. There he served as the VP-30 safety Officer and Commander, Patrol Wings Atlantic Fleet safety officer.

In 1998, he reported to Tridents of VP-26 deploying to the Mediterranean theater. He flew missions in Operations Deliberate Guard and Deliberate Forge. In addition, he served as Officer-in-Charge of the Patron Rota, Spain detachment.

His second deployment with the Tridents was a split site deployment to NAS Keflavik, Iceland and NS Roosevelt Roads, PR. He served as officer-in-charge of Patron Keflavik.

His other assignments with the Tridents included CTG Operations Officer in Caribbean theater and the squadron Operations Officer.

In 2000, Bowen reported to the Bureau of Naval Personnel in Millington, Tenn., where he served as the VP air combat placement officer. In 2002, he reported to VP-30, the MPRA FRS, in NAS Jacksonville, Florida, as executive officer. In 2004, he reported to the Fighting Marlins of VP-40 as executive officer.

Bowen's decorations include the Meritorious Service Medal (two awards), Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal (five awards), the Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medal and various other campaigns, service and unit awards.


Circa 2004

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VP History ThumbnailCameraCmdr. Kenneth J. Bowen "...Bowen takes charge of VP-40 - By Lt.j.g. Joe Parsons - Fighting Marlins' reporter - Friday, March 25, 2005..." WebSite: Northwest Navigator http://www.northwestnavigator.com/index.php/navigator/news/bowen_takes_charge_of_vp_40/ [08APR2005]

The Fighting Marlins of VP-40 held a change of command ceremony last week as Cmdr. Kenneth J. Bowen II relieved Cmdr. Stanton W. Dietrich.

Dietrich, who took command of VP-40 on Feb. 27, 2004, will become Director, Programming Division for the Deputy Chief of Naval Operations (N80) (Resources, Requirements and Assessment) in Washington, D.C.

Bowen, a native of Piedmont, S.C., graduated from Clemson University in 1986. He received his commission from Aviation Officer Candidate School in April 1987. Earning his wings as a Naval Aviator in June 1988, he was placed on the Commodore's List of Distinguished Graduates.

Bowen reported to VT-3 as a selectively retained graduate flight instructor where he instructed students in primary and intermediate flight training. During his tour, he received every flight instructor qualification and received the coveted Red Max award for flight instructional excellence and earned his master's degree from Troy State University.

From 1990 to 1993, Bowen served with the Fighting Tigers of VP-8. He completed a split site deployment to Sigonella, Sicily and Jeddah, Saudi Arabia flying combat missions in Desert Storm. His next deployment was in the Caribbean theater conducting counter-narcotic operations in support of JTF-4.

In 1993, Bowen reported to the Commander, Naval Safety Center in Norfolk, Va., where he served as Flag Lieutenant. His next assignment was on board USS George Washington (CVN 73) as V-2 Division Officer qualifying as Catapult/Arresting Gear Officer and Primary Flight Control Officer. He completed deployments to the Mediterranean Sea and Persian Gulf.

He returned to the Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance community joining VP-30 where he qualified as a Fleet Replacement Squadron (FRS) instructor pilot. There he served as the VP-30 safety Officer and Commander, Patrol Wings Atlantic Fleet safety officer.

In 1998, he reported to Tridents of VP-26 deploying to the Mediterranean theater. He flew missions in Operations Deliberate Guard and Deliberate Forge. In addition, he served as Officer-in-Charge of the Patron Rota, Spain detachment.

His second deployment with the Tridents was a split site deployment to NAS Keflavik, Iceland and NS Roosevelt Roads, PR. He served as officer-in-charge of Patron Keflavik.

His other assignments with the Tridents included CTG Operations Officer in Caribbean theater and the squadron Operations Officer.

In 2000, Bowen reported to the Bureau of Naval Personnel in Millington, Tenn., where he served as the VP air combat placement officer. In 2002, he reported to VP-30, the MPRA FRS, in NAS Jacksonville, Florida, as executive officer. In 2004, he reported to the Fighting Marlins of VP-40 as executive officer.

Bowen's decorations include the Meritorious Service Medal (two awards), Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal (five awards), the Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medal and various other campaigns, service and unit awards.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VP History ThumbnailCamera040914-N-8770A-025 Naval Air Station Whidbey Island, Wash. (Sept. 14, 2004) "...Aviation Machinist's Mate 3rd Class Linda Toofan removes the propeller control of a P-3C Orion for routine maintenance. Petty Officer Toofan is assigned to the "Fighting Marlins" of Patrol Squadron Four Zero (VP-40). The P-3C Orion is a land-based, long-range anti-submarine warfare (ASW) patrol aircraft. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 3rd Class Elizabeth Acosta (RELEASED)..." Navy News Stand http://www.news.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=17671 [02MAR2005]


Circa 2003

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Naval forces begin return home as war in Iraq subsides - Sea Power, May 2003 by BURGESS, Richard R. rburgess@navyleague.org..." http://www.findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_qa3738/is_200305/ai_n9206235 [27MAR2005]

One S-3B Viking assigned to Sea Control Squadron 38 launched-for the first time in the aircraft's combat history-an AGM-85E Maverick missile against an Iraqi naval vessel that was targeted by a laser from an F/A18. AIP (Aircraft Improvement Program) versions of P-3C Orions assigned to VP-46-augmented by VP-1, VP-40, and VP-47-employed their long-range optical surveillance systems to provide targeting for coalition forces, including Air Force AC-130 gunships. Saddam Hussein's personal yacht was destroyed by Navy F/A-18 Hornets.

One surprising participant in the war was Air Test & Evaluation Squadron 30, which dispatched its sole DC-130A drone-launch aircraft to the war zone. The ancient aircraft was used to launch Vietnam-era Firebee drones over Baghdad to drop radar-jamming chaff and, until they ran out of fuel, to circle the city as decoys to draw anti-aircraft fire away from coalition strike aircraft.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VP History ThumbnailCamera030920-N-3879H-002 Manama, Bahrain (Sept. 20, 2003)

"...Aviation Machinist's Mate 1st Class Eric Martinez performs pre-flight calculations before a P3-C Orion, belonging to the Patrol Squadron 40 "Fighting Marlins," departs for a regular mission. Martinez is assigned to the squadron Combat Aircrew Crew 10, deployed to the 5th Fleet in support of Operations Iraqi Freedom and Enduring Freedom. U.S. Navy photo by JO1 Dennis J. Herring. (RELEASED)..." WebSite: Navy NewsStand http://www.news.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=9672 [28FEB2005]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VP History ThumbnailCamera030920-N-3879H-001 Manama, Bahrain (Sept. 20, 2003)

"... Aviation Machinist's Mate 1st Class Eric Martinez makes pre-flight checks before the P3-C Orion, belonging to the Patrol Squadron 40 "Fighting Marlins," departs for a regular mission. Martinez is assigned to the squadron Combat Aircrew Crew 10, deployed to the 5th Fleet in support of Operations Iraqi Freedom and Enduring Freedom. U.S. Navy photo by JO1(SW) Dennis J. Herring. (RELEASED)..." WebSite: Navy NewsStand http://www.news.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=9671 [28FEB2005]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VP-40 History ThumbnailCamera030129-N-0226M-002 Naval Air Station North Island, Calif. (Jan. 29, 2003)

A P-3C "Orion" assigned to the "Fighting Marlins" of Patrol Squadron Four Zero (VP-40) takes off on a routine training mission. The Orion, which carries a crew of ten, is a multi-mission, long-range maritime patrol aircraft. U.S. Navy photo by Senior Chief Photographer's Mate Mahlon K. Miller. (RELEASED)..." WebSite: Navy NewsStand http://newshome.news.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=4314 [07MAR2005]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VP-40 History ThumbnailCamera030128-N-5362A-003 Naval Air Station North Island, Calif. (Jan. 28, 2003)

The pilot of a P-3C "Orion" from Patrol Squadron Four Zero (VP-40), home based at Naval Air Station Whidbey Island, Wash., guides her aircraft on a routine mission over the Pacific. VP-40 is training with the USS Nimitz (CVN 68) Battle Group. The P-3 C is a four-engine turboprop anti-submarine and maritime surveillance aircraft. U.S. Navy photo by Photographers Mate 1st Class Arlo K. Abrahamson. (RELEASED)..." WebSite: Navy NewsStand http://www.news.navy.mil/ [22FEB2003]


Circa 2002

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCamera020311-N-9777F-009 Naval Air Facility, Misawa Japan (Mar. 11, 2002) "...Aviation Machinist Mate 2nd Class Samnang Cheng, Aviation Machinist Mate 3rd Class Charles Cobb and Aviation Machinist Mate 2nd Class Manolito Pimentel remove the power section of a P-3 "Orion" engine. Cheng and Pimentel are attached to the Aircraft Intermediate Maintenance Department (AIMD), Naval Air Facility Misawa, Japan. Cobb is on a scheduled six-month deployment to Japan with Patrol Squadron Four Zero (VP-40). U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 3rd Class Nicholas Fry. (RELEASED)..." WebSite: Navy NewsStand http://newshome.news.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=1025 [09MAR2005]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VP-40 History ThumbnailCamera020225-N-9777F-011 Naval Air Facility Misawa, Japan (Feb. 25, 2002) "...Airman Jonathan Gee, a lineman assigned to Patrol Squadron Four Zero (VP-40), signals to direct the pilot of a P-3C "Orion" through engine start up procedures. VP-40 is on a regularly scheduled deployment in the region. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 2nd Class Nicholas Fry. (RELEASED)..." WebSite: Navy NewsStand http://www.news.navy.mil/ [22FEB2003]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCamera020122-N-9777F-002 Misawa, Japan (Jan. 22, 2002) "...Aviation Ordnanceman 3rd Class Herbert G. Chappell loads sonobuoys into a P-3 "Orion" aircraft. Sonobouys are a directional frequency and ranging (DIFAR) device, and are deployed from the aircraft to search for underwater submarine activity. Chappell is assigned to the "Fighting Marlins" of Patrol Squadron Four Zero (VP-40) currently deployed to Naval Air Facility Misawa, Japan. U.S. Navy Photo by Photographer's Mate 2nd Class Nicholas Fry. (RELEASED)..." WebSite: Navy NewsStand http://newshome.news.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=687 [09MAR2005]

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: VP-40 History ThumbnailCamera020122-N-8726C-001 Misawa, Japan (Jan. 22, 2002) "...Aviation Electronics Technician 2nd Class Donald Auradou from Lake Port, CA., aligns the focal lens on an infrared detection set for a P-3 "Orion" aircraft. Auradou is currently deployed to Naval Air Facility Misawa, Japan, with Patrol Squadron Four Zero (VP-40). U.S. Navy Photo by Photographer's Mate 2nd Class John Collins. (RELEASED)..." WebSite: Navy NewsStand http://www.news.navy.mil/ [22FEB2003]


Circa 2001

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...After 50 Years of Service, Patrol Squadron Keeps Going - Published: April 02, 2001 - By Robert F. Dorr - Special to the Times ..." WebSite: NavyTimes http://www.navytimes.com/ [16MAR2009]

Waiting for permission to post entire article.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Humpty Dumpty Had a Great Fall - by ADC Emmit Roblyer - Mech Fall 2002 (received this story in August 2001)..." WebSite: Navy Safety Center http://www.safetycenter.navy.mil/media/mech/issues/fall02/humptydumpty.htm [27JUN2006]

After serving 19 years in the Navy aboard USS Ranger, USS Nimitz, and various other duty stations without suffering a scratch, I thought I was invincible. I found out it's not true! Trouble comes when you least expect it. So it was with me.

I'm a flight engineer and the command-services LCPO with the Fighting Marlins of VP-40. As a flight engineer, my job is to preflight the aircraft, to fuel it, to fill out the necessary paperwork, and to fly. After we land, I have to do a post-flight inspection, which includes putting covers on the aircraft and filling out more paperwork. This is where my problems began.

I was scheduled for a 0800 preflight and a 1000 launch for a routine mission to San Diego. The flight then would return to Whidbey Island. We carried out our preflight as normal, but then the flight was delayed. As minutes turned to hours, we realized the flight would be cancelled. After confirming this with operations, I went out to the aircraft to cover it up. To my surprise, the aft observer already had covered most of the aircraft and left the engine intake covers for me. That's just like an AW, but it is my responsibility.

I usually start with the No. 1 engine and work my way to No. 4. This time I decided to work in reverse. I did a pre-operational check on the ladder and the intake covers. I laid the intake covers under the engines, strapped on my cranial, and hoisted up the ladder onto the No. 4 cowling. I then grabbed an intake cover and went to work.

Everything was fine until I reached the No. 1 engine. I proceeded as normal, with my right hand holding the top of the ladder for stability. I inserted the starboard pin, looked down the intake, checked the top of the propeller afterbody, and then pulled the port pin around the front to fasten it. With almost no tension on the strap, it broke, and I lost my balance.

I felt myself falling back and tried to grab the ladder with my left hand. Realizing my right hand did not have a good enough grip, I had to think fast before hitting the ground. As aircrew, we are trained to do parachute-landing falls (PLFs) when jumping out of aircraft. I thought this might help, but it didn't work so well on concrete.

My left foot touched down first. Then I hit the ground with my right knee. Somewhere in that split second, I must have put down my right arm to break the fall. The front of my cranial hit the deck. Stunned over what had just happened, I sat up and was very upset about the whole ordeal. At this point, I noticed my head was bleeding. A witness to my misfortune ran up and said, "You better lie down because your head is bleeding." He then asked if I was all right. I told him I was.

As I lay back on the concrete, another Sailor brought some canopy wipes, pulled off my cranial, and applied direct pressure to my wound. Lucky for me, our corpsman was in the hangar and saw the whole event. She ran out and took charge of the scene. She asked if anything hurt other than my head, and I painfully acknowledged my left wrist and right elbow.

The ambulance showed up, along with what seemed to be everyone in the squadron, and I was rushed to the hospital. I had broken the fifth metacarpal in my left pinky, fractured my right arm radial head, lacerated my forehead, and skinned my right knee.

What was my punishment for this endeavor? My arm was locked in a cast for six weeks, I received three stitches in my forehead, and the doc downed me for two months, which placed a burden on the squadron manning.

An investigation found the intake cover strap had worn around its center, causing it to tear in half. These straps are subjected to the elements, and, combined with stress to the material, they can fail. The intake covers since have been removed and altered with an elastic cord that will wear evenly and give a little. I have learned it doesn't matter who you are, where you are, or what you are doing, accidents happen when you don't take every precaution and practice ORM.

Chief Roblyer is a flight engineer at VP-40.

This is a known problem. I received this story in August 2001 (yes, a story can take a long time to make the magazine), and a few months later-in November-this problem happened, again. This latest case makes it the sixth reported incident since 1995 and caused an FE to suffer an ankle and back injury (a fractured L4 vertebrae). Check your straps before you use them. Don't risk an injury on something as simple as an engine cover.-Ed.


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