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HistoryCPRW-11 HistoryHistory

Circa 1986

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: CPW11 History "...Patrol Wing Eleven Change of Command - 24 JULY 1986 - NAS Jacksonville, Florida..." [05NOV2001]

PROGRAM
ARRIVAL OF DISTINGUISHED GUESTS
PARADING OF THE COLORS
CPW-11 1812 Fife and Drum Corps

NATIONAL ANTHEM

INVOCATION
Captain C. B. McPhail, CHC, U.S. Navy

INTRODUCTION OF GUEST SPEAKER
Rear Admiral S. F. Gallo, U.S. Navy

GUEST SPEAKER
Vice Admiral Bernard M. Kauderer, U.S. Navy

REMARKS AND READING OF ORDERS OF DETACHMENT
Captain Byron E. Tobin, Jr., U.S. Navy

READING OF ORDERS TO COMMAND AND REMARK
Captain Jon S. Coleman, U.S. Navy

BENEDICTION
Captain C. B. McPhail, CHC, U.S. Navy

RETIRING OF THE COLOR


Patrol Squadrons

VP-5
CDR R. G. KIRKLAND

VP-16
CDR J. R. LOVE

VP-24
CDR M. G. BRUNER

VP-45
CDR T. P. LAWLER

VP-49
CDR L. D. NEWSOME

VP-56
CDR H. M. WILSON


VICE ADMIRAL BERNARD M. KAUDERER, USN

Vice Admiral Bernard M. Kauderer, U.S. Navy, a 1953 graduate of the U.S. Naval Academy, first served in the destroyer, USS THE SULLIVANS (00 537), and then as Executive Officer of the minesweeper, USS HUMMINGBIRD (MSC 192) before attending Submarine School.

Following qualification in USS RATON (SSR 270), he attended a year of nuclear power training in New London and Idaho Falls, Idaho. He then served in USS ROBERT E. LEE (SSBN 601), as Engineer Officer in USS SKIPJACK (SSN 585) and as Executive Officer, USS U. S. GRANT (SSBN 631).

Successive commands of the nuclear attack submarine USS BARB (SSN 596), the Nuclear Power Training Unit, Idaho Falls, and the submarine tender USS DIXON (AS 37), were followed by service on the staff of Commander Submarine Force, U .S. Atlantic Fleet, first as Deputy Chief of Staff for Logistics and Management, and then as Chief of Staff. Following selection to flag rank in 1977, he served as Commander Submarine Group FIVE, and then as Deputy Director, Research, Development, Test and Evaluation, in the Office of the Chief of Naval Operations. He served as Commander Submarine Force, U.S. Pacific Fleet, from June 1981 to June 1983. Vice Admiral Kauderer assumed duties as Commander Submarine Force, U.S. Atlantic Fleet in June 1983.

In addition to the Legion of Merit, Gold Stars in lieu of second and third Legions of Merit, the Meritorious Service Medal and the Navy Commendation Medal, the Admiral holds the Navy Expeditionary Medal, the Navy Occupation Service Medal, National Defense Service Medal with Star and the Vietnam Service Medal with Star.

A native of Philadelphia, Vice Admiral Kauderer is married to the'fu'rmer Myra Frances Weissman of Brooklyn, New York. They have three married children and five grandchildren.

REAR ADMIRAL S. FRANK GALLO, USN

Rear Admiral S. F. Gallo was born in Brooklyn, New York, on i July 1936. He attended the New York State Maritime College and graduated in 1957 with a B.S. in Marine Engineering in addition to a Third Engineer's Merchant License in Steam and Diesels. Rear Admiral Gallo was commissioned an Ensign in the U.S. Navy in November 1958.

His first assignment was aboard USS ESTES (AGC-12) homeported in San Diego where he served as Main Propulsion Assis- tant until July 1960. He commenced flight training and was designated a naval aviator in October 1961.

After designation, Rear Admiral Gallo reported to Patrol Squadron TWENTY-THREE in Brunswick, Maine, serving there until June 1965. He then reported to the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey, California, where he received an Aeronautical Engineer's Degree (AeE) in June 1968. His next assignment was as Communications Officer on the staff of Commander Carrier Division TWENTY, initially aboard USS ESSEX and later aboard USSINTREPID. After the decommissioning of CARDIV TWENTY , he reported as Communications Officer to the staff of COMCARDIV FOURTEEN aboard USS WASP where he served until January 1971. He then reported to Patrol Squadron THIRTY for transition to the P-3 enroute to Patrol Squadron ELEVEN in Brunswick, Maine, where he served as Safety Officer and Operations Officer. In 1973, Rear Admiral Gallo attended the Naval War College. After training at Patrol Squadron THIRTY , Rear Admiral Gallo reported to Patrol Squadron TWENTY -FOUR as Executive Officer and subsequently as Commanding Officer where he served until December 1976. He then reported to the staff of Commander Patrol Wing FIVE as Operations Officer, serving in this capacity until February 1979. His next assignment was to OPNAV in Washington, D.C., as P-3 Program Coordinator until April 1980 when he was assigned as Executive Assistant to the Deputy Chief of Naval Operations (Air Warfare) until June 1981. He was then ordered as Commander Patrol Wing ELEVEN from July 1981 to August 1982. Following tour with PATWING ELEVEN, he then served as Executive Assistant to the Supreme Allied Commander Atlantic, Commander in Chief, U.S. Atlantic Command and Commander in Chief, U.S. Atlantic Fleet until June 1985 when he was promoted to the rank of Commodore and assigned as Commander Patrol Wings, Atlantic in Brunswick, Maine.

Rear Admiral Gallo is married to the former JoAnne Balch of Munsonville, NH. They reside in Brunswick, Maine and have three children: Elizabeth, Anne and Katherine. Rear Admiral Gallo has been awarded the Defense Superior Service Medal, Legion of Merit, Meritorious Service Medal (2), Air Medal, Navy Commendation Medal, Navy Achievement Medal, Navy Unit Commendation, Viet- nam Service Medal, Philippine Presidential Unit Commendation, and the Vietnam Civil Action Ribbon.

CAPTAIN BYRON E. TOBIN, JR., USN

Captain Byron E. Tobin, Jr., was born in Newark, New Jersey in 1937. Following graduation from the Wharton School of Finance and Commerce at the University of Pennsylvania in 1960, he entered the Navy as an Aviation Officer Candidate. He was commissioned in 1961 and designated a Naval Aviator in May 1962.

Upon completion of flight training, Captain Tobin was assigned to Patrol Squadron FORTY -FIVE, then located at U.S. Naval Station, Bermuda flying the P5M Marlin.

He participated in deployments to Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, following the Cuban Crisis and, in late 1963, relocated with the squadron to NAS J acksonville, Florida and commenced transition to the P3A.

In 1966, Captain Tobin reported to Patrol Squadron THIRTY, NAS Patuxent River, Maryland and served as Aircraft Division Officer, Quality Assurance Officer, and as Pilot/Flight Engineer Training Officer. In 1969, he received orders to the USS INTREPID. He served as Assistant CIC Officer and qualified as an Officer of the Deck Underway. In 1972, he graduated from the Naval War College in Newport, Rhode Island. In the same year, he was awarded a Master of Science Degree in International Affairs from George Washington University.

Captain Tobin reported to Patrol Squadron FIVE in December 1972, where he was Training Officer and Maintenance Officer. In May 1975, he was reassigned to the Organization of Joint Chiefs of Staff as Emergency Actions Senior Operations Officer in the National Military Command Center .

In July 1978, Captain Tobin assumed command of Patrol Squadron FORTY-NINE. During this tour, the squadron was awarded the Navy Unit Commendation, the Arnold J. Isbell Trophy for Anti-Submarine Warfare Excellence, and the Commander-in-Chief, Atlantic, Golden Anchor Award for Retention. Following this tour, Captain Tobin assumed command of the Navy Recruiting District, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Under his command, the Pittsburgh Recruiting District advanced in the National Recruiting Competitive Standings from nuIl}ber 39 to number 13. In December 1980, Captain Tobin assumed command of Patrol Squadron THIRTY. Patrol Squadron THIRTY was awarded the Meritorious Unit Commendation for the period December 1980 through July 1982 in recognition of its role in the transition of the Japanese Maritime Self-Defense Force and the Royal Netherlands Navy to the P-3C.

From February 1982 through May 1984, Captain Tobin served as the Special Assistant for Legislative Coordination to the Deputy Chief of Naval Operations for Manpower, Personnel and Training/Chief of Naval Personnel.

Captain Tobin has been awarded the Legion ofMerit, the Meritorious Service Medal with two Gold Stars, the Joint Service Commendation Medal, the Navy Achievement Medal, the National Defense Medal, and the Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal.

Captain Tobin assumed command of Patrol Wing ELEVEN in June 1984. He is married to the former Sally Maguire of East Orange, New Jersey; they have two children, Meredith and B.E.

CAPTAIN JON S. COLEMAN, USN

Captain Jon S. Coleman is a native of Shreveport, Louisiana. He attended Loui- siana Polytechnic Institute, graduating in June 1962, and was commissioned an Ensign through the NAOC Program in October 1962.

After designation, Captain Coleman reported to Airborne Early Warning Squadron Pacific at NAS Barbers Point, Hawaii, where he served until May 1965. He then reported to Naval Aviation Schools Command, Pensacola, Florida and served until December 1966. He was next assigned to the Naval Post Graduate School where he earned a Masters Degree in Computer Systems Management in 1968. He then reported to Patrol Squadron FORTY-TWO. Late in 1969, VP-42 was decommissioned and Captain Coleman was reassigned to Patrol Squadron FORTY, homeported at NAS Moffett Field, California. His next tour was with the staff, Chief of Naval Education and Training, Pensacola, Florida. In August 1974, he commenced the Naval Command and Staff Course at the Naval War College, Newport, Rhode Island and graduated in July 1975.

In November 1975, Captain Coleman reported to Patrol Squadron FIVE. There he served, in turn, as the squadron's Tactics Officer and Operations Officer. His next assignment was to the staff, Commander-in-Chief, Atlantic Fleet as Air ASW Operations Officer. After training at VP-30, Captain Coleman reported to Patrol Squadron FORTY -NINE in June 1980, for his command tour. In June 1982, he assumed duties as Operations Officer on the staff of Commander Patrol Wing ELEVEN. His next assignment was to OPNAV in Washington, D.C., as Aviation Plans Officer for the Deputy Chief of Naval Operations (Air Warfare).

During the past year, he has been a student at the National War College in Washington, D.C. Captain Coleman is married to the former Cissy Roberts of Shreveport, Louisiana. They reside at NAS Jacksonville, Florida and have three children: Judy, Jill and Jon. Captain Coleman's awards include: the Meritoriou; Service Medal. (5), Air Medal, Navy Commendation Medal (3) and various campaign and service awards.

HISTORY OF THE CHANGE OF COMMAND


Naval ceremonies antedate the Christian era. Common dangers and shared victories tend to the creation of brotherhood, and in none is it closer than that of the Naval profession where men are bound by common traditions, shared practices and ancient customs. The Navy, an organization of explicit discipline, lends itself to the perpetuation of the more venerated customs, heroic traditions and dignified ceremonies such as this which you are witnessing today.

The ceremonies, customs and traditions of our modern Navy draw their origin from ancient customs and laws of the sea begun in histotic times by seafating men and gradually merged into the British Naval Regulations in effect at the time of the American Revolution. The effect these old customs have had in the formulation of naval regulations is a marked example of the influence of tested usage.

John Adams, who compiled the first rules for Regulation of the Navy in the United Colonies and thus set a precedent for future provisions, used as his guide the instructions and regulations of the British Admiralty, themselves a product of time-honored traditions and customs. It was under the direction of these that the Father of the U.S. Navy, John Paul Jones, a born British subject, gave our Navy its earliest traditions of heroism and victory.

The Change of Command Ceremony you witness today is not prescribed specifically by U.S. Navy Regulations, but rather is an honored product of the rich heritage of Naval tradition. It is wholly a naval custom without an equivalent counterpart in the Army or Air Force. Custom has established that this ceremony be formal and impressive-designed to strengthen that respect for atlthority which is vital to any military organization. Parading all hands at quarters and public reading of official orders stems from those days when movement of mail and persons was a very slow process. This procedure was designed to insure that only duly authorized officers held command and that all aboard were aware of its authenticity.

The heart of the ceremony is the formal reading of official orders by the relieving officer and the officer to be relieved. Command passes upon utterance by the relieving officer, "I relieve you, Sir!" The officer being relieved responds, "I stand relieved." This simple procedure is duplicated hundreds of times daily throughout the navies of the world as each watch officer passes responsibility to his relief in the conduct of each ship's routine.

The strength and supremacy of today's Navy stems in large measure from the observance of customs and traditions, each founded on need, each conttibuting its share to stability, combat effectiveness and smooth transferred of authority. This simple ceremony, passing authority and responsibility to yet another fine officer , reflects the dedication of free men serving their nation proudly.

HISTORY OF PATROL WING ELEVEN


Patrol Wing ELEVEN's history has been long and colorful. The Wing was commissioned on August 15, 1942, at Norfolk and five days later was moved to San Juan, Puerto Rico. It was charged with providing anti-submarine protection to shipping convoys in the southwest Atlantic and the Caribbean at the height of the German U-Boat campaign. The PBY-5A aircraft, equipped with a limited capability for spotting and destroying enemy submarines, patrolled a million square miles of ocean area with amazing success. The three assigned squadrons were credited with sinking ten German submarines and damaging eighteen others. Only two aircraft were lost.

Peacetime brought a winding down of the Caribbean operations and with the closing of facilities at San Juan in 1950, Patrol Wing ELEVEN shifted its homeport to NAS Jacksonville, Florida. From this base, flying the multi-engine P2V aircraft, Wing ELEVEN squadrons continued to patrol vast ocean areas, participate in Fleet exercises, and train for future commitments. These commitments, however, were taking on new dimensions as the capabilities of patrol aircraft were expanded. Although anti-submarine warfare surveillance flights were still the first order of the day, secondary missions of aerial mine warfare, search and rescue and photographic intelligence were being assigned.

In 1964, Wing ELEVEN squadrons began transitioning to the new P-3A "Orion" aircraft. By December of 1969, all Patrol Wing ELEVEN squadrons were operating the P-3A "Orion" and the venerable P2V aircraft's twenty-five year old career came to an end. In July of 1971, the art of anti-submarine warfare reached anew level of sophistication when Patrol Wing ELEVEN squadrons began transil:ieJ:ling to the new computerized P-3C "Orion" aircraft.

To support this new aircraft, a new computetized Operational Control/Tactical Support Center was installed in Headquarters In January of 1,972. Since then, additional squadrons have joined Patrol Wing ELEVEN bringing the total Wing strength up to SIX operational fleet squadrons, 54 aircraft and approximately 2500 men. All squadrons now operate the highly complex computerized P-3C "Orion" aircraft.

Patrol Wing ELEVEN squadrons have performed with distinction in the Korean conflict, the Lcebanon and Berlin ctises, the Cuban missile crisis, and recently, off the coast of Libya in support of battle group sttike operations. On their regular deployment cycle, Patrol Wing ELEVEN aircraft have been a familiar sight in the skies from Norway and Greenland to Chile and Argentina, and from the eastern Mediterranean westward to Southeast Asia and in the Indian Ocean. Commander Patrol Wing ELEVEN and assigned squadrons face the future with increased strength and newer equipment, ready to meet any challenge to our nation's use of the seas.

PREVIOUS WING COMMANDERS

CAPT S. J. MICHAEL
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CAPT S. J. Michael

AUG 1942

CAPT S. I. PRICE
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Capt. S. I. Price

JAN 1943

CAPT A. 0. RULE
JUN 1943

CAPT C. W. CRAWFORD
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Capt. C. W. Crawford

AUG 1944

CDR W. T. SHIELDS
NOV 1944

CAPT W. K. GOODNEY
JAN 1945

CAPT D. T. DAY
JAN 1947

CAPT G. C. MONTGOMERY
APR 1949

CAPT J. S. McCLURE
JAN 1951

CAPT A. S. BORN
JUN 1952

CAPT L. 0. DAHL
SEP 1953

CAPT E. J. S. YOUNG
OCT 1954

CAPT R. J. DAVIS
DEC 1955

CAPT B. F. McCLEOD
JAN 1956

CAPT S. J. LAWRENCE
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CAPT S. J. Lawrence

FEB 1957

CAPT D. E. MACINTOSH
MAR 1958

CAPT R. M. MILNER
JUN 1959

CAPT C. L. LAMBING
JUN 1960

CAPT R. TURNER, JR.
AUG 1960

CAPT G. J. FRAUENHEIM
DEC 1961

CAPT L. P. PRESSLER
MAY 1963

CAPT A. C. CASON, JR.
JUL 1964

CAPT H. B. SCOTT
JUL 1965

CAPT J. H. BURTON
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Capt. J. H. Burton

JAN 1967

CAPT W. W. HONOUR
FEB 1968

CAPT D. W. HERLONG
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Capt. D. W. Herlong

FEB 1969

CAPT W. J. PRESSLER, JR.
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Capt. W. J. Pressler

MAR 1970

CAPT. W. J. VAUGHT
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CAPT. W. J. Vaught

JUN 1971

CAPT A. P. LESPERANCE
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CAPT A. P. Lesperance

OCT 1973

CAPT R. A. MARTINI
MAR 1975

CAPT. C. 0. PRINDLE
SEP 1976

CAPT R. E. NARMI
JUL 1977

CAPT W. T. PENDLEY
JUL 1979

CAPT S. F. GALLO
JUL 1981

CAPT J. S. YOW
SEP 1982

CAPT B. E. TOBIN, JR.
JUN 1984

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